Harvard University Announces the Gough Whitlam and Malcolm Fraser Chair in Australian Studies for 2018-2019

WA

The University of Sydney and Harvard University have announced the appointment of HPS Associate Professor Anderson to the Gough Whitlam and Malcolm Fraser Chair in Australian Studies for the 2018-2019 academic year.

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THE UNIT FOR HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE SYDNEY CENTRE FOR THE FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE

2017 RESEARCH SEMINARS

The HPS Research Seminar Series runs on selected Mondays during Semester time.

All Welcome. No Booking Required. Free

Please note NEW START TIME: 5:30

CCANESA MEETING ROOM, MADSEN BUILDING
CAMPERDOWN CAMPUS

Best access to CCANESA is from the Eastern Avenue entrance of the Madsen Building. When you enter you will be on the 3rd floor. Please proceed across the foyer and take the stairs on the right up one floor. The door to CCANESA will be straight ahead on this landing


Research Seminar Series - Semester 1, 2016
Date Venue Speaker Topic

March 13th

CANCELLED

CCANESA

Barbara Osimani, PhD

Bias, random error, and the variety of evidence thesis

March 20th

 

Mark Honigsbaum
Wellcome Research Fellow
Queen Mary University of London

 Between Securitisation and Neglect:
Managing Ebola at the Borders of Global Health

March 27th

CCANESA Meeting Room

Madsen Building

Huw Price
Bertrand Russell Professor of Philosophy
Academic Director, CSER (cser.org) & CFI (lcfi.ac.uk)
University of Cambridge

'Heart of DARCness'

Huw Price and Yang Liu 

 


April 3rd

CCANESA Meeting Room

Madsen Building

DR CHRISTINE VON OERTZEN

Visiting Lecturer University of Sydney

Max Plank Institute for the History of Science Berlin

Contingencies of Innovation: At the Crossroads from Manual to Machine Data Processing in Nineteenth-Century Europe


 

April 10th

CCANESA Meeting Room

Madsen Building

Michael Devitt
Distinguished Professor of Philosophy The Graduate Center The City University of New York.


 HISTORICAL BIOLOGICAL ESSENTIALISM

The consensus in the philosophy of biology is that a taxon’s essence or nature is wholly historical. In “Resurrecting Biological Essentialism” (2008), I rejected this consensus in arguing that there is an intrinsic component to the essence. Still I accepted that there was also an historical component. But why believe that there is? This paper begins with an argument, drawing on the literature, that this component is required by historical/evolutionary explanations. But most of the paper is concerned with another question. What precisely is this historical component?  An answer must be complete in that it distinguishes one taxon from another; for example, zebras from horses. An answer must be plausible in that posits an essence that can bear the explanatory burden. Despite asking around, I have been surprisingly unable to find a worked out complete and plausible answer in the literature. I go on to propose one: the relevant history of a taxon is of organisms of a certain intrinsic kind evolving into organisms of a certain other intrinsic kind, until we reach the taxon in question. The consensus is right that there is an historical component to the essence of a taxon but that component requires that there also be an intrinsic component.

April 24th

CCANESA Meeting Room

Madsen Building

Albert Atkin

Macquarie University

"Race as a Pragmatic Cluster Concept"
May 1st

CCANESA Meeting Room

Madsen Building

 

Greg Dawes
Associate Professor
Department of Philosophy
University of Otago
Dunedin
NZ
  The Development of Medieval Empiricism
Was there such a thing as medieval empiricism? Distinguishing between three kinds of empiricism – genetic, explanatory, and justificatory – I argue that there was. The uptake of Aristotle's thought in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries encouraged a form of genetic empiricism, which held that the (potential) intellect begins the process of cognition as a "blank slate." But this was commonly offset by an emphasis on the role of the active (agent) intellect, which was sometimes coupled with a version of the doctrine of divine illumination. During the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries, there emerged a more thoroughgoing empiricism. Factors favouring an empiricist attitude included the study of natural magic, the idea of intuitive cognition, and the growth of nominalism. By the mid-fourteenth century the foundations of early modern empiricism were already in place and the problems to which it would lead already evident.

THURSDAY

MAY 18TH

From 6PM

NICHOLSON MUSEUM

 DR EVELLEEN RICHARDS

BOOK LAUNCH

 "DARWIN AND THE MAKING OF SEXUAL SELECTION"


 

CCANESA Meeting Room

Madsen Building

 


 

 

 CCANESA Meeting Room

Madsen Building

 


 

 END SEMESTER ONE

2017

TBA

 RESEARCH

PRESENTATION

DAY