Dr Tatjana Seizova-Cajic

PhD University of New South Wales, MA Belg BPsych (Hons) Belg
Senior Lecturer, Behavioural and Social SciencesSecond Year Coordinator, Bachelor of Health Sciences

C43O - O Block Cumberland Campus
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9351 9190
Fax +61 2 9351 9278

Website Dark Side of Science
Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders

Biographical details

Tatjana studied Psychology at the University of Belgrade, former Yugoslavia, where she completed her BPsych and Masters degree, specializing in perception. She continued to study perception upon her migration to Australia and completed a PhD on spatial vision and vision used in action at the University of New South Wales in 2003.

Tatjana's initial employment at the University of Sydney was at the Faculty of Science, School of Psychology (where she taught perception and research methods), and she is currently at the Faculty of Health Sciences (teaching mainly research methods).

Research interests

Tatjana's own research concerns perception of one's body (somatosensation) and the ways in which vision and somatic senses come together to enable smooth perception of position and movement of ourselves and objects in the environment.

Tatjana is also interested in the application of this research to treatment of clinical conditions where somatosensation and action are impaired.

Teaching and supervision

Tatjana teaches research methods to undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Themes

Clinical and Rehabilitation Sciences

Selected grants

2011

  • Adaptation and after effects in perception of tactile motion; Seizova-Cajic T, Birznieks I; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

2004

  • The role of kinesthetic input from neck muscles in visual perception; Seizova-Cajic T; DVC Research/Research and Development Scheme: Newly Appointed Staff (NAS).

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Taylor, J. (2014). Somatosensory space abridged: Rapid change in tactile localization using a motion stimulus. PLoS One, 9(3), 1-10. [More Information]
  • McIntyre, S., Holcombe, A., Birznieks, I., Seizova-Cajic, T. (2012). Tactile Motion Adaptation Reduces Perceived Speed but Shows No Evidence of Direction Sensitivity. PLoS One, 7(9), 1-12. [More Information]
  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Azzi, R. (2011). Conflict with vision diminishes proprioceptive adaptation to muscle vibration. Experimental Brain Research, 211, 169-175. [More Information]
  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Azzi, R. (2010). A visual distracter task during adaptation reduces the proprioceptive movement aftereffect. Experimental Brain Research, 203(1), 213-219. [More Information]
  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Smith, J., Taylor, J., Gandevia, S. (2009). Perception of movement extent depends on the extent of previous movements. Experimental Brain Research, 195(1), 167-172. [More Information]
  • Holcombe, A., Seizova-Cajic, T. (2008). Illusory motion reversals from unambiguous motion with visual, proprioceptive, and tactile stimuli. Vision Research, 48, 1743-1757.
  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Sachtler, B. (2007). Adaptation of a bimodal integration stage: visual input needed during neck muscle vibration to elicit a motion aftereffect. Experimental Brain Research, 181(1), 117-129. [More Information]
  • McIntyre, S., Seizova-Cajic, T. (2007). Neck muscle vibration in full cues affects pointing. Journal of Vision, 7(5), 9-1-9-8.
  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Smith, J., Taylor, J., Gandevia, S. (2007). Proprioceptive Movement Illusions Due to Prolonged Stimulation: Reversals and Aftereffects. PLoS One, 2(10), e1037 -1-e107 -8.
  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Gillam, B. (2006). Biases in judgements of separation and orientation of elements belonging to different clusters. Vision Research, 46(16), 2525-2534.
  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Curthoys, I., Sachtler, B. (2006). Eye movements cannot explain vibration-induced visual motion and motion aftereffect. Experimental Brain Research, 173(1), 141-152. [More Information]
  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Sachtler, B., Curthoys, I. (2005). Eye movements do not explain visual illusory motion during neck-muscle vibration. Perception, 34, 122-122.
  • Seizova-Cajic, T. (2003). The role of perceived relative position in pointing to objects apparently shifted by depth-contrast. Seeing and Perceiving: an international journal on computation, perception, attention and action (Spatial Vision), 16(3-4), 325-346.
  • Stankov, L., Seizova-Cajic, T., Roberts, R. (2001). Tactile and kinaesthetic perceptual processes within the taxonomy of human cognitive abilities. Intelligence (Kidlington): a multidisciplinary journal, 29, 1-29.

2014

  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Taylor, J. (2014). Somatosensory space abridged: Rapid change in tactile localization using a motion stimulus. PLoS One, 9(3), 1-10. [More Information]

2012

  • McIntyre, S., Holcombe, A., Birznieks, I., Seizova-Cajic, T. (2012). Tactile Motion Adaptation Reduces Perceived Speed but Shows No Evidence of Direction Sensitivity. PLoS One, 7(9), 1-12. [More Information]

2011

  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Azzi, R. (2011). Conflict with vision diminishes proprioceptive adaptation to muscle vibration. Experimental Brain Research, 211, 169-175. [More Information]

2010

  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Azzi, R. (2010). A visual distracter task during adaptation reduces the proprioceptive movement aftereffect. Experimental Brain Research, 203(1), 213-219. [More Information]

2009

  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Smith, J., Taylor, J., Gandevia, S. (2009). Perception of movement extent depends on the extent of previous movements. Experimental Brain Research, 195(1), 167-172. [More Information]

2008

  • Holcombe, A., Seizova-Cajic, T. (2008). Illusory motion reversals from unambiguous motion with visual, proprioceptive, and tactile stimuli. Vision Research, 48, 1743-1757.

2007

  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Sachtler, B. (2007). Adaptation of a bimodal integration stage: visual input needed during neck muscle vibration to elicit a motion aftereffect. Experimental Brain Research, 181(1), 117-129. [More Information]
  • McIntyre, S., Seizova-Cajic, T. (2007). Neck muscle vibration in full cues affects pointing. Journal of Vision, 7(5), 9-1-9-8.
  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Smith, J., Taylor, J., Gandevia, S. (2007). Proprioceptive Movement Illusions Due to Prolonged Stimulation: Reversals and Aftereffects. PLoS One, 2(10), e1037 -1-e107 -8.

2006

  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Gillam, B. (2006). Biases in judgements of separation and orientation of elements belonging to different clusters. Vision Research, 46(16), 2525-2534.
  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Curthoys, I., Sachtler, B. (2006). Eye movements cannot explain vibration-induced visual motion and motion aftereffect. Experimental Brain Research, 173(1), 141-152. [More Information]

2005

  • Seizova-Cajic, T., Sachtler, B., Curthoys, I. (2005). Eye movements do not explain visual illusory motion during neck-muscle vibration. Perception, 34, 122-122.

2003

  • Seizova-Cajic, T. (2003). The role of perceived relative position in pointing to objects apparently shifted by depth-contrast. Seeing and Perceiving: an international journal on computation, perception, attention and action (Spatial Vision), 16(3-4), 325-346.

2001

  • Stankov, L., Seizova-Cajic, T., Roberts, R. (2001). Tactile and kinaesthetic perceptual processes within the taxonomy of human cognitive abilities. Intelligence (Kidlington): a multidisciplinary journal, 29, 1-29.

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