News

2010 Media Report



31 December 2010

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JANUARY

5: "Why I fear for sharks: survivor" In an article about shark attacks in Australia, Dr Will Figueira comments to the Sydney Morning Herald on people's attitudes and susceptibility to shark attacks.

7: Research led by Dr Ben Phillips, and published in Biology Letters, shows that female cane toads can pump themselves up full of air to prevent smaller and less preferable males from mating with her. On 7 January the research was featured in Canberra Times, Illawarra Mercury, Newcastle Herald, Townsville Bulletin and Northern Territory News (on 8 Jan).

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FEBRUARY

9:Dr Kerryn Parry-Jones comments in the Daily Telegraph about flying fox culling methods approved by the state government, warning that animal cruelty laws are set to be broken by allowing farmers to shoot bats.

Widespread coverage of research led by Honour student Stephanie O'Donnell, Dr Jonathan Webb and Professor Rick Shine where cane toads are turned into sausages in the NT as part of a University and Territory Wildlife Park research project to help prevent endangered quolls eating them. The media coverage occurred before the research was published in April. See below for more media after the research was officially published.

  • 2: ABC (Darwin) interview with Stephanie O'Donnell
  • 3: ABC (Kimberley, Broome); (ABC Ballarat) interview with Stephanie O'Donnell; ABC 702 (Sydney) interview with Prof Shine
  • 4: ABC (Hobart) interview with Stephanie O'Donnell
  • 5: ZINC 66 (Mt Isa) interview with Stephanie O'Donnell
  • 6: Radio National (Canberra) interview with Stephanie O'Donnell
  • 7: ABC1 TV (Darwin, Adelaide) interview with Stephanie O'Donnell
  • 8: ABC2 TV (Sydney) and ABC1 TV (Melbourne) both interviews with Stephanie O'Donnell
  • 13: Radio National (Canberra) interview with Stephanie O'Donnell
  • 14: ABC 612 (Brisbane) interview with Stephanie O'Donnell
  • 17:"Anyone for toad in the hole? How snags may save fauna"Sydney Morning Herald; "Survival of the sickest: cane toad sausages put on quoll menu"Australian; "Cane toad snags to save quolls" West Australian; "Toad snags to save cat" MX (Brisbane & Melbourne)
  • 17: ABC (Illawarra, Wollongong), ABC (Newcastle), ABC 774 (Melbourne), ABC (Central Australia, Alice Springs) interview with Prof Shine; ABC 666 (Canberra) interview with both Stephanie O'Donnell and Prof Shine.
  • 18: "Cane toad sausages" North Queensland Register
  • 24: "Quolls in training" Central Magazine, Sydney.

In March 2009 research by Honours student Georgia Ward-Fear, Dr Greg Brown and Professor Rick Shine found encouraging evidence of the deadly effect of native meat ants on young cane toads. Now they have further proven their thesis by luring ants to cane toads with cat food. In research published in the February edition of the Journal of Applied Ecology, Georgia, Dr Brown and Professor Shine showed that meat ant densities and toad mortalities increased "more than fourfold" with the addition of cat food baits. Read full University of Sydney press release here. The research was featured in:

  • 17: ABC 774 (Melbourne); ZincFM (Townsville, Sunshine Coast); ABC (Newcastle); Curtin FM (Perth); HOT FM (Sunshine Coast); ABC (Central Australia) all interviews with Prof Rick Shine
  • 18: "Cat food gives killer ants strength for toad feast" Sunshine Coast Daily; "Cat food used to lure toad terminator" Newcastle Herald; "Ants put toad in the hole" Daily Telegraph; "Toads get antsy" Herald Sun; "Toads on ants menu" Canberra Times; "Cane toads killed by combo" Daily Advertiser, "cat food, ants kill cane toads" Boarder Mail, "Ants will decimate toads" Daily Liberal, "Toads prepare to meat(ant) maker" Townsville Bulletin, "Cat food fatal lure for toads" Gold Coast Bulletin, "Meat ant may fight cane toad" Queensland Country Life
  • 18: ABC (Capricornia); Territory FM (Darwin), ABC (Wide Bay, Bundaberg), ABC (North Coast); ABC (Darwin); ABC (Tropical North); ABC (Far North); 4BU Bundaberg, ABC 612 (Brisbane), ABC 666 (Canberra), ABC (north Queensland), ABC 702 (Sydney) all interviews with Shine; ABC (Western Queensland, Longreach) interview with both Ward-Fear and Shine
  • 19: Radio Adelaide and ABC Sydney Webcast interviews with Shine; "Cat food, ants take on cane toads" Maitland Mercury, "Cat food and meat ants vs toad" The Advocate, "Cat food latest weapon against toad" Daily News, "Hit toads with cat food" North West Star
  • 20: "Cat food the ant-idote to toad" Geelong Advertiser
  • 22: Radio Adelaide interview with Prof Shine
  • 25: "Little guys devour big pest" North Queensland Register

