Our Alumni

Kate Goodwin

BArch ’03
BSc(Arch) ’99

Head of Architecture and Drue Heinz Curator, The Royal Academy, London
2016 Royal Institute of British Architects Honorary Fellow

“After briefly practising architecture in Sydney, I moved to London and secured a role co-ordinating the architecture program at the Royal Academy of Arts. This entailed a series of lectures and events but there were immense possibilities to grow the program, create a new department and expand the Royal Academy’s remit on architecture.

I have been here now for 12 years and have had four different roles, each of which did not exist before.

The 2014 exhibition Sensing Spaces: Architecture Reimagined was a highlight. It involved a 2000 square-metre installation in the Academy’s Beaux Arts galleries by architects including Kengo Kuma from Japan; Alvaro Siza from Portugal; and Pezo von Ellrichshausen from Chile. The scale of it still surprises me.”

Postgraduate

Steven Bai

BDesComp (Hons) and University Medal, '14
John C Harsanyi Graduate Medal (International)

2015 Founder and Designer, Simple Collective

“The University of Sydney keeps creating great leaders, so I knew I could meet people with whom I could potentially collaborate.

After graduating, I worked in one of Australia’s largest design and technology consultancies, then on some intense digital projects that serve millions of users worldwide. My start-up focuses on responsive environment and immersive experience and has involved me with some exciting entrepreneurs.

One of my research projects, an interactive installation called TetraBIN, featured in Vivid Sydney 2014, and I participated in Beijing Design Week 2015. The faculty assisted me in implementing the project in China, for which I am very grateful.

The creative and technology sectors are evolving rapidly, so it was very helpful, even during my junior year at university, to connect with industry leaders for mentorship and attend guest lectures by influential people.”

Casey Bryant

BDes Arch, MArch

“Studying architecture at Sydney has put me in contact with many people within the industry. These contacts led to my initial internships and employment.

After graduating, I moved to Melbourne to work for McBride Charles Ryan. I was exposed to large projects, including the new Victorian Cancer Centre. I won the Emerging Architect prize in the Boral Design Awards. Two years ago I returned to Sydney to work for Andrew Burns Architects. I played a key role in the design and delivery of significant residential and cultural buildings, including Australia House in Japan and the shortlisted proposal for the Green Square Aquatic Centre. My advice is to look for the potential for innovation and experimentation in everything you do. Even if doesn’t lead to a useful outcome, the process will always further your thinking."

Pamela Degabriele

BDes Arch, MArch

“The Master of Architecture program provided me with immense opportunities. Under the Hazlet Bequest Travelling Scholarship, I was fortunate to travel to Chile with nine other students to complete a design intensive. I had a unique opportunity to experience a new environment, meet new people and appreciate a different approach to design. I am working in the sphere of heritage, residential, and commercial architecture. Eventually I would like to move into the affordable housing market and my recent career decisions have all centred on this goal. I believe that as an advocate of architecture, it is my duty to bring my expertise to the masses and not just the rich.”

Bettina Easton

BDes Arch, MArch

“The Master of Architecture program provided me with immense opportunities. Under the Hazlet Bequest Travelling Scholarship, I was fortunate to travel to Chile with nine other students to complete a design intensive. I had a unique opportunity to experience a new environment, meet new people and appreciate a different approach to design. I am working in the sphere of heritage, residential, and commercial architecture. Eventually I would like to move into the affordable housing market and my recent career decisions have all centred on this goal. I believe that as an advocate of architecture, it is my duty to bring my expertise to the masses and not just the rich.”

Sarah Hill

MUrbRPlan ’00, BSc ’99

PhD candidate, Urban Planning and Economics
CEO Greater Sydney Commission

“As the third generation in my family to attend the University of Sydney, I have long been aware that ongoing education, training and development are critical to any leader’s respect for themselves as well as their ability and accountability to others.

My tertiary education has also provided me with the confidence I needed to say I am a fully trained and capable planner with the ability to solve problems. I have worked for local government in the UK, state government in NSW and the London Olympic Delivery Authority, as well as the private sector. Today I work in my family’s property consultancy.

However, some of the most important developments in my career have been as a result of volunteering. Examples include my election as President of the Planning Institute of Australia’s NSW Division and my recent appointment to the Committee for Sydney board at a time when Sydney is gearing up to jump ahead of the curve.

For me, there is no surprise that being one of the chief planners for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games and their Legacy Masterplan was a key highlight. Today, highlights relate to projects or roles that open doors and introduce you to likeminded people. In planning, it is all about people."

Hans Latuperissa

Master of Design Science (Sustainable Design)

"I wanted to study sustainability. Australia is a good example of a country that has committed to sustainable design: the governments have agreed to the greenhouse gas abatement protocols and how these relate to with the building sector. GreenStar and NABERS prove that Australia wants to move forward as much as possible.

What I’ve learnt is that it’s not just a matter of understanding sustainable design, but also to convince a client to invest in it. We study a lot of concepts.

By learning sustainable design this way, it gives you a way to base your reasoning on evidence and simulation, so that you can convince your client. I think it’s important that you’re able to ‘show your working’. It increases the chance that your client will want to incorporate sustainable design.

