Dr Ahmad Jabbarzadeh Khoei

PhD in Mechanical Engineering , Sydney (1998)
Senior Lecturer
School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering

J07 - Mechanical Engineering Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9351 2344
Fax +61 2 9351 7060

Website School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering

Personal Profile

Biographical details

Dr Ahmad Jabbarzadeh is an internationally recognized molecular rheologist (science of flow and deformation of materials) and tribologist (science of friction and lubrication) whose research mainly deals with studying the properties of complex materials by advanced computational techniques at micro and nano scales.

Research interests

Everything around us is made of atoms and molecules, whose characteristics ultimately give rise to the properties and behaviours of the materials they comprise. Dr Ahmad Jabbarzadeh studies materials at this scale, leading to improvements in technologies as varied as mechanical lubricants, polymeric materials, suspension liquids, joint replacements and drug-delivery implants.

"While the behaviours of some materials are predictable by more conventional methods, others are more complex. My research involves studying such complex materials at micro and nano scales, in order to better understand their properties and behaviours in various applications.

"An example of such an application is in biomedical systems, where our understanding of a material to be implanted into the human body - such as for a joint replacement or a drug-delivery device - is crucial.

"If I were to choose a single scientific milestone in the past 100 years that has led to astonishing technological acceleration, I would say our understanding of the atomic nature of matter. This has led us to the invention of new materials, processes and applications, and will continue to do so in coming years.

"I joined the University of Sydney as a postgraduate student in the mid-1990s, and have held academic and research positions here for the past 14 years. During this time I have been fortunate to liaise with world-class researchers who have inspired me to excel and look beyond the normal routines of research, and to attain a vision that may one day change the way we tackle complex problems.

"I have also learnt to focus on the quality of our research achievements and to build foundations that will take us one step higher in what we see on the horizon - a step that will be part of a lasting foundation for the next generation of researchers for years to come in our unending quest for knowledge."

Teaching and supervision

AMME4010 - Major Industrial Project

AMME5271 - Computational Nanotechnology

AMME5310 - Engineering Tribology

ENGG1802 - Engineering Mechanics

ENGG5802 - Foundations of Engineering Mechanics

MECH1560 - Introduction to Mechanical Engineering

Current projects


Nano-Rheology and Nano-Tribology: Atomistic Simulation of Boundary Lubrication
Successful manufacturing and application of miniaturized mechanical parts in the Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems and other nano-devices with moving parts greatly depend on our ability to reduce friction, wear and energy dissipation. That requires understanding of the atomic origins of friction, high viscosity and rigidity of confined ultra-thin lubricant films and the interplay of surface and lubricant characteristics. This research seeks to find practical ways to reduce friction in boundary lubrication regime by a novel virtual nano-tribometer/ nano-rheometer. Various types of lubricants with nonpolar and functionalised molecules confined by realistic smooth and rough surfaces are studied through direct atomistic simulations. The project is focused on the areas related to lubrication problems in boundary level and their rheological properties, with emphasis on self assembled monolayers (SAM).


Boundary Condition and Wall Slip at the Fluid-Solid Interface
Understanding the boundary condition of flow near solid surfaces is very important in many applications such as polymer processing, adhesion and lubrication problems. For computational rheology of viscoelastic flows using constitutive equations applying appropriate boundary conditions is essential to obtain meaningful results. Using molecular dynamics simulations we explore various parameters that affect the flow condition near the surface. Surface energy, roughness characteristics and topography and atomic order as well as molecular architecture, size and interaction energies are among the many parameters that are investigated.


Characterizing Material Properties by Molecular Level Simulations
Using molecular dynamics simulations bulk properties of many low molecular weight liquids can now be calculated quantitatively thanks to well tested molecular potential available. An example is the zero shear rate viscosity of various alkanes. The system of interest is usually put under shear over a range of accessible rates by molecular dynamics simulations 107-1012 s-1). The Newtonian plateau then reveals the zero-shear viscosity. Below the results are shown for a linear and a branched alkane.