24: ABC (Ballarat), ABC (Central Victoria, Bendigo), ABC (North and West SA, Port Pirie), ABC (North Queensland, Townsville) A major report was released yesterday by the Invasive Animals Cooperative looking into the impact of feral cats on Australia and its wildlife. Professor Christopher Dickman, who was co-author on the report, says feral cats have a significant impact on native species by depleting populations to a point of extinction.

25: ABC (North Queensland, Townsville) A major report was released yesterday by the Invasive Animals Cooperative looking into the impact of feral cats on Australia and its wildlife. Professor Christopher Dickman, who was co-author on the report, says feral cats have a significant impact on native species by depleting populations to a point of extinction.

26: ABC (North West WA, Karratha) Professor Dickman discusses the impact of cats on ecology. He wrote a definitive report on cat control 14 years ago and says the most effective control is shooting at strategic times.

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MARCH

5: "Oysters and urchins early warning agents" In a special series published by the Sydney Morning Herald (What lies beneath), Professor Maria Byrne discusses the impact of ocean acidification on development of marine invertebrates.

Research by Honours student Georgia Ward-Fear, Dr Greg Brown and Professor Rick Shine, published in the February edition of the Journal of Applied Ecology, showed that can food baits can be used to lure meat ants to toad areas, increasing toad mortalities "more than fourfold". The research was featured in:

  • 3: "Meat ants hungry for cane toad dinner" Clarence Valley Review (page 18)
  • 6: "Cat food and cane toads" Gympie Life (page 8)
  • 8: "Cat food used to lure meat ants to cane toads" Australian Canegrower (page 5)

9: A female cane toad carrying 30,000 eggs was found on the outskirts of the WA town of Kununurra. It is predicted that the first wave of cane toads will cross Kununurra within two or three weeks after the Kimberley. Professor Rick Shine is interviewed on ABC radio to discuss cane told movement and invasion of the Kimberley. He notes that the toads have travelled 1.5 million kilometres across Australia and points out that research done over the past year, in conjunction with the Australian Research Council, has identified a number of vulnerabilities in the toad's biology, but describes their control a 'slow process'.

10: On 2CC, Canberra, Professor Rick Shine discusses the 'disastrous' arrival of cane toads in the Kimberley region.

10: "Pheromone may be key to killing cane toads" West Australian features results of research done by Professor Rick Shine and colleagues that uses cane toads' own alarm pheromones as a weapon against the pest.

10: "Australia's feline folly" The report on the impact of cats in Australia, produced for the Invasive Animals CRC by authors Dr Elizabeth Denny and Professor Christopher Dickman, is featured in an article in Narooma News.

18:Professor Rick Shine was quoted in Sky News Australia commenting on the cane toads discovered in Sydney's Southerland Shire.

20: "Snakes tracked to monitor impact of cane toads" Pilbara Echo (page 11) mentions research by Dr Jonathan Webb and Professor Rick Shine, which examines animals potentially affected by eating cane toads.

23: "Toad bite" the Herald Sun (page 61) features research by O'Donnell, Webb and Shine showing that quolls can learn to avoid eating toxic cane toad sausages by being fed cane toad sausages.

25: "Sydney safe from toad invasion" Professor Rick Shine was quoted in Sydney City News, commenting on the cane toads found in Sydney's Taren Point. He says that cane toads are tropical animals so won't survive winter this far south.

