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Music at the Centennial Exhibition 1888

Dr GRAEME SKINNER (University of Sydney)


To cite this:

Graeme Skinner (University of Sydney), "Music at the Centennial Exhibition 1888", Australharmony (an online resource toward the history of music and musicians in colonial and early Federation Australia): http://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/centennial-exhibition-1888.php; accessed 22 September 2018






For a TROVE virtual archive of all documentation on the Centennial Orchestra:

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Centennial+Orchestra (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

Page directory

Preliminaries

- - -

August 1888

September 1888

October 1888

November 1888

December 1888

January 1889

- - -

February 1889 and after

The permanent Victorian Orchestra



Preliminaries

News from before the opening of the exhibition

- - -

Orchestra list

"EXHIBITION NOTES. THE ORCHESTRA", The Argus (16 June 1888), 13

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6133263 

The orchestra has now been completed. It consists of 66 members, all of whom are engaged to give their entire services to the commissioners during the period of the Exhibition. Sixteen of the players were engaged in London by Mr. Frederic H. Cowen, and the remainder were obtained from the colonies. The following is a complete list of their names, viz.-

Violins - G. Weston, G. A. Sutch, H, C. Quin (Adelaide), E. Sylvester (Sydney), C. J. Alger (Sydney), F. Schmellitscheck (Sydney), L. Iverson (Albury), A. Wenzel (Sydney), W. H. Thompson, W. J. Law, L. Quin, T. W. Busch, M. A. Phillips, R. F. Hess, A. Casiraghi, R. H. Hunter, A. V. Wallenstein, F. Kruse, F. E. Hornidge, H. T. Schrader (Adelaide), T. Dierich, R. Buttery (London), W. S. Wilson (London), W. A. Robins (London), Max Klein (London), J. P. Connolly (New Zealand).

Violas - Jan Meyroos (London), R. Bima, H. Dettmer, H. Edwards, B. Draeger (Sydney), - Mortimer (London)

Cellos. - J. [recte T.] Liebe (London), C. Reimers, R. Patek, H. E. S. Jeboult (Sydney), F. Finn (Brisbane), G. P. Frayling.

Basses. - A. Ceschina, G. Briese, S. Hore, H. Pikrot [sic ?], W. A. Brown, jun., A. R. Peters.

Bassoons. - P. Langdale (London), H. Wakefield.

Flutes - H. L. Stoneham, F. Burrough (Brisbane).

Oboes - W. H. Morton (London), W. C. Thomson.

Clarionets - J. W. Lundberg, W. Grainger.

Trumpet - H. Warnecke.

Cornets - E. Rawlins (London), J. W. Richardson, sen.

Trombones - R. A. Meek, W. Stoneham, W. Worsley.

Horns - A. Lawson (London), T. Seymour (London), A. Flewin (London), W. Maby (London).

Tuba - C. W. Berg [sic, recte C. R. Berg].

Harp - Fred Barker (London).

Drums - J. Munyard, jun., J. Twentyman.

The orchestra will begin its rehearsals in July under the conductorship of Mr. Cowen.

"On the Wing", Table Talk (22 June 1888), 14

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146022273 

"Local & General", The Tasmanian (23 June 1888), 23

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article199506896 

All the engagements for the English contingent of the orchestra for the Melbourne Exhibition (writes the London correspondent of the Argus in the letter of May 11) have been made. The principal cornet player is Mr. Edwin Rawlins, who has been the leading performer on that instrument in the bands of the Royal Horse Guards, and Drury Lane and Covent Garden theatres. Mr. A. Lawson, of the 1st Life Guards, is the principal horn, and with him will be associated Mr. Frank Seymour, of the 2nd Life Guards and the Guildhall School of Music; Mr. A. Flewin, of the 1st Life Guards, and Mr. William Mayby, of the 2nd Life Guards. In Mr. Langdale the patrons of the Exhibition will have the pleasure of hearing one of the best of English bassoon players, and a prime favourite at the Royal Italian Opera and the Promenade Concerts. The principal oboe will be in the hands of Mr. W. Morton, of Alhambra fame, and the principal violoncello will be entrusted to Mr. Theodore Liebe, who has achieved an English reputation in connection with that instrument. Herr Meyroos, whose name is a familiar feature at English orchestral concerts, takes the leading violin. The combination will also include a youth of 16, named Frederick Barker, who is a harpist of unusual ability. He came to the front during the late season of the Glasgow Choral Union, under the direction of Mr. Manns. Mr. Thomas, the head of the English harpists, and Sir George Grove have both warmly recommended his appointment as a member of the Melbourne Exhibition orchestra. Messrs Robbins, Buttery, Mortimer, and Wilson complete the list.

"PREPARATIONS FOR THE MELBOURNE EXHIBITION", The Sydney Morning Herald (26 June 1888), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13690020 

"THE ORCHESTRA", The Argus (2 August 1888), Supplement 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6896635 

... So we have in our Centennial orchestra in Melbourne, 1888, as follows, namely -

14 first violins, played by Messrs. G. Weston (leader), M. Klein, Schräder, Wenzel, Sutch, Dierich [Dietrich], Schmellitscheck, Wallenstein, Phillips, Silvester, Casiraghi, Thompson, Algers, and Iverson

12 second violins, played by Messrs. Buttery, Conolly, Robins, Kruse, Hunter, Wilson, A. C. Quin, Hess, jun., L. Quin, Busch, Hornidge, jun., and Stevens

6 violas, by Messrs. Meyroos, Bima, Dettmer, Mortimer, Edwards, and Draeger

6 violoncellos, by Messrs Liebe, Reimers, Patek, Harrison, Jeboult, and Frayling

6 contra bassos, by Messrs. Ceschina, Winterbottom, Brown, jun., Briese, Peters, and Pickroh;

2 flutes, by Messrs. H. Stoneham and Burroughs; 1 piccolo, Mr. Kerr; 2 oboes, Messrs. Morton and Thomson (the Cor Anglais is included); two clarinets (bass clarinet included), Messrs. Lundborg and Grainger; two bassoons, Messrs. Langdale and Wakefield;

four horns, Messrs. Lawson, Seymour, Flewin, and Mayby; two cornets, Messrs. Rawlins and Richardson; one trumpet, Mr. Warnecke; three trombones, Messrs. Worsley, Stoneham and S. Hore; one tuba, Mr. Berg

timpani, Mr. Munyard; Grosse Caisse, Mr. Twentyman; cymbale, Mr. Stoneham, jun.; one harp, Mr. Barker; organ, Mr. G. Peake

total, 69 performers, power being given to Mr. F. H. Cowen, the conductor, to employ some extra instruments where special need arises.

"PASSENGERS BY INTERCOLONIAL TRAINS", The Age (13 February 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196989664 

ALBURY. Tuesday. Sydney to Melbourne (express): Fred. H. Cowen, L. J . Cowen, M. A. Phillips, Edward Kerr, A. Peters, J. Twentyman, A. Ceschina, H. Hunter, Jan Meyroos, H. Warnecke, A. H. Huuter, W. R. Morton, A. Flewin, F. Burrough, W. Grainger, J. Gassies, J. W. Lundborg, W. Basset, Mr. and Mrs. T. Richardson, S. Hore, W. Worsley, F. Miller, C. J. Alger, H. Alger, C. R. Berg, W. F. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Thomson, J. Munyard, W. A. Stoneham, W. Stoneham, H. L. Stoneham, F. W. Busch, A. Casiraghi, G. Weston, G. A. Sutch, A. Wentzel, P. G. Langdale, A. M. Lawson, T. Siebe [Liebe], Max Klein, F. Parkin, W. A. Robins, Frank R. Seymour, F. Kruse, C. W. Harrison, W. A. Brown, G. P. Frayling, Fr. Tretwich, Roberto Bimo, A. C. Quin, Barry Stevens (Cowen's Exhibition Orchestra) ...


CONDUCTOR

Frederic H. COWEN


ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR

Alberto ZELMAN


FIRST VIOLINS (14)

George WESTON (leader)

Max KLEIN (deputy leader) (London)

Hermann T. SCHRADER (Adelaide)

Albert WENTZEL (Sydney)

George A. SUTCH

Franz DIERICH

Felix SCHMELLITSCHECK (Sydney)

A. V. WALLENSTEIN

M. A. PHILLIPS

Eugene SYLVESTER (Sydney)

Angelo CASIRAGHI

W. THOMPSON

Christopher J. ALGER

Louis IVERSON (Albury)


SECOND VIOLINS (12)

R. BUTTERY (London)

J. P. CONNOLLY (New Zealand)

W. A. ROBINS (London)

F. W. KRUSE

H. HUNTER

W. WILSON (London)

Alfred C. QUIN (Adelaide)

Frederick HESS, junior

L. QUIN

T. BUSCH

F. E. HORNIDGE, junior

? STEVENS


VIOLAS (6)

John B. ZERBINI (leader)

Jan MEYROOS (London)

Roberto BIMO

Henry DETTMER

MORTIMER (London)

H. EDWARDS

B. DRAEGER (Sydney)


VIOLONCELLOS (6)

Theodore LIEBE (London)

C. REIMERS

Rudolph PATEK

C. W. HARRISON

H. E. S. JEBOULT (Sydney)

George P. FRAYLING


CONTRA BASSOS (6)

A. CESCHINA

Charles WINTERBOTTOM

A. BROWN, jun.

G. BRIESE

A. R. PETERS

H. PICKROH


FLUTES

Herbert L. STONEHAM

Frank BURROUGH (Brisbane)


PICCOLO

Edward KERR


OBOES (also cor anglais)

W. R. MORTON (London)

W. C. THOMSON


CLARINETS (also bass clarinet)

John William LUNDBORG

W. GRAINGER


BASSOON

Philip LANGDALE

Henry WAKEFIELD


HORNS

A. LAWSON (London)

Frank SEYMOUR (London)

A. FLEWIN (London)

William MAYBY (London)


CORNETS

Edwin RAWLINS

J. W. RICHARDSON, senior


TRUMPET

Henry WARNECKE


TROMBONES

W. WORSLEY

William STONEHAM

Samuel HORE


TUBA

Charles R. BERG


TIMPANI

John MUNYARD, junior


GROSSE CAISSE

J. TWENTYMAN


CYMBALE

W. STONEHAM, junior


HARP

Fred. BARKER


ORGAN

George PEAKE



August 1888


All TROVE items tagged Centennial Orchestra for August 1888

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Centennial+Orchestra&q&l-decade=188&l-year=1888&l-month=8 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

Wednesday 1 August 1888
Centennial Exhibition Opening 1 August 1888

Image: http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/items/253861/newspaper-cutting-the-opening-ceremony-the-graphic-london-14-sep-1888

Another image: http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/54010

The opening ceremony






"THE OPENING CEREMONY", The Argus (2 August 1888), supplement 3-4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6896620

See also Plan of the exhibition

The arrival of His Excellency was timed for noon, but as early as 10 there were hundreds of people passing through the gates, and by 11 the floors were thronged and the galleries filling fast. Representatives of all the colonies were seen exerting their friends to allotted places, judges in scarlet gowns, and bewigged counsel, learned in the law, making pleasant contrast or variety with the tens of thousands of ordinary folk who made their way hither and thither, and took their places without much confusion, and with a courtesy and kindliness which seemed to befit the occasion, and augur well for the happy outcome of the great international effort. All available spaces were densely packed by noon, the hour at which His Excellency was expected. The Avenue of Nations was lined with the military guard, the bands were in their stands, and a very splendid guard, assembled on the steps before the main entrance, awaiting the signal which should announce the approach of the vice-regal cavalcade. The guards of honour were formed, then cadets of the state schools lined the steps, and blue-jackets were formed on either side of the drive. Admiral, commandant, lieutenants, and captains, consuls, aides-de-camp intermingled on the stairway head, or passed up and down, or grouped in the matted enclosure where the personages of the occasion should presently alight. The wind blew shrill and icy, fresh from the snow on the mountains, and the grey clouds gathered ominously, borne up by the wind. Noon passed, and yet His Excellency had not arrived, and amongst the chills and shivering there were some few forebodings as to what might have happened. People who knew the St. Kilda road very well opined that an experience akin to the glue-pot episodes of Gippsland might have happened to the state carriages, and foolish people, with no basis for their fears, had doubts about the new bridge. Many fears and many doubts are born in a quarter of an hour, and it was a full quarter past noon when a mounted trooper was seen actively clearing the way beyond the park railings, and the soldiers of the guard led the way down the double-lined drive. The carriages followed fast, and in a very few seconds the whole party had alighted, the procession was formed, and Colonel T. Bruce Hutton, marshal of ceremonies, informed His Excellency that all was ready for the procession to advance. And then was a time for all to look up that wonderful avenue, where the fruits of the trees of industry and art are seen on either hand, as the fruits and leaves of the palms in the world famed avenue of Rio Janeiro. Then, also, was the time for all who had looked along the same perspective a day or two, or even 12 hours before, to marvel at the change which had been wrought. Had art magic or only industrial art been at work? At sun-down the night before there was nought but evident energy and apparent chaos here. Cars were thundering along the rails, endless workmen were hammering away at cases and fittings, straw and sawdust, and broken boards strewed all the floors. The whole scene resembled the packing room of some vast emporium rather than a decorated art museum in gala array. And similar changes had been wrought down all the annexes. Bustle, chaos, disorder, haste everywhere last night. Quiet satisfaction, perfect decorum, artistic adornment, and well marshalled display this morning. It is but just and righteous and manly to yield honour and fame to each and all who had any part in the wonderful work, to president, and commissioners and secretary, and superintendent, and exhibitors, and agents, and assistants of all sorts. From the honourable president to the man who swept the sawdust away, hearty commendation and loud cheers for all.

But the procession is formed by the doors of the Grand Avenue. Never before have men Australian-born and lacking foreign travel been privileged to view such an array. The military went before with the Queen's colours royally advanced, and naval and military officers, British and foreign, followed after. Then came the ceremonial committee, variously attired, some in academical, some in military, some in the Windsor uniform, and but one or two in plain civilian costume, and who next but that magnificent 'White Knight', the town clerk of Melbourne, leading the way of the Worshipful the Mayor, worthily bearing the chain and sables of his office. Then the judges in their crimson and horsehair – glorious chips of colour from at grand old world; the secretary then bearing the beautifully illuminated and bejewelled address, the Executive Commissioners - the good gentlemen who had borne the brunt of all the long battle; Her Majesty's Ministers, for all her Australian colonies, the Chief Justices, who add ermine to the crimson; the learned clerk of our Legislative Assembly, the Speakers of three colonies, our own Premier, and our own Speaker in his own gown; our Lieutenant Governor, the president of the Exhibition, and the executive vice president, the Admiral's staff; the Admiral, and then, preceded by the staff, the Governors with their families. Proudly walked Sir Henry Loch, there his courtly lady by his side, and much marvelled all who had eyes for such things as the splendours of that lady's robe. It was not as the gown of that dear damosel of the Spenserian lay, but it was a wonderful harmony, in all soft and beautiful colours, gliding away from head to foot in lines of beauty and of grace, that seemed to elevate millinery into a place with the other arts. Lord Carrington, with the gentlest lady England ever sent to Australia, followed our Governor, and then their Excellencies of New Zealand, Queensland, South Australia, and Tasmania, with various ladies and friends of their households. Presidents, vice presidents, commissioners, and consuls of other colonies brought up the rear, and as the general advance was made the band of the First and Second Battalions of Rifles pealed out the first of the anthem, which as each successive court was reached, was changed to the national air of the nation represented.

At the entrance to the Grand Hall, a group of British exhibitors yield to their national instincts and cheer the Governor, but it is felt that such effusive loyalty is ill-timed, and the cheering is not taken up, nor yet when some other exuberant person within the Grand Hall calls for cheers is there any response, which is well, for the proper expression of the universal feeling will directly be made by the choir. Mr. Cowen lifts his baton, organ and orchestra peal forth, the choir joins in a full chord, and the music of the everlasting anthem of old England rolls I away over the heads of all the people, and fills the dome and roof and transept and nave with loyal and devotional sound.

In very few minutes the dais is fully occupied, and presents the most striking picture of the day. The notabilities of Australia are all there, or at least the few absent are scarcely missed. The Governors occupy the first line, as is meet, and then crowding all the long, steep gallery are military and naval men, consuls, and all classes of folks distinguished in civil life. Notably some old warriors, whose memories date back from the very early days of the century. Sir John Hay, and Sir John Robertson, with his bright eyes and unblanched cheeks, but long flowing, snowy hair. We could have wished to see Sir Alfred Stephen amongst the representatives of New South Wales, for no man bettor deserves a place in any Australian pageant, and can hardly excuse the absence of Sir Henry Parkes who alleged that be had "business more important" in his hands. The colour of the scene took every eye. The abundance of scarlet and gold, the frequent blue, the blaze of unfamiliar glory which proceeded from many a consular person, the rich lustres of the feminine attire, and over all the colossal figure of Victory extending the wreath; while in front on either side of the vice regal chair the Queen's colours, advanced by two officers of the navy, supported by two pairs of blue jackets, with straw hats pushed back, exposing their tanned faces and keen eyes; bated blades held aright, and a look about them that would give a timid person courage, though all the enemies of the empire were leagued for her destruction. That dais, as seen from the gate of the Grand Avenue, should form the subject of a great historical picture. It would be very instructive, and it might be inspiring, to the children of future generations.

But other pictures claim attention. Beyond that gorgeous canopy and curtain, which by-and-by will at need complete the enclosure of the concert hall, is the choir and orchestra, almost a thousand strong. Two banks of female forms, with sashes of blue and cardinal, on dresses of universal white, backed by the useful sables of the men, with the gilded organ pipes filling in the background. It is a charming picture, but it lacks the strength and significance presented by the dais. And right opposite in the crowded gallery, with Germany's magnificent tribute to Australia rich in drapery as bold in form, and only lacking perhaps in the classic grace which should characterise emblematical outlines of even Teutonic blood. And all the floor and the galleries are filled. There must be thirty thousand people assembled, though there is very little noise or stir amongst them all for all are impressed with the dignity and grandeur of the occasion, and desire to be in it and of it with a seemly and proper decorum.  

The proceeding opened with prayer. It would have seemed proper that one of the high clerical personages present should have offered up the prayer, or that it should, like grace before meat, have been made by the Governor's chaplain, but it had been considered better th it the Bishop of Melbourne should compose the prayer specially for the occasion, and that it should be sanctioned and approved by the heads of other denominations and offered by the president of the Exhibition Commission. Acting in a very federal and friendly spirit, the bishops and elders of the churches agreed to this proposal. Sir James MacBain therefore advanced to the front of the dais and read the eloquent and devotional words which elsewhere will be found fully recorded. And then most appropriately following, Mr. Cowen called on all his forces for such a rendering of the Old Hundredth as must have gladdened the hearts of all who had grown into love of the simple, grand old tune from the earliest days of their childhood. The volume of sound was magnificent, and followed each motion of the conductor's lightly wielded baton as one of our ocean steamships the skilled finger touch on the delicately adjusted wheel. It was a triumph of music in its most complete simplicity, and nobody amongst the audience desired to join. That, perhaps, is the highest tribute to the excellence of the performance.

Music ruled all for the next 20 minutes, for Mr. Cowen's own Song of Thanksgiving had next place on the order of ceremony. Mr. Cowen, as is well known had volunteered this service. He desired to present us on our opening day with something composed for and dedicated to our own great occasion, and thus wisely choosing certain sweet and grand words of Scripture, he set them to music, which, by a public audience, was heard for the first time yesterday, and, it is very certain, will not tomorrow be forgotten. His words were singularly appropriate, beginning with thanks and ending with blessings, and in a very remarkable manner describing circumstances which are strikingly analogous to these of Australia's centenary. It would indeed seem that Australia mast have been in the sacred writer's mind when he penned such words as the following: - "O give thanks unto the Lord for He is good, for his mercy endureth for ever. "He turneth the wilderness into a standing water, and dry ground into water springs, and there He maketh the hungry to dwell that they may prepare a city for habitation, and sow the fields and plant the vineyards which may yield their fruits of increase. He maketh peace in their borders, and filleth them with wheat. He blesseth them also, so that they are multiplied greatly."

The character and the merit of the music will, of course, be dealt with elsewhere but it maybe said here that it was adequate and suited to the occasion that it claimed the attention and admiration of all who were privileged to hear it, and brought the proceedings along to that most interesting stage when presidents, vice presidents, and secretary should ascend the dais and present His Excellency with the address and key whereby the great Exhibition should be formally opened. Very much satisfied with the result of all his initial efforts looked Mr Secretary Lavater, as he bore along the great crimson covered folio, a copy of winch Sir James MacBain proceeded to read. It was a nicely composed document, saying all that ought to be said in the best possible manner and His Excellency listened to it with attention, as was right; but it is very doubtful if he - like nine hundred and ninety nine percent of the audience - would not rather have taken it as read, and, giving the real and elaborate document to his Secretary for careful preservation have handed the copy over to the press. His Excellency's reply was commensurate and by no means fulsome; but like the address can only be reached by the bulk of the audience through the record which is made in the journals of the day. And then was the pleasant little ceremony of the key - a marvel of a key wrought in solid gold, fitter to be put into a jewel casket than a key hole, and probably destined to that permanent abode. Following the key came little testimonials to various members of the Governor's family in the shape of jewel studded gold passes to the Exhibition, and then the declaration. Whereat out flew the ensign over the dome, bang went the guns onshore and at sea, and to the front came the superintendent of telegraphs to read the message which His Excellency had prepared for despatch to the Queen. This also was waste of time and trial of patience to the audience, for the clever inspector has not a loud voice, and very few people indeed could understand from him what His Excellency proposed to say to his royal mistress. There was a certain pleasure, however, in listening to the boom after boom which echoed through the now rainy weather without, and in knowing that the news of our successful opening was being flashed across the world to the expectant Empress, whose realms were so well represented here.

The performance of the Centennial Cantata followed the reading of the cablegram, a very lengthy and trying ordeal to many thousands who could see little, and hear less. It continued through 41 minutes, not being completed till 10 minutes past 2. It is a work at which the composer has laboured much, and laboured well, trying to give interpretation to the thoughts which have been so crudely and frequently erroneously expressed by the author of the words. It was not well heard yesterday, and should have another chance when the curtains are down, and the necessary quiet possesses the proper concert hall.

Mr. Cowen, Mr. King (composer of the cantata), and the Rev. W. Allen, author of the words, were at its conclusion presented to the Governor, and then, without loss of time, the Hallelujah Chorus was sung, and the National Anthem following brought the musical portion of the proceedings to a close. It is a pity that the commissioners did not see at an earlier date, as they must see now, that one anthem or cantata dedicated to the occasion with one or two such anthems as the "Old Hundredth" and the "Hallelujah Chorus," written for all time and worthy of the greatest occasions, would have sufficed for the musical portion of the opening ceremony. With the omissions of the over-long readings, this would have saved tediousness, and indeed some suffering, to not a few among the less robust of the audience.

But all was well meant, and hurriedly devised, and, it may freely be said, all fairly well accomplished. Cheers were then given for the Queen, for the Governor and his lady, and as the Queen's colours were once more advanced, and His Excellency descended to the floor, followed by his vice regal associates, the universal impression was that a great deed had been well accomplished, and a great work well begun. The majority of those who had been spectators throughout began to disperse then, to seek their homes or places of necessary refreshment, but His Excellency and suite had still to traverse, and with much deliberation and many delays, the long Grand Avenue. The ladies of the vice-regal party had here to receive bouquets of magnificent orchids graciously presented by the New South Wales Commissioners, while His Excellency must needs halt at the entrance of each court and congratulate each executive commissioner on the more than satisfactory appearance already presented. For shape has been already taken with even the most backward of the courts, and the designs shortly to be completed are well shown. Indeed, a week more of such progress as had been made in the last few days should render everything perfect within and without the building.

Others, not yet wearied, who desired to take full advantage of the first day's opportunities, wandered away to the picture galleries, where the walls are already covered, and very little detail work remains to be done; and several moved with difficulty through the inner recesses of the machinery courts where some few wheels were already spinning, and processes in operation, and the trades and labour societies making the best of their holiday, very effectively crowded the floors

The termination of the day's ceremony, which may be taken as the final departure of His Excellency was not until 3 o'clock had passed when began mutual congratulations amongst all who had had any share in the accomplishment of the day. And no man with a fair idea of the difficulties encountered, the frequent delays, the many vexatious oppositions which have met the various commissions in every week and almost every day, will say that congratulations were uncalled for, or that honest self-satisfaction was not the proper sentiment to be entertained. A little more activity, and careful organisation, and thorough understanding amongst all concerned at the beginning of the work might have resulted in a fuller or more complete triumph today. But even that is uncertain, for had things been fairly forward the prodigious efforts of the last few days and hours would not have been put forth. A "Government stroke" might have been continued quite up to the close, and then we should still have had to tolerate many blemishes, and should have missed the general air of smartness which almost excuses the incompletion of our opening day.

The people of Australia, who will so largely assemble in Melbourne through the spring and summer of this memorable year, will not be grudging in their praise of those to whom praise is due for the undertaking and carrying through and managing of this great work. All things are well so far and promise well for the future. It is a trite old truth that the good beginning goes far towards the good ending, and the good beginning has assuredly been made.

In concluding a description of this opening ceremony, the thanks of the press, as most directly representing the public, should be offered to the commissioners for the adequate opportunities afforded for rendering a full and faithful report of the whole proceedings. Every door was generously and cordially thrown open, and in the midst of much excitement and pressing business a ready answer was given by every official to every reasonable question. This is a happy condition which does not always obtain in public ceremonials, and will be as heartily appreciated by the public as by those to whom it was immediately tendered.