Novel 3D Nano-Structures, the Origin of High Rigidity for Ultra-Thin Liquid Films
Thin films of liquid, confined between atomically smooth surfaces, exhibit a transition characterised by an enormous increase in shear viscosity (by a factor of 106 in some cases) as the film thickness is decreased to somewhere between 6 and 8 molecular layers. This rheological transition has been observed for lubricating liquids as diverse as linear alkanes and near spherical cyclohexane and siloxanes, a ubiquity that strongly suggests a general underlying cause. Despite extensive study over the last 15 years, fundamental questions remain unresolved concerning both the phenomenon itself (i.e. whether the transition is continuous or discontinuous, a consequence of surface contaminants or an intrinsic property of the surface) and the physical process responsible. We have shown that the transition to rigidity in a realistic simulation of a dodecane film between mica surfaces is the result of the formation of crystalline bridges across the film. This transition leads to a novel solid state in which the crystal bridges organise themselves into a mosaic structure, translationally disordered, but with a long range tetratic orientational order. The dynamic heterogeneity associated with the in-plane organisation of these crystal bridges accounts for the striking difference in how the shear viscosity and the diffusion constant vary with film thickness and temperature.


Low Friction States of Films Only A Few Nanometer Thick
The effective viscosity of confined lubricant films less than 6-7 molecular layers is usually enhanced by many orders of magnitude. For dodecane the high friction film has a strong in-plane order with "mosaic-like" structures that extend across the film and effectively form "crystalline bridges" resulting in high friction. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have identified three routes to lower the friction. We show that the structure of confined films and their response to shearing are affected by atomic in-plane order and smoothness of the confining surfaces, the relative orientation of two crystalline surfaces and the direction of shear. We show a small increase in surface roughness in going from crystalline to amorphous surfaces can lead to a much lower friction. We demonstrate that misaligning (twisting) one surface with respect to the other by 45x results in a much lower effective viscosity. Application of shear for extended times induces alignment of lubricant molecules into a nematic-like order with ultra-low effective viscosity. The magnitude of reduction in the friction and the physical process through which it happens varies for each of these three routes. Depending on the method used, destruction of crystalline bridges, multilayer or fault plane slip provides a route for dramatic reduction in friction.


Nano-Rheology and Complex Flow Through Nano-Channels
Generally in MD simulation the averages are obtained for the entire space of the simulation box. However, in situations that involve non-isotropy and inhomogeneity, or when we are interested in the properties of the fluid on a certain point of space one needs to calculate the time average properties locally. For this purpose the volume of the simulation box is divided into a number of cells. To get good statistics each cell should be occupied by a few tens of particles. The properties that vary only in two dimensions are often calculated easily. This then involves dividing the simulation box in two dimensions into a number of sampling cells.All the local properties such as the stress tensor, velocity and density can be measured by this technique. Meshing in three dimensions has been attempted, but it requires much larger systems to acquire good statistics.

We have used to study complex flows through nano-channels. Two examples are the shown here Flow over a nano-cylinder in a nano rectangular box. The fluid is made of dodecane molecules. The calculated stream-lines and velocity field are shown.


Linking Material Properties and Molecular Architecture en route to Design of Customized Purpose Materials
The shape of molecules in liquids (polymers, lubricants etc) dictates their dynamical behaviour and mechanical properties. Understanding these structural effects is crucial in synthesising new materials with desired properties. In most cases especially for the high molecular weight molecules, it is still very difficult to determine the structure of by experiments. Experimental techniques such as NMR are useful in determining the number of branches for polymers. However in measuring the length of branches NMR cannot differentiate branches that have more than 6 to 10 atoms. Using highly active catalysts we can control short and long chain branching. This produces polymers with different rheological properties. A molecular simulation such as the Monte-Carlo method or molecular dynamics (MD) is an alternative approach to understand the structure-property relationships. The advantage of these methods is that highly detailed architectures can be simulated with controlled molecular weight and shape of the molecules. This is especially useful to study moderate length molecules usually a limited number of molecules are examined in the simulation because of the large number of calculations required. Also, for larger molecules the relaxation time is much longer and beyond the available simulation time. So the molecular weight of the simulated molecules is usually below the entanglement molecular weight. Although the molecules in these simulations are short, they can still capture much of the behaviour of real polymer melts. These model molecules often reproduce non-linear behaviour and normal stress differences that are observed for polymer melts. MD simulations have shown that liquids that often appear Newtonian in experiments at low shear rates, show non-Newtonian behaviour if they are sheared at large enough shear rates, such as occur in MD simulations. Shear thinning is now thought to be a universal phenomenon at high enough shear rates. For molecules with long relaxation times shear thinning occurs at low shear rates, but for Newtonian fluids with very low relaxation times it happens at much larger shear rates. MD simulation can examine the properties of the fluid at very much higher shear rates than those possible to achieve in the laboratory. There are situations such as hard-disk lubrication and flow in nano-channels where the fluid experiences extremely high shear rates. So these simulations can also be used to capture the effect of molecular shape on the rheological behaviour in such applications. An understanding of such structural effects no doubt can add to our knowledge and gives help in devising theoretical models for longer polymers.


