All units

The information on this page originates from the Units of Study Handbook. Always refer to the handbook for the most up to date information.

CONTENTS

Semester 1 Units

Semester 2 Units



Course guides - Important information

This site uses information from the UoS Handbook - for this reason, the handbook is (usually) the best reference for course information.

If there is any discrepancy between the UoS Handbook and the information provided below, the UOS Handbook always takes precedence, unless otherwise advised in writing.

  • The Unit of Study Handbook can be found here.
  • The university's Course Search is available here.

Semester 1

ANAT2008 Principles of Histology

Learning Goals
This Unit of Study examines the structure of human cells, tissues and organ systems at the light and electron microscopic levels. The way the body is constructed from the cellular to the organ levels and how different tissue types contribute and interact in the body are key themes of the course. Gaining an understanding of these themes is the major learning goal. Instruction also includes an introduction to the practical applications of histology and the techniques involved.

 

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this unit the students will have:

  • a thorough understanding of the structure of a range of human cells, tissues and organ systems.
  • a firm basis of knowledge for further in-depth study in human biology.
  • gained an understanding of the application of histology and specific techniques in current research.

 

Information
Faculty: Science
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Offered session(s): 1
Assumed knowledge: General concepts in human biology
Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Junior Biology or Junior Psychology
Prohibitions: ANAT2001

 

Classes
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour practical per week; online and museum exercises (6 hours per week total)

 

Assessment
One 1-hour theory exam, one 1 hour practical exam, four quizzes

 

Textbooks
Ross, MH, Paulina, W. Histology - A Text and Atlas. 6th Edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2011

Course Coordinator

Laura Lindsay
+61 2 9351 2508 - Phone
laural@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room N364, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

ANAT3006 Forensic Osteology

Learning Goals
This course involves the study of the morphology and variation of human skeletal remains and dentition in a legal context. The major aims are:

  1. To gain an understanding of human osteology
  2. To introduce students to the concept of forensic science
  3. To encourage critical thinking
  4. To help students gain skills in observation, rigorous record taking, analysis and interpretation.

 

Learning Outcomes
Students will be assessed on their ability to:

  • Understand the variation in the human skeleton
  • Identify human and non-human bone and detailed features on bones.
  • Write an essay
  • Select the appropriate procedure to determine race, sex, age, stature
  • Carry out the statistical calculations required
  • Interpret and explain results
  • Apply techniques to solve problems involving new case studies

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine (Sydney Medical School)
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Offered session(s): 1
Assumed knowledge: An understanding of basic musculoskeletal anatomy.
Prerequisites: ANAT2008 and a credit in ANAT2009 or in ANAT2002

 

Classes
Two 1-hour lectures, one 2-hour tutorial and one 1-hour practical per week

 

Assessment
One 1.5-hour theory exam, one 30 min. prac exam, continuous assessment, case study

 

Textbooks
Bass, W. Human Osteology: a Laboratory and Field Manual 5th edition. Missouri Archaeological Society Columbia. 2005. 

Course Coordinator

Dr Denise Donlon
+61 2 9351 4529 - Phone
+61 2 9351 6915 - Fax
ddonlon@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room W601, Shellshear Museum - Anderson Stuart Building - F13

ANAT3007 Visceral Anatomy

Learning Goals
Anatomy This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the anatomy of the walls & viscera of the thorax, abdomen & pelvis. Students are encouraged to relate structure to both function & development especially with respect to the important functions of breathing, digestion, excretion & reproduction.

The course also aims to provide both theoretical & practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.

 

Learning Outcomes
At the end of the course participants will be able to/will have:  

  • A knowledge of the anatomy of the viscera & walls (excluding back) of the trunk
  • A general understanding of some of the functions of these structures
  • The ability to locate the structures studied by human dissection
  • Techniques of dissection which can be applied in other areas eg. head & neck and musculoskeletal anatomy

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine (Sydney Medical School)
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Offered session(s): 1
Assumed knowledge: General knowledge of biology.
Prerequisites: ANAT2009 or ANAT2010

 

Classes
Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour practicals per week.

 

Assessment
Theory exam, prac exam, continuous assessment

 

Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi and Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.

Course Coordinator

Robin Arnold
phone: +61 2 9351 3955
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
ra@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S224 - Anderson Stuart Building - F13

BMED2401 Cellular Foundations of Medical Sciences

Learning Goals
This unit of study provides a basis for understanding cell structure and function, and response to drugs. It begins with a discussion of the characteristics of micro-organisms (bacteria, fungi and viruses) followed by the structure and function of human cells.

Basic cell structure is examined by focussing on cell specialization and tissue organization in humans. The fundamentals of metabolism are introduced, in particular, the chemical reactions that are responsible for fuel processing. The molecular basis of drug action will then be discussed.

Students will be introduced to the role of enzymes in the catalysis of cellular reactions and the pharmacological strategies employed to exploit our knowledge of these mechanisms. Intracellular signalling, cell to cell signalling, and pharmacological intervention in these processes are covered. To conclude this unit of study gives an introduction into embryology and how gene expression is regulated during development.

Practical classes not only complement the lecture material but also introduce students to a wide range of technical skills. In addition, the sessions are also designed to provide students with generic skills such as record keeping, data collection and presentation, protocol planning and written communication.

 

Learning Outcomes
At the end of the course participants will be able to/will have:  

  • Gain an understanding of the cellular basics of medical science, through study at the macroscopic, microscopic and molecular level
  • Analyze normal cell structure and function through an integration of knowledge from microbiology, histology, biochemistry and pharmacology
  • Attain a working knowledge of the structure and function of eukaryotes, prokaryotes and viruses
  • Correlate the microscopic structure of cells to biochemical cellular processes
  • Achieve a basic knowledge of drug structure and function
  • Use the terminology of these disciplines, in order to facilitate communication
  • Apply theoretical knowledge to qualitative and quantitative analysis in practical settings

 

Information
Faculty: Science (with the cooperation of the Faculty of Medicine)
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology, Biochemistry, Pharmacology, Microbiology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Offered session(s): 1
Prerequisites: 42 credit points of junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study.
Prohibitions: All Intermediate level units offered by the Schools of Molecular Bioscience, Medical Sciences and BIOL(2006/2906) and BIOL(2016/2916), IMMU2101, BMED2801, BMED2802

 

Classes
Two 1 hour lectures per week; 2-3 hours of practical or tutorial classes per week.

 

Assessment
One 2 hour theory exam (60%); two in-semester assessments (40%).

