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Room for improvement: cities, housing and health

Exploring the impact of cities and housing on health and wellbeing
Improving our cities and housing conditions can increase our quality of life, prevent disease, and help mitigate climate change. What does this look like in practice, and how might we get to this place? Let's get (urban) planning.

Event details
Date and time:
 Monday 9 September, 6.30 – 8pm
Venue: Lecture Theatre 200, Social Sciences Building
The University of Sydney (Camperdown/Darlington Campus)
Entry: free and open to all with online registrations essential

When housing is structurally deficient, it exposes people to risk of injury and illness. Poor access to walking and recreation opportunities, urban heat islands and long journeys to work can all impact on our health and wellbeing.

How can better designed, constructed and maintained housing address these issues, and more importantly, in a way that's sustainable and equitable? 

This event brings together a range of perspectives. David Jacobs, a member of the World Health Organisation working group on Health and Housing, will summarise key insights from Housing and Health guidelines (WHO, 2018), which provides strong evidence and recommendations to reduce the health burden of housing.

Environmental health researcher Luke Knibbs will outline the effects of housing conditions on childhood illness while Jennifer Kent, a research fellow in urban planning, will describe the aspects of city design that have negative impacts on public health and what we can do to improve. 

This event is part of The Festival of Urbanism (2-12 September), presented by Henry Halloran Trust with the support of the University of Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning; Monash Urban Planning and Design; Charles Perkins Centre; and Planning Institute of Australia.

The speakers

David is the Chief Scientist at the National Center for Healthy Housing. He also serves as Director of the U.S. Collaborating Center for Research and Training on Housing Related Disease and Injury for the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO WHO), an adjunct associate professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, and as a faculty associate at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He is one of the nation’s foremost authorities on childhood lead poisoning prevention and was principal author of both the President’s Task Force Report on the subject in 2000 and the Healthy Homes Report to Congress in 1999. 

His current work includes research on asthma, international healthy housing guidelines, lead poisoning prevention, and green sustainable building design. David is a Certified Industrial Hygienist® and holds degrees in political science, environmental health, technology, and science policy and a doctorate in environmental engineering.

Luke conducts research and teaching on the health effects of environmental risk factors, with a specific focus on air pollution and bioaerosols (airborne particles of biological origin).

Luke is an Associate Professor of Environmental Health and joined the School of Public Health in 2012. Prior to that, he completed his PhD on ultrafine particle exposure assessment in 2009, followed by 3 years' postdoctoral training at the International Laboratory for Air Quality and Health. He has a special interest in understanding the burden of disease due to anthropogenic air pollution and transmission of respiratory pathogens via bioaerosols.

Jennifer is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Urban and Regional Planning program at the University of Sydney. Prior to joining the University of Sydney, Jennifer was a Lecturer at Macquarie University and Research Associate at the Healthy Built Environments Program at the University of NSW. She has also worked as a town planner in NSW in both local government and as a consultant.

Event information

This event is free and open to all but online registration is essential.

Simply click the 'Register now' button or follow this link.

Entry to ticket holders will be prioritised and given on a first-in, best-dressed basis until the room reaches capacity. If an event is full, this may result in standing room or delayed admittance until an appropriate time.

We recommend early arrival to allow time for finding the venue and securing a seat to the event. Doors open 15 minutes before the advertised start time. 

If you could not register but would like to attend, you are welcome to join a stand-by queue on the night as seats may become available due to late cancellations. Please note, this is not guaranteed so you come at risk of non-admittance.

This venue provides wheelchair access, hearing loop and infrared hearing system.

Access requirements

If you have other access requirements or want more information, get in touch with us on 9351 2943 or email sydney.ideas@sydney.edu.au with 'Access | Sep 9 – Housing' in the subject line at the earliest opportunity to allow us time to organise for any additional services in time for the event.

This event takes place at SSB Lecture Theatre 200, which is on Level 2 of the Social Sciences Building (enter via Science Road). 

There will be directional signage on the day leading to the theatre. You may also refer to the map on this page. 

Public Transport

To help you plan your trip, visit transportnsw.info

Bus

Buses to the University are readily available from Railway Square, Central Station (Broadway). Please use the campus maps tool and tick the ‘State transit bus stops’ box under the ‘Amenities’ column to view all possible bus stops.

  • via Parramatta Road: Take one of these buses: 412, 436, 438, 439, 440, 461, 480, 483, m10, L38 or L39 and alight at the Footbridge on Parramatta Road. It's roughly a five-minute walk to the venue.
  • via City Road: Take one of these buses: 352, 370, 422, 423, 426, 428, m30, L23 or L28 and alight at the footbridge before Butlin Avenue. Cross the road or go across the bridge and take Eastern Avenue towards the Quadrangle, and turn into Science Road. It's roughly a 12-minute walk to the venue.
Train

The venue is roughly 30 minutes walk from Redfern Station. Catch a train to Redfern Station and take Lawson Street up to Abercrombie Street. At the roundabout, follow Codrington Street up to Butlin Avenue. Follow Butlin Avenue through to the campus and up Eastern Avenue towards the Quadrangle and turn into Science Road. Keep walking along there – the venue will be on the right.

There is some on-street parking around Forest Lodge and Glebe.

There is also paid parking available at Western Avenue Carpark. Head to the University's Parking page for more information about fees and opening hours.

Use the University Campus Maps tool to find out more details about parking and access areas: search for the 'Social Sciences Building'. 

Event image: Tom Rumble on Unsplash

Getting there

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