25: "Tadpoles scared to death" Kimberly Echo features results of research done by Professor Rick Shine and colleagues that uses cane toads' own alarm pheromones as a weapon against the pest.

25:"Following the penguins" Masters student Melissa Slarp is doing research to determine if ecoliteracy can be taught to kindergarten children. Her work was featured in the Inner West Courier.

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APRIL

1: "New research has tadpoles scared" Broome Advertiser reports on research done by Professor Rick Shine and colleagues that uses cane toads' own alarm pheromones as a weapon against the pest.

8: Research by Ashley Ward featured on Catalyst. He describes his work in the field of collective behaviour in understanding how individuals in a group make decisions. He conducts behavioural tests using mosquito fish in a Y-maze and finds that groups of fish make better decisions that solo ones. Read transcript and watch Catalyst footage.

"Marine life threatened by environmentally friendly cooling system" Buildings on Sydney Harbour's foreshore are pumping seawater into buildings for heating and cooling instead of using electric air conditioners. The Sydney Morning Herald reports on research by PhD student Fabiana Moreira which seeks to quantify the impact of this system on marine life.

11:"Stocks of fox a pox on our pets"Dr Mathew Crowther is interviewed by the Sun Herald about the problem of foxes in urban areas where they are a threat to domestic pets.

Research led by Honour student Stephanie O'Donnell, Dr Jonathan Webb and Professor Rick Shine has shown that Northern Quolls can be taught to avoid eating cane toads by being fed cane toad sausages laced with a nauseating drug. The research, published in the April Journal of Applied Ecology, received widespread media coverage nationally and internationally. Read full University of Sydney news story here.

International media includes:New Scientist, UK nationals (Daily Telegraph and Times), wires (AFP), US dailies (LA Times), German (Die Zeit), Austrian, Swedish and Norwegian media plus international broadcast coverage (BBC Radio Wales), NBC (US), CBC (Canada) and BBC (World service).

National media includes:

  • 15:Sydney Morning Herald, Age, "Quolls fed toxic toads" Adelaide Advertiser, "Quolls get toad smart" Bendigo Advertiser, Diet lesson for quolls" Boarder Mail, "Toads of quolls' menu" Cairns Post, "Quollity of life seen in load tests" Courier Mail, "Endangered Quolls taught to turn their noses up at toxic toad" Southern Argus, "Toads too much to stomach" Sunraysia Daily, "Quolls learn to steer clear of toxic toads" Sunshine Coast Daily.
  • 16: "Quolls given aversion therapy" Maitland Mercury, "Toad therapy for quolls" Northwest Star, "Endangered Quolls taught to turn noses up at toxic toad" South Burnet Times, "Toad taste test trial" Townsville Bulletin
  • 17: "Quolls trained to not eat cane toads" Gympie Times
  • 19: "Quolls taught to avoid cane toads" Daily Examiner
  • 21: "Quelling a quolls taste for the toad" The Weekly Times
  • 23: "Teaching quolls to say no to toads" The Week
  • 25: "Toad-smart quolls may save species" Sunday Tasmanian
  • 27: "Quolls learn toxic lesson" Campus Review
  • 29: "Clever quolls may avoid extinction" Kimberley Echo

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MAY

1:Stephanie O'Donnell and Dr Jonathan Webb's research, in which Northern Quolls are trained to avoid eating cane toads, is featured in Northern Territory News ("fairy tale inspires cane toad cure") and Australian Sugar Cane ("Quolls taught to turn noses up at cane toad").

4:Dr Jonathan Webb speaks to ABC Hobart about his research into protecting predators such as quolls from cane toads. Webb says he has been working with Territory Wildlife Park who had already set up a captive breeding program to protect northern quolls from cane toads. Webb says the method he is using is called taste diversion, explaining that predators can learn not to eat a certain food from one adverse reaction.

5: "Hopalong catastrophe: Sydney surrenders to northern invaders" Professor Rick Shine comments on the breeding colony of cane toads in Sydney's Taren Point, interviewed in the Sydney Morning Herald and on 2UE radio.

