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Ethics of data science conference 2020

25-27 March 2020, Sydney 

Multidisciplinary advances towards AI for greater good.

Hosted by the University of Sydney, the international conference on the Ethics of Data Science brings together world-renowned experts from multiple disciplines to discuss the use and misuse of our data.

The conference is hosted by the Centre for Translational Data Science (CTDS) at the University of Sydney with partners from The Gradient Institute and the Humanising Machine Intelligence group from the Australian National University.

The aim is to advance the understanding of ethical aspects of algorithms, assess limitations, and showcase progress on the topic among different areas of Philosophy, Law, Data Science, and beyond. This conference is an exciting opportunity to exchange views on the viability, legitimacy, and complexity of algorithmic decision-making. 

The conference provides a unique opportunity for students, academics and practitioners to exchange views on the ethics of data science. This year we are bringing world leaders in research related to various aspects of ethical data science, including fairness, decision making, accountability, privacy and transparency. Draft program will be released soon.

The high calibre keynotes and paper presentations raise fundamental questions and principles for ethical data science including purpose, diversity, fairness, transparency, accountability, and bias. Developers and practitioners must continuously reflect on these issues while they are designing, implementing and deploying the data science systems that will ultimately affect society. The workshop series will link government and industry needs with academics.

 

Over the last few years, the world has awoken to the incredible power that we have all vested—often without thought or care—in the people and systems that collect, aggregate, analyse, and act on our data. Governments, universities, corporations and philanthropists the world over have recognised the urgent need to bring all of our intellectual tools to bear on charting a course through this opaque new normative territory. We've seen press release after press release, and funding announcement after funding announcement. But (with some notable exceptions) the actual interdisciplinary research on this topic has yet to reach its full potential. Scholars have been struggling to find a common language. 

The early days of interdisciplinary work on the ethics of data science are now behind us. Fully-fledged research programs are well underway, or else swinging into action. Our goal with this conference is to bring together the fruits of that progress—to find the scholars, worldwide, who are genuinely pushing the boundaries of understanding in all areas related to the morality, law and politics of data and artificial intelligence. We are not looking for overviews or position papers, funding applications or project launches, or epicycles to existing debates. We're looking for the research that will frame the next phase of research in this area that will itself frame so much of the rest of our lives. 

We are seeking papers from all academic disciplines relevant to understanding the morality, law, and politics of data and AI, with each of those terms understood inclusively. Our centres of gravity are in computer science, law, and philosophy, but our focus is on work that advances our understanding, not on disciplinary pigeonholes. We are committed to the view that these questions cannot be adequately understood without bringing together a diverse range of skill-sets, and building the community necessary for us to work towards a common goal. Authors of accepted papers will have enough time to state their thesis clearly, and start a genuine discussion on its merits.

So, submit your paper to the second edition of the international conference on the Ethics of Data Science on 25-27 March 2020 at the University of Sydney. We have enough travel scholarships to ensure that resources are no obstacle to presenting your world-leading research. If you're in doubt about whether your paper fits our conference profile, ask yourself this: is this in any way connected to better understanding the morality, law, or politics of data or AI? Is it world-class research? And can you convey its central insights to an interdisciplinary audience of very smart people? If you've answered 'yes' each time, then send us your paper. We're not going to list example problems. You already know what they are. And the point of this conference is to rejuvenate discussion on this topic, not reproduce frozen accidents.

Submissions

Deadline for submission is 13 January 2020 AoE. Acceptance will be via double blinded review process. Full length papers should be submitted to the Open Review conference management system, with a limit of 6-8 pages. Papers will be assessed for their ability to engage with and inspire researchers in a broad range of disciplines, and to learn from and make an impact on real data science practice and/or its real world application. 

Accepted papers with be notification on 3 February 2020.

Travel Grants

The conference will provide travel grants to cover for registration, flights and/or accommodation fees. Applications open 20 January 2020 - Applications close 24 January 2020 AoE. Successful applications will be notified 7 February 2020.

Prize

The conference will give a Best Paper prize, based on the potential impact of the research. This paper will receive the special opportunity to present in an extended session oriented to attendees from government and industry.