 

Textbooks

  1. BIOCHEMISTRY Biochemistry - Garret RH and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 6th Edition, 2009
    OR
    BIOCHEMISTRY Biochemistry - Garret RH and Grisham CM, Thomson Brooks Cole, 5th Edition, 2012
  2. MICROBIOLOGY Prescott’s Microbiology - Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ, McGraw-Hill, 8th Edition, 2010
  3. PHARMACOLOGY Medical Pharmacology at a Glance - Neal MJ, Blackwell Science, 6th Edition, 2009
  4. REFERENCES
    The following textbooks are recommended as useful references but not required directly for the course.
    1. Clinically Oriented Anatomy - Moore KL and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th edition, 2009
    2. Grant’s Atlas of Anatomy - Agur AM and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 11th Edition, 2005
    3. Robbins Basic Pathology - Kumar V, Cotran KS and Robbins SL, Saunders, Philadelphia, 8th Edition, 2008
Course Coordinator

Dr Suzanne Ollerenshaw
phone: +61 2 9351 2838
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
slo@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S318, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

BMED2402 Nerve and Muscle

Learning Goals
This unit of study begins with a description and analysis of the basic anatomical organization of the musculoskeletal and nervous (central and peripheral) systems. The structure and function of excitable cells, muscle and nerve, will lead to a discussion of membrane potential, synaptic transmission and neuromuscular junction.

After consideration of the mechanisms of contraction, the way in which nerve signals are integrated and coordinated are covered in more detail. The receptors involved in normal modes of communications are discussed. This is complemented by discussion of the effects of drugs on the nervous system, with special reference to pain and analgesics. An appreciation is gained of how toxins and infections can disturb the normal neuromuscular coordination. Thus, pharmacological and pathological considerations are studied with relevance to the physiological concepts. Various senses such as vision and hearing are introduced.

In practical classes, students perform experiments to illustrate the functioning of motor control, coordination and the senses. In addition, students extend their anatomical and histological expertise by examining prosections and prepared microscope slides. Practical classes also include the effects of analgesics on experimental pain and case studies of tetanus and botulism.

 

Learning Outcomes
At the end of the course participants will be able to/will have:  

  • Use professional terminology for describing the structure and function of the human nervous and musculoskeletal systems
  • Recognise and describe the structural and functional organization of the human nervous and musculoskeletal systems and relate structural features of these systems with their function
  • Explain the anatomical and histological differences between the central and peripheral nervous systems
  • Identify, name, classify and discuss anatomical and histological features of the human central and peripheral nervous systems, bones, cartilage, joints and muscles of the upper and lower limbs
  • Draw anatomical features of the central and peripheral nervous systems, limbs and joints
  • Identify, describe and differentiate neurotransmitters of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems and their effects on target organs, and describe how drugs are used to modify autonomic nervous system function
  • Recognise and differentiate histological and functional aspects of smooth, skeletal and cardiac muscle fibres
  • Classify and describe the different types of muscle contraction
  • Describe the structure and function of excitable cells, both muscle and nerve, and explain the role of their features in the membrane potential, synaptic transmission, and mechanisms of contraction at the neuromuscular junction; explain how nerve signals are integrated and coordinated
  • Describe the role of microbes in diseases of the nervous system and explain the effects of selected microbes on nervous system function
  • Explain the structural and functional organization of the central and peripheral pain pathways and the mechanisms of action of drugs that modify the sensation of pain
  • Predict how changes in physiological variables affect nerve and muscle function at the cellular, organ and behavioural levels

 

Information
Faculty: Science (with the cooperation of the Faculty of Medicine)
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology, Biochemistry, Pharmacology, Microbiology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Offered session(s): 1
Prerequisites: 42 credit points of junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study.
Prohibitions: BMED2806, IMMU2101

 

Classes
Two 1 hour lectures per week; 2-3 hours of practical or tutorial classes per week.

 

Assessment
One 2 hour theory exam (60%); two in-semester assessments (40%).

 

Textbooks

  1. ANATOMY The Anatomy Coloring Book -3rd Edition, Kapit. W. and Elson. L. M. 2001.
  2. MICROBIOLOGY Prescott’s Microbiology - Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ, McGraw-Hill, 8th Edition, 2010
  3. PHARMACOLOGY Medical Pharmacology at a Glance - Neal MJ, Blackwell Science, 6th Edition, 2009
  4. PHYSIOLOGY Human Physiology: An integrated approach - Silverthorn D, Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 5th Edition, 2010
  5. REFERENCES
    The following textbooks are recommended as useful references but not required directly for the course.
    1. Clinically Oriented Anatomy - Moore KL and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th edition, 2009
    2. Grant’s Atlas of Anatomy - Agur AM and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 11th Edition, 2005
    3. Robbins Basic Pathology - Kumar V, Cotran KS and Robbins SL, Saunders, Philadelphia, 8th Edition, 2008
Course Coordinator

Dr Tina Hinton
phone: +61 2 9351 6208
fax: +61 2 9351 3868
tina.hinton@sydney.edu.au
Room 294, Blackburn building - D06

BMED2403 Cardiovascular and respiratory systems

Learning Goals
This unit of study focus is on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems and the many homeostatic processes responsible for the maintenance of constant conditions in the human body. The structure and function of the cardiovascular system is discussed and cardiac output, blood pressure and blood flow are studied. This is complemented by discussion of cardiovascular pathology and pharmacological intervention.

Discussion of the respiratory system includes the structure of the respiratory organs, the mechanics of breathing, control of respiration, and description of the mechanism of gas exchange. Specifically, the actions of drugs for asthma are discussed and the pathology of obstructive versus restrictive airways disease examined. The unit of study then extends the students learning to pathogenic microbes involved in infectious diseases of the respiratory system.

Practical classes are designed to nurture the same generic attributes taught in BMED2401 and BMED2402 but, in addition, students are introduced to a wider range of technical skills.

 

Learning Outcomes
At the end of the course participants will be able to/will have:  

  • have a detailed knowledge of the structure and function of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems
  • understand how certain diseases of these systems arise
  • distinguish between organic and infectious diseases
  • understand the rationale for different treatments
  • be aware of how relevant physiological variables are measured
  • be able to predict how homeostasis of these variables is achieved

 

Information
Faculty: Science (with the cooperation of the Faculty of Medicine)
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology, Biochemistry, Pathology, Pharmacology, Physiology, Microbiology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Offered session(s): 1
Prerequisites: 42 credit points of junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study.
Prohibitions: All Intermediate level units offered by the Schools of Molecular Bioscience, Medical Sciences and BIOL(2006/2906) and BIOL(2016/2916), BMED2803, IMMU2101

 

Classes
Two 1 hour lectures per week; 2-3 hours of practical or tutorial classes per week.

 

Assessment
One 2 hour theory exam (60%); two in-semester assessments (40%).