Using Molecular Simulations to Study Crystallization of Polymers
We have studied the crystallization of alkanes using molecular dynamics simulation. Moderate system sizes have been simulated ranging from chains of C20 to C60. Model PE molecules are in the simulation box with periodic boundaries in all three directions. The temperature is dropped gradually according to the cooling rate and then the system is monitored.

Associations

  • Australian Society of Rheology
  • American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
  • American Chemical Society

Editorial Board

  • The Scientific World Journal

Selected grants

2013

  • nanoIR - nanoscale bioimaging with continuous mapping of chemical and physical properties; Gomes V, Dehghani F, Gan Y, Chang L, Jabbarzadeh-Khoei A, McKenzie D, Hanaor D, Zhou F, Chrzanowski W, Braet F, Bilek M, Chan H, Perrier S, O'Neill G, Ammit A, Brand-Miller J, McEwan A, Hawkett B, Kondyurin A, Li Q, Burgess J, Li Z; National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)/Equipment Grants.

2009

  • Multiscale modeling of flexible fibrous suspensions under flow; See H, Jabbarzadeh-Khoei A, Ekwebelam C; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).
  • Lubrication at the atomic scale; Jabbarzadeh-Khoei A; DVC Research/Bridging Support Grant.

2006

  • Nano-Rheology and Nano-Tribology: Atomistic Simulation of Boundary Lubrication; Tanner R, Jabbarzadeh-Khoei A; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

Selected publications

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Book Chapters

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Ilies, I. (2013). Effect of Roughness on Wettability of a Surface by Nano-droplets: Correlation With the Slip Length in Nanofluidics. In NSTI (Eds.), Nanotechnology 2013 Volume 2: Electronics, Devices, Fabrication, MEMS, Fluidics and Computational, (pp. 560-563). Boca Raton, Florida. USA: CRC Press.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2012). Nanotribology and Lubrication at Nanoscale: Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies. In Matthew Laudon and Bart Romanowicz (Eds.), Nanotechnology 2012: Electronics, Devices, Fabrication, MEMS, Fluidics And Computation: Technical Proceedings Of The 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference And Expo (Volume 2), (pp. 657-660). Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press.
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2011). Odd-Even Effect in Self Assembly and Phase Transition of Alkanethiols Monolayers (SAMs) on Au (111) Surfaces. In NSTI - Nano Science and Technology Institute (Eds.), Nanotech 2011: Technical Proceedings of the 2011 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, (pp. 476-479). USA: CRC Press.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2010). Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Flow over a Nano-cylinder in a Rectangular Nano-channel. In M Laudon and B Romanowicz (Eds.), Nanotech Conference & Expo 2010: Technical Proceedings | Vol. 2 Electronics, Devices, Fabrication, MEMS, Fluidics and Computational, (pp. 733-736). Boa Raton: CRC Press.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2006). Molecular Dynamics Simulation and its Application to Nano-Rheology. In Bindings D M and Walters K (Eds.), Rheology Reviews, (pp. 165-216). Aberystwyth UK: British Society of Rheology.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Atkinson, J., Tanner, R. (2002). Effect of branching on the lubricant properties: A molecular dynamics study. In D Dowson, M Priest, G Dalmaz, AA Lubrecht (Eds.), Boundary and Mixed Lubrication: Science and Applications, (pp. 231-240). United States: Elsevier.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Atkinson, J., Tanner, R. (2001). Lubrication processes near wall asperities: a molecular dynamics study. In G. Dalmaz, A.A. Lubrecht, D. Dowson and M. Priest (Eds.), Tribology Research: From model experiment to industrial problem, (pp. 779-785). Netherlands: Academic Press Elsevier.