6:Dr Marianne Frommer is one of 17 new fellows to be elected into the Australian Academy of Sciences. The story is covered by the Canberra Times, ABC Wollongong and ABC 666.

7:Dr Marianne Frommer tells Rust Weekly ("Research produced biological control" page 4) and ABC Ballarat that a safer way to control for the Queensland fruit fly is by biological means using the sterile insect technique, where huge numbers of sterile flies are released.

20: "Foxes raiding city hen pens" Dr Mathew Crowther is interviewed by The Land (page 20) about methods of controlling urban foxes.

20 and 22: Research led by Phd student Reid Tingley and Professor Rick Shine has shown that cane toads are moving as quickly through arid areas as tropical regions, indicating that the dry interior of Australia is not an obstacle to the spread of cane toads. Tingley describes the methods and results of his study with Radio National (Sydney), ABC 666 (Canberra), ABC Western Queensland (Longreach), ABC Southern Queensland (Toowoomba), ABC Tropical North (Mackay), ABC North Queensland (Townsville).

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JUNE

1: "Slime moulds get smart" Dr Tanya Latty is featured in Australasian Science (page 44), discussing her career in biology and her latest discovery that slime moulds can make complex feeding decisions.

1: "Quolls learn to avoid toads" Research by Honour student Stephanie O'Donnell, Dr Jonathan Webb and Professor Rick Shine on conditioned taste aversion in quolls is featured in the June edition of Australasian Science (page 7).

10: Research by Honours student Stephanie O'Donnell, Dr Jonathan Webb and Professor Rick Shine is featured on Catalyst. Northern Quoll are facing dangers from Cane Toads and are almost extinct from the Northern Territory. Scientists from Sydney University have begun a program to try to teach quolls not to eat Cane Toads. Sydney University researcher Stephanie O'Donnell creates 'toad sausages' for the program. See the footage or read the transcript on the Catalyst website here.

17: ABC Western Queensland, Longreach, report on the Simpson Desert fieldwork conducted by Professor Chris Dickman and his group for the last 20 years, which seeks to understand and conserve life in Australia's desert.

19: "Worker bees lay seeds of revolution" New Scientist report on work done by Michael Holmes for his Honours, together with Associate Professor Madeleine Beekman and Professor Ben Oldroyd. Read full Biology story here.

23:Professor Rick Shine talks to ABC 666 and Radio National about the introduction of cane toads to Australia saying it was a truly stupid thing to do.

23: "Quolls taught to turn their nose up at toxic toads" conditioned taste aversion research by Honour student Stephanie O'Donnell, Dr Jonathan Webb and Professor Rick Shine is covered in Bellingen Courier Sun.

28: Pregnant lizards are helping scientists understand cancer. PhD student Bridget Murphy is interviewed on Channel Ten News (Sydney, Melbourne and Perth) to discuss her accidental discovery of a potent cancer protein found in the embryo of three-toed skink. Bridget was one of only 16 people around Australia to take part in Fresh Science, a workshop that trains people to communicate their research effectively.

29: "National honours to Fresh scientists" The St George and Southerland Shire Leader reports on three Fresh Science winners, including Bridget Murphy, who attended St George Girls High School.

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JULY

2:Professor Chris Dickman is interviewed on ABC Western Queensland to discuss his 20-year ecological study of the Simpson Desert. Dickman says that they were surprised that the rodents were not doing very well this year despite the high levels of rain that have occurred.

9: Interview with Professor Chris Dickman on ABC Southern Queensland, Toowoomba. Dickman talks about his trips to the desert and the changes caused by recent flooding, discussing the environmental cycle of the desert, and the concerns for species in the area which are affected by introduced species such as feral cats and foxes.

12: Cane toads have all but conquered the Top End but now they are moving toward Lake Eyre via outback rivers. Professor Rick Shine says on ABC1 (Darwin) TV the toads are tough survivors and "invasion machines." The toads have gone from Longreach, Central Queensland to Noonbah Station, nearing the Cooper Creek. Professor Shine says the toads are highly toxic to other living things.