 

Textbooks

  1. ANATOMY The Anatomy Coloring Book -3rd Edition, Kapit. W. and Elson. L. M. 2001.
  2. MICROBIOLOGY Prescott’s Microbiology - Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ, McGraw-Hill, 8th Edition, 2010
  3. PHARMACOLOGY Medical Pharmacology at a Glance - Neal MJ, Blackwell Science, 6th Edition, 2009
  4. PHYSIOLOGY Human Physiology: An integrated approach - Silverthorn D, Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 5th Edition, 2010
  5. REFERENCES
    The following textbooks are recommended as useful references but not required directly for the course.
    1. Clinically Oriented Anatomy - Moore KL and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th edition, 2009
    2. Grant’s Atlas of Anatomy - Agur AM and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 11th Edition, 2005
    3. Robbins Basic Pathology - Kumar V, Cotran KS and Robbins SL, Saunders, Philadelphia, 8th Edition, 2008
Course Coordinator

Dr Miriam Frommer
phone: +61 2 9351 2720
fax: +61 2 9351 2058
miriam.frommer@sydney.edu.au
Room E216, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

THEORY
HSTO3001 Microscopy & Histochemistry (co-requisite HSTO3002)

Learning Goals
The aims of this unit of study are to provide a theoretical understanding of why biological tissues need to be specifically prepared for microscopic examination, how differing methods yield different types of morphological information; to allow students to study the theory of different types & modalities of microscopes, how they function & the differing information they provide; to develop an understanding of the theory of why biological material needs to be stained for microscopic examination; to allow students to understand how biological material becomes stained; to develop an understanding of the chemical information provided by biological staining - dyes, enzymes & antibodies.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Anatomy & Histology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Offered session(s): 1
Co-requisite: HSTO3002
Prerequisites: Credit or better grade in ANAT2008. For BMedSci: Credit average in (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or Credit average in (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806 and BMED2804).

 

Classes
Usually four 1-hour lectures per week plus some tutorials


Assessment
One 2-hour theory exam.


Textbooks
Keirnan, J.A. Histological & Histochemical Methods. 4th edition. Scion. 2008.

Course Coordinator(s)

Robin Arnold
phone: +61 2 9351 3955
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
ra@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S224 - Anderson Stuart Building - F13


Professor Christopher Murphy
phone: +61 2 9351 4128
fax: +61 2 9351 4195
histology@medsci.usyd.edu.au
Room N366, Lab N364, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

PRACTICAL
HSTO3002 Microscopy & Histochemistry (co-requisite HSTO3001, permission required)

Learning Goals
The aims of this unit of study are to provide a theoretical understanding of why biological tissues need to be specifically prepared for microscopic examination, how differing methods yield different types of morphological information; to allow students to study the theory of different types & modalities of microscopes, how they function & the differing information they provide; to develop an understanding of the theory of why biological material needs to be stained for microscopic examination; to allow students to understand how biological material becomes stained; to develop an understanding of the chemical information provided by biological staining - dyes, enzymes & antibodies.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Anatomy & Histology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Corequisites: HSTO3001
Prerequisites: Credit grade or better in ANAT2008. For BMedSci: Credit average in (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or Credit average in (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806 and BMED2804).

 

Classes
Usually 5.5 hours practical per week

 

Assessment
One 1.5 hour practical exam, 1 practical report, essay.

 

Textbooks
Keirnan, JA. Histological & Histochemical Methods 3rd Edition. Butterworth-Heinmann. 1999.

Course Coordinator(s)

Robin Arnold
phone: +61 2 9351 3955
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
ra@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S224 - Anderson Stuart Building - F13


Professor Christopher Murphy
phone: +61 2 9351 4128
fax: +61 2 9351 4195
histology@medsci.usyd.edu.au
Room N366, Lab N364, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

NEUR3001 Neuroscience: Special Senses

Learning Goals
The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system and to the main concepts of processing of sensory information. Understanding basic sensory transduction mechanisms and the function of the sensory systems is necessary to understand how perceptual processes work in normal and disease conditions and provides a gateway to unravel the complexity of the mind. Basic aspects of low and high level sensory processing in all sense modalities will be covered, with a special emphasis in the auditory and visual systems. The relationship between sensory systems, perception and higher cognitive functions will be addressed.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Physiology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Prerequisites: For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or( BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806) For other students: (PHSI2101 or PHSI2001 or PHSI2901 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or ANAT2003 or ANAT2010) and 6 credit points of MBLG.
Prohibitions: PHSI3001, NEUR3901

 

Classes
Two 1 hour lectures per week; one 3 hour practical per fortnight and one 3 hour tutorial per fortnight.

 

Assessment
Two 1 hour exams, one prac report

 

Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2000 or Bear, Connors, Paradiso. Neuroscience: Exploring the brain. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 2001

Course Coordinator

Dr Vladimir Balcar
phone: +61 2 9351 2837
lab: +61 2 9351 4035
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
vibar@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S419, Lab W423, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

ADVANCED
NEUR3901 Neuroscience: Special Senses Advanced (permission required)

Learning Goals
This unit of study is an extension of NEUR3001 for talented students with an interest in Neuroscience and research in this field. The lecture/practical component of the course is run in conjunction with NEUR3001.

The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system and to the main concepts of processing of sensory information. Understanding basic sensory transduction mechanisms and the function of the sensory systems is necessary to understand how perceptual processes work in normal and disease conditions and provides a gateway to unravel the complexity of the mind.

Basic aspects of low and high level sensory processing in all sense modalities will be covered, with a special emphasis in the auditory and visual systems. The relationship between sensory systems, perception and higher cognitive functions will be addressed.

Permission from the coordinators is required for entry into this course. It is strongly recommended that students also take unit NEUR3002 or NEUR3902.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Physiology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Prerequisites: For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED including Credit average in (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806) For other students: Credit average in (PHSI2101 or PHSI2001 or PHSI2901 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or ANAT2003 or ANAT2010) and 6 credit points of MBLG.
Prohibitions: NEUR3001, PHSI3001, PHSI3901

 

Classes
Two 1 hour lecture per week; one 3 hour practical per fortnight and one 3 hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students may be exempt from attending some of these classes to permit meetings with supervisor.

 

Assessment
Two 1 hour exams, one prac report, tutorial papers, one research or library essay (research essay will replace some other assessment items from regular course).