Journals

  • Moshfegh, A., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2014). Analysis of Dissipative Particle Dynamics Fluid in Sheared Regimes. Applied Mechanics and Materials, 553, 115-120. [More Information]
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2014). Effect of Pressure on Dry and Hydrated Self Assembled Monolayers: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study. Applied Mechanics and Materials, 553, 35-40. [More Information]
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2013). Effect of nano-patterning on oleophobic properties of a surface. Soft Matter, 9, 11598-11608. [More Information]
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2013). Effect of Water on Structural and Frictional Properties of Self Assembled Monolayers. Langmuir, 29(44), 13367-13378. [More Information]
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2012). Effect of compression on self-assembled monolayers: a molecular dynamics study. Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering, 20(8), 1-25. [More Information]
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2012). Effect of load on structural and frictional properties of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers on gold: some odd-even effects. Langmuir, 28(9), 4102-4112. [More Information]
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2012). Frictional properties of two alkanethiol self assembled monolayers in sliding contact: Odd-even effects. Journal of Chemical Physics, 137(17), 1-15. [More Information]
  • Kittipoomwong, P., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2011). Effect of fibre curvature on the rheology of particulate suspensions. Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics, 166(23-24), 1347-1355. [More Information]
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2011). Odd-even effects on the structure, stability, and phase transition of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers. Langmuir, 27(16), 9748-9759. [More Information]
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2011). Thin lubricant films confined between crystalline surfaces: Gold versus mica. Tribology International, 44(6), 711-719. [More Information]
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2010). Flow-Induced Crystallization: Unravelling the Effects of Shear Rate and Strain. Macromolecules, 43(19), 8136-8142.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2009). Crystallization of alkanes under quiescent and shearing conditions. Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics, 160, 99-21. [More Information]
  • Tanner, R., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2008). Thin-film lubrication nano-rheology via molecular dynamics. Australian Journal of Mechanical Engineering, 5(1), 43-50.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Harrowell, P., Tanner, R. (2007). Crystal bridges, tetratic order, and elusive equilibria: The role of structure in lubrication films. The Journal of Physical Chemistry Part B: Condensed Matter, Materials, Surfaces, Interfaces and Biophysical, 111(39), 11354-11365.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Harrowell, P., Tanner, R. (2007). The structural origin of the complex rheology in thin dodecane films: Three routes to low friction. Tribology International, 40(10-12), 1574-1586.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Harrowell, P., Tanner, R. (2006). Crystal bridge formation marks the transition to rigidity in a thin lubrication film. Physical Review Letters, 96(20), 206102-1-206102-4. [More Information]
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Harrowell, P., Tanner, R. (2006). Low friction lubrication between amorphous walls: Unraveling the contributions of surface roughness and in-plane disorder. Journal of Chemical Physics, 125(3), 034703-1-034703-11.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Harrowell, P., Tanner, R. (2005). Very low friction state of a dodecane film confined between mica surfaces. Physical Review Letters, 94(12), 126103-126103-4.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Atkinson, J., Tanner, R. (2003). A parallel algorithm for molecular dynamics simulation of branched molecules. Computer Physics Communications, 150(2), 65-84.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Atkinson, J., Tanner, R. (2003). Effect of Molecular Shape on Rheological Properties in Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Star, H, Comb and Linear Polymer Melts. Macromolecules, 36(13), 5020-5031.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Atkinson, J., Tanner, R. (2002). The effect of branching on slip and rheological properties of lubricants in molecular dynamics simulation of Couette shear flow. Tribology International, 35(1), 35-46.

Conferences

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2011). Detecting local molecular order and stresses in flow induced polymer crystallization. 7th International Symposium on Molecular Mobility and Order in Polymer Systems, Russia: Russian Academy of Sciences.
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2011). Odd-Even effects on tribology of self assembled monolayers. ASME/STLE 2011 International Joint Tribology Conference (IJTC2011), Los Angeles, USA: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).
  • Kittipoomwong, P., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., See, H. (2010). Dynamic simulation of fiber suspensions. The Society of Rheology 82nd Annual Meeting, USA: The Society of Rheology.
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2010). Effect of Loading and Shear Rate on Tribological Behaviour of Dodecanethiol Self Assembled Monolayer on AU(111): A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Study. STLE/ASME 2010 International Joint Tribology Conference (IJTC 2010), USA: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Ramin, L. (2010). Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Alkanethiol Self Assembled Monolayers on Au(111): Effects of Loading and Chain Size on Tribology and Film Structure. International Tribology Congress - ASIATRIB 2010, Australia: International Tribology Congress.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2010). Separating the effects of shear rate and strain on flow induced crystallization of polymers by large scale molecular simulations. International Soft Matter Conference 2010, Spain: RSC Publishing.
  • Kittipoomwong, P., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., See, H. (2009). Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulation of Particulate Suspensions. 5th Australian-Korean Rheology Conference AKRC 2009, Korea, Republic of: The Korean Society of Rheology.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2008). Complex Rheology of Molecularly Thin Films and the Role of Surface and Structure. The XVth International Congress On Rheology- The Society of Rheology 80th Annual Meeting, United States of America: American Institute of Physics (AIP).
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2007). Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Crystallization under Quiescent and Shearing Conditions. International Conference on Computational Methods in Science and Engineering 2007 (ICCMSE 2007), Melville, New York United States: American Institute of Physics (AIP).