Bird's-eye view of the exhibition buildings
The music

"THE MUSIC", The Argus (2 August 1888), Supplement 4-5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6896636 


As his Excellency the Governor, at the head of Her Majesty's representatives for the neighbouring colonies, and the following of distinguished men which accompanied them, reached the dais provided for them, the orchestra, conducted by Mr. F. H. Cowen, and the organ under the control of Mr. G. Peake, the appointed organist during the term of the Exhibition, played the National Anthem with noble volume of tone and most impressive effect. The sight presented by the vast concourse of people, the august strains of the anthem, the glow of colour the significance of the occasion will long be memorable to everyone privileged to be present. Then followed in noble simplicity of tune, in fulness of harmony and fervency of feeling, "The Old Hundredth", commencing "All people that on earth do dwell" to which a choir of fully 700 voices imparted the pathos of human song, and the united strength of all the instrumental forces an accompaniment of surpassing grandeur. Nothing more seemly or appropriate than this commencement could have been devised or better executed. Then there ensued the performance of a Song of Thanksgiving for chorus and orchestra, the words selected from the Psalms, the music composed expressly for the opening of the Melbourne Centennial Exhibition 1888 by Frederic H. Cowen. The following is the text: -


A SONG OF THANKSGIVING

No. 1. - CHORUS.

O give thanks unto the Lord, for He is good; for His mercy endureth for ever.

He turneth the wilderness into a standing water and dry ground into watersprings; and there he maketh the hungry to dwell that they may prepare a city for habitation; and sow the fields and plant the vineyards which may yield their fruits of increase. He maketh peace in their borders and filleth them with wheat. He blesseth them also, so that they are multiplied greatly.

Let the Lord be magnified, who taketh pleasure in the prosperity of His servant.

No. 2 - CHORUS (unaccompanied).

Except the Lord build the house, they labour in vain that build it; except the Lord keep the city, the watchman waketh but in vain.

No. 3 - FINAL CHORUS.

We, Thy people, and sheep of Thy pasture, do give thanks unto Thee for ever.

Blessed be Thou, O God, and praised be Thy glorious Name; and let the whole earth be filled with Thy glory. Amen and Amen.


It will be seen that this graceful musical compliment which Mr. Cowen has paid the city of the Australian Centennial Celebration consists of three choruses, the second of which is unaccompanied. The first is in G, common time, allegro poco vivace, "O give thanks unto the Lord" – a spirited and thoroughly acceptable theme, which proceeds by passages "in imitation" to a richly harmonised and effectively orchestrated conclusion. The unaccompanied chorus, lento,  3/4, "Except the Lord build the House", is a movement of singular beauty and insidious effect in attracting and fixing the attention of the listener, and is written for the voices with consummate skill. It is to be regretted that uncertainty of intonation on the part of the trebles detracted from the perfect effect of the chorus. The final chorus, "We, Thy People", andante molto maestoso, commences with an emphatic introduction by the brass, followed by pesante progressions for wood and strings. The altos and basses in unison commence with a theme of very sterling tune and dignified and graceful movement. In like manner the trebles and tenors take up the theme in higher progression, and then the composer, having set his themes in harmonised movement, deals with them in masterly style until a grand chorus on a great scale of treatment and with instrumentation at once firm, sustained, and florid, is found to be in full performance. The whole work is not long, but it is admirable for choral purposes, and evinces throughout the touch of a master hand.

Then came in musical sequence the Centennial Cantata, dedicated by permission to Sir Henry Loch, the Governor of the colony of Victoria, the words by the Rev. William Allen, the Congregational minister of Carlton, the music composed by Mr. Henry John King, who may properly be called a Victorian composer, having been born in South Melbourne, although at the time of the production of the Cantata he was resident of Sydney. It is to be regretted that the author of the words should not have given some distinctive title to his little poem, because the musical composer has evidently felt himself constrained lo adhere to a "heading" which has no special local significance until the lines in the body of the work are studied. But as works of this kind for the last 40 or 50 years have not possessed more than ephemeral value, the absence of special title may be passed over without further comment. There were 257 contributions [words]. The second prize of 20 guineas was awarded to Mr. G. F. Chinner, of Parkside, South Adelaide. Mr. J. W. Meaden, of South Melbourne, who wrote the prize words of the cantata for our Exhibition in 1880 by Leon Caron], received on this occasion "honourable mention". The following are the lines to which were awarded the first prize of of 50 guineas. We published them in our issue of the 2nd February in this year.

CENTENNIAL CANTATA

Historically descriptive poem, written (with a view to music) either in trochaic or trisyllabic measure, with the exception of the second part, where (in consequence of the sombre character of the theme) the heroic couplet is adopted, consisting of six parts: the Cantata Proper (Parts II, to IV); an Introduction (Part I); and an Epilogue (Part VI).

ARGUMENT

PART I. - Introduction: Welcome to Visitors.
PART II. - Australia's Solitary Past.
PART III. - First Stage in the National History: The Solitude invaded by the Pastoral Pioneers.
PART IV. - Nest Stage in the National History: The Discovery of Gold and its Effects.
PART V. - The Present and the Future.
PART VI. - Epilogue. Laus Deo.

PART I. - INTRODUCTION: WELCOME TO VISITORS

Loyally, royally, greet we here
Guests of this Centennial Year;
You, who over distant seas
Sailed to our festivities;
You, allied in federal bands
Sister States of Austral lands;
Heart and hand we give to all
At our opening festival.
Let the curved arches ring
With the greeting song we sing.

PART II. - AUSTRALIA'S SOLITARY PAST

The reign of solitude; o'er vale and hill;
Broad-breasted lake; deep river; leaping rill
O'er stony wastes of stillness, scarcely stirred
By whirr of wing, or note of passing bird;
Or speech barbaric; from whose face austere
The dusky savage turns in shuddering fear:
Where fainting nature sinks and swoons away,
Smit by the summer sun's unkindliest ray:
O'er ferny haunts, whose mossy hollows, deep,
The lifelong year their fadeless beauty keep;
O'er the primeval forest depths profound,
Wherein is heard the wild-bird's joyful sound;
O'er leagues of wrathful waves, with sullen roar,
Tumultuous, thundering on the rock-bound shore;
O'er all perpetual solitude doth brood,
Save where the savage stalks in search of food:
A land by civilisation's step untrod -
Alone with Nature, and with Nature's God.

PART III. - FIRST STAGE IN THE NATIONAL HISTORY: THE SOLITUDE INVADED BY THE PASTORAL PIONEERS

Honour the Pioneers.
Stout of heart and strong of frame,
Sturdy Sons of Britain came;
Grappling hard with natural powers
Turned the wilderness to flowers;
Taught the sometime barren field
Nature's kindly fruits to yield;
Now on lawny spaces green,
Chestnut-spotted kine are seen,
With the horse, and patient ox,
And the fleecy-covered flocks.
Cheerful human speech is heard,
Mingling with the song of bird,
And the inharmonious call
Off the tameless warrigal.
Stout of heart and strong of frame,
Worthy of their British name;
These the men that set the tree
Of Australian liberty.
Honour the Pioneers.

PART IV. - NEST STAGE IN THE NATIONAL HISTORY: THE DISCOVERY OF GOLD AND ITS EFFECTS.

Said of old the mighty master
(Speaking he of hails infernal
Where the lords of hell assembled),
That from earth the enormous fabric
"Rose up like an exhalation."
So arose the stately structure,
Rose the temple walls supernal
Of the commonwealth Australian.
Pastoral pioneers, unheeding,
Recked not that there lurked beneath them
Subtle, strong, the great magician -
Gold, before whose spell arising,
Lo, the myriad-peopled cities,
And the hum of human converse
Dispossessing solitude.

PART V. - THE PRESENT AND THE FUTURE

Where the warrigal whimpered and bayed,
Where the feet of the dark hunter strayed,
See the wealth of the world is arrayed.
Where the spotted snake crawled by the stream,
See the spires of a great city gleam,
Is it all but the dream of a dream?
And the halls of our domed palace fair,
And the wealth of the world that is there,
Are they nought? Are they fashioned of air?
Not a dream! For the night is away,
And we walk in the light of a day
That shall not be extinguished for aye.

PART VI.: - EPILOGUE: LAUS DEO

Lowly and reverent, Thy people are kneeling,
Hear us, All-bountiful Father, we pray.
O'er us the thought of Thy goodness is stealing,
As for our land we invoke Thee to-day.
All through the past has Thy goodness, unsleeping
Guided the path that our fathers have trod;
May we, their children, be held in Thy keeping
True to our country, and true to our God.


The work is scored for flauti, oboi, clarinetti, fagotti, corni, cornetti, tromba, tromboni, tuba, timpani, gran cassa e piatti, tambour militaire, arpa, organo, violini, viole, violoncelli e contra bassa. The composer directed the performance of his own work, which commenced andante maestoso with brass instruments, joined immediately with full effect by strings and wood, and leading to the first chorus, "Guests of this Centennial year" - the "Welcome Chorus" - which is grandiose in style, and has the assistance of organ for the support of the voices, besides many pretty devices in orchestration, wherein imitation passages for various instruments come in well upon sustained harmonies supplied by horns. The whole of the orchestration of this full opening number is effective, and it might here be remarked that the pianoforte score is by no means suggestive of the fulness of effect achieved by the skillful use of the various instruments employed by the composer in the orchestra.

The next number, "Australia's Solitary Past", is in 4/4 tempo adagio, with solo for baritone voice and chorus singing seated and with closed mouths. The baritone voice was represented yesterday by Mr. Otto Fisher, and with fair effect to all those well placed to hear him. The instrumentation in the little orchestral introduction to this number is delicate and impressive, the string instruments being muted, and the harp, the Cor Anglais, and drums with discretion. The passages for the voice are properly more declamatory than melodic. The result is pleasing, but we think nevertheless that the plan of condemning the chorus to sing with closed mouths is suggestive of modern Liedertafelism and far-fetched effects. The sentiment is well reflected in the instrumental accompaniment, and the finale, andante pastorale, is a pretty chromatic breaking off, in which oboi and related wood instruments are pleasantly used, but the audience in the eastern nave heard nothing of it, and began to move about restlessly and noisily to the detriment of further musical effect. The aria for contralto voice (the voice of Madame Christian), commencing "Where fainting nature", is a very gracious measure in 3/4 tempo, to which a varied and skilfully written orchestral accompaniment gives fine artistic effect, and return is then made by the chorus to the theme of "Australia's solitary past" - an effective use of what may be termed the leit motif of the composition.

The character of the music now changes. The solitude is invaded, and a recitation and air for tenor voice with chorus of men's voices is introduced by an orchestral movement, in which the part writing is fanciful and the ensemble good. The tenor air commencing "Stout of Heart" being favourably set for the voice, was sung by Mr. Beaumont. It is to be observed that the solo singers, of whom we have already named three, have had very little of rehearsal. A canzonet for soprano solo, "Now on Lawny Spaces Green", gives Miss Amy Sherwin good opportunity for the display of charming voice in a movement allegretto gracioso, which has about it something of the grace and fluency of Weber - a fine solo, of high vocal setting, but rich in descriptive instrumental accompaniment. This number, on account of the quality and interpretation, received the highest honours of the day.

After a short choral movement in honour of the pioneers, follows a duet for soprano and baritone, "Said of Old, the Mighty Master" - rhythmical, fluent, and spirited; and this leads to an unaccompanied quartet for the solo voices, "Before whose Spells" - a short movement which pleases the ear with its vocal harmonies, and makes thoroughly welcome a fanciful and very pretty orchestral movement, allegro vivace, 2/4 tempo, in which the composer's management of instrumental combinations is neatly displayed. A trio follows for soprano, contralto, and tenor voices, commencing with the much disputed line "Where the Warrigal whimpered" - a trio in large form, wherein the composer has shown something of mastery, and has produced fine artistic effects.

This leads to the epilogue "Laus Deo". The andante maestoso strain of the opening movement is again heard in the orchestra, and the chorus enters upon the fully harmonised strain "Lowly and reverent Thy people are kneeling", to develop after a few bars into passages of fugato writing, and then to be joined by the quartet of solo voices in a full voiced and effective finale. The work, which displays genuine aptitude on the part of the composer, and especially in the use of instruments, was received with great applause, and the joint authors, together with Mr. F. H. Cowen, were presented to His Excellency the Governor, who spoke to them most kindly on the success of their artistic production.

The occasion was not one on which to enlarge upon the merits of Mr. Cowen as conductor. He displayed a method which must claim the attention of all under his bâton, but of which we shall have plentiful opportunity to speak in time to come. The warmth of the welcome he received could not have been surpassed, and will not readily be forgotten. A magnificent rendering of the "Hallelujah Chorus", and the final performance of the National Anthem, with the full strength of band, chorus, and organ, brought the ceremonial musical entertainment to an end amidst enthusiastic cheers for the Queen.

The orchestra

"THE ORCHESTRA", The Argus (2 August 1888), Supplement 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6896635 

At a time when the most complete instrumental organisation seen in this part of the world has been effected, it will not be out of place, when giving the names of the players, to say something of the quality and function of the various instruments upon which they perform. For it may be easily understood that in a country such as this there may be a number of highly intelligent persons who, for reasons which will readily occur to the experienced reader, have never had opportunity to hear orchestral music in the right sense of the term. Even in this great city, with its metropolitan tone, orchestral music other than that connected with opera and oratorio has only been rarely heard until quite recently. It is true that from time to time heroic efforts have been made to produce orchestral music in grand form before the public - witness the Symphonic Concerts given on Saturday afternoons in the Exhibition building by the public spirited citizens who undertook the direction of the Continental concerts. The Melbourne Philharmonic Society and the two Liedertafels have each in degree done dutiful and honourable service in the cause of symphonic music, but as these societies are principally supported by subscribers, they are to that extent exclusive, so that the Victorian public, with its inherent apathy and general want of opportunity, is less enlightened on this phase of music than upon all others belonging to the art.

Orchestra is a comprehensive term applied equally to that part of a hall or theatre set apart for musical performers - or to platforms specially erected for them out of doors - or to the instrumental performers occupying such places, but not to regimental bands or performers of chamber music, and again, the term orchestra is applied, "not only to the performers, but to the instruments upon which they play." Instruments of various kinds in the hands of vigorous, and for the most part independent players, have been heard of from earliest times, but it is conceded by the authority from which we quote that the honour of first organising instrumental bands - or, in other words, the invention of the orchestra - belongs to France, and towards the end of the sixteenth century. In the course of the next hundred years a certain constitution of the orchestra came to be recognised, and the string quartet or quintet, with harmonious reinforcements from wood-wind instruments became established form. The string quintet is to the orchestra that which the diapason work is to the organ. It is the means used by the composer for the exemplification of his principal idea. What ever he may add in the way of further instrumentation is chiefly for the sake of that tone colouring which, by varying the tints of his musical picture, will make more impressive its effect upon the ear. We present here, on the sufficient authority of Mr W. S. Rockstro, the constitution of a great orchestra in 1784 at the Handel Commemoration held in Westminster Abbey in that year, namely, 48 first and 47 second violins, 26 violas, 21 violoncellos, 15 double basses, 6 flutes, 26 hautboys, 26 bassoons, 1 double bassoon, 12 trumpets, 12 horns, 6 trombones, 4 drums, and 2 organs. Here there were 250 instruments, exclusive of the two church organs used. We in Melbourne cannot construct upon the great lines here indicated but we follow as nearly as possible the modern plan of forming an efficient orchestra for the performance of the works of the great masters, who lived at the close of the last century and the beginning of this.

So we have in our Centennial orchestra in Melbourne, 1888, as follows, namely -

14 first violins, played by Messrs. G. Weston (leader), M. Klein, Schräder, Wenzel, Sutch, Dierich [Dietrich], Schmellitscheck, Wallenstein, Phillips, Silvester, Casiraghi, Thompson, Algers, and Iverson; 12 second violins, played by Messrs. Buttery, Conolly, Robins, Kruse, Hunter, Wilson, A. C. Quin, Hess, jun., L. Quin, Busch, Hornidge, jun., and Stevens; 6 violas, by Messrs. Meyroos, Bima, Dettmer, Mortimer, Edwards, and Draeger; 6 violoncellos, by Messrs Liebe, Reimers, Patek, Harrison, Jeboult, and Frayling ; 6 contra bassos, by Messrs. Ceschina, Winterbottom, Brown, jun., Briese, Peters, and Pickroh;

2 flutes, by Messrs. H. Stoneham and Burroughs; 1 piccolo, Mr. Kerr; 2 oboes, Messrs. Morton and Thomson (the Cor Anglais is included); two clarinets (bass clarinet included), Messrs. Lundborg and Grainger; two bassoons, Messrs. Langdale and Wakefield;

four horns, Messrs. Lawson, Seymour, Flewin, and Mayby; two cornets, Messrs. Rawlins and Richardson; one trumpet, Mr. Warnecke; three trombones, Messrs. Worsley, Stoneham and S. Hore; one tuba, Mr. Berg; timpani, Mr. Munyard; Grosse Caisse, Mr. Twentyman; cymbale, Mr. Stoneham, jun.; one harp, Mr. Barker; organ, Mr. G. Peake; total, 69 performers, power being given to Mr. F. H. Cowen, the conductor, to employ some extra instruments where special need arises.

An orchestra formed upon this plan has distinct and strongly marked divisions - namely, the full group of strings, the wood-wind instruments, comprising the flutes, clarinets, oboes, and bassoons, and the brass, which includes trumpets, horns, trombones, cornets, tubas, and drums - "natural bass" to the trumpets. Each one of these principal divisions admit of sub-grouping according to a kind of organic relationship, which the ear can easily recognise, such as oboes and bassoons, or flutes and clarinets, and so with the string and brass bands, according to the tonal characteristics of the various instruments composing them. With such ample means at command, with such variety of colours on his palette, the musical tone painter is practically master of endless effect.

Let us take now, as an illustration of this subject, the strength of an orchestral score used in the production of one of the most widely known of operatic overtures - the "William Tell" overture, by Rossini. Here we find flute, piccolo, two oboes, two clarinettes, four horns, two trumpets, two bassoons, three trombones, timpani, cymbals, triangle, Groase Caisae (or big drum), first and second violini, violas, five parts for violincellos, and a ripieno, or supplementary part for that instrument, and contrabasso.

To gain some idea of the musical qualities and capacities of these different instruments may not be unacceptable to the general reader. The flute, one of the oldest known of musical wind instruments, the tone of which has been most advantageously developed of late years and with it a change effected in the internal form of the instrument and the exterior application of the mechanism for playing it. This instrument, "though not possessing a very extensive compass, is especially prominent in concerted music from the acuteness of the sounds it is competent to produce," - and, it might also be added, for the sweetness of its grave tones. The piccolo or small octavo variety of the flute emits the sharpest notes "ordinarily used in music."

The oboe is also an instrument of the highest antiquity and widely-spread use. It is made of wood in joints, with a conical bore, and its tone is produced by a double reed, in this respect differing from the clarinet, the mouth piece of which is fitted with a single reed. Like the flute, the outer form of the oboe has been greatly altered in appearance of late, in consequence of the elaboration of the machinery for governing the ventages of the tube. There have been, and still are, exceptionally fine players on the oboe as a solo instrument, but it is as a member of the orchestra that it it most highly prized, and there it is indispensable whenever the composer's imagination has been touched by the charm of pastoral tranquility. For all sorts of rustic merriment it and its near relations the Cor Anglais and the bassoon, have special qualifications for faithfully reflecting the spirit of the scene. The Cor Anglais is a tenor oboe of grave and sonorous tone, and the bassoon - "a wooden double reed instrument of eight-foot tone. The English and French names are derived from its pitch, which is the natural bass of the oboe and other reed instruments, the Italian and German names (Fagotto and Fagott) come from its resemblance to a faggot, or bundle of sticks." Of very powerful and penetrating reedy tone throughout its entire compass, the great writers from the time of Haydn downwards have made most effective use of the bassoon.

The clarionet is an instrument of wood - a "mouth piece furnished with a single beating reed, a cylindrical tube terminating in a bell." It is a valued instrument possessing extended compass, managed by fingering, which is rather difficult to learn. It is said to be named after the clarion, "the English equivalent for trumpet, to which its tone has some similarity. The clarionet is made in a variety of sizes and registers, and its lower and middle tones are of great power and beauty."

The horn is a brass instrument - a very long tube, convoluted, expanding at one end into a wide bell mouth, and having at the other a small funnel shaped mouth piece. It is supplied with interchangeable crooks for varying the pitch and in its latest form with valves under the control of the player's finger. Although difficult to learn, and treacherous to be played, the horn is an orchestral instrument of wide compass and singular beauty of tone, and in a group of four, us we find it in our Rossini score, and in the organisation under Mr. Cowen's baton it is of wonderful advantage to all sweet and sustained harmonies.

The trumpet, both in form and tone, is a familiarly known instrument, and of great value in heralding impressive instrumental combinations, and in giving ringing finish to all kinds of military fanfare. The trombone, a long brass tube with bell mouth and mouthpiece, having about it this peculiarity that its component lengths slide upon each other telescopically with this great advantage that all gradations of tone possible to the instrument can be produced with purity as on the violin, or with the human voice. The quality of the tone of the trombone, whether singly or in group, is strikingly impressive.

Drums deserve to be spoken of by themselves on account of the important position they hold in all great instrumentnl organisations. First stand the kettle drums, consisting of vellum heads slitched over closed metallic vessels; then the side drums, consisting of vellum heads stretched over cylindrical vessels - the upper head to be tapped by the sticks, the lower being made to rattle by means of cords, called snares, being stretched tightly across it (Do not these "snares" come from the German Schnarr?) The big drum, or grosse-caisse, with its thunderous boom, has its own effective part to play, but it is the kettledrums, with their accurate intonation, which are prized by the musician when aiming at orchestral effect. Cymbals and triangles are simple metal instruments of percussion, easy to understand, useful when wanted and often introduced with pleasing result.

There remains now but to speak of the string quintet, consisting of first and second violin, viola, violoncello, and contra-basso, which form the very backbone of the orchestra. In the score wo have been examining there are five "parts" written for violoncellos - a rare combination, but exceedingly rich in harmonious effect, as will be remembered by all who heard the last performance here of the William Tell Overture. With these string-instruments, which all belong to one family, the composer can do wonders. With their family-likeness in tone, a likeness not to be denied, however much the volume of their voices may differ, and with their overlapping of registers, the most perfect gamut conceivable is placed at the composer's disposal, and thus far and through this means the most unbroken flow of tune and the finest of homogeneous harmonics have been attained. Given then the string quintet of our Melbourne Centennial Orchestra, the personnel of which we have named and which numbers 44 players, and the well founded strength of the general organisation is assured.

With such combinations and chromatic effects as shall be added with the wood and brass wind instruments, we shall not have to complain during Exhibition time that we are debarred from hearing the highest class of orchestral music in form and quality such as must satisfy the most fastidious. Our orchestra is of the same numerical strength as that of the Gewandhaus Leipzig. Surely it is possible for Melbourne to achieve a reputation like that of the musically well favoured city named.


Other reports of the opening ceremony

"THE OPENING CEREMONIAL", The Age (1 August 1888), 9-10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196001108 

"THE CANTATA AND POEM", The Age (1 August 1888), 13

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196001114 

"THE MUSICAL PERFORMANCE", The Age (2 August 1888), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196004109 

Never before has there been seen in Melbourne, or in the southern hemisphere, such a perfect and complete musical organisation as that which rendered the music selected for performance yesterday. The chorus of 800 ladies and gentlemen, and orchestra of 66 performers, have been associated for the last month in daily practice under the conductorship of Mr. F. H. Cowen, and the result more than satisfied the utmost expectations that could have been formed. The appearance of Mr. Cowen on the platform was the signal for a prolonged outburst of enthusiastic applause, which must have satisfied him as to the recognition and appreciation of his high position in the musical world, both on the part of the public and of the orchestra and chorus under his control. Upon the signal being given announcing the arrival of the vice regal party the National Anthem was played by the orchestra and organ, and after a prayer, read by the president of the Exhibition, the choir sang the Old Hundredth Psalm. After this came A Song of Thanksgiving, a cantata for chorus and orchestra by Mr. F. H. Cowen, specially composed for the occasion. It consists of three choral numbers, the employment of solo voices having been purposely avoided by the composer, on account of his having had no knowledge of what artists could be obtained here. The words have been selected, from the Psalms, and are singularly appropriate, the second phrase of those taken for the first chorus, commencing "He turneth the wilderness into a standing water," reading almost like a prophecy. The leading subject of the first number, "O give thanks," is announced in unison by the entire chorus, accompanied by short chords in the orchestra, followed by closely imitative passages on a portion of the theme, forming a series of bold, yet perfectly natural, modulations. After further development the second section is reached, and to the words "He maketh peace in their borders" is heard a purely melodious cantabile movement, in which effective use is made of antiphonal phrases, the male and female voices responding to each other; leading back to the original subject, powerfully treated, both chorally and orchestrally. An exquisite modulation occurs here, from the key of A to that of B flat, gradually introducing the second number, an unaccompanied chorus, "Except the Lord build the house." For melodic charm, purity of harmonics and graceful construction this must be pronounced one of the most beautiful among similar compositions by any modern composer. From simple harmonisation of a melody, it proceeds by imitative and modulatory passages, and after a return to the original theme ends with a kind of coda, in which a particularly elegant phrase of descending fourths occurs, a distinctly original effect. The final chorus, "We, Thy people," is somewhat in the form of a triumphal march, introduced first in unison, the development being conducted to a great extent by means of imitation and antiphony, the whole presenting a broad, rhythmic and strongly impressive movement. In his use of the orchestra the composer shows not only complete mastery over technical details, but distinct individuality, using his instruments as a painter does his colors, and so well does he know the exact effect of every combination and tone that he never fails to clearly convey his meaning. The choral writing is very free, the treatment of the voices following to some extent the orchestral method, and he does not hesitate to double parts, even for a few notes, if thereby he can intensify an effect. Familiarity with contrapuntal writing is evident throughout the work, although no set piece of mathematical ingenuity is introduced.