 

Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2000 or Bear, Connors, Paradiso. Neuroscience: Exploring the brain. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 2001

Course Coordinator

Dr Vladimir Balcar
phone: +61 2 9351 2837
lab: +61 2 9351 4035
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
vibar@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S419, Lab W423, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

NEUR3002 Neuroscience: Motor Systems & Behaviour

Learning Goals
The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Our current knowledge of how the brain works is based on the analysis of the normal structure of the nervous system and its pathways, the functional effects of lesions and neurological diseases in different parts of the nervous system, and the way that nerve cells work at the molecular, cellular and integrative level. This course focuses on to the neural circuits and the mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions. The lecture series addresses the different topics, each of which offers special insight into the function of the nervous system in health and disease.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Physiology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: It is strongly recommended that students also take unit NEUR3001. ANAT2010 and PHSI2005 is assumed knowledge.
Prerequisites: For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806) For other students: (PHSI2101 or PHSI2001 or PHSI2901 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or ANAT2003 or ANAT2010) and 6 credit points of MBLG.
Prohibitions: PHSI3001, NEUR3902

 

Classes
Two 1 hour lectures per week, one 3 hour practical per fortnight and one 3 hour tutorial per fortnight.


Assessment
Two 1 hour exams, neuroanatomy practical test, prac report, paper discussion sessions, library essay.


Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2000 or Bear, Connors, Paradiso. Neuroscience: Exploring the brain. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 2001 Nolte. The Human Brain. 4th Ed, C.V. Mosby Co., St Louis, Washington D.C., Toronto, 1999

Course Coordinator

Dr Vladimir Balcar
phone: +61 2 9351 2837
lab: +61 2 9351 4035
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
vibar@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S419, Lab W423, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

ADVANCED
NEUR3902 - Neuroscience: Motor Systems & Behaviour Advanced (permission required)

Learning Goals
This unit of study is an extension of NEUR3002 for talented students with an interest in Neuroscience and research in this field. The lecture/practical component of the course is run in conjunction with NEUR3002. The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Our current knowledge of how the brain works is based on the analysis of the normal structure of the nervous system and its pathways, the functional effects of lesions and neurological diseases in different parts of the nervous system, and the way that nerve cells work at the molecular, cellular and integrative level.

This course focuses on to the neural circuits and the mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions. The lecture series addresses the different topics, each of which offers special insight into the function of the nervous system in health and disease.

Permission from the coordinators is required for entry into this course. It is strongly recommended that students also take unit NEUR3001 or NEUR3901.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Physiology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Prerequisites: For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED including Credit average in (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806) For other students: Credit average in (PHSI(2101 or 2001 or 2901 or 2005 or 2905) or ANAT(2003 or 2010)) and 6 credit points of MBLG.
Prohibitions: NEUR3002, PHSI3001

Classes
Two 1 hour lectures per week, one 3 hour practical per fortnight and one 3 hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students may be exempt from attending some of these classes to permit meetings with supervisor.

 

Assessment
Two 1 hour exams, neuroanatomy practical test, prac report, paper discussion sessions, one research or review essay (research essay will replace some other assessment items from regular course).

 

Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel. Principles of Neural Science. 4th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2000 or Bear, Connors, Paradiso. Neuroscience: Exploring the brain. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 2001 Nolte. The Human Brain. 4th Ed, C.V. Mosby Co., St Louis, Washington D.C., Toronto, 1999

Course Coordinator

Dr Vladimir Balcar
phone: +61 2 9351 2837
lab: +61 2 9351 4035
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
vibar@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S419, Lab W423, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

Semester 2

ANAT2009 Comparative Primate Anatomy (permission required)

Learning Goals

  1. To gain an understanding of human anatomy. The skull and central nervous system will be introduced but there will be an emphasis on musculo-skeletal anatomy.
  2. To introduce theories of human evolution.
  3. To present a comparative approach to human anatomy by examining the similarities and differences in human and other primate anatomy (especially pongids/apes.)
  4. To use the above knowledge obtained to understand the unique physical adaptations of modern humans.
  5. To encourage critical thinking - especially with regard to human origins.
  6. To encourage the ability to make testable predictions of function based on structural observations.

This unit of student covers the musculo-skeletal anatomy of the human body with particular emphasis on human evolution and comparisons with apes and fossil hominids. The topics covered include the versatility of the human hand, in manipulation and locomotion, bipedalism, climbing and brachiation in apes, and the change in pelvic anatomy associated with bipedalism and obstetric consequences.

 

Learning Outcomes
Students will be assessed on their ability to:

  1. Identify human, ape and fossil bones and joints.
  2. Identify detailed features on bones.
  3. Identify human muscles.
  4. Identify major structures of the human central nervous system.
  5. To have an understanding of the differences between the human and ape anatomy and relate these to differences in forms of locomotion and in manipulation.
  6. Show an understanding of the theories of human evolution.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of basic vertebrate biology
Prerequisites: 36 credit points, including 12 credit points of Junior Biology (BIOL) or Junior Psychology or Junior Archaeology.
Prohibitions: ANAT2002

 

Classes
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour practical per week.

 


Assessment
One 1-hour theory exam, one 30 min prac exam, two quizzes.

 

Textbooks

  1. Kapit, W and Elson, LM The Anatomy Coloring Book. Addison-Wesley. 2001.
  2. References (optional)
    The following textbooks are recommended as useful references but not required directly for the course.
    1. Aiello, L, Dean, C. An Introduction to Human Evolutionary Anatomy. Academic Press. 1990. Zilman, AL.
    2. The Human Evolution Coloring Book. Barnes and Noble, Sydney. 1982.
Course Coordinator

Dr Denise Donlon
+61 2 9351 4529 - Phone
+61 2 9351 6915 - Fax
ddonlon@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room W601, Shellshear Museum - Anderson Stuart Building - F13

ANAT2010 Concepts of Neuroanatomy

Learning Goals
This unit of study aims to introduce students to the characteristics and essential structure of the cells which comprise the central nervous system (CNS).

Based on an understanding of the organization of its constituents, students will also be introduced to the principles of brain organization, with specific reference to the evolution of the 'higher' centres in primates.

Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function (memory). In essence, the course covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain and its different areas. The practicals offer students the unique opportunity to examine specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying science and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.

 

Learning Outcomes

  • understand the differences between and interdependence of neurons and glia.
  • recognize the differences between sensory neurons, motor neurons, and interneurons in the brain and spinal cord.
  • understand the significance of excitatory and inhibitory functions of neurons.
  • understand the essential features of sensory and motor pathways in the brain and spinal cord.
  • understand the significance of the evolution of cerebral cortex in primates and the consequences of cortical degeneration.

 

Note

  • This UoS is recommended for students undertaking the BSc (Neuroscience)
  • Students planning to enrol in NEUR3001 - NEUR3004 are stongly advised to complete ANAT2010

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: Background in basic cell biology and basic mammalian biology.
Prerequisites: BIOL (1003 or 1903) and one of: ANAT2008 or BIOL (1002 or 1902) or MBLG(1001 or 1901 or 2071 or 2971) or PSYC (1001 and 1002). Students must have a grade of credit in at least one of the prerequisite units.
Prohibitions: ANAT2003

 

Classes
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour practical per week.