13: Cane toads are moving from Longreach to Noonbah Station nearing Cooper Creek towards Lake Eyre with alarming consequences for native wildlife. The toads are being carried down by floods swollen outback rivers. Professor Rick Shine comments on ABC2 (Sydney) TV.

Authorities are getting ready for a horror spring when a plague of both locusts and mice could hit south-east Australia. The Australian Plague Locust Commission estimates there will be billions of locusts emerging from the ground, and mice numbers are tipped to reach about 1000 per hectare. Throughout July, small mammal expert Dr Mathew Crowther and locust biologist Associate Professor Greg Sword are interviewed by the media to discuss the mouse and locusts problems

14: "Cannibalism could avert locust plague" AAP Newswire reports on locust plague and interview Greg Sword who highlights the cannibalistic nature of locusts and how this relates to behaviour in plagues.

14:Dr Mathew Crowther and Associate Professor Greg Sword are interviewed on SBS World News Australia to discuss the predicted mouse and locust plagues.

14:Dr Mathew Crowther interviewed on ABC radio and discusses the mouse plagues and says that farmers could lose a large percentage of their crops, particularly grains. ABC (North and West SA); ABC (Illawarra).

15: Radio National, Canberra, report on the mouse and locust plagues of SE Australia. Dr Mathew Crowther explains that house mice do not live long and the quantity of food leads to extended lifespans and higher reproduction. He says the last big plague in 1993 cost grain farmers over $100m in damaged crops and machinery and a mouse plague is best fought early. Controlling areas that act as refugees, along fences for example, can be a good pre-measure. He says farmers should try and minimise the population by monitoring it.

15:Associate Professor Greg Sword discussing locust cannibalism and the development of aerial technology to study the movement of locust plagues and how this innovation can help in controlling plagues. On this day, he was featured in numerous radio and print media.

  • Radio:Associate Professor Greg Sword is developing radar and optical technology to track locust movements. The Australian Plague Locust Commission expects eggs to begin hatching in SA, Vic and NSW in late September. Sword says the new technology, developed in collaboration with the Centre for Autonomous Aerial Systems, will allow pesticides to be applied more efficiently. ABC Golburn, Ballarat, Adelaide, Mildura, Riverland SA, Shepparton, Central Victoria.
  • Print:Daily Telegraph, The Age, Western Advocate, Warrnambool Standard, Adelaide Advertiser, Herald Sun, Canberra Times, Daily Liberal, Sunshine Coast Daily, West Australian, Daily Advertiser.

16: 2NM Musswellbrook reports that aerial surveying of locust plagues will take place following warning about the extent of risk zones. Associate Professor Greg Sword says they aim to predict movements.

19: The Australian Plague Locust Commission predicts locust eggs will start hatching in Vic from late September. Associate Professor Greg Sword says they're developing tracking swarm movement to design pesticides. The University are working with the Centre for Autonomous Aerial Systems and The Australian Plague Locust Commission on this.

19: "Cannibalism to stop plagues" Associate Professor Greg Sword featured in Country Leader Tamworth (page three).

20: Sydney's southern outskirts has seen an explosion in the number of cane toads. Council workers have collected about 250 in Taren Point since January, when they normally only catch 2 or 3 a year. Professor Rick Shine is interviewed on ABC1 (Sydney) TV to discuss cane toad biology and the likelihood of toads colonising Sydney.

21:"Cane toads march"Daily Telegraph (13) reports on the first breeding colony of toads in Sydney. Professor Rick Shine comments that this is the most southernmost breeding colony in Australia, and although toads are tropical animals, they may adapt their metabolism to survive in cold Sydney winter.

21:"Mice, locusts to cost $2b"The Weekly Times reports on the mouse and locusts plagues to hit SE Australia. Dr Mathew Crowther and Associate Professor Greg Sword provide comment on the mouse and locust problems and possible methods of control.

29: "Keeping and aerial eye on plague" Stock and Land (page 25) report on the aerial innovations that are helping to control locust plagues and interview Associate Professor Greg Sword on his work with this technology.

29: ABC Ballarat interview Associate Professor Greg Sword about new technology to track locusts. They hope to use the movement of the individual locust in the band to help them predict where the band is going.