A work of art must be judged both by the value of the material composing it and by the quality of its workmanship, and in both these respects this cantata must take a very high position. This is the first important work produced by Mr. Cowen in the full maturity of his powers that has yet been heard in Melbourne, and it may naturally be taken as a fair sample of his style and method. One thing is immediately noticeable, namely, that he is an independent thinker. He follows no beaten track, he attaches himself to no so-called "school," but develops and treats his ideas with refreshing originality. Mr. Cowen has, further, the heaven-born gift of melody, pure and spontaneous, that "grace beyond the reach of art" that appeals directly to the heart of humanity, the very soul of music, without which the most consummate scholarship is cold and lifeless. Mr. Cowen conducted his work from memory, and also the rest of the music given under his direction. The performance showed the influence exerted by his master-mind, and the absolute perfection of control he has obtained. The whole body of performers was swayed by his slightest gesture, sufficing to produce the requisite effect without any departure from his ordinary composed and self-contained demeanor, with a result surprising in its satisfaction of the most exigent requirements. The tone produced by the chorus is full and true, the attack is decided and every part is evenly balanced, none predominating over the other; while the orchestra, led by Mr. George Weston, showed a high amount of efficiency.

After the delivery of an address to the Governor by the president, accompanied by a gold presentation key of the Exhibition, his Excellency declared the Exhibition to be open. The performance of the Centennial Cantata followed, words by the Rev. W. Allen, music by Mr. H. J. King, who conducted his own work, the solo portions being sung by Miss Amy Sherwin, Madame Christian, Mr. Armes Beaumont and Mr. Otto Fischer. The cantata is divided into six parts, the first being a prologue, welcoming the visitors, and the last an epilogue Laus Deo. The other four are entitled respectively Australia's Solitary Past, The Solitude Invaded, The Discovery of Gold, and The Present and the Future. The opening chorus, Guests of this Centennial Year, is broadly and effectively written for the voices, and fully scored. In the second part, illustrating the reign of solitude, the expedient of using the chorus as part of the orchestra, by giving it soft accompanying harmonies to sing with closed mouth, is adopted, a baritone solo meanwhile singing descriptive phrases in quasi-recitative. The composer announces in his published commentary that he has intended in this number to describe the gentle roll of waves on a beach, the placid river, broad lake and leaping rill; but the effect cannot be said to be commensurate with the intention. A solo for contralto, which follows, contains some pleasing phrases. The third part commences with a tenor air, Honor the Pioneers, in barcarole form, and accompanied by a male voice chorus at the end, leading to a solo for soprano, of a graceful character, also concluding with a chorus. A soprano and baritone duet calls for no special mention, but the unaccompanied quartet, Before Whose Spells, is well written for the voices. An instrumental episode, descriptive of the busy life of cities in contrast to the former solitude, precedes a trio for soprano, contralto and tenor, a number that must be pronounced decidedly weak. The final chorus, Lowly and Reverent, begins with a short movement, Andante maestoso, in which exception must be taken to the progression of the soprano and bass between the first and second bars, as being not only contrary to rule, but unpleasant to the ear. A tuneful subject is now fugally treated as far as the exposition is concerned, succeeded by simple harmonies and these are maintained to the end, the solo voices joining with the chorus at the close. The first and last numbers are the best, both in point of conception and treatment. Mr. King's orchestration is unequal, and in some places he appears to have overlooked the great size of the building in which his work would be performed, and made the orchestral part so light as to be scarcely audible at any distance from the platform. This is not the first time that Mr. King has been a successful competitor for musical prizes, and he is to be complimented on his success in obtaining this, the most important of all hitherto offered. The composition shows Mr. King to possess sufficient talent to warrant the expectation from him of good work in the future. He received enthusiastic applause both before and after the performance of the cantata. After Mr. Cowen, Mr. King and the Rev. W. Allen had been presented to his Excellency the Governor and Lady Loch, the proceedings terminated with the Hallelujah Chorus and the National Anthem, Sir Michael Costa's arrangement, conducted by Mr. Cowen, Mr. George Peake ably presiding at the organ. The musical arrangements, under the direction of Mr. Miller, the music business manager, were entirely satisfactory.



Thursday 2 August 1888

Invitation concert


"EXHIBITION FESTIVITIES. CONCERT GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT AND COMMISSIONERS", The Argus (3 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6896707

The president and commissioners of the Centennial Exhibition gave a concert last night in that part of the Exhibition building which has from the first, been set apart for music. The part named has always had a bad name for acoustic qualities, and it might be that, by experiment within the 35 acres occupied for the purposes of the Exhibition, there might he found some corner or other - accommodating four or five thousand people - of perfect fitness. Last night the concert room in the old place - and with its rearrangement of altered roof and curtained end - was put to the test, and amongst the valuable results noticed was that the old defect, the noise of a trampling crowd, was still a most objectionable and unremedied distraction The suggestion had been already made - and will most probably be carried out - that, for the sake of the music in the concert room, the floor immediately beyond the curtain and under the dome should be covered with matting. The room lost night, which in floor space and galleries was seated to accommodate some 3,000 people, was not nearly filled, and this was accounted for by want of punctuality on the part of many hundreds of persons in notifying their non-acceptance of the invitations sent to them, so that the vacant spaces observed were not due to any neglect on the part of the commissioners, who felt bound to reserve space for the full number invited.

At the appointed hour his Excellency the Governor and Lady Loch, and the Governors of the neighbouring colonies arrived with many staff attendants and a numerous following, and amongst the audience already seated were to be seen venerable pioneers and prominent Australian men of varying degree. There was a magnificent attendance of singers at the choir end of the room, and in comparison with their numerical force the orchestra was small in body and weak in tone. It was when they performed in separate capacity that each had full recognition of special power. The National Anthem was performed in handsome style, and there was some other music which showed the work of the chorus in very good light. The part they took in the great chorus, "The Heavens are telling", from the musical "Creation" of Haydn, was very fine indeed, and especially that part towards the conclusion which ends it in an ecstasy of chromatic musical progression, and the clear, short, and fine cut finish is arrived at. The Centennial Chorus also enjoyed all to themselves special honour in their unaccompanied performance of the part-songs, "Sweet und Low" by Barnby, and "Now is the Month of Maying", written by Morley in A.D. 1595. We may pass over the Barnby composition in order to point out the special and unexpected value of the old English work - the performance of which not only represented well the sweet and charmingly harmonised work of the good writer of madrigals, but tested the musical quality of the audience, who with voice and hand and in an instant recognised the beauty of the work, and insisted on its repetition.

Before parting from the fine organisation known as the Melbourne Centennial Choir, we would like at the commencement of the Exhibition term to point out that it is highly improper for the ladies and gentlemen composing it to make any demonstrations in the way of applause. They appear in their places as performers, and do their best to win the favour of those for whose gratification they sing, not to display it themselves. The orchestra, under Mr. Cowen, came in last night for its proper share of recognition. Its component members, whether belonging of old to this locality, or newly brought hither by the wise selection of the conductor, have submitted themselves with laudable esprit de corps to a month's close drill. We have the advantage of it in listening to the best orchestra this part of the world has heard.

And now comes in the proper recognition of the influence of Mr. Cowen, who was invited from London to organise and develop our strength in instrumental musical resource, and the wisdom as well as the good fortune of the commissioners in selecting him. Mr. Cowen, with quiet manner, has his men completely with him. He conducts like a master in music, or like a man who has passed his student years in the study of the richly written scores of the great masters - one whose mind is informed in classic lore, and can direct "without book" the right reading of all the splendid tone poems which enlightened men throughout all the world have agreed to call best. Apart from his skill and and sympathy and good manner as conductor, Mr. Cowan displayed last night a really delightful talent as accompanist at the pianoforte. Mr. Gladstone Wright sang "Infelice", from "Ernani". Madame Boema gave her noble voice to the high pitched declamatory air, "O golden day of glory", from Caron's Exhibition cantata of 1880. She might with her fine powers have done better. Miss Mitchell sang with good tone the song "Regret", to which the composer's [Cowen's] accompaniment lent new charm, and Mr. W. C. Fraser, a gentleman possessing a fine tenor voice, sang Blumenthal's "My Queen", and for this he was deservedly well applauded. Where the ladies and gentlemen named appeared in concerted music, such as the trio in "The Heavens are Telling", and the quartet from "Rigoletto", the effect was not so good as in their solo performances, for the reason that they had evidently had little practice together and were not all of them masters of operatic style.

The instrumental selections played by the orchestra, which, for the next six months, is going to be the joy of Melbourne, were the overture to "Oberon", by Weber, "Entr'acte", from "Colombe", by Gounod, the gavotte from "Mignon", by A. Thomas, the magnificent accompaniment to "The Heavens are Telling", the Suite de Ballet "Sylvia", by Delibes, and the splendid overture, "Leonora" (No. 3), by Beethoven. With slight exception all these pieces have been heard here many times before, but for the present it will suffice to say never with such charming effect.

The musical programme for today is very full. The afternoon concert commences at half past 3 p.m. and the evening at 8 p.m. The full programmes are to be seen in our advertising columns.



Friday 3 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

FIRST DAILY ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Flying Dutchman" .. .. Wagner
2. Larghetto (from 2nd Symphony) .. .. Beethoven
3. Ballet music, "Reine de Saba" .. .. Gounod (First time [in Australia])
4. Serenade for Strings .. .. Haydn (First time)
5. Invitation to the Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
6. Overture, "Zanetta" .. .. Auber


EVENING, at 8

SECOND DAILY ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Ruy Blas" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Entr'acte (Colombe) .. .. Gounod
3. Graceful Dance (Henry VIII.) .. .. Sullivan
4. Suite de ballet (Sylvia) .. .. Delibes
5. Serenade for Strings .. .. Haydn
6. Grand selection, "Carmen" .. .. Bizet
7. Overture, "Semiramide" .. .. Rossini


CONDUCTOR - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN.

Admission free, with the exception of a few front seats on the ground floor, which will be sold at one shilling.


[Advertisement], The Argus (3 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6896775

The following morning's review:

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION, AFTERNOON AND EVENING CONCERTS", The Argus (4 August 1888), 14

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6896875 

A beginning was made yesterday afternoon with the musical performances which will form one of the main attractions of the Australian Centennial International Exhibition. Lady Lock and a number of lady friends were present, and there was a fairly numerous audience, but not sufficiently so to do honour to the players and their conductor. There were many people scattered about the various courts of the Exhibition at the time of the performance who were in ignorance of the fact that music had been provided for them, else no doubt the attendance would have been much greater. The proper hearing of the music was unfortunately hindered by noises of hammering going on in proximity to the concert chamber and the sound of trampling feet about the courts. With this hint we pass on to the consideration of a musical performance, the only fault of which was that it could not be heard under circumstances such as would do justice to all its beauty. The programme was judiciously compiled with a view to contrast, and the production of the first two numbers was sufficient to show the difference between the greatest of the old masters and the loudly proclaimed greatest of the "new school".  Wagner's overture to "The Flying Dutchman" was immediately contrasted with the strains of the larghetto movement from the Second Symphony of Beethoven. The one appeared to be "full of sound and fury", the other came like a new evangel of peace and perfect consolation to all persons whose nature is in sympathy with true music. A wonderful Suite de ballet from "La Reine de Saba", by Gounod, consisted of five numbers, wherein the homogeneity of the idea in reflecting what the author imagined to be Oriental rhythm and general tone was greatly to be admired. Amongst these Suites de ballet, no matter what the scene or climate to be represented, the composer and the maître de ballet have to work together. There are certain figures to be danced, certain pas to be executed, and certain grand marches to be done with support or fanfare and scenic effect. In this way Gounod, and Delibes and Ponchielli - not to mention Meyerbeer and others of French and Italian school - have lent their art to scenes of fine conception, wherein music and the "poetry of motion" have exercised cheerful and wholesome influence. A "Serenade for Strings" by Haydn is to be heard again. The "Invitation to the Waltz", by Weber, arranged in the key of D by Berlioz, for grand orchestra, was a most interesting performance, opened with all the grace of fine recitative by Mr. Liebe on the violoncello, and finding its way under the guidance of Berlioz through all the beautiful movements of the charming work with brilliant instrumental illustration to the unique and effective ending, which makes of this original pianoforte composition a perfect dramatic scene, The  overture to "Zanetta", by Auber, often heard here as an organ performance, was given as a final number with all the verve and fine finish which the composer could have desired. The evening concert was listened to by a larger audience than that of the afternoon, and the whole surroundings were better. There were more people in the concert hall, and therefore amongst the bulk of them less interference from outside influences, except to those who sat near the screen. There yet remains much to be done to convert the western nave of our Exhibition building into a suitable musical hall. An idea might be taken from experience in London, where the vast Albert Hall upon its first trial was found to be defective as a concert room. The Exhibition commissioners have done something to cover the organ and choir and orchestral space of the Exhibition permanent building with an arched roof, but there is yet something more to be done, as was the case in the adaptation for musical purposes of the much larger building already mentioned. Some canvas or other fabric might be extended from the platform to the dome along the interior ridge of the roof and draped tent like to the top front of the galleries. This, and perhaps more than this, will have to be done to enable the full effect to be gained of the fine performances which are to be given. It is always difficult to improve upon radical defects, but with a splendid musical organisation, with an enlightened conductor of modern school, and with good will on the part of the governing powers, the musical part of the Exhibition should by the means suggested be made as perfect as possible. Last night's programme included Mendelssohn's "Ruy Blas" overture, charming "bits" by Gounod, by Sullivan, by Delibes, and by Haydn, operatic selections by Bizet, and a famous overture by Rossini, and they all received a magnificent interpretation at the hands of the orchestra. It is to be regretted that the full enjoyment of them by the whole audience was in any way interfered with, but remedial measures in the direction of aiding the listeners may be hoped to be taken ere long.


There were no official exhibition concerts on Saturday 4th or Sunday 5th, and no orchestral concerts were held on succeeding Sundays



Monday 6 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT, By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA

1. Overture, "Prometheus" .. .. Beethoven
2. Allegretto (from the "Reformation" Symphony) .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Au bord de la mer .. .. Dunkler (First time)
4. Graceful Dance (Henry VIII.) .. .. Sullivan
5. Scenes Pittoresques .. .. Massenet (First time)
6. Liebesliedchen .. .. Taubert
7. Overture, "Anacreon" .. .. Cherubini


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT, By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA

1. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber
2. Chaconne and Rigaudon d'Aline.. .. Monsigny (First Time)
3. Ballet music (from "Le Prophète") .. .. Meyerbeer
4. Nocturne (from "Midsummer Night's Dream") .. .. Mendelssohn
5. Selection from "Carmen" .. .. Bizet
6. Overture, "Merry Wives of Windsor" .. .. Nicolai


CONDUCTOR, Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Admission free, with the exception of a few front seats on the ground floor, which will be sold at one shilling.


[Advertisement], The Argus (4 August 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6896841

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. AFTERNOON AND EVENING CONCERTS", The Argus (7 August 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6897110  

... "Scenes Pittoresques", by Massenet ... Altogether this last piece was not equal in inspiration to many fine performances we have heard from this composer. His "Mary Magdalene" - a beautiful oratorio - had to be produced here yet.

Amongst the beauties of the instrumental performances given under the hands of Mr. Cowen are such "little bits" as the "Little Love Song", by Taubert, in which the oboe solo part was played by the English player, Mr. Morton, with that inherited respect for the traditional and typical tone of the instrument which distinguishes the school to which he belongs. The effect of this was, in the little time it occupied, so complete and charming that it was by general consent redemanded and repeated.

The overture to "Anacreon", by Cherubini, as it was composed by the greatest stickler for observance of form in composition and rule, and as he understood it in his day, as counterpoint and harmony, should be recognised as the work of an enlightened but uninspired great worker ...




Intercolonial coverage of the exhibition music so far:


On Monday, The Sydney Morning Herald ran its first report from one of its exhibition emissaries, the self-styled as "Huron". Though the author was not limited to music (Huron would also deliver exhibition reports on other subjects), the correspondent's report on the event's first musical offerings, while generally positive, could also adopt a more trenchant tone when necessary than those of, for instance, the Argus. Still only a few days in, it was:

... worth while to have come to the Centennial Exhibition if for no other purpose than to hear the music ... And two things are evident, that there are fine musical resources in Australia, and that it pays to give a good price and get a good man [Cowen] to make the beat use of those resources. If people heard this choir and orchestra - people who have been in the habit of saying that no good thing can come out of Australia musically or artistically - they would for very shame's sake for ever after hold their peace ....

At the opening, King had done his music a dis-service by conducting his cantata:

Mr. King cannot conduct well; he had a wild and nervous way of doing things that would ruin the composure of any orchestra, and particularly of this one, so varied in its composition and so newly brought together.

The invitation concert the following day:

... viewed from the broad standpoint of artistic merit, was a great success, and what it lacked in warmth and spontaneity may be attributed ... to the apathy, real or affected, of the audience of over 2000 people that attended ...

The wonder is to me that after only one month's training this orchestra can play with the admirable form that it does: Mr. Cowen's task was a hard one. He came here to find raw material, that is, raw so far as practice together was concerned, and he has trained them into a musical union which would be suggestive of  long association. The bowing is remarkably uniform, and the whole orchestra come to their work with artistic alertness. For the remainder of this year there is good enjoyment for Australia in this orchestra, and I shall be disappointed if the popular verdict is not one of perfect satisfaction and delight. So good an inception of the musical factor of the Exhibition suggests great things. In a few days Sir Arthur Sullivan's "Golden Legend" will be performed, and with the further companionship of the conductors and musicians it is safe to predict a great success. I firmly believe Melbourne is both musical and artistic in its inclinations. lt is not defined in its tastes; but that will come with time. A German artist said to me yesterday in the German Art Gallery, of which I shall speak in another paper, "Yes. I think the Australian people like art. In a general wav; but they do not yet know what to like; but that will come, that will come.

"THE MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Sydney Morning Herald (6 August 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28344429



Tuesday 7 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
By the Centennial Orchestra
Leader - Mr. GEO. WESTON

1. Overture, "Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Symphony in C minor, No. 5 .. .. Beethoven
- Allegro con brio, C minor
- Allegro [recte Andante] con molto, A flat
- Allegro (scherzo), C minor
- Allegro (Finale), C major
3. Entr'acte, "Rosamunde" .. .. Schubert
4. Hungarian Rhapsody No. 1 .. ... Liszt (First Time)
5. Danse des Bachantes ("Philemon et Baucis") .. .. Gounod (First Time)
6. Prelude and Entr'acte (Lohengrin) .. .. Wagner

Conductor, Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (7 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6897183

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (8 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6897233

... the best day's orchestral music ever heard in this part of the world.



Thursday 9 August 1888

There were no public concerts on Wednesday 8th.

However, on Thursday evening, there was another unadvertised Invitation Concert, as the Argus reported the next day:

The great music hall of the Exhibition building was thronged last night by guests invited by the President of the Legislative Council (Sir James MacBain) and the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly (Mr. M. H. Davies) ...

The entertainment, which was very much enjoyed by the great audience present, was not on a grand scale of music. There were plenty of well-known songs and familiar pieces from the players, and perhaps on this account the applause was more discriminating and hearty than usual.

As reported, the program by the soloists and the Centennial Chorus and Orchestra included:

"Occasional Overture" .. .. Handel
"Hear my prayer" .. .. Mendelssohn
"Gipsy Life" .. .. Schumann
"Hallelujah Chorus" ... Handel
"Annie Laurie" (sung by Mrs. Palmer)
"The Better Land" .. .. Cowen (Madame Christian)
"Kathleen Mavoureen" .. .. Crouch (Mad. Christian)
"Sound an alarm" .. .. Handel (Mr. R. Kennedy)
"The Macgregor's gathering" (Mr. Kennedy)
Piano Concerto in G minor .. .. Mendelssohn (Madame Madeline Schiller)
Polonaise in E .. .. Liszt (Mad. Schiller)
[Hungarian] Rhapsody No 1 in F [minor] .. .. Liszt
"Albion" - a selection of National Airs, English, Irish, and Scotch


"EXHIBITION FESTIVITIES. INVITATION CONCERT", The Argus (10 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6897530


Friday 10 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Egmont" .. .. Beethoven
2. Entr'acte, "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
3. Overture, "Flying Dutchman" .. .. Wagner
4. Ballet Music, "Prophète" .. .. Meyerbeer
5. Entr'acte, "Columbe" .. .. Gounod
6. Minuet .. .. Boccherini
7. Overture, "Le Philtre" .. .. Auber


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Flauto Magico" .. .. Mozart
2. Allegro, "Reformation Symphony" .. .. Mendelssohn
3. "Au Bord de la Mer" .. .. Dunkler
4. Saltarello .. .. Gounod (First Time)
5. Suite, "Aus Aller Herren Länder" (From Foreign Parts) .. .. Moskowski (First Time)
(1 Russian, 2 Italian, 3 German, 4 Spanish, 5 Hungarian)
6. Gavotte, "Mignon" .. .. Thomas
7. Selection, "Lucia" .. .. Donizetti
8. Coronation March, "Prophète" .. .. Meyerbeer


[Advertisement], The Argus (10 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6897558

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Argus (Saturday 11 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6897723

... that part of the great building set apart for music is never full. This is not as it should be. The public are the losers, for the present series of musical performances are of a kind never before possible to be enjoyed in Australia, and it is a misfortune that their great educational and humanising effect will be curtailed by the apathy of those for whose benefit they have been arranged ...

In noticing the performance of yesterday afternoon, we may confine our attention to those numbers which were new to the programme, though not in many cases new to the audience. The first was the overture to "Egmont" by Beethoven, one of his great contributions to dramatic music. It would be greatly interesting and highly instructive if the whole of the "Egmont" music, by Beethoven, could be given by the band under Mr. Cowen's control, with descriptions of each scene - or, at least, the general progress of the play - given in the official programme of the day. This would be a form of annotation which has not as yet been tried, but would be very valuable to Australians as well as to all others ...

A charming suite, cleverly composed, by Moskowski, was played by the band with more or less of acceptable suggestion of the Russian, the Italian, the German, the Spanish, and the Hungarian styles imitated by the composer. The Italian and the Hungarian styles were distinctly weak, the Russian, the German, and the Spanish imitations were cleverly written ...




Saturday 11 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT, By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Especially Augmented for the Occasion.

1. Symphony In C, No. 7 .. .. Haydn
- Adagio and vivace, C major
- Adagio ma non troppo, F major
- Minuet Allegretto, C major
- Finale presto assai, C major
2. Duet, from "Italian Love Tale" .. .. Hoffmann (First Time)
3. Concerto in F minor for Pianoforte and Orchestra ... Chopin
  MADAME CARLOTTA TASCA
4. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner (First Time)
5. Solo - Pianoforte, "Faschingsschwank aus Wien" (1st movement) .. .. Schumann
  MADAME CARLOTTA TASCA
6. War March of the Priests ("Athalie") .. .. Mendelssohn


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERTS.

1. Overture, "Mirella" .. .. Gounod (First time) (The ORCHESTRA)
2. Song, "The Village Blacksmith" .. .. Weiss (Mr. A. H. GEE)
3. Song, "My dearest heart" .. .. Sullivan (Miss ELLEN ATKINS)
4. "Hungarian Rhapsody No. 1" .. .. Liszt (The ORCHESTRA)
5. Song, "The Blue Alsatian Mountains" .. .. Adams (Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT)
6. Liebesliedchen .. .. Taubert (The ORCHESTRA)
7. Minuet .. .. Boccherini (The ORCHESTRA)
8. Song, "The Gallant Vaqueroo" .. .. M. Watson (Mr. A. H. GEE)
9. Solo Cornet, "The Better Land" .. .. Cowen (Mr. E. RAWLINS)
10. Song, "Waiting for the King" .. .. F. Muir (Miss ELLEN ATKINS)
11. Prelude and entr'acte ("Lohengrin") .. .. Wagner (The ORCHESTRA)
12. Song, "My Pretty Jane" .. .. Bishop (Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT)
13. Duet, "Think a Sailor is Faithful" .. .. Balfe (Miss ELLEN ATKINS and Mr. A. H. GEE)
14. Grand Selection, "Albion" (On English, Irish, and Scotch Airs) .. .. Baetens (The ORCHESTRA)


[Advertisement], The Argus (11 August 1888), 20

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6897729

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SATURDAY'S CONCERTS", The Argus (13 August 1888), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6897843



Monday 13 August 1888

AFTERNOON, 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA

1. Overture, "Euryanthe" .. .. Weber
2. Entr'acte, "Colombe" .. .. Gounod
3. Gavotte, tambourin, minuet, and passepied from the Suite, "Castor and Pollux .. .. Rameau (First time)
4. Valse lente and pizzicato (Sylvia) ... Delibes
5. Suite, "Aus Aller Herren Länder" (From Foreign Parts) .. .. Moskowski
      (1 Russian, 2 Italian, 3 German, 4 Spanish, 5 Hungarian)
6. Overture, "Gazza Ladra" ... Rossini

EVENING, at 8

1. Overture, "Flying Dutchman" .. .. Wagner
2. Andante and Finale (Symphony in D) .. .. Haydn
3. Invitation to the Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
4. Angelus and Bolero (Scene Pittoresques) .. .. Massenet
5. Selection (Trovatore) .. .. Verdi
6. Overture, "Le Brasseur de Preston" ... Adam (First Time)


[Advertisement], The Argus (13 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6897806

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Argus (14 August 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6897931

... The [afternoon] programme opened with the best performance of Weber's "Euryanthe" overture that has yet been heard in the southern hemisphere. The work is familiar to all regular concert goers, and has been heard quite recently, but not with such a performance as yesterday's. The novelty on the programme was the gavotte, tambourin, minuet, and pasepied from Rameau's "Castor and Pollux" ... As a composer we cannot compare Rameau with the great German and Italian masters of the day, but with the contemporary French composers for the stage he more than held his own. The selections above mentioned are distinguished by varied and piquant rhythms, ingenious harmonies, and at that time quite new and effective orchestration; we shall expect to hear them again ...

In the evening ... that most exacting of overtures, "The Flying Dutchman", with its marvellous representation of the raging of the elements and the phantom ship was magnificently rendered ... The last number ... was a merry, sparkling, and melodious overture, "Le Brasseur de Preston", by Adam, performed here for the first time, in which the wood wind plays a conspicuous part ... Mr. F. H. Cowen conducted throughout with his usual quiet but commanding influence.



