Professor Susan Hayes

AO
Professor of Behavioural Sciences
Medicine, Central Clinical School
Behavioural Sciences in Medicine

Telephone +61 2 9351 2776
Fax +61 2 9351 5319

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Biographical details

Forensic Psychologist, Susan Hayes, is Head of Behavioural Sciences in Medicine in the Sydney Medical School at the University of Sydney, holds a doctorate in psychology and is a registered psychologist with an established forensic psychology practice, working with offenders and victims who have an intellectual disability.

Over more than 20 years Susan Hayes has conducted a sustained program of research in intellectual disability (ID), focussed upon the rights of people with ID, especially those who come into contact with the criminal justice system as victims or offenders. She was amongst the first researchers in Australia and internationally to engage in this area of research. Her research has followed a logical path, first investigating the prevalence of ID in prisons and magistrates courts, followed by the development of the Hayes Ability Screening Index (HASI) to assist in the identification of people with ID within the criminal justice system. The HASI is used in research and clinical work in the UK and has been translated into (Canadian) French and Norwegian and is currently being translated into Dutch. Susan has made a significant international contribution to this field through her ability to identify and solve problems, using research to benefit people with ID and their service providers and carers. In 1998 Susan Hayes was awarded the Order of Australia (AO) for services to the community, particularly through research on criminality in the young and the problems faced by people with developmental disabilities in the criminal justice system. Since 2002 she has been awarded four competitive grants, and two commissioned grants for research, one of the latter being awarded in Queensland and the other by the NHS in the UK. Susan has been granted the title of Fellow of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disability and was a recipient of the UNSW Alumni Award for Achievement, as well as being appointed Benjamin Meaker Visiting Professor to the Norah Fry Research Centre (NFRC) at the University of Bristol.

Research interests

Forensic psychology; offenders and victims of crime with intellectual disability, autistic spectrum disorder, sex offenders with intellectual disability; "Looking for the causes of Motor Neurone Disease" (in collaboration with A/Prof Roger Pamphlett, Pathology) - life stresses and personality in persons with MND

Teaching and supervision

I supervise PhD students researching in the area of intellectual disability, and other areas including psychological factors in Motor Neurone Disease (in conjunction with A/Prof Roger Pamphlett, Pathology). I teach in the Sydney Medical Program and also in other courses throughout the University.

International links

Norway

(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Research collaborator

Singapore

(Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports) Research consultant

Singapore

(Singapore Prison Service) Research consultant

United Kingdom

(Mr Phil Shackell, North West Specialised Commissioning Team and Department of Health, UK) Research consultant

United Kingdom

(University of Bristol) Visiting Professor, Norah Fry Research Centre

United States

(University of New Mexico) Collaboration with Professor Ruth Luckasson

Selected grants

2009

  • Continuation study of intellectual disability in courts and police cells; Hayes S; DVC Research/Bridging Support Grant.

2007

  • Intellectual disability in courts and police cells; Hayes S, Levy M; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

2005

  • Prevalence and identification of intellectual disability in HMP Liverpool (UK); Hayes S; National Health Service (NHS)/Research Grant.
  • Women with an Intellectual Disability; Aldunate R, de Simone T, Hayes S; Legal Aid Queensland/BLO Project.

2000

  • Anti-libidinal medication and men with disabilities: a long term follow-up of outcomes following third party consent; Hayes S; Criminology Research Council/Research Grant.
  • Consumers with an Intellectual Disability - Determining the extent of the problem , and designing information and education resources; Hayes S; Consumer Education Trust Fund/Research Grant.

Selected publications

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Book Chapters

  • Hayes, S. (2012). People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in the Criminal Justice System. In James K. Luiselli (Eds.), The Handbook of High-Risk Challenging Behaviors in People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, (pp. 211-228). Baltimore, USA: Paul H. Brookes Publishing.
  • Hayes, S. (2010). Developmental Pathways in Intellectually Disabled Sexual Offenders. In Leam A. Craig, William R. Lindsay & Kevin D. Browne (Eds.), Assessment and treatment of sexual offenders with intellectual disabilities: a handbook, (pp. 37-46). Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing.
  • Hayes, S. (2010). Intellectual Disability. In Ian Freckleton & Hugh Selby (Eds.), Expert Evidence. Australia: Thomson Reuters.
  • Hayes, S. (2004). Interaction With The Criminal Justice System. In Eric Emerson, Chris Hatton, Travis Thompson, Trevor Parmenter (Eds.), International handbook of applied research in intellectual disabilities, (pp. 479-494). Chichester, UK: Wiley.
  • Hayes, S. (2004). Legal issues – the Australian perspective. In William Lindsay, John Taylor, Peter Sturmey (Eds.), Offenders with developmental disabilities, (pp. 37-65). New Zealand: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Hayes, S. (2004). Pathways For Offenders With Intellectual Disabilities. In William Lindsay, John Taylor, Peter Sturmey (Eds.), Offenders with developmental disabilities, (pp. 67-89). New Zealand: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Hayes, S. (2001). Intellectual disability. In Ian Freckleton & Hugh Selby (Eds.), Expert Evidence. Australia: Thomson Reuters.