 

Assessment
One 1.5-hour theory exam, one 1 hour practical exam, 2000 word essay, practical reports

 

Textbooks

  1. Bear, MF, Connors, BW, Paradiso, MA. Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. 3rd edition. Williams and Wilkins. 2006.
  2. Recommended: The following textbook is recommended but not required.
    • Nolte J, Angevine JJB. The Human Brain in Photographs and Diagrams. Mosby/Elsevier. 2007.

 

Course Coordinator

Dr Karen Cullen
phone: +61 2 9351 2696
lab: +61 2 9351 2436
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
kcullen@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S464/W114-W117 - Anderson Stuart Building - F13

ANAT3004 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy

Learning Goals
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves.

This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. Tutorials are designed to encourage students to develop their own approach to the understanding and organisation of subject material. Communication of key concepts and presentation of subject material in an academic context are encouraged and assessed in a major assignment.

 

Learning Outcomes
At the end of the unit of study students should:

  • know the territories innervated by, and the functional anatomy of, the cranial nerves.
  • know the bones of the skull and their significant markings and be able to use these to describe the distinctive features of skulls representative of different groups.
  • be able to identify muscles, nerves and blood vessels of the region and to describe their functional significance.
  • understand the anatomical specializations of the human visual and vocal apparatus.

 

Note
Students having taken and ANAT2010 (Concepts in Neuroanatomy) and/or NEUR 3001/2 (Neuroscience) will find this UoS enhances their understanding/knowledge of the peripheral distribution of the cranial nerves

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: General knowledge of biology.
Prerequisites: ANAT2009 or ANAT2010. For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED at Credit average including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806)
Prohibitions: ANAT3904

 

Classes
Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week.

 

Assessment
Theory exam, prac exam, continuous assessment

 

Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.

Course Coordinator

Robin Arnold
phone: +61 2 9351 3955
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
ra@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S224 - Anderson Stuart Building - F13

ANAT3008 Musculoskeletal Anatomy

Learning Goals
This unit of study aims to provide an opportunity for students to study the topographical and systems anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and the back regions. Emphasis is placed upon the identification and description of structures and the correlation of structure with function, which for the upper limb includes its role in manipulation, for the lower limb standing and walking and for the back flexible support and protection. Emphasis is also given to the innervation of the limbs and the consequences of nerve lesions for limb function.

The unit also aims to develop the general skills of observation, description, drawing, writing and discussion as applying to biological structure. The unit builds upon or compliments other macroscopic anatomy units offered by the Department and provides for the development of skills which could be relevant to a later honours project or higher degree in the field of stuctural biology.

 

Learning Outcomes
Students who successfully complete the unit should be able to identify, describe and discuss the major structures of the limbs and back as set out in the lecture objectives and the tutorial notes.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: A knowledge of the subject of anatomy, including practical class experience, and some knowledge of basic mammalian biology.
Prerequisites: ANAT2009 or ANAT2002 (for students who completed Intermediate study before 2005). For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED at Credit average including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806).
Prohibitions: ANAT3005

 

Classes
Two 1-hour lectures, two 2-hour tutorials/practicals per week.

 

Assessment
One 30 minute practical examination and one 90 minute theory examination, no assignment.

Course Coordinator

Dr Richard Ward
phone: +61 2 9351 4320
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
rward@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room E315, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

ANAT3904 Cranial & Cervical Anatomy (Advanced)

NOTES

  1. Department permission required for enrolment.
  2. Course is subject to availability of donor material for dissection.


Learning Goals

This unit of study is an alternative to ANAT3004 Cranial & Cervical for talented students with a special interest in and need for dissection experience. The lecture/tutorial component of the course is run in conjunction with ANAT3004.

Students in the advanced course will study the anatomy of the skull, muscles of face, jaw and neck, eye, ear, nose oral cavity, larynx and pharynx as well as the peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the neck. Dissection will allow students to find these structures in donated human cadavers for themselves and to study and to understand at least some of the many anomalies and variations which characterise human cranial and cervical anatomy.

 

Information

Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study Load : 6 credit points, EFTSL: 0.125
Department permission required for enrolment in the following session(s): 2
Practical/Field Work: One 3-hour dissection per week
Assessment: Theory exam, practical spot test, participation in dissection practicals and production of detailed weekly reports of the dissection carried out that week (100%)
Prerequisites: Available to BSc students only. By invitation only. Requires a credit average in ANAT3007 plus a demonstrated aptitude for practical work. Emphasis in selecting for invitation is placed on results in practical performance, marks and quizzes in ANAT3007.
Prohibitions: ANAT3004


Classes

Two lectures per week, one 1-hour tutorial per week. Practical work: One 3-hour dissection per week.

 

Assessment

Theory exam, practical spot test, participation in dissection practicals and production of detailed weekly reports of the dissection carried out that week (100%).

 

Textbooks

An Anatomy atlas such as Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Colour Atlas of Human Anatomy.

Course Coordinator

Robin Arnold
Lecturer
+61 2 9351 3955 - Phone
+61 2 9351 2813 - Fax
ra@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S224 - Anderson Stuart Building - F13

BMED2404 Microbes, infection and immunity

Learning Goals
This unit of study begins by introducing the concepts of disease transmission, pathogenicity and virulence mechanisms of microbes. For a full understanding of the process of infection, the structure and function of pathogenic microorganisms is examined. How the body deals with injury and infection is discussed by exploring barriers to infection and host response once those barriers are breached. The body’s response to such physical damage is dealt with in a series of lectures on wound healing, clotting and inflammation, and is complemented by discussion of the pharmacological basis of anti-inflammatory drugs.

This is followed by a comprehensive discussion of molecular and cellular immune responses to pathogen invasion. In particular, this gives students an appreciation of the processing of antigens, the structure, production and diversity of antibodies, the operation of the complement system and mechanisms for recognition and destruction of invading microbes.

The unit concludes with an overview of microbial diseases, the characteristics of causative agents, pathogenesis and symptoms as well as treatment and control and culminates with exploring current issues of antibiotic resistance, important emerging infections and vaccination strategies.

Practical classes illustrate and underpin the lecture content. Students will investigate normal flora, host defences and medically important microbes and will obtain experience in, and an understanding of, a range of techniques in bacteriology.