Tuesday 14 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT, With Specially Augmented Orchestra.
74 PERFORMERS.

1. Overture, "Rosamunde" .. ... Schubert (First time)
2. Symphony in E flat .. .. Mozart
     - Adagio and Allegro, E Flat
     - Andante, A flat
     - Minuet, E flat
     - Finale Allegro, E flat
3. Air for Strings from Suite in D .. .. Bach
4. Suite de Ballet, "Coppelia" .. .. Delibes
5. Overture, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON SAME PROGRAMME REPEATED.


[Advertisement], The Argus (14 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6897919

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (15 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898073

... The first performance was that of the overture to the "Rosamunda" music of Schubert, played for the first time in Melbourne ... The "Rosamunda" was followed by the Mozart symphony in E flat, companion work to the G minor and the "Jupiter" symphonies which mark the crowning effort in this class of composition of the great master's life ...

The "Air for Strings" [ ...] by J. S. Bach, is no stranger to the Melbourne audience, but to hear it as it was played yesterday was a new experience. Hitherto we have heard it as violin solo with pianoforte accompaniment; yesterday it sounded as if 16 Wilhelmjs were playing in unison, with pure harmonics supplied in subdued tone by the related strings in the great orchestra. The overture to "Tannhäuser" was played to perfection, and gave good insight into the real genius of its composer. A "Suite de Ballet" from "Coppellia", by Delibes, made a most exhilarating finish to a delightful concert The evening concert was to have been a repetition of the programme already named, but events turned out which disappointed a great audience ...

The performance had commenced in the order already named, when the noise of hammering overhead induced Mr. Cowen to suspend work, as he has already done once before, until silence could be restored. Some minutes elapsed before Mr. Cowen returned, after expostulating, being cheered at each step be took in the interests of the musical audience. On returning to his place he recommenced and finished the " Rosamund" overture, but still amidst the disgraceful noise of hammering. A commencement was made upon the symphony, and the "allegro" has hardly been reached when the same noise, as if in defiance of all decency, became so abominable that Mr. Cowen laid down his baton and addressed the audience in earnest tones that told throughout the room. He said that in justice to himself, to the audience, to the players, and the art of music, he must and would cease conducting that that concert. Money would be returned to those who had paid for special chairs, and he hoped that the music would be heard in future without unseemly interruption. In taking this stand Mr. Cowen met with the hearty support of all musical people.



Wednesday 15 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA.

1. Overture, "Freischutz" .. .. Weber
2. Chaconne and Rigaudon d'Aline .. .. Monsigny
3. Overture, "Son and Stranger" .. .. Mendelssohn
4. Entr'acte, "Rosamunde" .. .. Schubert
5. Ballet music, "Feramorz" .. .. Rubinstein (First time)
     (1 Dance of the Bayaderes, 2 Torchlight Dance, 3 Dance of the Bayaderes No 2, 4 Wedding March)
6. Overture, "Domino Noir" .. .. Auber


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (15 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898034

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (16 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898229

... Some ballet music by Rubinstein, from the opera "Feramorz" - founded, as the name will indicate, upon the poem "Lalla Rookh", by Moore - was a novelty of quite unexpected charm ... There is always a pleasant ending to a mixed orchestral concert when an overture by Auber is given by way of finale, for he in his way was a giant as compared with all others of French school who wrote in his style. This was clearly illustrated yesterday when the overture to "Le Domino Noir" brought the concert to an end. There was no Exhibition music last evening.



Thursday 16 August 1888

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING

INVITATION CONCERT (not open to the public)
CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS

The program, as reported in the review, included:

Overture, "Athalia" .. .. Mendelssohn
Song of Thanksgiving .. .. Cowen (Second performance)
Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
Liebesliedchen .. .. Taubert (Mr. MORTON, oboe solo)
Air with Variations, "Coppelia" .. .. DELIBES (Mr. G. WESTON, violin solo)
Partsong [probably "Sweet and Low"] .. .. Barnby (CHORUS)
"Now is the month of maying" .. .. Morley (CHORUS)
Carnival of Venice .. .. Benedict (Miss ROSSOW)
"It is enough" (Elijah) .. .. Mendelssohn (Mr. F. H. MORTON)
Two Grenadiers .. .. Schumann (Mr. F. H. MORTON)
Chorus .. .. Weber
Overture, "La Sirene" .. .. Auber


"INVITATION CONCERT", The Argus (17 August 1888), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898297

The concert which was given last night in the music hall of the Exhibition-building was attended by about 4,000 persons who were present by invitation from the president and commissioners. The invitations had been distributed with a liberal hand. This event is to be the last of the formal acts of public hospitality in connection with the opening of the exhibition. After this the public programmes, which we have already explained, will be carried out without variation ...

The programme contained little that was new. The National Anthem came first, as a matter of course, and the performance of it satisfied every one, as was well indicated on the conclusion of it. The overture to the "Athalie" music by Mendelssohn followed, and then came a fine performance of the "Song of Thanksgiving", which Mr. Cowen composed expressly tor the opening of the exhibition. The general outline and substance of this work have been already noticed. It has now upon repetition finer effect than ever, the part of the final chorus commencing "Blessed be Thou", being singularly impressive for good effect ...

Also of interest in Thursday's press:

"EXHIBITION NOTES. INTERRUPTIONS AT THE CONCERTS", The Argus (16 August 1888), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898234



Friday 17 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT. By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN. Leader, Mr. GEO. WESTON.

1. Overture, "Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Largo in F sharp, for strings .. .. Haydn (First time)
3. Overture, "Leonora" (No 3) .. .. Beethoven
4. Ballet music, "Reine de Saba" .. .. Gounod
5. Gavotte, "Mignon" .. .. A. Thomas
6. Valse and mazurka from Suite de Ballet (Coppelia) .. .. Delibes
7. Overture, "Le Brasseur de Preston" .. .. Adam


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT. By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN. Leader, Mr. GEO. WESTON.

1. Overture, "Fidelio" (No. 4) .. .. Beethoven
2. Minuet and Finale, from "Symphony in E flat" .. .. Mozart
3. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
4. Serenade for Strings .. .. Haydn
5. Saltarello .. .. Gounod
6. Ballet music, "Feramorz" .. .. Rubinstein
    (1. Dance of Bayaderes; 2. Torchlight Dance; 3. Dance of Bayaderes No. 2; 4. Wedding Procession)
7. Overture, "Masaniello" .. .. Auber

ADMISSION FREE.


[Advertising], The Argus (17 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898358

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Argus (18 August 1888), 13

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898459

... The musical performance commenced with a repetition of the "Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage", the concert overture of Mendelssohn, which we described a few days since. This was followed by a largo movement in F sharp for strings by Haydn. We do not know the opus number of the string quartet from which this movement is taken, but the fine mind of the master is stamped upon every bar in sweetness, dignity, and pathos. The overture "Leonora", No. 3, of Beethoven was played with fine effect. The last performance of the same work from the same platform was different, and, by comparison, not so good ... the overture, pretty and bright, by Adam - the overture to "Le Brasseur de Preston" - not to be confounded with the overture to "II Birrajo de Preston", by Ricci - a musical work, which, with its accompanying musical dramatic scenes, has already been heard in Melbourne. This overture by Adam is very pretty, is gay in tone, and has themes of pleasant rhythm and fine passages for violins which only players of the first rank can execute.



Saturday 18 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT, With Augmented Orchestra of 74 PERFORMERS

Conductor. MR. FREDERIC H. COWEN. Leader, Mr. Geo. Weston. Principal Viola, M. Zerbini.

1. Overture, "The Naiads" .. .. Sterndale Bennett
2. Symphony No. 1 in C .. .. Beethoven
     - Adagio motto and allegro con brio, C major
     - Andante cantabile, F major
     - Minuet and trio, C major
     - Adagio and allegro molto vivace, C major
3. Largo for organ, harp, and strings .. .. Handel
4. Suite de Ballet, "The Language of Flowers" .. .. Cowen (First time)
     (1 Daisy (Innocence), 2 Lilac (First Emotion of Love), 3 Fern (Fascination), 4  Columbine (Folly), 5 Yellow Jasmine (Elegance and Grace), 6 Lily of the Valley (Return of Happiness))
5. Overture di Ballo .. .. Sullivan (First Time)

ADMISSION FREE


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT.
Conductor, Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Ruy Blas" .. .. Mendelssohn (The ORCHESTRA)
2. Finale from Symphony in C (No. 1) .. .. Beethoven (The ORCHESTRA)
3. Song, "Guinevere" .. .. Sullivan (Miss ADA BLOXHAM, A.R.C.M.)
4. Song, "The Devout Lover" .. .. Maude V. White (Mr. AVON D. SAXON)
5. Valse, Mazurka, Ballade and Air Varie from Suite de Ballet ("Coppelia") .. .. Delibes (The ORCHESTRA)
6. Air with Variations, "Carnival de Venise" Arranged for the voice by Benedict (Signorina REBOTTARO)
7. Gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine", "Language of Flowers" .. .. Cowen (The ORCHESTRA)
8. Song, "Kathleen Mavourneen" .. .. Crouch (Miss ADA BLOXHAM, A.R.C.M.)
9. Song, "Bedouin Love Song" .. .. [Pinsuti] (Mr. AVON D. SAXON)
10. Valse, "Romeo and Juliet" .. .. Gounod (Signorina REBOTTARO)
11. Selection, "Bohemian Girl" .. .. Balfe (The ORCHESTRA)
12. Duet, "Nina" .. .. Guercia (Signorina REBOTTARO and Mr. SAXON)
13. Overture, "William Tell" .. .. Rossini (The ORCHESTRA)

Accompanist, Herr BENNO SCHEREK Organist, Mr. GEO. PEAKE

ADMISSION 2s, 1s


[Advertisement], The Argus (18 August 1888), 20

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898502

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", & "EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT", The Argus (20 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898630

The special orchestral concert given on Saturday afternoon at the Exhibition was a grand success, not only on account of the splendid performance of the selections of music, but also for the magnificent attendance on the part of the public which filled the great music room in all parts of floor space and galleries, with as many more outside of the curtain who would have been glad to get in. The prospects of the future success of these fine entertainments are most reassuring . The performance of the "Naiads" was followed by that of the first symphony of Beethoven, and here it may be mentioned that the re-publication of Mr. Manns's annotations from the Crystal Palace programmes are of great interest and value to the visitors at the Exhibition concerts ... The orchestra, as then handled by Beethoven, was not the volcano of sound which we sometimes find it to be in more recent times, but, then, how much more easily could the value of each part be estimated, and the beauty of ensemble justly admired.  ...

The symphony was followed by that largo movement from Handel which was first heard at the Town-hall during the Hazon concerts, but on the occasion now under notice enhanced effect was produced on account of the larger forces employed, and the prominence given to special parts for the organ and the harp - the former played by Mr. George Peake and the latter by Mr. Barker, the youngest member of the Exhibition Orchestra, but already a masterly performer on the instrument named ... the effect was simply over whelming - no such result had ever before been attained in Melbourne, and when the enchanting sounds came to an end, there was a long continued roll of enthusiastic applause ...

A popular concert took place in the evening, and was largely attended, the prices of admission being two shillings und one shilling ... Miss Ada Bloxham, A.R.C.M., was very heartily welcomed on her first appearance in public since her return from London. It will be remembered that this young lady was the first to gain the Sir William Clarke Scholarship at the Royal College of Music in London, where as a student in various branches of musical art she has passed a distinguished career. Her first selection was the fine song by Sullivan entitled "Guinevere", which she sang with sweet voice and musicianly grace to Herr Scherek's accompaniment at the pianoforte.



Monday 20 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Son and Stranger" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Largo in F sharp for strings .. .. Haydn
3. Scherzo and Finale from Symphony, in C minor, No.5 .. .. Beethoven
4. Air de Ballet, "Scenes Pittoresques" .. .. Massenet
5. Graceful Dance, "Henry VIII" .. .. Sullivan
6. Ballet Music, "Feramorz" .. .. Rubinstein
     (1 Dance of Bayaderes, 2 Torchlight Dance, 3 Dance of Bayaderes No.2, 4 Wedding Procession)
7. Overture, "Pré Aux Clerx" .. .. Hérold


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "The Naiads" .. .. Sterndale Bennett
2. Andante, from Symphony in C, No.1 .. .. Beethoven
3. Overture , Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
4. Ballet music, "The Resurrection of the Nuns" ("Robert le Diable") .. .. Meyerbeer
5. Selection, "Lucia" .. .. Donizetti
6. Overture, "William Tell" .. .. Rossini


[Advertisement], The Argus (20 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898600

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Argus (21 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898652

Yesterday afternoon the galleries and free floor space of the concert hall of the Exhibition were fairly well occupied ... The scherzo and finale from Beethoven's Symphony in C minor, upon repetition, finds favour with all who heard it when it was performed in the same room quite recently ... It would be well for all who have not yet mode the acquaintance of Beethoven in his greatest mood of mind to attend occasionally during the next five months, when his symphonies are to be produced, and perhaps in some instances repeated ...

The "Pré aux Clercs" overture, by Hérold, is quite on impressive instance of that development of French mind in music, the outcome and finish of which is to be found in Auber. The concert in the evening was largely attended ... The overture to "Tannhäuser", by Wagner, was welcome to the audience, on account of its special qualities. The effect, with all its fulness and uncompromising attack on the general ear, is much admired by those who are susceptible to the power of harmonised sound, but it does not compare in beauty of form, in value of tune, in ingenuity of construction, in influence of idea, or in grateful acceptance in the musical ear, with the work of Beethoven ..., nor that of Mozart, nor that of Haydn. [It] was finely and powerfully performed, and the large audience assembled were greatly pleased with it.

"EVENING CONCERT",  The Argus (21 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898679

The one novelty in last night's programme was the production here in concert form, apart from stage effect, of the ballet music from the incantation scene in the ruined cloister, in the opera "Roberto il Diavolo", by Meyerbeer. This is without doubt the finest music of the kind ever written, and gives the stamp of special aptitude to the work of the composer ...



Tussday 21 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT,
With Augmented Orchestra of 74 PERFORMERS

1. Overture, "Nozze di Figaro" .. .. Mozart
2. Symphony in A, "Italian" .. .. Mendelssohn
     - Allegro Vivace, A major
     - Andante con moto, D minor
     - Con moto moderato, A major
     - Saltarello - presto, A minor
3. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
4. Danse des Sylphes and March Hongroise (Faust) .. .. Berlioz


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (21 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898735

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION, SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Argus (22 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898876

The programme of orchestral music yesterday was not lengthy, but rich. The audience in the afternoon was decidedly sparse. The inviting days when genial warmth woos people from their houses have not yet come, but, according to many premonitions, they will soon be here. Mozart's gem-like overture to "Le Nozze di Figaro" was the subject of the first performance. It takes less time in playing than any other overture known to fame, but within small limits there is compressed such amount of musical wealth as to make it a beauty and a wonder for all time. After this most satisfactory commencement came, for the first time under Mr. Cowen's direction in Melbourne, the joyous orchestral symphony in A, No. 4 of Mendelssohn ...



Wednesday 22 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Preciosa" .. .. Weber
2. Minuet and Tambourine, "Castor and Pollux" .. .. Rameau
3. Overture, "Egmont" .. .. Beethoven
4. Dualogue, from "Italian Love Tales" .. .. Hoffmann
5. Ballet Music, "Masaniello" .. .. Auber
6. Overture, "Mignon" .. .. A. Thomas


EVENING, at 8

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (22 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898842

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (23 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899044

There was a large audience in the concert-hall of the Exhibition building yesterday afternoon, and those who were present enjoyed a most pleasant hour's entertainment. We understand that the improvements in the hall are to be commenced on Monday (already the scaffolding is going up), and that whilst the work is in progress, which will probably extend over a week, there will be a cessation of the afternoon concerts. As scarcity enhances value we may expect to see the hall utilised to its fullest holding capacity for the rest of this week. The chief gem on the programme was Beethoven's colossal overture to "Egmont", one of the grandest productions of his second period. The majestic opening sostenuto - the splendid subject given out by the cellos, the wonderfully contrasted second subject, introduced fortissimo by the stringed orchestra, and answered by clarinet and flute, and the magnificent coda ushered in by a pause on the dominant, were all faithfully and artistically portrayed under the masterly conductorship of Mr. F. H. Cowen. Before Mendelssohn conducted this overture at the London Philharmonic Concert it had been the custom in the coda to return from the crescendo to piano, contrary to the directions in the score. Mendelssohn broke through this custom, maintaining the fortissimo to the end, which has always been done since ...


And a letter to the editor:

"EXHIBITION MUSIC. TO THE EDITOR", The Argus (22 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6898872

Sir,-"A Philistine", in one of your morning contemporaries, asks Mr. Cowen, through its columns, to give the public an opportunity of hearing a concert à la Jullien, including quadrilles, walzes, &c, so as to have thunders of applause. I, through your columns, beg respectfully to suggest that Mr. Cowen be asked to persuade the members of his orchestra to blacken their faces und give us a few selections a la Ethiopian, not forgetting a break-down. I am sure, if he were to carry out this suggestion, the thunders of applause would be increased a hundredfold from all Philistines and Australian natives. Yours, &, BANJO.



Thursday 23 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT by the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA

1. Overture, "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
2. Minuet and Finale from Symphony in C, No.7 .. .. Haydn
3. Prelude and Entr'acte, "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
4. Ballet music (Skating Scene), "Le Prophete" .. .. Meyerbeer
5. Gavotte, "Mignon" .. .. A. Thomas
6. March, "Reine de Saba" .. .. Gounod (First Time)

ADMISSION FREE


EVENING, at 8

CENTENNIAL FIRST PUBLIC GRAND CHORAL CONCERT

CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers.

On which occasion The Work Especially Composed For the Opening Ceremony Will be given

Artists: Mrs. PALMER, Mme. CHRISTIAN, Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT, Mr. OTTO FISCHER; Mr. GEO. PEAKE, Organist; Mr. F. H. COWEN, Conductor

1. Overture, "Athalie" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Song of Thanksgiving .. .. Cowen
3. Air, "Is not his word like a fire" ("Elijah") .. .. Mendelssohn (Mr. OTTO FISCHER)
4. Duet, "Quis est homo" ("Stabat Mater" .. .. Rossini (Mrs. PALMER and Mdme. CHRISTIAN)
5. Recit. and Air, "In native worth" ("Creation") .. .. Haydn (Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT)
6. Trio and Chorus, "The Heavens are Telling" ("Creation") .. .. Haydn
7. Centennial Cantata .. .. H. J. King
8. Hallelujah Chorus (Messiah) .. .. Handel

CONCERT ADMISSION 4s, 2s 6d, and ONE SHILLING


[Advertisement], The Argus (23 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899012

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (24 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899129

There was a very good attendance in the Exhibition Concert hall yesterday afternoon, the floor space and galleries being handsomely filled, and the shilling reserved space fairly attended. It is gratifying to witness the favour with which Mr. Cowen is received on his appearance as conductor at each concert by an audience growing more numerous every day, and more ready to recognise the talent which distinguishes the conductor as an enlightened master, and a firm disciplinarian with most persuasive manner ... The Prelude and Entr'acte from Wagner's opera, "Lohengrin" ... was the finest performance of yesterday after noon's concert. We do not think that any selection from the work of Wagner could represent him in better light ... the march from "La Reine de Saba", by Gounod - heard for the first time here - beginning with grand "fanfare", entering on a fairly spirited and graceful but not Oriental theme, having a pretty trio movement well instrumented, and winding up with much of pompous instrumental effect, did not much redound to the assured fame of its composer.

"GRAND CHORAL CONCERT", The Argus (24 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899128

The evening was devoted to a "grand choral" concert ... the whole of the large space devoted to musical purposes in the Exhibition-building was crowded, and as each scat had its special money value the fact may be noted as showing the interest felt in the splendid musical entertainments which are now being given at the Exhibition under Mr. Cowen. The programme last night was specially arranged for the benefit of the public, so that those inclined might hear the music which was given to signalise the opening ceremony. Mr. Cowen's "Song of Thanksgiving", for band and chorus, was repeated, with all the enhanced effect which comes from perfected practice amongst the band, and refinement of reading belonging to the full enlightenment of the choir. The whole work now appears to be of noble character ... The applause on the conclusion ... was earnest and long continued ...

Mr. H. J. King's prize Cantata ... was reproduced last night under Mr. Cowen's direction ... The whole work was heard to infinitely better advantage than on the 1st August, and now, in its entirety, and in the presence of attentive listeners, it gains the sincere approval of all who hear it, not only from those who can point out such faults as it may contain, but those who are greatly and properly pleased with the effect which, in its complete form, it leaves upon the memory. We learn that so great was the success of this concert from the Exhibition point of view, and so great the disappointment on the part of those unable to gain admission to hear it, that it has been resolved to repeat the entire programme next Thursday night.



Friday 24 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Jubilee" .. .. Weber
2. Andante and Saltarello (Italian Symphony) .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Suite, "Jeux d'Enfants" .. .. Bizet
     (1 march (trumpet and drum); 2 cradle song (the doll); 3 impromptu (the humming top); 4 duet (little husband and wife)
4. Gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine" (Language of Flowers) .. .. Cowen
5. Selection, "Aida" .. .. Verdi
6. Overture, "Fra Diavolo" .. .. Auber


[Advertisement], The Argus (24 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899189

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (25 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899217

Yesterday there was no music at the Exhibition in the afternoon. In the evening Mr. Cowen gave one of his fine orchestral concerts ... The performance commenced with Weber's "Jubilee Overture", sufficiently well known to make it a favourite, and in its ending especially, to make it sacred. Mendelssohn's "Andante and Saltarello," from the "Italian Symphony" ... were reproduced with finished effect by the band. Then came for the first time some "Child's-play" music, by Bizet ... These quaint and cleverly-composed musical numbers were interesting to listen to, and were well received. They are to be heard again with increasing effect. They are in high degree exemplary of playful humour in creative mind, and in this connection we might mention that another and familiarly-known name - that of Max Vogrich - is connected with musicianly compositions of the same order - commenced here in Melbourne and not yet finished in New York - the musical illustration of the short fables of Hans Christian Anderson ... The overture to "Fra Diavolo", by Auber, a favourite composition, with special powers in its musical rush and rhythm to make effect upon the popular ear, was given as the concluding number, and worked its invincible way in the favour of those present all the more that on this occasion there was a better performance and a larger audience than usual.



Saturday 25 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT With Augmented Orchestra of 74 Performers

1. Overture, "Genoveva" .. .. Schumann (First time)
2. Symphony in D, "The Clock" .. .. Haydn
3. Hungarian Rhapsody, No. 1 .. .. Liszt
4. Prelude, "Le Dernier Sommeil de la Vierge" .. .. Massenet (First time)
5. Invitation to Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
5. Kaiser March .. .. Wagner (first time)


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT

1. Overture, "L'Etoile du Nord" .. .. Meyerbeer (THE ORCHESTRA)
2. Nocturne, "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn (THE ORCHESTRA)
3. Song, "Orpheus with his Lute" .. .. Sullivan (Madame PEACOCKE)
4. Song, "Good night, beloved" .. .. Balfe (Mr. H. STOCKWELL)
5. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner (THE ORCHESTRA)
6. Song, "O that we two were Maying" .. .. Gounod (Miss IDA OSBORNE)
7. Ballet music, "Masaniello" .. .. Auber (THE ORCHESTRA)
8. Song, "When the heart is young" .. .. Dudley Buck (Madame PEACOCKE)
9. Entr'acte, "Colombe" (Funeral March of a Marionette) .. .. Gounod (THE ORCHESTRA)
10. Song, "Death of Nelson" .. .. Braham (Mr. Hy. STOCKWELL)
11. Solo Cornet, "The Lost Chord" .. .. Sullivan (Mr. RAWLINS)
12. Selection, "Martha" .. .. Flotow (THE ORCHESTRA)
13. Song, "Never Again" .. .. Cowen (Miss IDA OSBORNE)
14. Waltz, "New Wein" .. .. Strauss (THE ORCHESTRA)
15. Overture, "Zampa" .. .. Hérold (THE ORCHESTRA)


[Advertisement], The Argus (25 August 1888), 20

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899288

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (27 August 1888), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899389

Saturday afternoon's concert was attended by an audience that filled the hall to overflowing. ... Massenet's prelude, "Le Dernier Sommeil de la Vierge", was new to Melbourne ... and is a dreamy melodious andante for muted strings. It was rendered with the utmost delicacy, and very heartily applauded ... The programme concluded with the "Kaiser March" (Emperor's Match), written by Wagner in honour of King Wilhelm of Prussia ... The orchestration is essentially Wagnerian. The sublime chorale "Ein Feste Burg ist Unser Gott" is introduced more than once, and gives it a colour which pervades the whole as loyal, triumphant, and reverential. Other opportunities of hearing this work will be welcome.

"EVENING POPULAR CONCERT", The Argus (27 August 1888), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899388

Owing probably to counter attractions elsewhere, the attendance in the evening was not so good as in the afternoon. The programme, which was a miscellaneous one certainly did not err on the side of brevity ...



Monday 27 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL NOTICE THERE WILL BE NO AFTERNOON CONCERTS THIS WEEK,
Owing to the Alterations in the Concert Room Now in Progress.


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Fidelio" .. .. Beethoven
2. Allegro, "Reformation Symphony" .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Overture, "Freischütz" .. .. Weber
4. Valse, mazurka, ballade, and air varié, "Coppélia" .. .. Delibes
5. "Funeral March of a Marionette" .. .. Gounod
6. Selection, "Aida" .. .. Verdi
7. Ouvertura di ballo .. .. Sullivan


[Advertisement], The Argus (27 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899396

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (28 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899577

... The excellent performance of the allegro from Mendelssohn's "Reformation Symphony" makes us wish that we may soon have an opportunity of hearing the work in its entirety. The listeners were enthusiastic, and would gladly have heard it over again ... The "Coppelia" ballet music of Delibes, owing to its elegance and brightness, may always be sure of a hearty reception, either from a critical or non-critical audience - especially so with the air varié, which is marked by a sense of humour which was not wasted on yesterday's listeners, as could be easily seen by anyone who chanced to look around and observe the smiling faces ... A good performance of Sullivan's "Ouvertura di Ballo" concluded a programme in which the first three numbers weighed considerably more than the last four. Mr. Cowen conducted, as usual, which explains itself.