This degree makes me more qualified in dealing with consultation and design. Because I already have the basic knowledge of how to deal with sustainable development, my next challenge is gaining more experience.

It’s the time for me to put what I know into practice. I’m confident I know what to do.""

Lucas Macci

Master of Design Science (Audio and Acoustics)

“I became interested in audio and acoustics while studying engineering. I have a passion for music (being a musician myself) and wanted to combine those two fields. That's how I discovered acoustical engineering.

I didn't know much about Sydney before coming here. I chose Sydney because I was looking for a course outside Europe, with a campus close to the center of a city. When I saw the courses offered at The University of Sydney for acoustics, the diversity of course that were taught and the facilities available, my choice was made.

I enjoyed Sound Design for New Media classes very much. This is a fascinating field, where every other aspect of acoustics is involved (including: digital signal processing, room acoustics, loudspeaker design), but used for a creative purpose. History of Sound Design also teaches a lot about the evolution of acoustics.

Acoustics are becoming more important in many industries. New regulations are increasing the need for consultancy offices with the ability to measure, study and certify. In the transportation industry – in which I now work - acoustics have been important for many years but it is still a challenging area.

There is a lot that remains to be discovered. In helicopters and cars, noisiness (or quietness) of the cabin is becoming a major point of investigation for manufacturers. This means the outputs from research and development are always increasing."

Alex McCoy

Master of Design Science (Illumination Design)

“I come from an entertainment lighting background, the majority of which is based on information handed down by informal on the job training which is fine but I wanted a more formal, defined education in Illumination Design.

The convenience of the timetable was extremely appealing as the lectures are run in intensive mode so you’re only required to attend four days of class per unit.

As someone who works full time this allows for minimal interference with work compared to weekly night classes or other conventional arrangements.

The collective group of lecturers and guest speakers have an immense quantity of knowledge to impart and I hope to take as much of that away as possible."

David Montero

Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts

"When I was a kid I was fascinated by sci-fi and technology, and wanted to be an inventor. After I graduated in Computer Engineering I realised that technology could feel intimidating and somehow non-human—my goal was to democratise it and make technology accessible to everyone.

I did two years postgraduate research in HCI and empathic agents but wasn’t yet able to combine my goal with my professional career

The IDEA program brought the user into the picture; it finally showed me the way to make technology humane and friendly. As a side effect it brought back my creativity—buried from years of engineering school—and I finally became an inventor!

Thanks to the IDEA program I managed to steer my career into a creative and fulfilling path. I also rediscovered my artistic side in which I’m still working with passion, and even exhibiting some interactive pieces.

There is a lot that remains to be discovered. In helicopters and cars, noisiness (or quietness) of the cabin is becoming a major point of investigation for manufacturers. This means the outputs from research and development are always increasing."

Dr Crighton Nichols

PhD, Design Lab '14

Innovation Lead, Core Technology, PricewaterhouseCoopers Australia

“I embarked on a PhD, more out of my interest in combining social issues with my technological skills than as a step up the corporate ladder.

A PhD is a great way to develop the self-discipline required to deliver a large, complex, mostly solitary project.

I studied part time while working on a range of related startup ventures, including One Laptop per Child Australia, an organisation dedicated to reducing the digital divide in remote communities.

A highlight of my PhD involved engaging with very wise and humble Indigenous Elders to understand how to encourage the appropriation of Western ICTs by First Australian communities – the world’s oldest continuing cultures.

My first role since attaining my PhD has been with PwC Australia, where I lead an innovation team within the core technology group.

I’ve hired two graduates from the University of Sydney’s Design Computing program and we are now Platinum sponsors of the University’s annual Graduate Show.

We’re keen to hire creative thinkers to explore digital disruption and the opportunities it affords.”

Rob Taylor

Master of Design Science (Audio and Acoustics, 2013)

“When I was researching postgraduate programs in New South Wales, Sydney offered the only degree that leaned towards scientific based subjects like digital audio systems and acoustics. There appeared to be a better balance between the creative and the analytical than other courses that were available.

Already having had a career in audio production, I’m looking at this point in my life to build upon what I have already done and maybe move into a different area. I’m certainly hoping to do some academic research in the future carrying on from what I am doing now in the Master degree. I honestly wish I had of done the course a long time ago as the science gives you an understanding of everything that is going on ‘besides’ just the mixing console and performance. A whole new area of knowledge has opened up for me and I’m really finding that very useful. I’m passionate about my studies; I tend to put a lot of time and effort into it. I think that’s vitally important if you want to get a good result and make the most of the experience.”

Scott Willsallen

Master of Design Science (Audio and Acoustics) 2002

Founder and Chief Executice, Auditoria

“As a professional musician I’ve always loved the performing arts. I embarked on my master’s degree to differentiate myself from my competitors in events design. I now confidently say to clients “this is what the result will be” based on mathematics rather."

I started my own audio company, Auditoria, in 2004, and we are now world leaders in the design and direction of audio systems for major broadcast events such as the 2012 London Olympic Games opening and closing ceremonies.

I’ve encouraged others to undertake the master’s program and I’ve hired a graduate because I know the program equips you with professional skills that make you immediately employable. As a consultancy business, where human capital is our currency, this has major commercial benefits.”