30: ABC Swan Hill report that research has indicated that locusts resort to cannibalism when they run out of plants to eat. Interview Associate Professor Greg Sword about his work in this area.

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AUGUST

4: New research has found the reason locusts move across a region is to avoid being cannibalised. The Australian Plague Locust Commission predicts locust eggs will begin hatching in North West Victoria from late September. Associate Professor Greg Sword is interviewed by ABC radio and says in a plague there can be more than 10,000 locusts per square metre and often few plants to feed on.

11: Darren Osborne from ABC Science discusses research by Dr Tanya Latty into the decision making process of slime moulds. ABC Mid North Coast, Coffs Harbour.

12: Abbie Thomas, from ABC Science Online, talks about researcher Dr Tanya Latty looking at slime moulds and their choices about food and the environment. Thomas mentions that CHOICE Magazine has an article on marketing tricks and discusses how decoy marketing was applied to the slime moulds.

20: "Even slime moulds can be irrational" The Week featured the work of Dr Tanya Latty whose research, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, has shown that slime moulds can make irrational decisions like humans.

25: Cannibalism has been confirmed as a key trigger for locust swarms and Associate Professor Greg Sword discusses on Channel Ten News and ABC radio his research showing how the insects will attack each other and what Australia can expect in its worst ever locust plague in the coming months.

28: "Harbouring hungry life" Associate Professor Ross Coleman was quoted in the Daily Telegraph, commenting on how marine life contributes to the decay of wooden pylons in Mosman.

26: "Day of the locust" Associate Professor Greg Sword was featured in Inner West Courier talking about the locusts that were on display at Biology's activity table at Open Day, which were used to educate visitors about the research being conducted at the University of Sydney.

26:Associate Professor Greg Sword was also interviewed on ABC Western Queensland, discussing his research that has discovered that the movement of locusts is strongly influenced by the fear of individual insects being eaten by other locusts.

12: "Rat wars: native rats fighting for their habitat" Professor Chris Dickman was featured on ABC's TV program Catalyst about his three-year study looking to re-introduce the native bush rat, or Bogul, to Sydney in an attempt to control the European Black Rat. Read transcript or watch footage here.

23:Dr Min Chen has discovered a new type of chlorophyll, named chlorophyll f, deep within stromatolites in Western Australia's Shark Bay. Her research, published in the journal Science, was highlighted in the Daily Telegraph.

28:"Infrared chlorophyll is good news for solar cells"Dr Min Chen speaks to New Scientist about her discovery of chlorophyll f and how this new molecule might contribute to energy industries.

Dr Min Chen's history-making discovery attained vast attention from the media internationally, being featured in many outlets including Nature, Scientific American and Faculty of 1000. The new molecule, chlorophyll f, was also chosen by Chemical Year in Review as a "Superlative Achievement" of 2010. Read full story here

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SEPTEMBER

3: The worst locust plague in history is set to hit Australia in late September and NSW Minister for Primary Industries is urging for the locusts to be controlled. Associate Professor Greg Sword is interviewed on 2GB and Sky Sports radio and says the fungal agent Green Guard is the best option for controlling plagues.

4:"What brainless moulds may teach us"Dr Tanya Latty is interviewed by the Sydney Morning Herald to discuss her research on decision-making in slime moulds, showing that, like humans, they are capable of making good decisions and also irrational ones.

10:Professor Rick Shine was interviewed on ABC North Queensland, Bundaberg and Far North Cairns to discuss the cane toad's effect on the environment. The discussions stemmed from a review published by Professor Shine in the Quarterly Review of Biology (in which he examined various studies conducted on the impact of cane toads) where he claims that the impact of cane toads has not triggered the overwhelming disaster predicted.

11:"Cane toad invasion: ugly but not so bad" In New Scientist, Professor Rick Shine discusses the result of his review in the Quarterly Review of Biology in which he reviews various studies on the impact of cane toads.

30:Professor Rick Shine was interviewed by ABC Darwin to discuss the declining reptile populations due to cane toad invasions.

11: "Hatching a plan to control a plague" Dr Fiona Clissold answered questions for a special feature on locust plagues, published in Shepparton News.

