NEW INSIGHTS INTO DISEASE AND DRUG TARGETS FROM ENDOGENOUS BIOLOGICAL NANOSCALE VESICLES TO ENGINEERED NANOPARTICLES

This Flagship Project aims to discover new aspects of human diseases and new pathways for drug targeting from the myriad of endogenous biological nanovesicles (e.g. microparticles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies) released by the immune system in response to both infectious and non-infectious diseases. To achieve this, we are developing powerful new nano-biospectroscopic protocols and advanced in-vitro spectroscopic modelling techniques to dynamically interrogate living cells and elucidate the beneficial and adverse effects of released endogenous nanovesicles.

Project leaders - Professor Georges Grau

Professor Georges Grau

Professor Georges Grau holds a Chair of Vascular Immunology in the School of Medical Science. His research focuses on immunopathological mechanisms of infectious disease. His team has shown that microparticles are nano-metre size biological entities that behave as crucial effectors in disease and inflammation.

Learn more about Professor Georges Grau

Contact details
E

Professor Peter Lay

Professor Peter Lay

Peter Lay is Professor of Inorganic Chemistry and Director of the Vibrational Spectroscopy Core Facility. His research interests include understanding the role of microvesicles in infectious and degenerative diseases. With Georges Grau, he developed the first X-ray fluorescence microscopy studies on microparticles released from immune system cells.

Learn more about Professor Peter Lay

Contact details
E

Professor Nicholas King

Professor Nicholas King

Professor Nicholas King holds the Chair of Immunopathology in the School of Medical Science and is the Foundation Director of the USYD Cytometry Core Facility. His research focuses on how the immune system causes lethal pathology during virus infection. His team has shown that negatively-charged nanoparticles prevent the pathological migration of inflammatory blood cells into sites of inflammation in the body, markedly reducing severe tissue damage caused by these cells and improving healing and recovery.


Learn more about Professor Nicholas King

Contact details
E


Key collaborators

Professor Tania Sorrell – Director, Marie-Bashir Institute for Infections, Immunity and Biosecurity