 

Learning Outcomes
At the end of the course participants will be able to/will have:  

  • develop an appreciation and understanding of the impact of microbial disease on global human health
  • be able to describe, with specific examples, the dynamic nature of the symbiosis spectrum existing in the relationship between microbes and humans
  • have a detailed knowledge of non-specific host defences, particularly the role of normal flora, physical barriers and inflammation, that function to protect against injury and infection
  • be able to explain the relationship between maintaining well-being and these defences
  • be able to discuss the functions, diversity and features of medically-significant microbes, with use of specific examples
  • have a detailed knowledge of the characteristics of bacterial, viral and fungal replication and virulence mechanisms and their role in invasion, establishment and progression of infection in the human host
  • be able to explain the way in which the human body mounts an adaptive response to injury and infection
  • be able to explain in detail how intracellular microbes are recognised and eradicated for successful recovery and long term protection from infection
  • be able to explain in detail how extracellular microbes are recognised and eradicated for successful recovery and long term protection from infection
  • to appreciate that understanding the mechanisms of how the adaptive immune response responds to infection underpins the design of successful immunisation strategies
  • be able to explain in detail, using specific illustrative examples, how immunisation serves as an effective infection preventive strategy
  • have developed a practical dexterity in and detailed knowledge and understanding of microbiological, viral and serological laboratory processes as a basis for the identification and successful treatment of microbial infections

 

Information
Faculty: Science (with the cooperation of the Faculty of Medicine)
Discipline: Infectious diseases/Immunology, Microbiology, Pathology, Pharmacology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Offered session(s): 1
Prerequisites: 42 credit points of junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study.
Prohibitions: All Intermediate level units offered by the Schools of Molecular Bioscience, Medical Sciences and BIOL(2006/2906) and BIOL(2016/2916), IMMU2101, BMED2807

 

Classes
Two 1 hour lectures per week; 2-3 hours of practical or tutorial classes per week.

 

Assessment
One 2 hour theory exam (60%); two in-semester assessments (40%).

 

Textbooks

  1. MICROBIOLOGY Prescott’s Microbiology - Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ, McGraw-Hill, 8th Edition, 2010
  2. PHARMACOLOGY Medical Pharmacology at a Glance - Neal MJ, Blackwell Science, 6th Edition, 2009
  3. IMMUNOLOGY Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of the Immune System - Abass AK and Lichtman AH, WB Saunders, 2nd Edition updated, 2006
Course Coordinator

Helen Agus
phone: +61 2 9351 6043
fax: +61 2 9351 5858
helen.agus@sydney.edu.au
Room 533, Molecular Bioscience building - G08

BMED2405 Gut and nutrient metabolism

Learning Goals
This unit of study examines in detail the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract, from the oral cavity to anal canal, and includes the liver, gallbladder and pancreas. This is complemented by description of the specialised cells in the gastrointestinal tract. This is followed by discussion of the transport mechanisms employed to absorb nutrients, and consideration of control systems used to regulate activity of the digestive process. The role of intestinal microflora in the gastrointestinal tract, contributing to both beneficial digestion and absorption of nutrients, as well as to pathogenic disruption, is also discussed.

The pharmacokinetic perspective is explored with discussion of the metabolism and absorption of drugs including detoxification and excretion of xenobiotic compounds. The fate of the macronutrients (carbohydrate, fat and protein) is then considered in terms of their uptake, disposal and reassembly into storage fuels and cellular structures. The biochemical pathways involved in the extraction of energy from the macronutrient fuels are then covered.

Examples of these metabolic processes are provided by considering fuel selection during starvation and in diabetes. Practical classes give students extensive experience with inspection of the gastrointestinal system at both the cellular and gross anatomical levels. The biochemical influences are explored.

These sessions are designed to nurture observation, data analysis, record keeping and report writing skills.

 

Information
Faculty: Science (with the cooperation of the Faculty of Medicine)
Discipline: Infectious diseases/Immunology, Microbiology, Pathology, Pharmacology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Offered session(s): 1
Prerequisites: 42 credit points of junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study.
Prohibitions: All Intermediate level units offered by the Schools of Molecular Bioscience, Medical Sciences and BIOL(2006/2906) and BIOL(2016/2916), IMMU2101, BMED2804

 

Classes
Two 1 hour lectures per week; 2-3 hours of practical or tutorial classes per week.

 

Assessment
One 2 hour theory exam (60%); two in-semester assessments (40%).

 

Textbooks

  1. ANATOMY The Anatomy Coloring Book -3rd Edition, Kapit. W. and Elson. L. M. 2001.
  2. BIOCHEMISTRY Biochemistry - Garret RH and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 6th Edition, 2009
    OR
    BIOCHEMISTRY Biochemistry - Garret RH and Grisham CM, Thomson Brooks Cole, 5th Edition, 2012
  3. MICROBIOLOGY Prescott’s Microbiology - Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ, McGraw-Hill, 8th Edition, 2010
  4. PHARMACOLOGY Medical Pharmacology at a Glance - Neal MJ, Blackwell Science, 6th Edition, 2009
  5. PHYSIOLOGY Human Physiology: An integrated approach - Silverthorn D, Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 5th Edition, 2010
  6. REFERENCES
    The following textbooks are recommended as useful references but not required directly for the course.
    1. Clinically Oriented Anatomy - Moore KL and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th edition, 2009
    2. Grant’s Atlas of Anatomy - Agur AM and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 11th Edition, 2005
    3. Robbins Basic Pathology - Kumar V, Cotran KS and Robbins SL, Saunders, Philadelphia, 8th Edition, 2008
Course Coordinator

Dr Vanessa Gysbers
phone: +61 2 9351 1910
fax: +61 2 9351 5858
vanessa.gysbers@sydney.edu.au
Room 773a, Molecular Bioscience building - G08

BMD2406 Hormones, kidney and reproduction

Learning Goals
This unit of study examines hormonal regulation of human body functions, including metabolism, growth and development, tissue function, and mood. Specifically, students will investigate the structure and function of endocrine glands, such as the pituitary, adrenal, thyroid and pancreas, at the cellular and gross anatomical level. The fundamentals of the feedback systems which are mediated via the hypothalamus and pituitary gland are discussed, in particular, the adrenal, gonadal and thyroid axes.

Students will then cover the structure and function of the renal system at both the cellular and gross anatomical level. The fundamental homeostatic processes of the kidney, such as acid-base regulation and how the kidneys are involved in maintenance of constant conditions in the human body, are explored. Homeostatic processes, such as pH and acid-base regulation of extracellular fluid, are discussed.

This unit of study gives an introduction to the reproductive system, at both the anatomical and histological level. The hormones involved in reproduction, contraception, fertilization and pregnancy are discussed, leading on to an overview of pharmacological interventions in contraception.

In the practical classes, specifically, students will investigate the structure and function of the endocrine glands, and perform a glucose tolerance test to investigate how glucose levels are regulated. In addition, sessions are designed to nurture oral presentation skills, hypothesis testing and data analysis.