Following Professor Steve Simpson's Sydney Science Forum seminar, "Law of the Locust", presented at the University of Sydney on 15 September, Professor Simpson appeared on Channel Ten's the 7PM project to discuss the upcoming plague predicted to hit country Australia. He was also interviewed on ABC Ballarat on 16 September, Radio National Canberra and ABC North West WA on 17 September, ABC Melbourne on 20 September and ABC South East SA on 21 September. Watch Professor Simpson's lecture "Law of the locust" on Slow TV.

20:Professor Chris Dickman was interviewed on ABC Dubbo to discuss the impact of locust plagues on insect eating marsupials.

PhD student Ruchira Somaweera was featured in Kimberley Echo on 9 September (front page "The crocodile hunter" and page 9) and West Australian (page 10) on 10 September for his doctoral research on fresh water crocodiles in Lake Argyle.

18:"The rules of attraction" Research by Dr Jerome Buhl, Professor Steve Simpson and Associate Professor Greg Sword, which use robots to predict the movements of locust swarms, has been featured by The Economist.

10: "Regular exercise pays" Associate Professor Seebacher's research, which links metabolic rate with exercise and temperature (PLoS ONE) was highlighted in the Financial Review (page 61).

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OCTOBER

Associate Professor Seebacher's research, which links metabolic rate with exercise and temperature (PLoS ONE) was highlighted in the News Weekly (page 18) and Southern Highland News (page 31) on 6 October, Dubbo Photo News (page 28) on 7 October, Boarder Mail (page 39) on 8 October and Toowoomba Chronicle (page 13) on 9 October.

7: "Why are they so hungary?" Professor Steve Simpson's research on protein-leverage and appetite was featured in Sunraysia Daily.

9:"Evolutionary scientists ask what comes next: the lizard or the egg?"Professor Mike Thompson discusses his research on the evolution of viviparity with Deborah Smith at the Sydney Morning Herald. His research, published originally in the Journal of Morphology, shows that the three toed skink represents a transitional form between egglaying and live bearing lizards. The research has also been featured in National Geographic.

15:Professor Rick Shine was interviewed on ABC Darwin TV to comment on the predicted cane toad plague following early rainfall.

21: Research by Professor Mike Thompson was featured in Coffs Coast Independent (page two). See above media item (9 October).

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NOVEMBER

1: PhD student Bridget Murphy discusses her discovery of a potent cancer protein in the uterus of the three toed skink on Channel 10 News.

Bridget also published a feature article "Lizards give birth to cancer clues" on the same research in the November issue of Australasian Science.

1:Dr Min Chen has discovered a new type of chlorophyll, named chlorophyll f, deep within stromatolites in Western Australia's Shark Bay. Her research, published in the journal Science, was highlighted in the November edition of Australasian Science.

16:"Cane toad found in a Perth suburb". A cane toad has been found in the front garden of a Bayswater home and authorities have issued a warning about the invasive pest. Professor Rick Shine discusses on ABC Radio Perth 720 cane toad biology, why they are good a spreading and whether they will colonise Perth.

19: "Local student on exploration" Undergraduate biology student Bevan Yiu is selected to be part of the Next Wave project, which allows students to live and work on board Australia's flagship marine research vessel. His story is featured in Bega District News (page 44).

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DECEMBER

9: "Mite is right: ants prove to be masters of maths and mazes" PhD student Chris Reid discusses with Sydney Morning Herald (page three) the results of his research on problem solving in ants. Chris has shown that ants are capable of solving difficult mathematical problems, like the Towers of Hanoi, and are able to adapt their solutions to a changing environment. The research, published in Journal of Experimental Biology, may improve optimization software and assist various human industries. See full Biology news story here.

11: PhD student Chris Reid discusses his research, which has shown that ants can solve complex maths problems, with ABC 666 Canberra. Reid tells reporter Ashley Hall that the ants have inspired computer scientists to create algorithms to solve human optimisation problems. See full Biology news story here.

28: "Amazing ants lead the way" St George and Southerland Shire Leader featured the ant research of PhD student Chris Reid in an article (page three). See full Biology news story here.

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