Platinum Sponsorship: $40,000

Includes:

  • 6 delegate passes to all 3 days
  • Full-page advertisement on the inside front cover of the forum booklet being distributed to all attendees
  • Logo and 100-word organisational profile in conference booklet
  • Approved piece of marketing collateral
  • Two pull- up banners, supplied by the partner
  • Logo on the event website and registration page linking to partner website
  • Logo on event pull-up banner on stage reflecting partnership level
  • Recognition as platinum partner on event social media releases
  • Acknowledgement during opening ceremony
Gold Sponsorship: $30,000

Includes:

  • 3 delegate passes to all 3 days
  • Full-page advertisement on the inside front cover of the forum booklet being distributed to all attendees
  • Logo and 70-word organisational profile in conference booklet
  • One pull-up banner, supplied by the partner
  • Logo on the event website and registration page linking to partner website
  • Logo on event pull-up banner on stage reflecting partnership level
  • Acknowledgement during opening ceremony
Silver Sponsorship: $20,000

Includes:

  • 2 delegate passes to all 3 days
  • Half-page advertisement on the inside front cover of the forum booklet being distributed to all attendees
  • Logo and 40-word organisational profile in conference booklet
  • Logo on the event website and registration page linking to partner website
  • Logo on event pull-up banner on stage reflecting partnership level
  • Acknowledgement during opening ceremony

Dr Roman Marchant, Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer, Centre for Translational Data Science
“Important decisions are being made by government and big corporations based on data. This conference will help guide the analysis and decisions to be ethical and beneficial for society as a whole.“

Dr Tiberio Caetano, Chief Scientist, The Gradient Institute
We know computers run the world, but we don't know how. The complex dynamics between algorithms, data, AI systems and people is effectively giving rise to a new social order yet to be understood. At the core of EDSC is the purpose of understanding of what has to be done, from a truly multidisciplinary perspective, to direct this dynamics towards a world of increasing human wellbeing, fairness and autonomy.

Professor Kimberlee Weatherall, Professor of Law, Sydney Law School
“This conference will help us address decisions around the use of new data science technology, where and how are they are appropriate to be used."

Professor Seth Lazar, Head of School Philosophy, Australian National University
“The world is clamouring for research to help better understand the morality, law, and politics of data and AI, but while there have been many strategic announcements and statements of ethical frameworks and principles, real interdisciplinary research in this area is in its infancy. EDSC2020, uniquely, is grounded in a genuine collaboration between computer scientists, lawyers and philosophers. It is interdisciplinary at its heart."

 

2020 keynote speakers

Shannon Vallor

Baillie Gifford Chair in the Ethics and Data of Artificial Intelligence, The University of Edinburgh

 

Salil Vadhan

Vicky Joseph Professor of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Harvard University

 

Elias Bareinboim

Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science and the director of the Causal Artificial Intelligence (CausalAI) Laboratory at Columbia University

Masterclass, 25 March

A day full of insights and tutorials that introduce the audience to the main areas of research covered in the conference. A key aspect of a truly multidisciplinary conference, the first of its kind, where you get to hear from experts in each area and foster the exchange of information across academic disciplines, government and private companies.

Dr Julia Powles

Associate Professor Julia Powles

Associate Professor of Technology Law & Policy, University of Western Australia

Associate Professor Seth Lazar

Associate Professor Seth Lazar

Head, School of Philosophy. Project Lead, Humanising Machine Intelligence Grand Challenge, ANU

Important dates

Deadline for Submission
13 January 2020

Notification of Acceptance
3 February 2020

Conference
25-27 March 2020

Professor Sally Cripps

Professor Sally Cripps
Director, Centre for Translational Data Science
"The ethical use of data science methods and technology is one of the most debated topics of the digital age and CTDS is proud to be at the centre of it. The issues extend far beyond the ethical use of algorithms and touch on the idea of data sovereignty; how to give individuals back the ownership of personal data so that the economic benefits of data sharing flow to them and the legal implications of doing so."

Past conference, EDSC 2019 program

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Download PDF

Questions?

Contact the CTDS team