Journals

  • Vanny, K., Levy, M., Greenberg, D., Hayes, S. (2009). Mental illness and intellectual disability in Magistrates Courts in New South Wales, Australia. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 53(3), 289-297. [More Information]
  • Hayes, S. (2009). Psychological, psychiatric and behavioural outcomes for people with an intellectual disability who are victims of crime. Interaction (Canberra), 22(4), 20-28.
  • Hayes, S. (2009). The relationship between childhood abuse, psychological symptoms and subsequent sex offending. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(1), 96-101.
  • Vanny, K., Levy, M., Hayes, S. (2008). Health care for people with intellectual disability. Medical Journal of Australia, 189(2), 90. [More Information]
  • Vanny, K., Levy, M., Hayes, S. (2008). People with an Intellectual Disability in the Australian Criminal Justice System. Psychiatry Psychology and Law, 15(2), 261-271.
  • Hayes, S., Martin, F. (2007). Consumers with an intellectual disability and carers: perceptions of interactions with banks. Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 11(1), 9-21. [More Information]
  • Lindsay, W., Hastings, R., Griffiths, D., Hayes, S. (2007). Editorial: Trends and challenges in forensic research on offenders with intellectual disability. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 32(2), 55-61.
  • Hayes, S. (2007). Missing out: offenders with learning disabilities and the criminal justice system. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35(3), 146-153.
  • Ward, L., Hayes, S. (2007). Offenders with learning disabilities. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35(3), 141-142.
  • Hayes, S., Shackell, P., Mottram, P., Lancaster, R. (2007). The prevalence of intellectual disability in a major UK prison. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35, 162-167.
  • Lindsay, W., Hastings, R., Griffiths, D., Hayes, S. (2007). Trends and challenges in forensic research on offenders with intellectual disability. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 32(2), 55-61. [More Information]
  • Hayes, S. (2007). Women with learning disabilities who offend: what do we know? British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35(3), 187-191.
  • Hayes, S. (2005). A review of non-custodial interventions with offenders with intellectual disabilities. Current Issues in Criminal Justice, 17, 69-78.
  • Hayes, S. (2005). Diagnosing intellectual disability in a forensic sample: Gender and age effects on the relationship between cognitive and adaptive functioning. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 30(2), 97-103.
  • Hayes, S. (2005). Sentencing of people with mental disorders. Reform, 86, 25-28.
  • Martin, F., Hayes, S. (2004). Interpersonal self-efficacy and problematic behaviour in high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder (AD). Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 48(4 & 5), 337.
  • Hayes, S. (2004). People with intellectual disability (ID) who are victims of crime: outcomes and needs. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 48(4 & 5), 461.
  • Hayes, S. (2004). The relationship between childhood abuse and subsequent sex offending. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 48(4 & 5), 464.
  • Hayes, S., Farnill, D. (2003). Correlations for the Vineland Adaptive Behavior scales with Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test in a forensic sample. Psychological Reports, 92(2), 573-580.
  • Hayes, S. (2002). Early Intervention or Early Incarceration? Using a Screening Test for Intellectual Disability in the Criminal Justice System. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 15(2), 120-128.

Conferences

  • Hayes, S., Mottram, P., Shackell, P. (2006). Identifying intellectual disability in a UK prison. IASSID-Europe Conference 2006, Oxford, London: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Magazine / Newspaper Articles

  • Hayes, S. (2002). Intellectually disabled juvenile offenders in New South Wales. Intellectual Disability Australasia, 23 (2).

Report

  • Hayes, S. (2002). Anti-libidinal medication and people with disabilities: long-term follow-up of outcomes following third party consent to medication for problematic sexual behaviour.

2012

  • Hayes, S. (2012). People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in the Criminal Justice System. In James K. Luiselli (Eds.), The Handbook of High-Risk Challenging Behaviors in People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, (pp. 211-228). Baltimore, USA: Paul H. Brookes Publishing.

2010

  • Hayes, S. (2010). Developmental Pathways in Intellectually Disabled Sexual Offenders. In Leam A. Craig, William R. Lindsay & Kevin D. Browne (Eds.), Assessment and treatment of sexual offenders with intellectual disabilities: a handbook, (pp. 37-46). Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing.
  • Hayes, S. (2010). Intellectual Disability. In Ian Freckleton & Hugh Selby (Eds.), Expert Evidence. Australia: Thomson Reuters.