 

Learning Outcomes

  • have a detailed knowledge of the structure and function of the endocrine and reproductive and renal systems
  • understand how certain diseases of these systems arise
  • distinguish between diseases of over- and under-secretion
  • understand the rationale for different treatments
  • recognize the crucial hormonal events of pregnancy
  • understand sensitivity and specificity as illustrated in pregnancy tests

 

Information
Faculty: Science (with the cooperation of the Faculty of Medicine)
Discipline: Anatomy & Histology, Physiology, Microbiology, Pharmacology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Offered session(s): 1
Prerequisites: 42 credit points of junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study.
Prohibitions: All Intermediate level units offered by the Schools of Molecular Bioscience, Medical Sciences and BIOL(2006/2906) and BIOL(2016/2916), BMED2805, IMMU2101

 

Classes
Two 1 hour lectures per week; 2-3 hours of practical or tutorial classes per week.

 

Assessment
One 2 hour theory exam (60%); two in-semester assessments (40%).

 

Textbooks

  1. ANATOMY The Anatomy Coloring Book -3rd Edition, Kapit. W. and Elson. L. M. 2001.
  2. MICROBIOLOGY Prescott’s Microbiology - Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ, McGraw-Hill, 8th Edition, 2010
  3. PHARMACOLOGY Medical Pharmacology at a Glance - Neal MJ, Blackwell Science, 6th Edition, 2009
  4. PHYSIOLOGY Human Physiology: An integrated approach - Silverthorn D, Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 5th Edition, 2010
  5. REFERENCES
    The following textbooks are recommended as useful references but not required directly for the course.
    1. Clinically Oriented Anatomy - Moore KL and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th edition, 2009
    2. Grant’s Atlas of Anatomy - Agur AM and Dalley AF, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 11th Edition, 2005
    3. Robbins Basic Pathology - Kumar V, Cotran KS and Robbins SL, Saunders, Philadelphia, 8th Edition, 2008
Course Coordinator

Dr Miriam Frommer
phone: +61 2 9351 2720
fax: +61 2 9351 2058
miriam.frommer@sydney.edu.au
Room E216, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

THEORY
EMHU3001 Electron Microscopy and Imaging (co-requisite of EMHU3002)

Learning Goals
The course is run conjointly by the Department of Anatomy and Histology and the Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis (ACMM). The course will focus on the theoretical aspects of transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the preparation of biological samples for electron microscopy and digital imaging. Immunological and other techniques will also be covered. Students will receive theoretical training in laser scanning confocal microscopy including the use of fluorescent probes to visualize cellular organelles and cellular processes.

 

Learning Outcomes for this unit of study

  • Gain an understanding of the theoretical aspects of transmission and scanning electron microscopy
  • Attain a working knowledge of specimen preparation for electron microscopy
  • Attain a working knowledge of digital imaging
  • Attain a theoretical knowledge of cryoEM and confocal imaging techniques
  • Use the terminology of these disciplines, in order to facilitate communication
  • Apply theoretical knowledge to qualitative and quantitative analysis

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: General concepts in Biology, and in Biochemistry or in Chemistry.
Prerequisites:

  • At least 12 cp of Intermediate Science units from any of the following: Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology & Genetics, Pharmacology, Physics, Physiology or Statistics.
  • For BMedSci: (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) OR (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806 and BMED2804).

 

Classes
Four 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour tutorial per week

 

Assessment
Theory Examination 60%, Literature Review 20% and Essay 20%

 

Textbooks

  1. Bozzola, JJ, Russell LD. Electron Microscopy. 2nd edition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers. 1999.
  2. Reference: Russ, John C. The Image Processing Handbook. 3rd edition. CRC Press. 1998.
Course Coordinator(s)

Dr. Suzanne Ollerenshaw
phone: +61 2 9351 2838
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
slo@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S318, Anderson Stuart Building - F13


Dr Allan Jones
phone: +61 2 9351 7587
fax: +61 2 9351 7682
allanj@emu.usyd.edu.au
Room LG10, Madsen Building - F09

PRACTICAL
EMHU3002 Transmission & Scanning Electron Microscopy (co-req EMHU3001, permission required)

Learning Goals
The course is run conjointly by the Department of Anatomy and Histology and the Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis (ACMM). The course will provide students with hands-on training in the operation of transmission and scanning electron microscopes, processing biological tissue, ultrathin sectioning, cryo-ultramicrotomy, electron diffraction, digital imaging and other techniques required in modern research and hospital electron microscope laboratories.

Students will also learn the operation of laser scanning confocal microscopes, including the use of fluorescent probes to visualize cellular organelles.

Students will apply their knowledge to complete a project of their choice on electron microscopy of a biological tissue, from fixation of the tissue to interpretation of the resulting electron micrographs.

Learning Outcomes for this unit of study

  • Operate a transmission and a scanning electron microscope
  • Prepare biological tissue for electron microscopy
  • Attain a working knowledge of digital imaging
  • Attain a working knowledge of cryoEM and confocal imaging techniques
  • Use the terminology of these disciplines, in order to facilitate communication
  • Apply knowledge to qualitative and quantitative analysis
  • Present results in a clear and scientific manner in both written and oral forms

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: General concepts in Biology, Histology and in Biochemistry or in Chemistry.
Corequisites: EMHU3001
Prerequisites: 12 cp of Intermediate Science units of study including ANAT2008. For BMedSc students: 42 credit points of BMED Intermediate units including BMED (2801, 2802, 2803 & 2806)

 

Classes
Two 2-hour practicals per week

 

Assessment
Theory Examination 60%, Practical Exercises 25%, and Oral Presentation & Report 15%

 

Textbooks
Bozzola, JJ and Russell, LD. Electron Microscopy. 2nd edition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers. 1999.

Course Coordinator(s)

Dr. Suzanne Ollerenshaw
phone: +61 2 9351 2838
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
slo@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S318, Anderson Stuart Building - F13


Dr Allan Jones
phone: +61 2 9351 7587
fax: +61 2 9351 7682
allanj@emu.usyd.edu.au
Room LG10, Madsen Building - F09

THEORY
HSTO3003 - Cells and Development (co-requisite of HSTO3004)

Learning Goals
The main emphasis of this unit of study concerns the mechanisms that control animal development. Fertilisation, cleavage, gastrulation and the formation of the primary germ layers are described in a range of animals, mainly vertebrates. Much of the emphasis will be placed on the parts played by inductive cell and tissue interactions in cell and tissue differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation. This will be studied at both cellular and molecular levels.

 

Learning Outcomes
Students taking this option learn about the processes of animal development and examine the major questions in developmental biology.

By the end of the unit of study, students should have an in-depth knowledge of:

  • fertilisation, cleavage, gastrulation and formation of the primary germ layers.
  • the differentiation of the primary germ layers and organogenesis.
  • the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control tissue morphogenesis and differentiation.
  • the mechanisms that control differential gene expression leading to cell and tissue differentiation.

