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Faculties and schools_

Accreditation

Study with a globally recognised institution
Our accreditation and membership with leading bodies in Australia and around the world reflects our commitment to excellence.
The University of Sydney Business School is a leading institution at the forefront of global business and management education. We are focused on quality assurance, continuous improvement, international peer review and excellence in teaching and research.

AACSB

The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business recognises business schools based on their high-quality curriculum, faculty, research, innovation and global engagement. First awarded in 2003, the University of Sydney Business School is accredited until 2019.

EQUIS

EQUIS logo

The European Foundation for Management Development's Quality Improvement System (EQUIS) aims to raise the standard of management education worldwide by assessing institutions as a whole. This includes reviewing all programs on offer from bachelor's degrees to PhDs. First awarded in 2004, the University of Sydney Business School is accredited until 2021.

CEMS

CEMS logo

The Global Alliance in Management Education (known as CEMS) is a strategic alliance of leading business schools and multinational companies that together offer postgraduate students a unique blend of education and professional experience. In each country, only one business school is chosen to be part of the CEMS alliance. The CEMS Master of International Management is a prestigious global business degree that is often acknowledged as the best passport for an international career. We are proud that Deloitte chose to join CEMS as our corporate partner.

Other professional accreditations 

A number of programs at the University of Sydney Business School are professionally accredited and recognised by various industry and professional bodies. 

  • Our Bachelor of Commerce (Finance) is recognised as a program partner with the  CFA Institute.

Assurance of Learning

Assurance of Learning refers to the systematic process of collecting data about student learning outcomes, reviewing and using it to continuously develop and improve the School's degree programs. Assurance of Learning ensures our graduates achieve the goals and outcomes we say they will achieve when we promote our degree programs.

Five steps towards Assurance of Learning

What are the most important things our students should achieve in our program? What are our expectations?

Program learning goals and program learning outcomes are defined for each program by the Program Director, in collaboration with colleagues, to align with a common set for each suite of programs.

How will students achieve the program learning goals?

Program Directors collaborate with program teams to align the defined goals and outcomes with the curricula, mapping the introduction, practice and assessment of learning outcomes in units of study throughout the program (or majors/specialisation).

How and when will we know students have achieved the program learning goals?

Program Directors collaborate with program teams and particularly with the capstone unit coordinator to identify instruments and measures to assess learning in a final capstone unit of study where mastery is expected of the learning outcomes for the program (or major/specialisation).

How well have students achieved the outcomes? Is that up to our standard? Where have they done well/not so well?

Judgments about learning outcome achievement provided by capstone unit coordinators is downloaded from Gradecenter, aggregated and analysed into a draft report that is provided to program directors to discuss with teaching teams (and coordinators of majors/specialisations), noting limitations in interpretation, previous improvement actions and areas of success or requiring improvement.

What can we learn and share that has worked well? What will we do if students have not achieved the goals we set?

Program Directors (or coordinators of majors/specialisations) lead a discussion with teaching teams using the outcomes assessment information to inform and agree changes to the program (or major/specialisation).