2009

  • Vanny, K., Levy, M., Greenberg, D., Hayes, S. (2009). Mental illness and intellectual disability in Magistrates Courts in New South Wales, Australia. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 53(3), 289-297. [More Information]
  • Hayes, S. (2009). Psychological, psychiatric and behavioural outcomes for people with an intellectual disability who are victims of crime. Interaction (Canberra), 22(4), 20-28.
  • Hayes, S. (2009). The relationship between childhood abuse, psychological symptoms and subsequent sex offending. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22(1), 96-101.

2008

  • Vanny, K., Levy, M., Hayes, S. (2008). Health care for people with intellectual disability. Medical Journal of Australia, 189(2), 90. [More Information]
  • Vanny, K., Levy, M., Hayes, S. (2008). People with an Intellectual Disability in the Australian Criminal Justice System. Psychiatry Psychology and Law, 15(2), 261-271.

2007

  • Hayes, S., Martin, F. (2007). Consumers with an intellectual disability and carers: perceptions of interactions with banks. Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 11(1), 9-21. [More Information]
  • Lindsay, W., Hastings, R., Griffiths, D., Hayes, S. (2007). Editorial: Trends and challenges in forensic research on offenders with intellectual disability. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 32(2), 55-61.
  • Hayes, S. (2007). Missing out: offenders with learning disabilities and the criminal justice system. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35(3), 146-153.
  • Ward, L., Hayes, S. (2007). Offenders with learning disabilities. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35(3), 141-142.
  • Hayes, S., Shackell, P., Mottram, P., Lancaster, R. (2007). The prevalence of intellectual disability in a major UK prison. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35, 162-167.
  • Lindsay, W., Hastings, R., Griffiths, D., Hayes, S. (2007). Trends and challenges in forensic research on offenders with intellectual disability. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 32(2), 55-61. [More Information]
  • Hayes, S. (2007). Women with learning disabilities who offend: what do we know? British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 35(3), 187-191.

2006

  • Hayes, S., Mottram, P., Shackell, P. (2006). Identifying intellectual disability in a UK prison. IASSID-Europe Conference 2006, Oxford, London: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

2005

  • Hayes, S. (2005). A review of non-custodial interventions with offenders with intellectual disabilities. Current Issues in Criminal Justice, 17, 69-78.
  • Hayes, S. (2005). Diagnosing intellectual disability in a forensic sample: Gender and age effects on the relationship between cognitive and adaptive functioning. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 30(2), 97-103.
  • Hayes, S. (2005). Sentencing of people with mental disorders. Reform, 86, 25-28.

2004

  • Hayes, S. (2004). Interaction With The Criminal Justice System. In Eric Emerson, Chris Hatton, Travis Thompson, Trevor Parmenter (Eds.), International handbook of applied research in intellectual disabilities, (pp. 479-494). Chichester, UK: Wiley.
  • Martin, F., Hayes, S. (2004). Interpersonal self-efficacy and problematic behaviour in high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder (AD). Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 48(4 & 5), 337.
  • Hayes, S. (2004). Legal issues – the Australian perspective. In William Lindsay, John Taylor, Peter Sturmey (Eds.), Offenders with developmental disabilities, (pp. 37-65). New Zealand: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Hayes, S. (2004). Pathways For Offenders With Intellectual Disabilities. In William Lindsay, John Taylor, Peter Sturmey (Eds.), Offenders with developmental disabilities, (pp. 67-89). New Zealand: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Hayes, S. (2004). People with intellectual disability (ID) who are victims of crime: outcomes and needs. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 48(4 & 5), 461.
  • Hayes, S. (2004). The relationship between childhood abuse and subsequent sex offending. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 48(4 & 5), 464.

2003

  • Hayes, S., Farnill, D. (2003). Correlations for the Vineland Adaptive Behavior scales with Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test in a forensic sample. Psychological Reports, 92(2), 573-580.

2002

  • Hayes, S. (2002). Anti-libidinal medication and people with disabilities: long-term follow-up of outcomes following third party consent to medication for problematic sexual behaviour.
  • Hayes, S. (2002). Early Intervention or Early Incarceration? Using a Screening Test for Intellectual Disability in the Criminal Justice System. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 15(2), 120-128.
  • Hayes, S. (2002). Intellectually disabled juvenile offenders in New South Wales. Intellectual Disability Australasia, 23 (2).

2001

  • Hayes, S. (2001). Intellectual disability. In Ian Freckleton & Hugh Selby (Eds.), Expert Evidence. Australia: Thomson Reuters.

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