Tuesday 28 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Symphony in D, "The Clock" .. .. Haydn
2. Prelude, "Le Dernier Sommeil de la Vierge" .. .. Massenet
3. Kaiser March .. .. Wagner
4. Ballet Music, "The Resurrection of the Nuns" ("Robert le Diable") .. .. Meyerbeer
5. Liebesliedchen for the Oboe and Strings .. .. Taubert
6. Overture, "Le Cheval de Bronze" .. .. Auber


WEDNESDAY NO CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (28 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899532

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (29 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899641

The concert last evening was attended by Lady Loch and a large party from Government house. The hall was well filled in all parts. In the compilation of the programmes Mr. Cowen is giving abundant evidence of the possession of discernment and tact, he did not travel all these thousands of miles merely to tickle the ears of the musically ignorant, for such a purpose the Exhibition commissioners would not have offered the pecuniary remuneration which they did, and even had they done so it is quite certain that Mr. Cowen would not have accepted it, the object the commissioners had in view was, by means of the formation of a first class orchestra placed under the management and conductorship of a musician of high European standing, to elevate the standard of the public taste for music. As no great progress in art has ever been accomplished without having had to encounter opposition, Mr Cowen can estimate such opposition at its proper value, and push steadily on without deigning to notice it, and in doing so he deserves the ever cordial support and encouragement of all who have in reality the interests of music at heart, and who wish to live to see Australia take its proper place amongst the musical nations of the world.

The programme, which was an interesting and instructive one, opened with Haydn's Symphony in D ("The Clock") ... The performance of this work, like most of Haydn's, does not make any extraordinary demands on the technique on the members of the orchestra, but an artistic rendering necessitates something quite apart from mere technique - an intelligent mind ready to receive and to impart to others ... Taubert's beautiful "Liebesliedchen" for oboe and strings has been played before, but never better than last night. Mr. Morton's oboe solo was perfect, and the string pizzicato passages were rendered with faultless accuracy and delicacy; the audience would gladly have heard it again, but the encore was wisely declined. The concert ended with an admirable rendering of Auber's graceful and sparkling overture to "Le Cheval de Bronze", the long crescendo towards the end being splendidly worked up.



Thursday 30 August 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

SECOND PUBLIC PERFORMANCE OF THE CANTATAS

Specially Composed for the Opening Ceremony.

CENTENNIAL FIRST PUBLIC GRAND CHORAL CONCERT CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers.

Artists: Mrs. PALMER, Mme. CHRISTIAN, Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT, Mr. OTTO FISCHER; Mr. GEO. PEAKE, Organist; Mr. F. H. COWEN, Conductor

1. Overture, "Athalie" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Song of Thanksgiving .. .. Cowen
3. Solo (Mr. OTTO FISCHER)
4. Duet, "Quis est homo" ("Stabat Mater") .. .. Rossini (Mrs. PALMER and Mdme. CHRISTIAN)
5. Recit. and Air, "In native worth" ("Creation") .. .. Haydn (Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT)
6. Trio and Chorus, "The Heavens are Telling" ("Creation") .. .. Haydn
7. Centennial Cantata .. .. H. J. King
8. Hallelujah Chorus (Messiah) .. .. Handel

CONCERT ADMISSION 4s, 2s 6d, and ONE SHILLING


[Advertisement], The Argus (30 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899775

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. GRAND CHORAL CONCERT", The Argus (31 August 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900013

It was proposed that the musical entertainment under this heading which was given last night should be an exact reproduction of that which was given last Thursday night in the same place. The suggestion found great favour with the public, because by 8 o'clock the great music room contained the largest of paying audiences that has yet met together there since the opening day, the space for reserved seats at the same time being considerably extended. This in itself is a magnificent comment upon the favour in which the Exhibition concerts are held ...



Friday 31 August 1888

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


TONIGHT, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
CONDUCTOR, Mr. FREDERICK H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Genoveva" .. .. Schumann
2. Allegretto from Symphony in F (No. 8) .. .. Beethoven
3. Music de Ballet, "Sylvia" .. .. Delibes
4. Serenade for Strings .. .. Haydn
5. Selection, "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
6. Gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine" ("Language of Flowers") .. .. Cowen
7. Overture, "Semiramide" .. .. Rossini

ADMISSION FREE. Front Seats, One Shilling


[Advertisement], The Argus (31 August 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6899939

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (1 September 1888), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900060

The attendance last night at the orchestral concert was not nearly so large as on the previous evening ... It seems almost ungracious to say anything more in the way of suggesting improvements after so much has already been done to meet public requirements, but the intermittent hiss of the glass cutters' wheels just outside the north passage in the concert room is still a disturbing influence to those who affect that part of the room, and it those busy artisans could be accommodated elsewhere in the big building without detriment to their established interests, the concert hall of the Exhibition would be in the midst of as satisfactory surroundings as may be hoped for.

The programme last night contained little that had not been previously heard under Mr. Cowen's bâton. The first performance was that of Schumann's overture, "Genoveva" ... The allegretto from Beethoven's Symphony in F, No. 8, followed the Schumann selection, the last time this musical jewel was heard in Melbourne was from the same platform, when the "continental concerts" were being carried on by the good will of many Melbourne citizens interested in the advancement of musical taste in this city. Even then with a small band under experienced leading - that of Mr. J. Siede - the beauty of the work was recognised by the small audience present. Last night with a full orchestra, and in the presence of a large audience, in the midst of comfortable surroundings, the "inspiration" of this unique musical movement was recognised in such wise that the audience would gladly have had it repeated. It has only to be heard once to become a lasting memory ... and finally one of Rossini's best overtures, that to "Semiramide", was rendered with all the fire, the tenderness, and precision which recalled recollections of Costa, and the days when Italian opera was represented by artists of perfect school.



September 1888

Saturday 1 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
With Augmented Orchestra of 74 Performers

1. Overture, "Alphonse and Estrella" .. .. Schubert (First Time)
2. Symphony in D (No.2) .. .. Beethoven
      - Adagio molto. Allegro con brio (D major)
      - Larghetto (A major)
      - Scherzo allegro (D major)
      - Allegro molto (D major)
3. Concertstück for Pianoforte ... Weber (Madame MADELINE SCHILLER)
4. Scotch Rhapsody (No.1) .. .. A. C. Mackenzie (First Time)
5. March, "Schiller Fest" .. .. Meyerbeer (First Time)

ADMISSION FREE


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT

1. Overture, "Euryanthe" .. .. Weber (THE ORCHESTRA)
2. Larghetto from Symphony, No.1, in C .. .. Beethoven (THE ORCHESTRA)
3. Song, "When night is darkest" .. .. Land (Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS)
4. Suite, "Aus aller Herren Länder" (From Foreign Parts) .. .. Moskowski
      (1 Russian; 2 Italian; 3 German; 4 Spanish; 5 Hungarian) (THE ORCHESTRA)
5. Ave Maria .. .. GOUNOD (Miss ELSA MAY; Violin Obligato, Mr. George WESTON)
6. Minuet .. .. Boccherini (THE ORCHESTRA)
7. Invitation to the Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz (THE ORCHESTRA)
8. Song, "The Pilgrim of Love" .. .. Bishop (Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS)
9. Selection,"Trovatore" .. .. Verdi (THE ORCHESTRA)
10. Song, "She Wandered Down the Mountain Side" .. .. Clay (Miss ELSA MAY)
11. Overture, "La Sirène" .. .. Auber (THE ORCHESTRA)


[Advertisement], The Argus (1 September 1888), 20

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900078

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (3 September 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900244

The concert on Saturday afternoon was attended by Lady Loch and a party from Government house, and an audience which filled the hall in all parts The erection of a sound board over the orchestra has made a marked improvement in the acoustic properties of the hall ... Beethoven's symphony in D, op. 35, was the principal number on the programme ... Of the performance we cannot speak too highly, it was the evident reflex of a master mind, and was most creditable to both conductor and orchestra. The next number was Weber's well known and ever popular Concertstück ... Madame Schiller's rendering was graceful, brilliant, and artistic in the highest degree, and resulted in a most enthusiastic recall ... This was followed by Dr. A. C. Mackenzie's Scotch Rhapsody No.1 ... It is well deserving of popularity on account of its skilful treatment of Scotch melodies and effective orchestration ... The concert concluded with a fine performance of the Grand March written by Meyerbeer in Berlin in 1859 for the Schiller Centenary Festival. As a work of art it takes a high place amongst the creations of its author.

"EVENING POPULAR CONCERT", The Argus (3 September 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900242

Notwithstanding the reduction in the prices of admission, the attendance in the evening was meagre and somewhat depressing to both performers and listeners ...

Especial interest attaches itself to the first performance here of Cowen's dramatic oratorio "Ruth", under the conductorship of the composer, on Thursday evening.



Monday 3 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT.

1. Overture, "Ruins of Athens" .. .. Beethoven
2. March from Symphony [No. 4] ("Power of Sound") .. .. Spohr (First Time)
3. Overture, "Hans Heiling" .. .. Marschner
4. Ballet Music, L'Africaine" .. .. Meyerbeer
5. "Sous le Balcon" .. .. Wüerst (First Time)
6. Polonaise, "Life for the Czar" .. .. Glinka (First Time)
7. Air Varie ("Coppelia") .. .. Delibes
8. Overture, "Barbiere" .. .. Rossini


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Il Seraglio" .. .. Mozart
2. Gavotte, "Armide" .. .. Gluck (First Time)
3. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber
4. March, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
5. Shawl Dance, "Dieu et Bayadere" .. .. Auber (First Time)
6. Selection, "Un Ballo in Maschera" .. .. Verdi
7. Overture, "Haydée" .. .. Auber


[Advertisement], The Argus (3 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900235

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Argus (4 September 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900402

There was a good attendance in the concert hall yesterday afternoon when an interesting programme was provided. The opening number was Beethoven's overture to the "Ruins of Athens" ... The performance was excellent, Mr. Morton (oboe), who has a conspicuous part to play, being deserving of special mention. This was followed by the march from Spohr's symphony, "Die Weihe der Tone" (Power of Sound) ... As in all his other works, the technical workmanship is admirable, and the orchestration most masterly ... The ballet music from Meyerbeer's "L'Africaine" afforded a good opportunity to several members of the orchestra of distinguishing themselves-especially Mr. Rawlins with his cornet - which was fully taken advantage of. The next number, "Sous le Balcon", from a suite by Wuerst, opens with a beautiful solo for violoncello in the minor, admirably played by Mr. Liebe, to a string pizzicato accompaniment ... , alter which it may be described as a duct for violins and 'cello This was followed by a polonaise from an opera, "Vie pour le Czar" (Life for the Czar), by Glinka ... In Russia his two operas - the one mentioned above and "Ruslan et Ludmilla" - are considered as of national importance. On hearing the polonaise for the first time, we must acknowledge a feeling of disappointment, but possibly a further acquaintance may modify our opinion ...

At the evening orchestral concert the hall was again well filled, and a programme was presented calculated to suit all tastes. For those who were not capable of appreciating the masterpieces of Mozart, Weber, or Wagner, was provided music of a lighter calibre, including a good and effectively rendered operatic selection from Verdi's "Un Ballo in Maschera". Weber's "Oberon" overture has been played at these concerts before, but it is one of those works which, with its beautiful horn notes, its fairy like passages for flutes and clarinet, its bright orientalism, and its wonderful orchestration, cannot be repeated too often. The rendering was most impressive. The "Tannhäuser" march, taken at a rather quicker pace than we have been accustomed to here, was well played, but not so well that it could not be better. There was once or twice a slight indecision in the attack, which will probably be remedied at its next performance ... It is scarcely necessary to add that Mr. Cowen conducted with his usual ability.



Tuesday 4 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL CONCERT With Augment Orchestra of 74 Performers

1. Symphony in G minor .. .. Mozart
2. Overture, "Struensee" ... .. Meyerbeer (First Time)
3. Turkish March, "Ruins of Athens" .. .. Beethoven
4. Hungarian Dance .. .. Brahms (First Time)
5. Overture, "Crown Diamonds" .. .. Auber


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (4 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900320

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (5 September 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900468

The programme presented yesterday afternoon was of a most enjoyable kind. Lady Loch and a party of friends were present, but the general attendance was small. Cold weather may have had something to do with the shrinkage of attendance on Tuesday afternoons up to the present time ... Mozart's Symphony in G minor was the first number on the programme ...In the opening allegro is heard the germinal idea, a pretty and most ample phrase, and then it becomes fascinating to watch how this grows in beauty as it is reinforced by new instrumental colouring in this direction, and in that, by harmonies more and more ample and fresh at every turn ... it is most interesting to notice how valuable are the reed instruments so often spoken about in connection with symphonic compositions of this period - how they were used not only to enforce but to diversify orchestral tone, and how absolutely pleasing were the effects obtained by the great masters in the 18th century from their discriminating and evidently affectionate use of them ... Mozart in his symphonic form is little known to the average Melbourne audience, and such pleasure and enlightenment as was gained by most of those who were present yesterday afternoon should be more largely shared amongst Victorians and other Australians, who have now opportunities and privileges which they never had before and perhaps, unless there be goodwill on their part, they, in their generation, may not have again ... Numbers 5 and 6 of Brahms's orchestral arrangement of his "Hungarian Dances" were full of the charm which the public here are only beginning to recognise in the rhythms, the accents, the tunes, and harmonies which belong specially to that border music which unites Orient to Occident ... The same programme was repeated in the evening.



Wednesday 5 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Alphonse and Estrella" .. .. Schubert
2. Allegretto from Symphony in F (No.8) .. .. Beethoven
3. Danse des Sylphes, and Marche Hongroise ("Faust") .. .. Berlioz
4. Ballet music, "Feramorz" .. .. Rubinstein
5. Entr'acte, "Colombe" .. .. Gounod
6. Funeral March of a Marionette .. .. Gounod
7. Overture, "Merry Wives of Windsor" .. .. Nicolai


EVENING, at 8

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (5 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900502

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (6 September 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900566

A most pleasant hour's music was enjoyed yesterday afternoon at the Exhibition. The programme was well mixed, and was altogether interesting. There was not much in the way of novelty, but the recent performances have been so full in effect and finished in execution that many old and some more recent musical movements of high character have acquired new value through the way in which they have been presented by the great musical organisation now at work at the Centennial Exhibition. The novelty yesterday was the overture to "Alphonse and Estrella", composed by Schubert when he was 24 years old ... It commences with a phrase of two tones, the upper and lower notes of an octave, and this phrase, in whatever group of instruments it may occur, gives special character to the composition, wherein it is to be heard not only in the slow and majestic introduction but also in the brilliant allegro with its pretty musical figures for flutes, oboes, and strings. ... The "Marche Hongroise", from the "Faust" of Berlioz ... as it is better known upon repetition becomes quite dramatic in powerful tone painting, and the listener has a music picture placed before him speaking plainly of national purpose of valour, of conflict and of victory. There was no public music at the Exhibition last night.



Thursday 6 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

Cowen's Ruth

First Performance in Australia of Cowen's Oratorio, RUTH

Ruth .. .. Mrs. Palmer
Orpah .. .. Miss Ellen Atkins
Naomi .. .. Madame Christian
Boaz .. .. Mr. Armes Beaumont
A Reaper/An Elder .. .. Mr. F. H. Morton

THE CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA of 800 PERFORMERS
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN Leader - Mr. George Weston Organist - Mr. George Peake

CONCERT ADMISSION 4s, 2s. 6d., 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (6 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900584

"GRAND CHORAL CONCERT. COWEN'S RUTH", The Argus (7 September 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900776

The concert hall was filled to its utmost holding capacity last night, which is not to be wondered at, as the occasion was one of the most important ever known in Australia, namely the first performance here of Mr Cowen's dramatic oratorio, "Ruth", under the composer's own direction and conductorship. His Excellency the Governor and Lady Loch arrived at 8 o clock, and the concert opened with the National Anthem, sung in extenso, and producing a grand body of sound. The oratorio of the evening was written for and performed at the Worcester Musical Festival in 1887. Since then it has travelled far and wide, and has spread the fame of its composer in all directions. Six months ago on March 7, it was produced in Boston, USA, where it seems to have created an excellent impression. The dramatic oratorio "Ruth" is written on a libretto by Mr. Joseph Bennett, taken entirely from the Old Testament. It is divided into two parts, which include five scenes. The first scene is laid before the house of Naomi, and represents a Hebrew caravan approaching on its way to the land of Israel. The ordinary orchestral introduction is dispensed with, and the oratorio is commenced with the chorus ...

Mr. Cowen, who has deprived the orchestra of their overture, has made amends by giving them the leading part, especially in the opening phrases. Throughout the entire work the composer can never be said to have neglected the orchestra, on the contrary, the orchestration from beginning to end is masterly and wonderfully effective, even to the extent of at times throwing the choral work into the shade. It is as well to state at once that the choral writing in more passages than one contains progressions which, if appearing in the works of a less distinguished composer would be designated as errors. Here, however, they are inserted designedly and with eyes open. To our mind the danger is that other less talented writers may cite Mr. Cowen's example and do likewise. We shall hope to have several further opportunities of hearing this work. Looked at collectively as a whole, the oratorio "Ruth" may be ranked high amongst the greatest productions of modern times. The conception is often bold and original , the treatment is skilful and musicianly, and although we are a little surprised at the absence of contrapuntal writing, this is more than compensated for by that bright spontaneous flow of melody which permeates it throughout, and that distinguishes it from many of the more laboured compositions of the modern school of music ...

As Mr. Cowen is still a young man, in the prime of manly vigour, the production of "Ruth" will have the effect of keeping the eyes of the musical world focussed on him for some time to come, and his next great work will be eagerly watched for. The performance was excellent throughout. Mrs Palmer, as Ruth, was heard at her best, especially in the beautiful air "Be of good comfort". Mr. Beaumont sang the music allotted to Boaz with the sympathetic and artistic feeling peculiar to him. Madame Christian was in good voice, and gave an admirable reading of the part of Naomi. Miss Atkins, who took the minor part of Orpah, rendered it full justice; and Mr. Morton was effective in the characters of the elder and a reaper. The chorus parts were sung with vigour and refinement. The orchestra was heard at its best, and after the daily performances which we have become accustomed to that means a good deal. Both chorus and orchestra gave sufficient proof of the results of the excellent training which they have been undergoing. At the conclusion of the performance Mr. Cowen stood as a target for a well-aimed fire of bouquets from all sides of the choir. This is doubly gratifying knowing that, notwithstanding a few turbulent spirits, the choir remains staunch and true to its colours.



Friday 7 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Prometheus" .. .. Beethoven
2. Gavotte, "Armide" .. .. Gluck
3. Hungarian Rhapsody No 1 .. .. Liszt
4. Prelude, "Le dernier sommeil de la Vierge" .. .. Massenet
5. Turkish March, "Ruins of Athens" .. .. Beethoven
6. Gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine" (Language of Flowers) .. .. Cowen
7. Selection, "Carmen" .. .. Bizet
8. Overture, "Cenerentola" .. .. Rossini


[Advertisement], The Argus (7 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900791

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (8 September 1888), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900900 

The players and the public deserved some few hours' rest after the triumph attained on Thursday night in the performance of Cowen's oratorio "Ruth". On this account there was no concert yesterday afternoon ... The evening programme was well made up, Most of the performances were repetitions. The "Prometheus" overture, by Beethoven, was played with fine effect. The simple gavotte by Gluck from the opera "Armide" was delightful, on account of its truthfulness to form, and the honey-like mixture of its string principal and reed fundamental tones. The Hungarian Rhapsody, by Liszt, described in these programmes as No 1, narrowly escaped an encore, it was so well accentuated, so beautifully emphasised by the orchestra ...



Saturday 8 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

GRAND WAGNER CONCERT
By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
CONDUCTOR - MR. F. H. COWEN
To make this Concert a Complete Success the Orchestra has been augmented to
80 PERFORMERS
So as to give a Complete Performance
Of this great Master's works
All the principal musicians of Melbourne have been specially engaged for this performance.

WAGNER - "Flying Dutchman" and "Tannhäuser", "Ride of the Valkyries", prelude "Lohengrin", Siegfried Idyll, Introduction and Closing Scene, Tristan, &c

BODY of HALL, ONE SHILLING


EVENING, at 8

SATURDAY POPULAR CONCERT

GRAND VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTRAL PROGRAMME

1. Overture, "William Tell" .. .. Rossini
2. Song, "The Romany Lass" .. .. Adams (Mr. J. G. WRIGHT)
3. March, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
4. Song, "It was a dream" .. .. Cowen (Miss ANNETTE IVANOVA)
5. Solo, harp, "Autumn" .. .. J. Thomas (Mr. F. C. BARKER)
6. Song, "Sunshine and Shade" .. .. Randegger (Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT)
7. Ballet music, "Reine de Saba" .. .. Gounod
8. Old English Song, "The Friar of the Orders Grey" .. .. Reeve (Mr. J. G. WRIGHT)
9. Solo, Bassoon, air and variations, "Lucy Long" .. .. F. Godfrey (Mr. P. LANGDALE)
10. Song, "I'm a Merry Zingara" .. .. Balfe (Miss ANNETTE IVANOVA)
11. Selection, "Un Ballo in Maschera" .. .. Verdi
12. Song, "Tell Me, Mary, How to Woo Thee" .. .. Hodson (Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT)
13. Overture, "Zanetta" .. .. Auber

Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN
Accompanist, Herr B. SCHEREK

CONCERT ADMISSION, ONE SHILLING


[Advertisement], The Argus (8 September 1888), 24

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900904

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (10 September 1888), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901000

The concert on Saturday afternoon attracted an audience which filled the Exhibition concert-hall in every part. The place was full half an hour before commencing time, and the event was altogether memorable. Mr Cowen's programme was devoted entirely to selections from the works of Richard Wagner and for this purpose the strength of the orchestra was increased until the players numbered 84. The overture to the "Flying Dutchman" was the first item on the programme. This is a selection with which the average audience is tolerably well acquainted by this time. The skill with which it is built up is as indisputable as it is in one sense admirable. It is founded on themes which are to be recognised in the body of the work and is altogether a masterly composition. The performance of it repays well the analytical ear to watch with what easy mastery Wagner handles the gigantic forces he employs in the production of this most stormy of musical scenes, but it is to be doubted whether this analytical faculty is the common possession of the average audience. We believe, therefore, that to the average listener for the first time the overture to the "Flying Dutchman" must seem merely sound and fury, with very little of other significance. On the other hand, others find pleasure in contemplating a great master at work with his own method, and let it be said with his own daring and defiant self-assertiveness, in the production of effects which are admitted to be colossal, and which it may be supposed were never intended by their author to be called beautiful. It is this power of turning out music which is masterly in composition and yet repellent in effect which stamps the unique genius of Richard Wagner, and gives it special value for independence, self-reliance, and honesty of purpose in uttering the truths he believed in, whether they were to be found pleasant or not. But widening our purview and reasoning from other instances we find that the genius of Wagner is many sided, and that in varying mood he is inspired by thoughts of surpassing beauty and infinite tenderness.

What greater contrast could be presented than that between the overture named and the prelude to "Lohengrin" which followed it - the one so stormy, the other so tranquillising, and at the same time elevating m effect. Our readers know the quality of this remarkable and most beautiful movement too well to require detailed description of it. On Saturday afternoon it was presented in perfect form in all its purity, sweetness, and splendour under the direction of an enlightened and earnest-minded conductor, and by trained musicians in perfect sympathy with the work they interpreted. In like perfection of manner the overture to "Tannhäuser", with its majestic themes and glowing treatment, was also reproduced, and with such effect that the big hall rang with cheers when it was brought to a triumphant conclusion. What is called the "Siegfried Idyll" was the next to follow, and this was given for the first time in Melbourne ... the public applause, loud, long, and earnest. The introduction and closing scene from the same master's "Tristan and Isolde" has been in the past heard here already in Melbourne, but never with such impressive effect ... The last item in this Wagner programme was the most wonderful of all. This was "The Ride of the Walkyries", from the opera "Die Walkure" ...

The performance was an earnest tribute to the memory of a great master conscientiously and reverently offered, and it was a revelation to a great audience, who showed their appreciation in their earnest applause.

"EVENING POPULAR CONCERT", The Argus (10 September 1888), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6900999

The hall was fairly well filled in the evening, but not as one would expect to see it at a "popular concert". Whether this is to be accounted for by the attraction of the promenade outside, or by the steady advance of musical taste, the fact remains that, judging by attendances, the "Popular Concerts" on Saturday evening are in reality the least popular. The programme did not include much that was new ...

The two novelties at this concert were solos for harp and bassoon. In the first - solo, harp, "Autumn", J. Thomas, Mr. F. C. Barker (who is still in his teens) proved himself to be possessed of the brilliance, the steadiness, and the accuracy of a fully-matured artist. The performance was so good that after twice coming forward to bow his acknowledgements, Mr. Barker had to submit to an encore with another Welsh melody. As a distinguished harpist, Mr. Barker, has undoubtedly a great future before him. We believe it is something like 20 years since a bassoon solo had been heard in Melbourne, though we do not think it will be anything like that time before one is heard again. The bassoon, with its great compass and its vox humana upper notes, is, in the hands of a skilful artist, capable of producing extraordinary effects. Mr. P. Langdale is an exceptionally gifted bassoon player, able to perform wonders with it, and he is also, as is very obvious from his performance, possessed of a fund of humour, in which he and his instrument are perfectly at home together. His rendering of the air with variations on "Lucy Long", by F. Godfrey, was so good and yet so irresistibly funny that he had also to submit to an encore. The encore number was decidedly comic, as evincing a serious disinclination to return to "Home, Sweet Home", till "early in the morning". Mr. J. G. Wright, whose intonation was at tunes faulty, sang Adams's "The Romany Lass", and the old English song; "The Friar of Orders Grey", which carries some of us back to the days of our childhood. In the performance of this there was some little disagreement between vocalist and accompanist. Misa Annette Ivanova was recalled for a good reading of Cowen's very popular song "It was a Dream", and later on sang Balfe's somewhat music-hally "I'm a Merry Zingara". Mr. Armes Beaumont, who was received with the usual acclamation, was in good voice, and sang Randegger's "Sunshine and Shade"," and also "Tell me, Mary, how to woo thee" ...