2014

  • Moshfegh, A., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2014). Analysis of Dissipative Particle Dynamics Fluid in Sheared Regimes. Applied Mechanics and Materials, 553, 115-120. [More Information]
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2014). Effect of Pressure on Dry and Hydrated Self Assembled Monolayers: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study. Applied Mechanics and Materials, 553, 35-40. [More Information]

2013

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2013). Effect of nano-patterning on oleophobic properties of a surface. Soft Matter, 9, 11598-11608. [More Information]
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Ilies, I. (2013). Effect of Roughness on Wettability of a Surface by Nano-droplets: Correlation With the Slip Length in Nanofluidics. In NSTI (Eds.), Nanotechnology 2013 Volume 2: Electronics, Devices, Fabrication, MEMS, Fluidics and Computational, (pp. 560-563). Boca Raton, Florida. USA: CRC Press.
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2013). Effect of Water on Structural and Frictional Properties of Self Assembled Monolayers. Langmuir, 29(44), 13367-13378. [More Information]

2012

  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2012). Effect of compression on self-assembled monolayers: a molecular dynamics study. Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering, 20(8), 1-25. [More Information]
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2012). Effect of load on structural and frictional properties of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers on gold: some odd-even effects. Langmuir, 28(9), 4102-4112. [More Information]
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2012). Frictional properties of two alkanethiol self assembled monolayers in sliding contact: Odd-even effects. Journal of Chemical Physics, 137(17), 1-15. [More Information]
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2012). Nanotribology and Lubrication at Nanoscale: Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies. In Matthew Laudon and Bart Romanowicz (Eds.), Nanotechnology 2012: Electronics, Devices, Fabrication, MEMS, Fluidics And Computation: Technical Proceedings Of The 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference And Expo (Volume 2), (pp. 657-660). Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press.

2011

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2011). Detecting local molecular order and stresses in flow induced polymer crystallization. 7th International Symposium on Molecular Mobility and Order in Polymer Systems, Russia: Russian Academy of Sciences.
  • Kittipoomwong, P., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2011). Effect of fibre curvature on the rheology of particulate suspensions. Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics, 166(23-24), 1347-1355. [More Information]
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2011). Odd-Even Effect in Self Assembly and Phase Transition of Alkanethiols Monolayers (SAMs) on Au (111) Surfaces. In NSTI - Nano Science and Technology Institute (Eds.), Nanotech 2011: Technical Proceedings of the 2011 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, (pp. 476-479). USA: CRC Press.
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2011). Odd-even effects on the structure, stability, and phase transition of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers. Langmuir, 27(16), 9748-9759. [More Information]
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2011). Odd-Even effects on tribology of self assembled monolayers. ASME/STLE 2011 International Joint Tribology Conference (IJTC2011), Los Angeles, USA: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2011). Thin lubricant films confined between crystalline surfaces: Gold versus mica. Tribology International, 44(6), 711-719. [More Information]

