Find us on Facebook Find us on LinkedIn Follow us on Twitter Subscribe to our YouTube channel

2014 Seminars

27th Feb 2014 - 12:30 pm

Speaker:

Associate Professor Adam Duhachek,

Affiliation:

Indiana University

Venue:

Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Title:

Coping, Construal and Health Messages: Response Efficacy and Self Efficacy-based Persuasion

Description:

Four experiments examine the nature of different coping strategies and their subsequent effects on the effectiveness of health messages. We argue that the two strategies of problem-focused versus emotion-focused coping represent coping at different levels of construal, and we identify the role of distinct types of efficacy resulting from each coping strategy. We show that health messages are more effective when they are represented at a construal level that matches the specific coping strategies due to an efficacy-based fit mechanism. We propose that consumers primed with problem-focused strategies are more persuaded by messages presented at lower levels of construal. This effect occurs because lower rather than higher levels of construal reinforce self-efficacy perceptions that enhance persuasion under problem-focused coping strategies. Consumers primed with emotion-focused strategies are more persuaded by messages presented at higher level construals. Higher levels of construal reinforce response efficacy perceptions that drive persuasion for emotion-focused coping strategies. Finally, we show that priming consumers with hope can help boost their self-efficacy leading emotion-focused coping strategies to mimic problem focused coping strategies.

11th Apr 2014 - 12:00 pm

Speaker:

Associate Professor Alexander (Sasha) Fedorikhin,

Affiliation:

Indiana University

Venue:

Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Title:

The Impact of Bundle Components on the Focal Product Evaluations

Description:

Research on consumer evaluations of products offered with ad-ons (discretionary benefits that provide utility only if consumed with the corresponding base good; Guiltinam 1987) shows that the evaluation of the base product is affected negatively, if the ad-ons are alignable (enhance an existing feature). If the ad-ons are non-alignable (introduce a new capability), the base product evaluation is affected positively (Bertini, Ofek, Ariely 2008). The present research demonstrates that alignability of the supplemental products has a different effect, when the supplementary products are offered as part of a bundle with the focal product. In contrast to ad-on effects, bundling an alignable supplementary product (extra memory) with the focal product (camera) has a positive effect on the evaluation of the focal product. For the non-alignable supplementary product (tripod) the effect is negative. Further, we reverse the effect of alignability of supplementary product on the evaluation of the focal product, by prompting the participants to think about why the manufacturer would offer the products in a bundle. We also demonstrate the mediating effect of the prompt on the evaluations of the focal product.

1st Aug 2014 - 02:00 pm

Speaker:

A/Prof. Mengze Shi,

Affiliation:

Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

Venue:

Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Title:

Economic Incentives and Non-Economic Motivations in Contests

Description:

Abstract: This paper develops a new method to investigate the interaction between economic incentives and non-economic motivations in contests. Our method separates the effect of non-economic motivations from the effects of economic motivations and risk aversion. We run a set of laboratory experiments involving contests among salespeople and use the data to estimate the levels of non-economic motivations under different treatments. Our results show that the spread of contest rewards affects both the economic and non-economic motivations of the participating agents. We also explore the effects of alternative recognition regimes on the levels of effort and non-economic motivation. We find that a regime like "President's Club", under which top performers are recognized publicly without revealing the ranking among them, performs better than other regimes. Overall, this paper demonstrates the significant impact of an agent's non-economic motivation on her effort, and underscores the importance to managers of jointly choosing incentive structures and recognition regimes.

Speaker: Mengze Shi is Associate Professor of Marketing at Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. His research is focused on incentives and motivations, specifically how people respond to incentives and how companies should design incentive programs. He has investigated a wide range of consumer incentive programs, including loyalty rewards, sweepstakes, group buying, discounts, and direct mails, as well as incentives for sales agents such as commissions and sales contests. His work has covered such industries as airlines, wireless communications, automobile, financial services, and mailing catalogs.