Monday 10 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

[Overture, "Jessonda" .. .. Spohr, not performed, replaced with]
1. Overture, "Der Freischütz" .. .. Weber
2. "Chaconne and Rigadon d'Aline" .. ..  Monsigny
3. Finale, No.2 symphony in D .. .. Beethoven
4. "Scenes Pittoresque" .. .. Massenet
      (March, "air de Ballet", Angelus, Bolero)
5. "Au bord de la Mer" .. .. Dunkler
6. "Danse des Bacchantes", "Philemon et Baucis" .. .. Gounod
7. "Schiller Fest Marsch" .. .. Meyerbeer


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Hans Heiling" .. .. Marschner
2. Andante from Symphony in D, "Clock" .. .. Haydn
3. Overture, "Struensee" .. .. Meyerbeer
4. Hungarian dances, Nos. 5 and 6 .. .. Brahms
5. Gavotte .. .. Zelman
6. Selections, "La Traviata" .. .. Verdi
7. March, "Reine de Saba" .. .. Gounod


"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (11 September 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901224

The attendance at the afternoon orchestral concert on Monday was not quite so good as usual. The declension in the attendance is directly referable to the omission of the concert notices in the advertising columns of the morning journals. At this concert a change had to be made in the published programme in consequence of an important band part in Spohr's overture to the opera "Jessonda" having been mislaid. In lieu of this the ever welcome overture to Weber's "Der Freischütz" was substituted, and the performance or it earned the strongly expressed applause of the whole audience. The "Chaconne and Rigadon d'Aline", from the opera of that name, composed by Monsigny, concerning whom we recently spoke at length, was repeated with an effect that was greatly enjoyed by the audience Another repetition performance, and one which those who know it think can hardly for the present at least be repeated too often, was that of the great finale from the No.2 symphony in D, by Beethoven - the evidence of that power which kept on building up with finer and finer expansion the enduring work comprised in the nine symphonies which have immortalised the name of their composer. The "Scenes Pittoresque", by Massenet, including the March the "air de Ballet", the Angelus, and the Bolero, are always most pleasing to listen to. The Angelus particularly is informed with fine musical feeling, and adorned with skilful musical treatment, and Massenet, as we have before pointed out, is a new composer to whom has been given a fine musical mind, and who may be cultivated for a while with advantage. "Au bord de la Mer", the dreamy and delightful musical picture composed by Dunkler, lost nothing of its charm by reproduction. It is always grateful to the ear to listen to the finely equalised and sustained 'cello tone produced on the instrument by the accomplished player, Mr T. Liebe. This selection gives him fair opportunity for the display of his skill, and yesterday afternoon be made admirable use of it. The "Danse des Bacchantes", from "Philemon et Baucis", by Gounod, has a great deal of spirited and quaintly rhythmical writing to recommend it, and the performance of it was received with favour. The programme came to an agreeable ending by the performance of the "Schiller Fest Marsch", composed by Meyerbeer tor the Schiller Centenary Festival in 1859. The work is quite characteristic of the composer's method in finding spirited rhythms for the expression of his ideas. It is highly elaborated and grandiose in style, and the first trio movement is remarkable for a tuneful grace of high quality. The whole work was well calculated by its ingenious composer to give dignity to the interesting festival for which is was produced. The audience applauded the performance of it very heartily.

"EVENING ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (11 September 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901225

The attendance at the evening concert, which at first promised to be meagre, improved considerably after the performance of the first number, and before the conclusion of the concert the room presented a comfortable appearance. The first item on the programme was the short and spirited overture to Marschner's opera "Hans Heiling" ... This was followed by the repetition of the andante movement from that symphony in D, by Haydn, which earned for the work the stupid name of the "Clock Symphony" ... Meyerbeer's fine overture to the Struensee music held a place of honour on the programme, and was so well rendered that the good art displayed in its elaborate construction was conspicuously prominent, and was well approved. The Hungarian dances, Nos. 5 and 6, were welcome items in a programme which, for the most part, was made up of light and popular selections, It is pleasing to note that Signor Zelman's pretty gavotte - a recent composition, which has been heard before in public - was found worthy of a place in the Exhibition Centennial programme, and that a bright interpretation of it by a thoroughly efficient orchestra placed the talent of the composer in a very fair light before the audience. Numerous selections from Verdi's opera "La Traviata" gave unmixed pleasure from the manner in which they were performed by the solo instrumentalists and the well-drilled forces which make up the whole orchestra. These selections commenced with the charmingly written instrumental introduction to the opera, followed by the solo "Libiamo ne' lieti Calici," on the clarinet, by Mr. Lundborg, the tuneful "Di Provenza il Mar", with Mr. Rawlins in the principal cornet part; the chorus of the "Boeat-gras" [Bue grasso] by the orchestra, the fine tenor air "Di miei bollenti Spiriti" on the trombone, by Mr. Worsley; finishing with the brilliant scene "Sempre libera", with full musical effects, perfectly well rendered. The march from Gounod's "Reine de Saba" made a lively conclusion to this light and pleasing musical entertainment.


Note: The local work "found worthy of a place in the Exhibition Centennial programme", by Alberto Zelman, was perhaps the Gavotte for strings that had been performed previously by Roberto Hazon's orchestra in July 1888

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/171071326 

"SIGNOR HAZON'S SYMPHONIC CONCERT", The Argus (2 July 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6893286



Tuesday 11 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
With Augmented Orchestra of 78 Performers.

1. Overture, "Ruler of the Spirits" .. .. Weber (First Time)
2. Symphony in F (No. 8) .. .. Beethoven
3. Turkish Rondo .. .. Mozart
4. Selection from "Scenes Poétiques" .. .. Godard (First Time)
5. Overture, "Stradella" .. .. Flotow


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (11 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901154

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Argus (12 September 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901262

Two concerts of this class were given yesterday afternoon and evening with varying results, as far as attendance was concerned. In the afternoon the public patronage was meagre. In the evening it was much more generous. During the day time the commissioners charged the entry fee of 2s 6d, and after 6 o'clock the satisfactory minimum charge of 1s was made. Notice was given in our "Exhibition Notes" yesterday that the half-crown day would in future he done away with by the commissioners who have found now, in the sixth week of their management that this exceptional part of their tariff has been a failure. While the commissioners promise that for the future the minimum price of entry to the Exhibition will only be charged (with the exception limits mentioned of a small fee for a few reserved seats), they have not promised the continuance of the special orchestral concerts when the orchestra is strengthened by the addition it as many more players of acknowledged merit as will satisfy the requirements of Mr. Cowen. It is to be hoped that as the commissioners have started so well they will continue - for the sake of the good they are effecting - to give these special concerts at minimum price and with the maximum strength. The first selection on yesterday afternoon's programme was the overture by Weber known amongst English speaking people as the "Ruler of the Spirits". We do not think that this attractive work has been heard before in public in Melbourne ... For the first time at these concerts, but not for the first time in Melbourne, the charming No.8 Symphony in F, by Beethoven, was given in its entirety. The third and fourth selections from "Scenes Poétiques", by B. Godard, allowed imaginative power on the part of that writer, a good feeling for the employment of instrumental colouring in the orchestra, and a very liberal imagination. The scenes selected by Mr. Cowen for illustration were No.3 ("On the Mountain") and No 4 ("Village Life") ... The same programme was repeated at the concert in the evening.



Wednesday 12 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Anacreon" .. .. Cherubini
2. Minuet and Finale (Symphony in E flat) .. .. Mozart
3. Largo in F sharp .. .. Haydn
4. Ballet Music, "L'Africaine" .. .. Meyerbeer
5. Graceful Dance (Henry VIII) .. .. Sullivan
6. Tarantella .. .. Raff
7. Gavotte, "Tripping" .. .. Berger
8. Overture, "Gaza Ladra" .. .. Rossini


EVENING, at 8

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (12 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901269

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT', The Argus (13 September 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901352

The only public music which was given yesterday at the Exhibition under Mr Cowen's direction was that mentioned in the programme for the afternoon orchestral concert. The audience was numerous, the programme lengthy, the performance generally fine, and the public satisfaction very great. The music was for the moat part light in character, but so good in quality that it represented the sportive mood of mind of many men who are classed as great in musical composition. The name of Cherubini used to be one "to conjure with" ... represented yesterday afternoon by his overture to "Anacreon", one act composition, which in these days we would designate "operetta", but to which the opening symphony is elaborated on a scale which properly belongs to the form called "grand". The opening movement to this is sufficiently portentous in effect to secure the earnest attention of all hearers. In the second movement the extreme brilliancy and effectiveness of the rapid rushing passages written for the violin must be acknowledged by those who hear the performance even for the first time, and to those who know the work well the performance of it by the orchestra, under Mr Cowen s direction, was of the most gratifying kind. ... The "ballet music" from "L'Africaine", by Meyerbeer, is amongst the best of the ballet music written by the best of composers of music of that kind. This part of the opera is well known to the patrons of grand opera in Melbourne, and the reproduction of it by the fine Centennial Band renewed impressions of Oriental processions accompanied by clang and clash of cymbals, of rhythmic movement, of waving scarves and uplifted banners with mystic symbols inscribed upon them, and surrounding the scene is this music of Meyerbeer, with its near approach to true Oriental scale, its fine orchestral colouring, and the power possessed by the author of making his musical scenes grow with something of vitality in the imagination of his audience. ... A tarantella by Raff was a perfect performance in  characteristic rhythm, in fulness of idea, and in the untiring movement which sustained the listener's interest until the elaborate and really artistic composition came to an end. Berger's pretty gavotte entitled "Tripping" was repeated, and the long and highly enjoy able programme came to an end with a perfectly just, and decidedly spirited, performance of Rossini's overture to "La Gazza Ladra", first played at "La Scala" in 1817. The grandeur and effrontery of this most showy composition made powerful impression at the time, and this impression has not been weakened by the many repetitions to which it has been subjected from the date mentioned until the latest performance yesterday afternoon by the Centennial orchestra of Melbourne.

On Wednesday nights there are no concerts under Mr. Cowen's control. Last night, however, there was "music at the Exhibition" of a different kind from that generally noticed. The stirring tones of a brass bund, numbering 29 performers, the band of the second battalion V. R., under the direction of Bandmaster Hearnes, and by permission of Colonel Templeton, played a variety of musical selections under the northern dome, which were found to be very pleasing to those who made that part a rallying point - a place of rest and a point of departure for fresh discoveries amongst the many attractions of the Exhibition.



Thursday 13 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Ruler of the Spirits" .. .. Weber
2. Andante from Symphony in D .. ... Haydn
3. Overture, "Egmont" .. .. Beethoven
4. Turkish rondo .. ..  Mozart
5. Ballet Music, "Masaniello" .. .. (Auber)
6. "Village Life", from "Scenes Poétiques"  .. .. Godard
7. Overture, "Le Brasseur de Preston" .. .. Adam


EVENING, at 8

GRAND CHORAL CONCERT CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA OF 800 PERFORMERS

1. Overture, "Samson" .. .. Handel
2. Motett, "Hear my Prayer" .. .. Mendelssohn (Mrs. BETHELL and CHORUS)
3. Air, "Honour and Arms" ("Samson") .. .. Handel (Mr. GORDON GOOCH)
4. Air, "With Verdure Clad" ("Creation") .. .. Haydn (Mrs. BETHELL)
5. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
6. Gipsy Life .. .. Schumann (The CHOIR and ORCHESTRA)
7. Ballad, "The Peace of the Valley" .. .. Balfe (Mr. GORDON GOOCH; Cornet obligato, Mr. Rawlins)
8. Serenade for Strings .. .. Haydn
9. Turkish March, "Ruins of Athens" .. .. Beethoven
10. Part Songs (unaccompanied)
     A. "Sweet and Low" .. .. Barnby
     B. "Now is the month of Maying" .. .. Morley
11. Song, 'Stay with me" .. .. Mattei (Mrs. BETHELL)
12. Hungarian Dances Nos.5 and 6 .. .. Brahms
13. Chorus, "Let all who love Gladness" ("Preciosa") .. .. Weber
14. Coronation March, "Prophète" .. .. Meyerbeer


[Advertisement], The Argus (13 September 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901378

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. AFTERNOON ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (14 September 1888), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901528

The concert yesterday afternoon was attended by a fairly numerous audience, and those who were present had reason to be well pleased with an enjoyable hour's music ... The chef d'oeuvre of the concert was Beethoven's colossal "Egmont" overture. This is a work which will bear perpetual rehearing, especially when played to such perfection as it was yesterday ... The ballet music from Auber's "Masanielio" has been heard before, und does not call for special notice beyond mentioning that in the second trio movement Mr. Morton (the oboe player) has a good opportunity of distinguishing himself, which was fully taken advantage of, and the same remark is applicable to Messrs. Lundborg and Rawlins (clarinet and cornet) in the Bolero ... The concert concluded with a capital performance of Adam's merry, sparkling overture, "Le Brasseur de Preston", which has been noticed before in these columns.

"EVENING GRAND CHORAL CONCERT", The Argus (14 September 1888), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901526

In the evening the hall was well filled, but to nothing like the extent it was last Thursday, on the memorable first production of "Ruth". It is gratifying to all musically disposed to know that "Ruth" will be repeated next Thursday evening. Handel's oratorio, "Samson", was called into requisition for two numbers on the programme. ... Whilst admiringly contemplating the massive grandeur of the Herculean Handel, one cannot help being impressed with the remarkable difference between the orchestra then and the orchestra of to day. In Mendelssohn's "Hear My Prayer" the chorus was heard to great advantage. The extreme delicacy of the shading and the complete oneness with the conductor were most pleasing proofs of the effect of musicianly training on receptive minds. The Bolo part yesterday was undertaken by Mrs. Bethell. This lady is possessed of a pleasant voice, and has great natural advantages. In "0! for the Wings" she was heard at the best, and it was rendered with real sympathetic feeling. This being so, we would, with all kindly feeling, advise Mrs. Bethell to give more attention to the clear enunciation of the words; at present that is her weak point. Later on Mrs. Bethell sang also, "With Verdure Clad", ("Creation"), for which she was recalled, and Mattei's rather commonplace song "Stay With Me". ... Mr. Gordon Gooch gave a good reading of the air "Honour and Arms", from "Samson", and was much applauded; he also sang Balfe's somewhat insipid song, "The Peace of the Valley", which we consider au apt title, as the song is not at all likely to disturb it. Mr. Gooch bad the advantage of Mr. Cowen's accompaniment at the pianoforte, and Mr. Rawlins with a cornet obligato. Wagner's overture to "Rienzi" has, as we predict on its first performance, become a firm favourite, it is of such a character that none but the very densest can withstand its irresistible effect. It was magnificently played, and would have been gladly heard over again ... and the unaccompanied part songs "Sweet and Low" (Barnby), and "Now is the Month of May[ing]" (Morley). To sing two such well-known songs as these unaccompanied is a critical test, which, however, the chorus was fully equal to, The result showed a refinement of style and a massiveness of tone such as has never before been heard in Australia, and of which this colony may well be proud ... the "Coronation March" from Meyerbeer's "Prophète", formed a fitting conclusion to an interesting concert. Mr Cowen conducted throughout both concerts in his own quiet and masterly manner.



Friday 14 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Jessonda" .. .. Spohr
2. Entr'acte No.2 "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
3. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber
4. Allegro from "Reformation Symphony" .. .. Mendelssohn
5. Invitation to the Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
6. Sous le Balcon (for strings) .. .. Wuesrt
7. Valse (Reine de Saba) .. .. Gounod
8. Overture, "Le Philtre" .. .. Auber


EVENING, at 8

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

THIS EVENING From 8 to 10 WARNECKE'S BAND, Under North Dome.


[Advertisement], The Argus (14 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901563

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (15 September 1888), 15

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901679

The musical performance at the Exhibition yesterday was of a kind well mixed, but all so good that the compiler of the programmes, the annotator, the driller of the musical forces and the conductor in public - all represented by the one functionary, Mr. F. H. Cowen - deserves the highest thanks. There was a fairly numerous attendance present yesterday afternoon. Amongst them were the restless, who could not listen to an hour's good music. These must include many visitors with limited time. Others who have leisure and inclination, and are possessed by gentle nature and fine thought, are known to be constant visitors to the source of the best music ever heard in Melbourne. ... The Weber overture to "Oberon" is wonderful not only for the grace and force and brilliancy of its general effect, but for the mystic meaning of the invocation delivered in the tones of the Wald horn. After this all is sylvan, and Oberon and his delightful subjects disport themselves as they did in the lively imaginative mind of their musical inventor, The allegro from the "Reformation" Symphony of Mendelssohn with its clear expression fine harmony, and perfect symmetry was very greatly enjoyed on its reproduction yesterday afternoon. Weber's "Invitation to the Waltz", a well known, but cumbrous expression of a crystalline colloquialism, was played again with all the power that the orchestration of Berlioz could add to the first form in which it was presented to the world by the author, who wrote for the pianoforte. A new thing, "Sous le Balcon", by a composer with the extraordinary name of Wuerst, represented, according to its title, a melody which is plaintive, in accordance with men's circumstances when they sing under balconies - with a tinkling accompaniment without which no well regulated serenade was ever known to be performed. The male voice is made in fine tones by the violoncello, and is answered by the higher tones of the violin with really pretty effect. The "Reine de Saba" waltz was given with such well-reasoned giusto tempo on the part of the conductor that Gounod's idea seemed to go by itself, with the true vitality that is in it. Mr. Cowen always sends his audience away in cheerful spirits and the music of Auber gives him ample choice for his benevolent purposes. Yesterday the overture, "Le Philtre", was the work chosen, and was found to be full of grace and characteristic beauty and power. The music in the evening was provided by Mr. Warnecke's brass band, under the northern dome.



Saturday 15 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

GRAND SPECIAL CONCERT
With Largely Augmented Orchestra

1. Symphony in B flat, No.4 .. .. Beethoven
2. Organ Concerto in B flat .. .. Handel (First appearance of Mr. EDWIN BENDING, Organist of the Royal Albert Hall, London)
[Fugue in G minor .. .. Bach, as soloist's encore]
3. Hungarian rhapsody (No.3) in D .. .. Liszt (First Time)
4. Overture, "Siege of Corinth" .. .. Rossini


EVENING, at 8

POPULAR CONCERT

1. Overture, "Son and Stranger" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Aria, "Se opressi ognor" (Juive) .. .. Halévy (Mr. ARTHUR HUBBARD)
3. Overture, "Fidelio" .. .. Beethoven
4. Solos Violoncello
     A. Romance .. .. Mendelssohn
     B. Drinking Song .. .. Dunkler (Mr. THEODORE LIEBE)
5. Song, 'Nymphs and Shepherds" .. .. Purcell (Miss FANNY BRISTOW)
6. Romanza, "Alla Stella confidente" .. .. Robaudi (Miss MARIE HESTER; Violoncello obligato, Mr. LIEBE)
7. Ballet music (Skating Scene), "Prophète" .. .. Meyerbeer
8. Song, "Tis when to sleep" .. .. Bishop (Mr. ARTHUR HUBBARD)
9. Fantasia oboe, "Don Pasquale" (Donizetti) .. .. Verroust (Mr. W. R. MORTON)
10. Song, 'The Bird that Came in Spring" .. .. Benedict (Miss FANNY BRISTOW; Flute obligato, Mr. Herbert L. Stoneham)
11. Selection, "Traviata" .. .. Verdi (Solos for Clarionet, Cornet, and Trombone, Messrs. LUNDBERG, RAWLINS, and WORSLEY)
12. Song, "Answers" .. .. Bluemnthal (Miss MARIE HESTER)
13. Overture, "Masaniello" .. .. Auber

CONDUCTOR, Mr. F. H. COWEN. Accompanist, Herr BENNO SCHEREK.
Concert admission - One shilling.

The CARLTON DISTRICT BAND will Play under the NORTH DOME between 8 and 10 [sic]


[Advertisement], The Argus (15 September 1888), 24

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901756

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (17 September 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901879

On Saturday afternoon the concert hall was well filled in all parts, when, with the augmented orchestra of 74 performers, an excellent programme was rendered. The first number was Beethoven's Symphony in B flat (No.4), op.60. ... The performance of this symphony was such as to reflect the greatest credit on the orchestra and its gifted conductor, Mr. F. H. Cowen. The second number on the programme was Handel's concerto for organ and orchestra, in B flat (No.2). The organ part was taken by Mr. Edwin Bending, recently arrived from London, where he is organist at the Royal Albert Hall. This proved to be a thoroughly enjoyable performance. The same concerto has been played several times before in Melbourne, but never, we believe, with the assistance of the orchestra. The difference is great, and now that it has been done once, we hope that it may prove to be the precursor of many similar performances. Like all of Handel's organ works, this concerto is in proper keeping with the dignity of the organ as the king of instruments, as often lowered by the trivial, ephemeral scribblings of the present day. By his complete mastery of manuals and pedals and knowledge of the resources of the instrument on which he played, Mr. Bending proved himself to be an organist of the first rank. The Hungarian Rhapsody (No.3) in D was a novelty at these concerts. It is, however, well known to the Melbourne public as a pianoforte solo ... always popular as a pianoforte solo and is likely to become still more so as scored for orchestra; the finale especially is remarkable able for its exhilarating brightness. The performance was good, though we are inclined to think that after one or two more rehearsals it will become better. Bach's well known fugue in G minor came next on the programme, and if after the performance of the concert[o] referred to above anything farther were necessary to show Mr. Bending's extraordinary proficiency as an organist, his admirable management of the organ registers would in itself be sufficient to prove him a most accomplished performer on that instrument ...

"EVENING POPULAR CONCERT", The Argus (17 September 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901880

There was a fairly good attendance at the evening concert. The programme was a miscellaneous one, and does not call for any lengthy notice ... In numerous orchestral performances we have had occasion to refer to Mr. Liebe's admirable playing, but never to the same extent as now; his rendering of Mendelssohn's beautiful "Romance" was refined and artistic in the highest degree, and in Dunkler's "Drinking Song" he proved himself to be possessed of all the technical skill of the virtuoso, combined with the inborn feeling of the artist. At the conclusion Mr. Liebe had to come back and bow his acknowledgments. Miss Fanny Bristow made her second appearance in Melbourne, and sang Purcell's pleasing song, "Nymphs and Shepherds", and Benedict's well known and popular "The Bird that Came in Spring", the flute obligato to which was well played by Mr. Stoneham. Miss Bristow has a pure, sympathetic voice of high range, and in both of these songs she showed the possession of musicianly attainments ... One of the most interesting numbers on the programme was an oboe solo, a brilliant and showy fantasia by Verroust on Donizetti's "Don Pasquale", played by Mr W. R. Morton. Mr. Morton has great technical abilities in addition to a beautiful tone, and his performance of the fantasia was in every way successful, and was received with great enthusiasm by the audience ...


And news from the UK:

"MR. COWEN'S EXHIBITION ODE", The Argus (15 September 1888), 13

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901705

LONDON, Sept. 14. The "Song of Thanksgiving", composed by Mr. F. H. Cowen for the Melbourne Centennial Exhibition, has been performed at the Hereford Musical Festival. The press speaks favourably of the work.



Monday 17 September 1888

AFTERNOON, At 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Jeune Henri" .. .. Méhul (1763-1817)
2. Adagio from Symphony in B flat (No.4) .. .. Beethoven (1770-1827)
3. Overture, "Euryanthe" .. .. Weber
4. Ballet music from "William Tell" ... Rossini (1792-1868) [not played, replaced with 3 selection from "Scenes from Other Lands" .. .. Moskowski]
5. Minuet .. .. Boccherini (1740-1805)
6. Overture, "Mignon" .. .. A. Thomas


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, Scherzo, Nocturne, Wedding March (from "Midsummer Night's Dream") .. .. Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
2. Air de Ballet, from "Esmeralda" .. ..  A. Goring-Thomas (First Time)
3. Selection, "Ernani" .. .. Verdi
4. Marche Romaine .. .. Gounod (1818- )

Admission free; a few front seats 1s.

The BAND of the 1st BATTALION V.R. Will PLAY (by permission of Colonel Irving) Between 8 and 10, THIS EVENING, Under the NORTH DOME


[Advertisement], The Argus (17 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901830

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (18 September 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902042

Yesterday afternoon's concert was well attended, and those who came for the commencement of the programme heard something of unique interest. This was the first production here of Méhul's overture to "Le Jeune Henri" ... For reasons which are not always explainable at the moment to the public Mr. Cowen had to substitute for the William Tell ballet music three brilliant and powerfully charming selections from Moskowski's "Scenes from Other Lands" ... The "Boccherini Minuet" as usual found great favour with all hearers from the delicate way in which it was played, and the overture to "Mignon", by A. Thomas, brought the afternoon concert to an artistic close.

"EVENING CONCERT", The Argus (18 September 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902043

In the evening there was a numerous and more than usually enthusiastic audience, which may perhaps be accounted for by the fact that the programme included four numbers from Mendelssohn's music composed for Shakspeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream". ... The nocturne, with its exquisite horn solo, which was beautifully played by Mr Lawson, has been heard before at these concerts. The wedding march, which concluded this selection, is familiar to all who are musically disposed, even to a great many who are not but who have gone through the marriage ceremony. The applause throughout was most enthusiastic, and we hope Mr. Cowen will give us opportunities of hearing it all again ... The remaining numbers on the programme were a selection from Verdi's opera "Ernani", Gounod's "Marche Romaine", a special favourite with amateur organists, but very effective with the orchestra; and, though last, not least, an air de ballet from "Esmeralda", an opera written by A. Goring Thomas, and produced at Drury-Lane Theatre with great success in March, 1883 ... Coming immediately after the "Midsummer Night's Dream" music was a very severe test, but the orchestration is singularly effective, and if this is to be taken as a fair sample of the whole work, we should like to hear some more of it. The concert was over at 9 o'clock, and the audience left, feeling that they had spent a most enjoyable hour.