In addition, students in this unit of study should develop:

  • the intellectual and technical skills required for asking and answering questions related to cellular and developmental processes and
  • an overall appreciation for the complexity of developmental processes, and become familiar with the powerful cellular and molecular tools that are currently available for dissecting out these processes.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: (i) An understanding of the basic structure of vertebrates; (ii) An understanding of elementary biochemistry and genetics.
Prerequisites:

  • For BSc students: ANAT2008
  • For BMedSc students: 18 credit points of Intermediate BMED units, including: BMED2401, 2402, 2403, 2406

 

Classes
Four 1-hour theory lectures and one 1-hour tutorial per week

 

Assessment
One 2-hour exam, tutorial research papers

 

Textbooks
Gilbert, SF. Developmental Biology. 9th edition. Sinauer Associates Inc. 2010.

Course Coordinator

Frank Lovicu
phone: +61 2 9351 5170
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
frank.lovicu@sydney.edu.au 
Room S252, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

PRACTICAL
(ADVANCED)
HSTO3004 - Cells and Development (co-requisite HSTO3003, permission required)

Learning Goals
This advanced unit of study complements HSTO3003 (Cells and Development:Theory) and is catered to provide students with laboratory research experience leading to Honours and higher degrees. It will primarily cover the design and application of experimental procedures involved in cell and developmental biology, using appropriate molecular and cellular techniques to answer developmental questions raised in HSTO3003.

This unit of study will promote hands on experience with different animal models, allowing students to observe and examine developing and differentiating tissues at the macroscopic and microscopic level. The main emphasis of this unit of study will concentrate on practical approaches to understanding the mechanisms that control animal development. Fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and the formation of the primary germ layers may be covered. The parts played by inductive cell and tissue interactions in differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation are also examined at cellular and molecular levels.

Note that for some students, specialised practical classes may be carried out at the Westmead campus.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Anatomy and Histology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Corequisites: HSTO3003
Prerequisites: Unless special permission is granted from the course coordinator, this advanced unit of study is only available to select students who have achieved one of the following:

  • For BSc students: Credit or better in either ANAT2008
  • For BMedSci: 18 credit points of Intermediate BMED units, including: BMED2401, 2402, 2403, 2406

 

Classes
One 1-hour tutorial and two 2-hour practicals per week

 

Assessment
One 2-hour exam, Practical class reports.

 

Textbooks
Gilbert SF. Developmental Biology. 9th edition. Sinauer Associates Inc. 2010.

Course Coordinator

Frank Lovicu
phone: +61 2 9351 5170
fax: +61 2 9351 2813
frank.lovicu@ sydney.edu.au
Room S252, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

NEUR3003 Cellular & Developmental Neuroscience

Learning Goals
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences. This course is a combination of small lectures on current issues in cellular and developmental neuroscience and a research-based library project. Suitably qualified students may have the option of replacing the library project with a laboratory project. Issues covered in the lecture series will include the role of glial on cerebral blood flow and neural transmission, neurochemistry and psychiatric disorders and the development of central and peripheral nervous system. Enrolment in NEUR3004 is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Physiology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
Prerequisites:

  • For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806).
  • For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statisitics

Prohibitions: NEUR3903, PHSI3002, PHSI3902

 

Classes
Three 1 hour lectures plus one 1 hour tutorial or one 2 hour practical per week.

 

Assessment
One 1 hour exam. Major essay/report.

 

Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000.

Course Coordinator

Kevin Keay (Head of Department)
phone: +61 2 9351 3569
fax: +61 2 9351 2817
keay@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S502, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

ADVANCED
NEUR3903 Cellular & Developmental Neuroscience (permission required)

Learning Goals
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3003. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience.Enrollment in NEUR3004/3904 is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other. Students must receive permission from the coordinators for enrollment.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Physiology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
Prerequisites:

  • All students must have a CREDIT (or better) in NEUR3001/3901 and NEUR3002/3902.
  • For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED including Credit average in (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2806).
  • For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statisitics.

Prohibitions: NEUR3003, PHSI3002, PHSI3902

 

Classes
Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial or one 2 hour lab session per week.

 

Assessment
One 1 hour exam. Major essay/report. Mini-lecture.

Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition. Elsevier. 2000.

Course Coordinator

Kevin Keay (Head of Department)
phone: +61 2 9351 3569
fax: +61 2 9351 2817
keay@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S502, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

NEUR3004 Integrative Neuroscience

Learning Goals
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences and to be taken in conjunction with NEUR3003. This course is a combination of small group lectures on current issues in neuroscience, seminar groups and a research-based library project. Suitably qualified students may have the option of replacing the library project with a laboratory project. Seminars will be held on topics including imaging pain, emotions, cortical development & plasticity, colour vision, stroke and hypertension, long-term regulation of blood pressure, auditory hallucinations and the "cocktail party effect". Enrolment in NEUR3003 is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Physiology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
Prerequisites:

  • For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802).
  • For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statisitics.

Prohibitions: NEUR3904, PHSI3002, PHSI3902

 

Classes
One 0-1 hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial plus 1-2 hours small meeting/laboratory session per week.

 

Assessment
Mid-semester exam. 1-hour final exam. Major essay/report. Tutorial participation.

 

Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition.

Course Coordinator

Kevin Keay (Head of Department)
phone: +61 2 9351 3569
fax: +61 2 9351 2817
keay@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S502, Anderson Stuart Building - F13

ADVANCED
NEUR3904 - Integrative Neuroscience (permission required)

Learning Goals
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3004. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience research. Enrolment in NEUR3003/3903 is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Courses are designed to be taken in conjunction with each other. Students must receive permission from the coordinators for enrolment.

 

Information
Faculty: Medicine
Discipline: Physiology
Study Load: 6 credit points, EFTSL 0.125
Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar with the material in Bear, Connors & Paradiso Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain.
Prerequisites:

  • All students must have a CREDIT (or better) in NEUR3001/NEUR3901 and NEUR3002/NEUR3902.
  • For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED with a Credit average including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802).
  • For others: 18 credit points of Intermediate science units of study from Anatomy & Histology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Physiology, Psychology or Statistics.

Prohibitions: NEUR3004, PHSI3002, PHSI3902

 

Classes
One 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial and 1-2 hour small meeting/laboratory per week.

 

Assessment
Mid-semester exam. 1-hour final exam. Major essay/report. Tutorial participation. Mini lecture.

 

Textbooks
Kandell, Schwartz and Jessell. Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition.

Course Coordinator

Kevin Keay (Head of Department)
phone: +61 2 9351 3569
fax: +61 2 9351 2817
keay@anatomy.usyd.edu.au
Room S502, Anderson Stuart Building - F13


The information on this page originates from the Units of Study Handbook. Always refer to the handbook for the most up to date information.