2010

  • Kittipoomwong, P., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., See, H. (2010). Dynamic simulation of fiber suspensions. The Society of Rheology 82nd Annual Meeting, USA: The Society of Rheology.
  • Ramin, L., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2010). Effect of Loading and Shear Rate on Tribological Behaviour of Dodecanethiol Self Assembled Monolayer on AU(111): A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Study. STLE/ASME 2010 International Joint Tribology Conference (IJTC 2010), USA: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2010). Flow-Induced Crystallization: Unravelling the Effects of Shear Rate and Strain. Macromolecules, 43(19), 8136-8142.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Ramin, L. (2010). Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Alkanethiol Self Assembled Monolayers on Au(111): Effects of Loading and Chain Size on Tribology and Film Structure. International Tribology Congress - ASIATRIB 2010, Australia: International Tribology Congress.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2010). Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Flow over a Nano-cylinder in a Rectangular Nano-channel. In M Laudon and B Romanowicz (Eds.), Nanotech Conference & Expo 2010: Technical Proceedings | Vol. 2 Electronics, Devices, Fabrication, MEMS, Fluidics and Computational, (pp. 733-736). Boa Raton: CRC Press.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2010). Separating the effects of shear rate and strain on flow induced crystallization of polymers by large scale molecular simulations. International Soft Matter Conference 2010, Spain: RSC Publishing.

2009

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2009). Crystallization of alkanes under quiescent and shearing conditions. Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics, 160, 99-21. [More Information]
  • Kittipoomwong, P., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., See, H. (2009). Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulation of Particulate Suspensions. 5th Australian-Korean Rheology Conference AKRC 2009, Korea, Republic of: The Korean Society of Rheology.

2008

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2008). Complex Rheology of Molecularly Thin Films and the Role of Surface and Structure. The XVth International Congress On Rheology- The Society of Rheology 80th Annual Meeting, United States of America: American Institute of Physics (AIP).
  • Tanner, R., Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A. (2008). Thin-film lubrication nano-rheology via molecular dynamics. Australian Journal of Mechanical Engineering, 5(1), 43-50.

2007

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Harrowell, P., Tanner, R. (2007). Crystal bridges, tetratic order, and elusive equilibria: The role of structure in lubrication films. The Journal of Physical Chemistry Part B: Condensed Matter, Materials, Surfaces, Interfaces and Biophysical, 111(39), 11354-11365.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2007). Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Crystallization under Quiescent and Shearing Conditions. International Conference on Computational Methods in Science and Engineering 2007 (ICCMSE 2007), Melville, New York United States: American Institute of Physics (AIP).
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Harrowell, P., Tanner, R. (2007). The structural origin of the complex rheology in thin dodecane films: Three routes to low friction. Tribology International, 40(10-12), 1574-1586.

2006

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Harrowell, P., Tanner, R. (2006). Crystal bridge formation marks the transition to rigidity in a thin lubrication film. Physical Review Letters, 96(20), 206102-1-206102-4. [More Information]
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Harrowell, P., Tanner, R. (2006). Low friction lubrication between amorphous walls: Unraveling the contributions of surface roughness and in-plane disorder. Journal of Chemical Physics, 125(3), 034703-1-034703-11.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Tanner, R. (2006). Molecular Dynamics Simulation and its Application to Nano-Rheology. In Bindings D M and Walters K (Eds.), Rheology Reviews, (pp. 165-216). Aberystwyth UK: British Society of Rheology.

2005

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Harrowell, P., Tanner, R. (2005). Very low friction state of a dodecane film confined between mica surfaces. Physical Review Letters, 94(12), 126103-126103-4.

2003

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Atkinson, J., Tanner, R. (2003). A parallel algorithm for molecular dynamics simulation of branched molecules. Computer Physics Communications, 150(2), 65-84.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Atkinson, J., Tanner, R. (2003). Effect of Molecular Shape on Rheological Properties in Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Star, H, Comb and Linear Polymer Melts. Macromolecules, 36(13), 5020-5031.

2002

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Atkinson, J., Tanner, R. (2002). Effect of branching on the lubricant properties: A molecular dynamics study. In D Dowson, M Priest, G Dalmaz, AA Lubrecht (Eds.), Boundary and Mixed Lubrication: Science and Applications, (pp. 231-240). United States: Elsevier.
  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Atkinson, J., Tanner, R. (2002). The effect of branching on slip and rheological properties of lubricants in molecular dynamics simulation of Couette shear flow. Tribology International, 35(1), 35-46.

2001

  • Jabbarzadeh-Khoei, A., Atkinson, J., Tanner, R. (2001). Lubrication processes near wall asperities: a molecular dynamics study. In G. Dalmaz, A.A. Lubrecht, D. Dowson and M. Priest (Eds.), Tribology Research: From model experiment to industrial problem, (pp. 779-785). Netherlands: Academic Press Elsevier.

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