Tuesday 18 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
With INCREASED ORCHESTRA Of 74 PERFORMERS

1. "Jupiter" Symphony .. .. Mozart
2. Bridal Song ("Country Wedding") .. .. Goldmark
3. "L'Arlesienne" .. .. Bizet
4. Overture, "Lestocq" .. .. Auber


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (18 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6901978

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (20 September 1888), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902146

There was a very good, but not stable, attendance on Tuesday afternoon in the music room of the Exhibition. People kept on coming in and going out during the 75 minutes occupied by the musical performance, and on this account delays were made and something of a shifting character was given to the audience. His Excellency the Governor and Lady Loch were present, and were received with the National Anthem, played by the orchestra The first musical number on the programme was the symphonic masterpiece of Mozart - the "Jupiter Symphony" ... The invincible power of the composer made itself felt upon the audience, who applauded each movement separately, and were unanimous in the praise at the conclusion of the whole. ... Mr. Cowen displays a generous liking for the inimitable Auber, whose numerous operatic overtures he frequently uses to dismiss his audience with bright and cheerful thoughts in their minds. Yesterday afternoon he chose the overture to "Lestocq" and the end that he had in view was fully attained. The National Anthem was played at the departure of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Loch. The same programme was repeated in the evening with fine effect before a numerous audience.



Wednesday 19 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, Scherzo, Nocturne, Wedding March (from "Midsummer Night's Dream") .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Air de Ballet, from "Esmeralda" .. ..  A. Goring-Thomas
3. Minuet and Trio .. .. Prout (First Time)
4. Tarantella .. .. Raff
5. Shawl Dance ("Dieu et Bayadere") .. .. Auber
6. Overture, "Poet and Peasant" .. .. Suppé


EVENING, at 8

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (19 September 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902103

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (20 September 1888), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902148

There was a fair attendance yesterday afternoon at the orchestral concert. ... A "Minuet and Trio" by Prout were played for the first time and proved to be very interesting, the minuet in 3/4 time is graceful and fairly fresh in design, cheerful in its rhythm and influence on the ear, and with pretty responses between the high strings and the light-wood wind instruments; the trio is a movement at once tender and noble in character, over which the composer lingers lovingly, nor leaves it until he has adorned it with all the musical treatment and colouring known to his art ... The composer, Ebenezer Prout, is a musician of distinction in London, where he has written works of some magnitude in symphonic form and in the form of cantata.  In the style last named we have already heard, here his "Hereward, the Wake", first produced at Brighton under the direction of Mr. Julius Herz, and we may hope to hear something of his symphonic work in good time. Judging by the "Minuet and Trio" under notice, Mr. Prout has sympathy with the orchestra, and uses its resources faithfully, and with respect for the best traditions. Mr. Prout is not only distinguished as a modern composer, but exercises with acknowledged ability the important judicial function of musical critic to the London journal, the Athenaeum. Raff's "Tarantelle" was repeated by the orchestra with splendid precision and most enlivening effect. "The Shawl Dance", from Auber's "Dieu et Bajadere", already given at these concerts, was charmingly rendered; and Supp.. Suppé's not very solid, but still highly effective overture, "Poet and Peasant" (Bauer and Dichter) brought the afternoon's entertainment to a cheerful conclusion There was no orchestral concert in the evening, but in the main annexe the band of the 2nd Battalion V.R. was announced to play from 8 till 10 o'clock.



Thursday 20 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Il Seraglio" .. .. Mozart
2. Bridal Song (from Symphony "The Country Wedding") .. .. Goldmark
3. Hungarian Rhapsody in D (No.3) .. .. Liszt
4. Scherzo and Wedding March (from "Midsummer Night's Dream") .. .. Mendelssohn
5. Selection (from Suite de Ballet, "The Language of Flowers") .. .. Cowen
6. Saltarello .. .. Gounod
7. Overture, "Felsenmühle" .. .. Reissiger


EVENING, at 8

Second Performance in Australia of Cowen's Oratorio "RUTH"

Ruth, Mrs. PALMER
Orpah, Miss ELLEN ATKINS
Naomi, Madame CHRISTIAN
Boaz, Mr, ARMES BEAUMONT
A Reaper/An Elder: Mr. F. H. MORTON

THE CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers
Conductor, Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN Leader, Mr. Geo. Weston Organist, Mr. Geo. Peake


[Advertisement], The Argus (20 September 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902296

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (21 September 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902437

The afternoon performance yesterday was numerously attended. The short and lively overture to Mozart's "Entfuhrung aus dem Serail" ... was played with very inspiriting effect ... The Liszt Hungarian Rhapsody in D, No 3... was rendered with very fine effect, especially in the slow movement in the minor. The contrast between this and the quick finale was full of interest and refreshing to the ear ...The suite de ballet, "The Language of Flowers", composed by Cowen, was placed under contribution to the following extent, namely, No.2, "Lilac", "The First Emotions of Love", No.3, the popular gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine", "Elegance and grace", and No.4, "Lily of the Valley", "The Return of Happiness". These gracefully imaginative and well instrumented musical pictures - by this time well known in Melbourne - were repeated to the evident satisfaction of all hearers. The performance of Gounod's "Saltarello" was so spirited as to gain the loudly expressed approval of the audience, and the afternoon concert came to an end with a lively and pleasing interpretation of Reissiger's overture to his "Felsenmuhle" opera ...

"GRAND CHORAL CONCERT. COWEN'S RUTH", The Argus (21 September 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902436

Notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather the concert hall was filled to its utmost holding capacity last night, the occasion being the repetition of Cowen's dramatic oratorio "Ruth" ... Judging from its enthusiastic reception on both occasions " Ruth" has taken a firm hold on the Melbourne public, and will bear still further repetitions. Owing to a difficulty in obtaining seats, it was 10 minutes after 8 before the performance commenced ... The second performance confirms our opinion, as before expressed, that this is one of the finest works of modern times, deserving of high rank amongst those which may be designated imperishable. ... Both chorus and orchestra kept well up to the high standard which they have reached, and which it is to be hoped and expected they will zealously maintain. It is pleasing to have heard Mr. Cowen remark that the choruses have never been so well sung as in Melbourne. Mr. Peake presided at the organ in his own most useful but unostentatious way, and the composer conducted with that quiet but masterly manner which is habitual to him.



Friday 21 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESRAL CONCERT

1. Prelude, "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
2. Overture, "Tannhaüser" .. .. Wagner
3. Prelude, "Le Dernier Sommeil de la Vierge" .. .. Massenet
4. Hungarian Rhapsody (No.1) in F .. .. Liszt
5. Pizzicato ("Sylvia") .. .. Delibes
6. Ballade and Air Variée ("Coppelia") .. .. Delibes
7. Liebesliedchen for oboe and strings .. .. Taubert
8. Overture, "Siege of Corinth" .. .. Rossini


[Advertisement], The Argus (21 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902380

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (22 September 1888), 14

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902547

There was no afternoon concert yesterday at the Exhibition, but in the evening Mr. Cowen presented a singularly rich and varied programme, in the presence of a very numerous audience, composed of people who are moved to enthusiastic warmth of recognition when pleased with the music played for their delectation ... The two selections from Wagner were deeply impressive examples of that master's power to expand into gigantic proportions a germinal idea by the skilful introduction of new instruments with constantly increasing effect. Both selections were admirably performed, and handsomely applauded. The No.2 selection, by Massenet, was as different as could be from the two foregoing - but a band of 44 string instruments played with delicate touch and fine musical feeling, gave this an effect as touching as was all the grandeur of Wagner. The Hungarian Rhapsody in F illustrates, as the finest piece of orchestral playing yet heard here, how perfect is the organisation and general drill of the orchestra under Mr. Cowen's control. The two pieces by Delibes ...pleased very highly. the dainty pizzicato movement from the Ballet "Sylvia" was encored with enthusiasm, and was repeated. The selections from "Coppelia" gave Mr. G. Weston good opportunity for a most artistic solo violin performance of the ballade, while the succeeding variations on a different air were performed with exceeding brilliancy by all the string players. Mr. W. R. Morton, the talented oboist, gave perfect expression to the Liebesliedchen, by Taubert; and the pompous overture to Rossini's "Siege of Corinth", brought a fine programme to a brilliant end ...



Saturday 22 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

GRAND BEETHOVEN CONCERT

PASTORAL SYMPHONY
Turkish March, "Ruins of Athens"
Romance in F for Violin and Orchestra (Mr. MAX KLEIN)
Overture, "Leonora", No. 3

Body of hall, 1s. Galleries and under galleries free.


EVENING, at 8

GRAND OPERATIC POPULAR CONCERT

1. Overture, "Mirella" .. .. Gounod
2. Duet ("I Masnadieri") .. .. Verdi (Signor LEANDRO COY and Signor ATTILIO BUZZI)
3. Shadow Song ("Dinorah") .. .. Meyerbeer (Signorina ALICE REBOTTARO)
4. Overture, "Semiramide" .. .. Rossini
5. Romance, "Salve dimora" ("Faust") .. .. Gounod (Signor COY)
6. Fantasia, piano, violin, and violoncello ("Barbiere") .. .. Rossini (Messrs. SCHEREK, KLEIN, and LIEBE)
7. Ballet Music ("L'Africaine") .. .. Meyerbeer
8. Duet, "La ci darem" ("Don Giovanni") .. .. Mozart (Signorina REBOTTARO and Signor BUZZI)
9. Solo Cornet, "When Other Lips" ("Bohemian Girl") .. .. Balfe (Mr. E. RAWLINS)
10. Cavatina, "Infelice" ("Ernani") .. .. Verdi (Signor BUZZI)
11. Selection ("Ernani") .. .. Verdi
12. Trio ("Lucrezia Borgia") .. .. Donizetti (Signorina REBOTTARO, Signor COY, and Signor BUZZI)
13. Overture, "Fra Diavolo" .. .. Auber


[Advertisement], The Argus (22 September 1888), 24

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902477

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (24 September 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902597

On Saturday afternoon the concert hall was crowded to overflowing; this, undoubtedly, was owing to the production, for the first time of Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony. Of Beethoven's nine symphonies this is the most widely known and generally popular and, judging by the enthusiasm aroused by its performance on Saturday, we think it might well be included in one of the evening "popular" concerts, which so far have been remarkable for the paucity of attendance. The question of what is popular and what is not is as yet a moot point; but if the Pastoral Symphony draws a better house than some of the programmes provided for the first few Saturday evenings so much the better for the Exhibition treasury, and so much the better for the musical future of the colony. We think the experiment is worth trying. ... The performance, with one or two slight exceptions, was excellent, and we never remember hearing a symphony received with such enthusiasm in Melbourne before ... The programme was made up entirely of Beethoven's music, but it would be difficult to find anything in more striking contrast to the above symphony than the number which followed it; this was the well-known Turkish march from the "Ruins of Athens", which, with its military precision, its distant approach, march past, and gradual disappearance, was so admirably rendered that it had to be repeated. The next number was Beethoven's Romance in F, Op.50, for violin and orchestra ... played here several times before, but not, so far as we can remember, with orchestra; it breathes the spirit of extreme delicacy and tenderness. Mr. Max Klein, who played it, is a comparatively new arrival, as he was brought out by Mr. Cowen, and has not been heard here before as a soloist; he has a good tone, and the performance was decid[ed]ly artistic ... one of the most enjoyable lo concerts we have ever heard in this part of the world ...

"EVENING POPULAR CONCERT. OPERATIC PROGRAMME", The Argus (24 September 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902598

In the evening the hall was better filled than on any previous Saturday, but this fact does not alter our opinion, as expressed above, that the experiment of introducing a judiciously selected work, such as the Pastoral Symphony, or at least part of one, is well worth trying. We admire a good opera well rendered in its proper place as much as any, but we consider that a lengthy programme made up entirely of operatic selections no matter how well done, is liable to become nauseous ...



Monday 24 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Jeune Henri" .. .. Méhul
2. Minuetto and Finale (from "Jupiter" Symphony) .. .. Mozart
3. Ballet Music (Feramorz) .. .. Rubinstein
4. Minuet and Trio .. .. Prout
5. Hungarian Dances (Nos.5 and 6) .. .. Brahms
6. Overture, "Felsenmühle" .. .. Reissiger


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Hebrides" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Entr'acte ("Lohengrin", act 3) .. .. Wagner
3. Suite, "L'Arlesienne" .. .. Bizet
4. Overture, "Le médecin malgré lui" .. .. Gounod
5. Selection, "Don Giovanni" .. .. Mozart
6. Gavotte .. .. Zelman
7. March from "Eli" .. .. Costa


[Advertisement], The Argus (24 September 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902693

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. AFTERNOON CONCERT", The Argus (25 September 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902821

The attendance was sparse yesterday afternoon at the beginning of the concert, but it improved greatly during the progress of the entertainment, because there are many who are habitués of these fine musical performances, and these form a constant audience. We have already alluded to the distracting hiss which comes into the ears of those who sit in the north side of the concert room under the gallery. This comes from the work of the glass engravers, who have their mechanical bench work performed during the music hour in such a way as to make themselves public nuisances, Last Saturday afternoon, during the progress of some of the finest parts of the Pastoral Symphony by Beethoven, the insidious hiss of this machinery was more disturbing to those within its influence than all the beauties of the great mind of Beethoven were pleasing. Is it not possible that during the "music hour", both morning and evening, this distraction may be stopped? ...

"EVENING CONCERT", The Argus (25 September 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902822

The evening concert began with the performance of the "Hebrides" overture, by Mendelssohn, written in 1829 ... The entr'acte to the third part of "Lohengrin", by Wagner - with the wild and flaring and most stimulating movement in that opera - a rush of instruments under a new rhythm, and impressed upon the hearer's mind with clash of cymbals and other tricks, was greatly applauded in performance ... The overture to the "Mock Doctor", by Gounod ... was a very interesting concert number, but had no quality which would make the work which it opened interesting as a comic opera. Some selections from "Don Giovanni" were greatly enjoyed, because they were well played. The impressive opening to the last scene and some of the pretty and familiar tunes from the body of the work were gracefully reproduced. Signor Zelman was well represented in the reproduction of his last composition, a pretty gavotte, which has been heard in various tones from various instruments before now in Melbourne ...



Tuesday 25 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
The CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA (Specially augmented to 74 performers)

1. Symphony in B flat (No.1) .. .. Schumann (First Time)
2. Overture, "Struensee" .. .. Meyerbeer
3. Waltz from Suite for strings (No.2) .. .. Volkmann (First Time)
4. Ballet Music, "Dance of the Hours" (Gioconda) .. .. Ponchielli
5. Cornelius March .. .. Mendelssohn


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (25 September 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902784



Wednesday 26 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Hebrides" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Andante from "Surprise" Symphony .. .. Haydn
3. Overture, "Preciosa" .. .. Weber
4. Waltz from Serenade for strings (No.2) .. .. Volkmann
5. Turkish Rondo .. .. Mozart
6. Valse and Mazurka, "Coppelia" .. .. Delibes
7. Shawl Dance (Dieu et Bayadere) .. .. Auber
8. Overture, "L'Italiana in Algieri" .. .. Rossini


EVENING, at 8

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (26 September 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6902892



Thursday 27 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Allegretto from Symphony in E flat (No.3) .. .. Schumann (First Time)
3. Selection, "Don Giovanni" .. .. Mozart
4. Ballet music, "Dance of the Hours" (Giaconda) .. .. Ponchieli
5. Gavotte (Mignon) .. .. A. Thomas
6. Overture, "Zampa" .. .. Hérold


EVENING, at 8

THIRD PERFORMANCE in AUSTRALIA
Cowen's Dramatic Oratorio "RUTH"

Ruth, Mrs. PALMER
Orpah, Miss ELLEN ATKINS
Naomi, Madame CHRISTIAN
Boaz, Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
A Reaper/An Elder: Mr. F. H. MORTON
THE CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers
Conductor, Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN
Leader, Mr. Geo. Weston
Organist, Mr. Geo. Peake


[Advertisement], The Argus (27 September 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6903127



Friday 28 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, Entr'acte and Ballet Music (Rosamunda) .. .. Schubert
2. Overture, "Ruy Blas" .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Musette (Mirella) .. .. Gounod (First Time)
4. Russian Dance, "Kamarinskaja" .. .. Glinka (First Time)
5. Overture, "Nozze di Figaro" .. .. Mozart


[Advertisement], The Argus (28 September 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6903268



Saturday 29 September 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

GRAND WAGNER CONCERT
Specially augmented for this occasion

Overtures, "Rienzi"
Siegfried Idyll
Introduction and Finale (Tristan)
Overture, "Tannhäuser"
"Feuerzauber" (Walkyie) (First Time)
Ride of the Walkyries


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT

1. "Surprise" Symphony .. .. HAYDN
2. Song, "Across the far Blue Hills, Marie" .. .. Blumenthal (Mr. A. H. GEE)
3. Hungarian Rhapsody (No.1 in F) .. .. Liszt
4. Song, "Tears" .. .. Cowen (Mrs. PALMER)
5. Solo, harp, Welsh air, with variations "Merch Morgan" .. .. J. Thomas (Mr. BARKER)
6. Entr'acte (Colombe) .. .. Gounod
7. Pizzicato (Sylvia) .. .. Delibes
8. Song, "Queen of the Earth" .. .. Pinsuti (Mr. GEE)
9. Fantasia, bassoon, "Weel May the Keel Row" (Mr. LANGDALE)
10. Selection, "La Favorita" .. .. Donizetti
11. Song, "Rock me to sleep" .. ... Benedict (Mrs. PALMER)
12. Overture, "Il Barbiere" .. .. Rossini


[Advertisement], The Argus (29 September 1888), 28

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6903354



October 1888


All TROVE items tagged Centennial Orchestra for October 1888

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Centennial+Orchestra&q&l-decade=188&l-year=1888&l-month=10 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

Monday 1 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "The Naiads" .. .. Sterndale Bennett
2. Andante from Symphony in E flat .. .. Mozart
3. Overture, "Egmont" .. .. Beethoven
4. Invitation to the Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
5. Serenade for Strings .. .. Haydn
6. Ballet music (Reine de Saba) .. .. Gounod


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Coriolan" .. .. Beethoven
2. Allegretto from Symphony in E flat (No.3) .. .. Schumann
3. Overture, "Flying Dutchman" .. .. Wagner
4. Ballet Airs, Nos.1 and 3 (Rosamunda) .. .. Schubert
5. Wedding March .. .. Mendelssohn
6. Gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine" (Language of Flowers) .. .. Cowen
7. Selection, "Favorita" .. .. Donizetti


[Advertisement], The Argus (1 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6903578



Tuesday 2 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
By The CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA

1. Symphony in A (No.7) .. .. Beethoven
2. Introduction and closing scene (Tristan) .. .. Wagner
3. Dance Macabre .. .. Saint-Saëns
4. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (2 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6903646



Wednesday 3 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA

1. Overture, "The Vampire" .. .. Marschner
2. Finale from Symphony (No.1) .. .. Beethoven
3. Entr'acte (No.1), and March from "Maid of Orleans" .. .. Cowen (First Time)
4. "Elf Land" .. .. Barnett
5. Russian Dance, "Kamarinskaja" .. .. Glinka
6. Minuet .. .. Boccherini
7. Ballet music, "Dance of the Hours" (Gioconda) .. .. Ponchielli
(Music of this number kindly lent by Mr. Martin Simonsen)


EVENING, at 8

GRAND ORGAN RECITAL By Mr. FRANK H. BRADLEY


[Advertisement], The Argus (3 October 1888), 20

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6903746



Thursday 4 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Der Wassertragen" .. .. Cherubini
2. Andante from Symphony in C .. .. Mozart (First Time)
3. Danse Macabre .. .. Saint-Saëns
4. Turkish March (Ruins of Athens) .. .. Beethoven
5. Hungarian Dance (No.6) .. .. Brahms
6. Mazurka (Coppelia) .. .. Delibes
7. Graceful Dance (Henry VIII) .. .. Sullivan
8. Overture, "Le Lac des Fées" .. .. Auber (First Time)


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Leonora" (No.3) .. .. Beethoven
2. Andante from "Surprise" Symphony .. .. Haydn
3. Overture, "Macbeth" .. .. Plumpton (First Time)
4. March, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
5. Elf Land .. .. Barnett
6. Selection, "Ernani" .. .. Verdi
7. Overture, "Domino Noir" .. .. Auber


[Advertisement], The Argus (4 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6903940

"THE EVENING CONCERT", The Argus (5 October 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6904166 

This entertainment was entirely joyous in spirit, because there were large numbers of musically receptive persons present, a fine list of musical selections, and such performance on the part of the members of the orchestra as can be best described as intelligent, good-hearted, and well-finished ... Then came a novelty in the overture to "Macbeth", written some years ago by Mr. Alfred Plumpton, who has composed sympathetic music for introducing the various acts of Shakspeare's great tragedy. In this manner Mr. Plumpton has followed in the footsteps of Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, and others. Concerning his success in the introductory idea - the overture under notice - he is to be congratulated for some happy thoughts in illustration, and good work in the orchestral display of his ideas. The opening movement is suggestive of the opening movement in the tonically monotonous Locke's music to "Macbeth". This music, which had in some sense become classic amongst English speaking people, gives Mr. Plumpton perfectly good excuse for taking as a suggestive theme the few bars which precede the voices of the witches. Mr Plumpton has not used these in a way which suggests plagiarism, but as a text upon which he founds an intelligent musical sermon. This opening movement seems to be familiar in tone, but it is original in treatment. A slow pathetic movement follows this, in which the clarionet bears a prominent solo part, and illustrates the remorse to which Macbeth was fated after his treachery to his King. About this part of the work there is distinct feeling and colour; the music is Celtic and mournful, and belongs to a time when feeling could only be expressed in "minor" mode. But there were then, and remain now, easily recognisable distinctions between the Irish Celt and the Scottish Celt, and to our way of thinking Mr. Plumpton has been more influenced by the Irish Celtic idea than by that which is easily recognised in Scottish-Celtic music, the latter suggesting less of development than the former, more savage and less tender. A good and rhythmical march with excellent suggestions in the way of scenic colouring follows the last named movement, and the work closes with noisy and exciting conflict of instruments, and then some mournful passages indicating the end of the tragedy. Mr. Plumpton's work was well performed, and well understood amongst the audience, and the applause was earnest on the conclusion of it.



Friday 5 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

GRAND ORGAN RECITAL
By Mr. ARTHUR TOWSEY


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Prelude, "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
2. Overture, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
3. Ballet air No.1 (Rosamunda) .. .. Schubert
4. Hungarian Rhapsody No.? (in D) .. .. Liszt
5. Turkish Rondo .. .. Mozart
6. Pizzicato (Sylvia) .. .. Delibes
7. Air varié (Coppelia) .. .. Delibes
8. Coronation March (Prophète) .. .. Meyerbeer


[Advertisement], The Argus (5 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6904088

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Argus (6 October 1888), 18

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6904304 



Saturday 6 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

GRAND SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
By the CENTENNIAL OCRHESTRA (Specially augmented for the occasion)

1. "Eroica" Symphony .. .. Beethoven
2. Largo (for organ, harp, and strings) .. .. Handel
3. Overture, "Die Meistersinger" .. .. Wagner
4. Hungarian Rhapsody (No.1) .. .. Liszt


EVENING, at 8

FOURTH and LAST PERFORMANCE
For some time of Cowen's Oratorio RUTH

Ruth, Mrs. PALMER
Orpah, Miss ELLEN ATKINS
Naomi, Madame CHRISTIAN
Boaz, Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
A Reaper/An Elder: Mr. F. H. MORTON

THE CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers


[Advertisement], The Argus (6 October 1888), 28

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6904276



Monday 8 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3 O'Clock [sic]

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor: Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Prometheus" .. .. Beethoven
2. Largo in F sharp for strings .. .. Haydn
3. Overture, "Ruy Blas" .. .. Mendelssohn
4. Ballet Music, "Resurrection of the Nuns" (Robert le Diable) .. .. Meyerbeer
5. "Elf Land" .. .. Barnett
6. Salterello .. .. Gounod
7. Overture, "Le Cheval Bronze" .. .. Auber


EVENING, at 8

GRAND ORGAN RECITAL By Mr. FRANK H. BRADLEY


[Advertisement], The Argus (8 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6904447



Tuesday 9 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor: Mr. ALBERTO ZELMAN

1. Overture, "Nozze di Figaro" .. .. Mozart
2. Serenade for strings .. .. Haydn
3. Turkish Rondo .. .. Mozart
4. Overture, "Merry Wives of Windsor" .. .. Nicolai
5. Liebesliedchen, for oboe and strings .. .. Taubert
6. Mazurka (Coppelia) .. .. Delibes
7. Gavotte .. .. Zelman
8. Overture, "Masaniello" .. .. Auber


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED

Alberto Zelman 1889

[Advertisement], The Argus (9 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6904555

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (10 October 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6904702

The notable points about the orchestral performance in the Exhibition yesterday afternoon were the presence of Mr. Zelman in the place of Mr. Cowen as conductor, and the absence of the leading instrumentalists, principally English players, who were properly absent for a time. With a reduced orchestra Mr. Zelman produced good musical effect, and proved his fitness for the temporary position. Six months ago the bund which he conducted would have been looked upon us extravagant, now it is recognised as being inferior to the best we have heard. ... Mr. Zelman, as senior sub-conductor in the place of Mr. Cowen, was handsomely received, and throughout the performance justified his place by his good reading and his evident mastery of musical orchestral forces. It is to be kept in mind that long before the organisation of Centennial music Mr. Zelman made orchestral arrangements for a band of 44 from the full score of Wagner, when there was given in the Opera-house, under the management of the late William Lyster, for 17 nights in succession, a representation of "Lohengrin". The audience was large yesterday afternoon, and highly receptive. The same programme was reproduced in the evening before a still larger audience.



Wednesday 10 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor: Mr. ALBERTO ZELMAN

1. Prelude to 3rd act, "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
2. Graceful Dance (Henry VIII) .. .. Sullivan
3. Wedding March .. .. Mendelssohn
4. Minuet .. .. Boccherini
5. Overture, "Zanetta" .. .. Auber
6. Gavotte, "Mignon" .. .. Thomas
7. Shawl Dance, "Dieu et Bayadere" .. .. Auber
8. Overture, "Gazza Ladra" .. .. Rossini


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (10 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6904653



Thursday 11 October 1888

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS


EVENING

ORGAN RECITAL


[Advertisement], The Argus (11 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6904653



Friday 12 October 1888

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS


AFTERNOON, at 3.30, and EVENING at 8

SPECIAL CONCERTS By SOLOISTS OF THE CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Accompanist: Mr. W. A. ROBINS

[2 PROGRAMMES]


[Advertisement], The Argus (12 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6904947



Saturday 13 October 1888

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS


AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL CONCERT By SOLOISTS OF THE CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Accompanist: Mr. W. A. ROBINS


EVENING, at 8

GRAND EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT
VOCAL SOLOISTS & SOLOISTS OF THE CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Accompanists: Herr BENNO SCHEREK & Mr. W. A. ROBINS


[Advertisement], The Argus (13 October 1888), 28

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6905037



Monday 15 October 1888

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS


EVENING, at 8

SPECIAL CONCERT By SOLOISTS OF THE CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Accompanists: Herr BENNO SCHEREK & Mr. W. A. ROBINS


[Advertisement], The Argus (15 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6905283



Tuesday 16 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT (With Augmented Orchestra)
Conductor: Mr. FREDERICK H. COWEN

1. Symphony in G (the "Military") .. .. Haydn
2. Overture, "Die Meistersinger" .. .. Wagner
3-6. Scherzo, Intermezzo (First Time), Nocturne, and "Wedding March" from "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (16 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6905431



Wednesday 17 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor: Mr. FREDERICK H. COWEN

1. Overture, "The Hebrides" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Andante from the "Military" symphony .. .. Haydn
3. Entra'cte (No.1) and March from "Maid of Orleans" .. .. Cowen
4. Ballet airs (Nos.3 and 1) from "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
5. Tarantella .. .. Raff
6. Minuet from "L'Arlesienne" .. .. Bizet
7. Selection from ballet music ("Feramorz") .. .. Rubinstein


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (17 October 1888), 20

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6905580



Thursday 18 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor: Mr. FREDERICK H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Coriolan" .. .. Beethoven
2. Bridal Song from symphony "The Country Wedding" .. .. Goldmark
3. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
4. Hungarian Dances (Nos.1 and 2) .. .. Brahms (First Time)
5. Ballet Suite, "Sylvia" .. .. Delibes


EVENING, at 8

1. Stabat Mater .. .. Rossini
2. Gallia .. .. Gounod
3. Choral Fantasia .. .. Beethoven

With an Unusually Powerful Cast.
Madame GABRIELLA BOEMA
Madame CHRISTIAN
Madame CARLOTTA TASCA
Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
Signor ATTILIO BUZZI
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA of 800 Performers
Conductor: FREDERIC H. COWEN


[Advertisement], The Argus (18 October 1888), 20

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6905698



Friday 19 October 1888

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

CHRONOLOGICAL CONCERT
Illustrating the progress and development of orchestral music during the last two centuries

1. Chaconne, "Castor and Pollux" .. .. Rameau
2. Minuet, "Samson" .. .. Handel
3. Airs de ballet, "Iphigenia" .. .. Gluck ([? First Time])
4. Finale, Military symphony .. .. Haydn
5. Overture, "Nozze di Figaro" .. .. Mozart
6. Overture, "Leonora" (No.3) .. .. Beethoven
7. Scherzo, "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
8. Overture, Tannhäuser ... Wagner


[Advertisement], The Argus (19 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6905838



Saturday 20 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT (With augmented orchestra)

1. Unfinished Symphony .. .. Schubert
2. Pianoforte Concerto in E flat .. .. Beethoven (Madame MADELINE SCHILLER)
3. Hungarian Rhapsody (No.4) .. .. Liszt (First Time)
4. Overture, "Le Lac des Fées" .. .. Auber


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT

1. Symphony in F (No.6), "The Pastoral" .. .. Beethoven
2. Song, 'Polacca" (Mignon) .. .. A. Thomas (Signorina ALICE REBOTTARO)
3. Trio for three violins (burlesque) .. .. Hermann (Messrs. GEO. WESTON, MAX KLEIN, and W. A. ROBINS)
4. Entr'acte (No.2), "Rosamunda" .. ... Schubert;
    Entr'acte (No.3), "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
5. Solo, cornet (Mr. RAWLINS) 6. Song, "Tyrolienne" .. .. Hamm (Signorina ALICE REBOTTARO)
7. Selection, "Carmen" .. .. Bizet
8. Overture, "William Tell" .. .. Rossini

Conductor: Mr. F. H. COWEN
Accompanist: Herr BENNO SCHEREK


[Advertisement], The Argus (20  October 1888), 28

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6906028



Monday 22 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor: Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "King Stephen" .. .. Beethoven (First Time)
2. Andante from Italian Symphony .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber
4. Hungarian Dances Nos.1 and 2 .. .. Brahms
5. Selections from "Ernani" .. .. Verdi
6. Overture, "Tancredi" .. .. Rossini


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Melusine" .. .. Mendelssohn (First Time)
2. Minuet and Finale from Symphony in B flat No.12 .. .. Haydn (First Time)
3. Ballet music from "Le Cid" .. .. Massenet (First Time)
4. "Swedish Wedding" .. .. Södermann (First Time)
5. Overture, "La Dame Blanche" .. .. Boieldieu


[Advertisement], The Argus (22 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6906067



Tuesday 23 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Augmented to 74 Performers
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Symphony in D minor No.4 .. .. Schumann (First Time)
2. Barcarolle (Italian suite) .. .. Raff (First Time)
3. Hungarian Rhapsody, No.4 .. .. Liszt
4. Gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine" .. .. Cowen
5. Overture, "Freischütz" .. .. Weber


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (23 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6906205



Wednesday 24 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "La Vestale" .. .. Spontini (First Time)
2. Turkish March, "Ruins of Athens" .. .. Beethoven
3. Overture, "Propsero" .. .. F. Corder (First Time)
4. Ballet music ("Le Cid") .. .. Massenet
5. March, "Swedish Wedding" .. .. Södermann
6. Overture, "L'Italiana in Algieri" .. .. Rossini


EVENING, at 8

GRAND ORGAN RECITAL
By Mr. FRANK J. BRADLEY


[Advertisement], The Argus (24 October 1888), 20

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6906406



Thursday 25 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Si j'Etais Roi" .. .. Adam (First Time)
2. Minuet from overture "Samson" .. .. Handel
3. Overture, "Macbeth" .. .. Plumpton
4. Invitation to the waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
5. Entr'acte, "Colombe" .. .. Gounod
6. Shawl Dance (Dieu et Bayadere) .. .. Auber
7. Marche aux Flambeaux (No.3) .. .. Meyerbeer


EVENING, at 8

1. Stabat Mater .. .. Rossini
2. Gallia .. .. Gounod
3. Choral Fantasia .. .. Beethoven

ARTISTS:
Madame GABRIELLA BOEMA
Madame CHRISTIAN
Madame CARLOTTA TASCA
Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
Signor ATTILIO BUZZI
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA of 800 Performers
Conductor: FREDERIC H. COWEN


[Advertisement], The Argus (25 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6906522  



Friday 26 October 1888

AFTERNOON

NO CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
2. Introduction and closing scene (Tristan and Isolde) .. .. Wagner
3. Overture, "Egmont" .. .. Beethoven
4. Hungarian Rhapsody, No.4 .. .. Liszt
5. Gavotte (Mignon) .. .. A. Thomas
6. Ballade (Coppelia) .. .. Delibes (Solo violin: Mr. Geo. Weston)
7. Valse (Reine de Saba) .. .. Gounod  


[Advertisement], The Argus (26 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6906557  



Saturday 27 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT (With Greatly Augmented Orchestra)
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

For the FIRST TIME IN AUSTRALIA
COWEN's "SCANDINAVIAN SYMPHONY"
WAGNER'S PRELUDE to his last great music-drama "PARSIFAL"
Wedding March .. .. Mendelssohn
Brahms' Hungarian Dances


EVENlNG, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT

1. Symphony in C (No. 1) .. .. Beethoven (The ORCHESTRA)
2. Song, "I'll sing the song of Araby" .. .. Clay (Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS)
3. Aria, "Ah. Fors e lui (Traviata) .. .. Verdi (Miss COLBOURNE-BABER)
4. Capriccio in B minor (for piano and orchestra) .. .. Mendelssohn (Herr BENNO SCHEREK and ORCHESTRA)
5. Solo, harp, "Danse des Fees" .. .. Alvars (Mr. BARKER)
6. Song, "M'Appari" (Martha) .. .. Flotow (Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS)
7. Air varié (Coppelia) .. .. Delibes (The ORCHESTRA)
8. Song, "The Old and the Young Marie" .. .. Cowen (Miss COLBOURNE-BABER)
9. Selection, "Rigoletto" .. .. Verdi (The ORCHESTRA)

Conductor, Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN
Accompanist, Herr Benno Scherek


[Advertisement], The Argus (27 October 1888), 28

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6906807  



Monday 29 October 1888

AFTERNOON, At 3.30

100th ORCHESTRAL CONCERT By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

"SPECIAL PROGRAMME"

1. Overture, "Ruy Blas" .. ..  Mendelssohn
2. Scherzo and Finale (symphony in C minor) .. .. Beethoven
3. Turkish Rondo .. .. Mozart
4. Huldigung's March .. .. Wagner (First Time)
5. Ballet Air No.1 ("Rosamunda") .. .. Schubert
6. Hungarian Rhapsody No.1 .. .. Liszt
7. Jubilee Overture .. .. Weber


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (29 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6906868



Tuesday 30 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Consisting of works by ENGLISH COMPOSERS

1. Overture, "Wood Nymphs" .. .. Bennett (First Time)
2. Intermezzo, Allegro, and Lullaby (Serenade) .. .. Stanford (First Time)
3. Intermezzo. "On the Waters" (Jason) .. .. Mackenzie (First Time)
4. Mélodie a l'Espagnole .. .. Cowen (First Time)
5. Idyll from Suite Symphonique .. .. Parry (First Time)
6. Graceful Dance (Henry VIII) .. ..  Sullivan
7. Overture, "Chevy Chase" .. .. Macfarren (First Time)


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (30 October 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6907017



Wednesday 31 October 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Genoveva" .. .. Schumann
2. Air and minuet "Iphigenia"  .. .. Gluck
3. Hungarian March, "Faust" .. .. Berlioz
4. Ballet Music, "Masaniello" .. .. Auber
5. "Elf Land" .. .. Barnett
6. "Saltarello" .. .. Gounod
7. Finale from "Dance of the Hours" (Gioconda) .. .. Ponchielli


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (31 October 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6907297



November 1888


All TROVE items tagged Centennial Orchestra for November 1888

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Centennial+Orchestra&q&l-decade=188&l-year=1888&l-month=11 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

Thursday 1 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture. "Wood Nymphs" .. .. Bennett
2. Barcarolle (Italian Suite) .. .. Raff
3. Huldigung's March .. .. Wagner
4. Mélodie a l'Espagnole .. .. Cowen
5. Hungarian Dances (Nos.5 and 6) .. .. Brahms
6. Gavotte in G .. .. Macfarren (First Time)
7. Overture "Crown Diamonds" .. .. Auber


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, Prometheus .. .. Beethoven
2. Chaconne, and Rigodon d'Aline .. .. Monsigny
3. Overture, 'Struensee" .. .. Meyerbeer
4. Tarantella .. .. Raff
5. Selection, "Mignon" .. .. Thomas
6. Overture, "Mirella" .. .. Gounod


[Advertisement], The Argus (1 November 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6907449



Friday 2 November 1888

AFTERNOON

NO CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAI. CONCERT By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "In Hochland" .. .. Gade (First Time)
2. Allegro ("Reformation Symphony) .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Overture. "Die Meistersinger" .. .. Wagner
4. Minuet .. .. Boccherini
5. Ballet music ("Le Cid") .. .. Massenet
6. Overture, "Si j'Etais Roi" .. .. Adam


[Advertisement], The Argus (2 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6907518



Saturday 3 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
With augmented orchestra
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Mendelssohn's "Scotch" Symphony
2. Dvorak's "Slavonic Dances"
3. March from "Tannhaüser", Wagner


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT
Accompanist, Herr BENNO SCHEREK
Conductor, Signor ALBERTO ZELMAN

1. Overture, "Freischütz" .. .. Weber (The ORCHESTRA)
2. Song, "Out on the Rocks" .. .. Sainton Dolby (Miss IDA OSBORNE)
3. Prize song (Meistersinger) .. ..  Wagner (Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT)
4. Overture, "Zanetta" .. .. Auber (The ORCHESTRA)
5. Waltz (Vocal), "L'Estasi" .. .. Arditi (Mrs. BETHELL)
6. Solo Cornet, "L'Elegante Polka",  (Mr. E. RAWLINS)
7. Song, "She Wandered Down the Mountain Side" .. .. Clay (Miss IDA OSBORNE)
8. Selection, "Trovatore" .. .. Verdi (The ORCHESTRA)
9. Song, "Lily Mavourneen" (Lily of Killarney) .. .. Benedict (Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT)
10. Fantasia, Bassoon, "Lucy Long" .. .. F. Godfrey (Mr. P. LANGDALE)
11. Song, "It was a Dream" .. .. Cowen (Mrs. BETHELL)
12. Overture, "Tancredi" .. .. Rossini (The ORCHESTRA)


[Advertisement], The Argus (3 November 1888), 22

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6907661



Monday 4 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
2. Andante, "Scotch Symphony" .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Overture, "Fidelio" .. .. Beethoven
4. Entr'acte, "Colombe" .. .. Gounod
5. Ballet music, "Feramorz" .. .. Rubinstein
6. Overture, "Masaniello" .. .. Auber


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Merestille" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Serenade for strings .. .. Haydn
3. Overture, "Tannhaüser" .. .. Wagner
4. Liebesliedchen .. .. Taubert
5. Suite de ballet, "Coppelia" .. .. Delibes
6. Overture, "La Sirène" .. .. Auber


[Advertisement], The Argus (5 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6907801



Tuesday 5 November 1888

CUP DAY SPECIAL CONCERT ARRANGEMENTS

MORNING, at 11.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Flauto Magico" .. .. Mozart
2. Andante from "Surprise" Symphony .. .. Haydn
3. Overture, "Son and Stranger" .. .. Mendelssohn
4. Shawl Dance from "Dieu et Bayadere" .. .. Auber
5. Elf Land .. .. Barnett
6. Valse from "Reine de Saba" .. .. Gounod
7. March from "Prophète" .. .. Meyerbeer

ADMISSION FREE


AFTERNOON, at 3

CONCERT By the JUNGFRAU KAPELLE
Swiss band, Mountain Singers, and Tyrolese Jodellers
A Company of five Ladies and nine Gentlemen, who Will appear in their
PICTURESQUE NATIONAL COSTUMES
[Full program in advertisement]

ADMISSION ONE SHILLING


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
SPECIAL PROGRAMME consisting of pieces already made popular by the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA  

1. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
2. Scherzo from "Scotch Symphony" .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Hungarian Rhapsody No.4 .. .. Liszt
4. Invitation to the Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
5. Valse Lente and Pizzicato, from "Sylvia" .. .. Delibes
6. Selections from "Mignon" .. .. Thomas
7. Overture, "William Tell" .. .. Rossini

ADMISSION ONE SHILLING


[Advertisement], The Argus (6 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6907972



Wednesday 7 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Flying Dutchman" .. .. Wagner
2. Minuet from "Samson" .. .. Handel
3. Nocturne and Wedding March from "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
4. Suite, "Aus Aller Herren Länder" .. .. Moskowski
5. Overture, "'Semiramide" .. .. Rossini


EVENING, at 8

REHEARSAL of ELIJAH
OPEN to the PUBLIC

In order to afford visitors during Race week more than one opportunity of hearing the Centennial Choir, and as there is no concert on Wednesday evening, it has been decided that the REHEARSAL of ELIJAH for PRINCIPALS, CHOIR, ORCHESTRA, and ORGAN ... shall be OPEN to the PUBLIC.

Admission: Body of hall, 2s. 6d.; Galleries and Under Galleries, 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (7 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6908093



Thursday 8 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3

CONCERT By the JUNGFRAU KAPELLE


EVENING, at 8

MENDELSSOHN'S ORATORIO ELIJAH
... performed for the first time at the Exhibition

With the following powerful cast: Madame GABRIELLA BOEMA Madame CHRISTIAN Mrs. Kingsland, Miss Porritt, Miss Willey Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS Mr. FRANK H. MORTON Mr. J. H. Williams, Mr. Harrison Master Horace Stevens
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers
Organist - Mr. GEO. PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Reserved seats 4s; second seats 2s. 6d; galleries 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (8 November 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6908131



Friday 9 November 1888

MORNING, at 11.30

CONCERT By the JUNGFRAU KAPELLE


AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Prelude and Entr'acte, "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
2. Minuet from symphony in E flat .. .. Mozart
3. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber
4. Turkish March from "Ruins of Athens" .. .. Beethoven
5. Gavotte from "Mignon" .. .. Thomas
6. Ballet music from "Le Prophète" .. .. Meyerbeer
7. Overture, "Merry Wives of Windsor" .. .. Nicolai


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Leonora No.3" .. .. Beethoven
2. Entr'acte No.2 from "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
3. Hungarian Rhapsody No.1 .. .. Liszt
4. Gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine" .. .. Cowen
5. Ballet music from "Reine de Saba" .. .. Gounod
6. Overture, "Zampa" .. .. Herold


[Advertisement], The Argus (9 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6908277



Saturday 10 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT (With Augmented Orchestra)

1. Liszt's Symphonic Poem, "Les Préludes"
2. Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto (Mr. MAX KLEIN)
3. Overture, "Struensee" .. .. Meyerbeer &c
4. March from "Reine de Saba" .. .. Gounod

Body of hall, 1s.; galleries and under galleries, FREE


EVENING, at 8

ENGLISH NIGHT - The Programme will consist of English Selections, Old and Modern Enslish Ballads, &c.
Artists: Mrs. PALMER, Miss FREDERICA MITCHELL, Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT, Mr. F. C. BARKER (Harp), and Mr. W. R. MORTON (Oboe) Accompanist: Herr BENNO SCHEREK CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA Conductor: Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN.

1. Overture, "The Naiads" .. .. Bennett (The ORCHESTRA)
2. Song, "Tell me, my heart" .. .. Bishop (Mrs. PALMER)
3. Song, "Sally in our Alley" .. .. Old English (Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT)
4. Overture, "Chevy Chase" .. .. Macfarren (The ORCHESTRA)
5. Song, "Kathleen Mavoureen" .. .. Crouch (Miss FREDERICA MITCHELL)
6. Solo harp, Study in F .. .. Thomas (Mr. F. C. BARKER)
7. (a) Melodie, (b) A l'Espagnole  .. .. Cowen (The ORCHESTRA)
8. Song, "Sleep, my love, sleep" .. .. Sullivan (Mrs. PALMER)
9. Solo oboe, old English air (with variations), "The Ploughboy" .. .. Standhaff (Mr. W. R. MORTON)
10. Song, "Come into the garden, Maud" .. .. Balfe (Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT)
11. Elf Land .. .. Barnett (The ORCHESTRA)
12. Song, "The Arrow and the Song" .. .. Pinsuti (Miss FREDERICA MITCHELL)
13. Grand selection on English, Irish, and Scotch airs, "Albion" .. .. Beatens (The ORCHESTRA)

Concert admission, 1s.


References: [Advertisement], The Argus (10 November 1888), 20

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6908491



Monday 12 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Melusine" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Barcarolle (Italian Suite) .. .. Raff
3. Overture, "Recollections of the Past" .. .. Stephens (First Time)
4. Slavonic Dances, Nos.1, 4, and 8 .. .. Dvorak
5. Dance of the Hours ("Gioconda") .. .. Ponchielli (The music of this number kindly lent by Mr. Martin Simonsen)
6. Overture, "Poet and Peasant" .. .. Suppé


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Symphonic Poem, 'Les Preludes" .. .. Liszt
2. Prelude, "Le Dernier Sommeil de la Vierge" .. .. Massenet
3. Ballet Music, "Sylvia" .. .. Delibes
4. Selection, "Dinorah" .. .. Meyerbeer


[Advertisement], The Argus (12 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6908618



Tuesday 13 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT (augmented to 74 Performers)
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

1. Symphony in F .. .. Goetz (First time)
2. Introduction and Closing Scene ("Tristan and Isolde") .. .. Wagner
3. Suite de Ballet, "The Language of Flowers" .. .. Cowen

Admission FREE


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (13 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6908755



Wednesday 14 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Faniska" .. .. Cherubini (First Time)
2. Intermezzo from Symphony in F .. .. Goetz
3. Overture, "Euryanthe" .. .. Weber
4. Ballet Music from "Le Cid" .. .. Massenet
5. Gavotte, "Aus Schöner Zeit" .. .. Michaelis
6. Overture, "Stradella" .. .. Flotow


EVENING, at 8

CONCERT By JUNGFRAU KAPELLE


[Advertisement], The Argus (14 November 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6908923



Thursday 15 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Coriolan" .. .. Beethoven
2. Allegretto from "Military" Symphony .. .. Haydn
3. Danse Macabre .. .. Saint-Saëns
4. Turkish Rondo .. .. Mozart
5. Minuet in D .. .. A. M. Nesbitt (First Time)
6. Danse des Bacchantes .. .. Gounod
7. Slavonic Dance (No.1) .. .. Dvorak
8. Overture, "Cenerentola" .. .. Rossini  


EVENING, at 8

MENDELSSOHN'S ORATORIO ELIJAH
SECOND PERFORMANCE

With the following powerful cast: Madame GABRIELLA BOEMA Madame CHRISTIAN Mrs. Kingsland, Miss Porritt, Miss Willey Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS Mr. FRANK H. MORTON Mr. J. H. Williams, Mr. Harrison Master Horace Stevens
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers
Organist - Mr. GEO. PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Reserved seats 4s; second seats 2s. 6d; galleries 1s


[Advertisement], The Argus (15 November 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6909063



Friday 16 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

CONCERT By JUNGFRAU KAPELLE


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Prelude, "King Manfred" .. .. Reinecke
3. Hungarian Rhapsody No.4 .. .. Liszt
4. Prelude, "Nadeshda" .. .. Goring Thomas (First Time)
5. Scènes Pittoresques .. .. Massenet
6. Overture, "Le Lac de Fées" .. .. Auber


[Advertisement], The Argus (16 November 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6909236



Saturday 17 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT (With Augmented Orchestra)
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

1. SCHUBERT'S GREAT SYMPHONY in C
2. Scherzo, from "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber

Body of Hall, 1s. Galleries and Under galleries FREE


EVENING, at 8

POPULAR CONCERT

GOUNOD NIGHT

Artists: Signorina ALICE REBOTTARO, Signor LEANDRO COY, Signor ATTILO BUZZI, Herr BENNO SCHEREK, Mr. H. STONEHAM
THE CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "The Mock Doctor" (The ORCHESTRA)
2. Song, "Le Vallon" (Signor BUZZI)
3. Valse ("Romeo et Juliette") (Signorina REBOTTARO)
4. Overture, "Mireille" (The ORCHESTRA)
5. Cavatina, "Salve Dimore" (Faust) (Signor COY)
6. Entr'acte (Colombe), Saltarello (The ORCHESTRA)
7. Flute Fantasia, "Faust" (De Jong) (Mr. STONEHAM)
8. Serenata (Faust) (Signor BUZZI)
9. Funeral March of a Marionette (The ORCHESTRA)
10. Duet, Chanson de Magali (Mireilla) (Signorina REBOTTARO and Signor COY)
11. Ballet Music from "Reine de Saba" (The ORCHESTRA)

Concert Admission, 1s


[Advertisement], The Argus (17 November 1888), 22

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6909421



Monday 19 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Il Seraglio" .. .. Mozart
2. Larghetto from Symphony in D No.2 .. .. Beethoven
3. Overture, "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
4. Entr'acte (act 3), "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
5. Waltz from Serenade .. .. Volkmann
6. Prelude, "Nadeshda" .. .. Goring Thomas
7. Ballet Music from "Le Prophete" .. .. Meyerbeer


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Meistersinger" .. .. Wagner
2. Prelude, "King Manfred" .. .. Reinecke
3. Overture in C (Italian) .. .. Schubert
4. Suite, 'L'Arlesienne" .. .. Bizet
5. Tarantella .. .. Raff
6. Overture, "Fra Diavolo" .. .. Auber


[Advertisement], The Argus (19 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6909601



Tuesday 20 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

1. "Reformation" Symphony .. .. Mendelssohn (First time)
2. Overture, "Carnival Romain" .. .. Berlioz (First time)
3. Ballet Air No 3, from "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
4. Hungarian Rhapsody No.3 .. .. Liszt


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (20 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6909666



Wednesday 21 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ENGLISH BALLAD AND GLEE CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ENGLISH BALLAD AND GLEE CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (21 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6909743



Thursday 22 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor: Mr. FRED. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Egmont" .. .. Beethoven
2. Andante from Symphony in C (No.3) .. .. Mozart
3. Overture, "Preciosa" .. .. Weber
4. Sous le Balcon (for strings) .. .. Wuerst
5. Valse from "Coppelia" .. .. Delibes
6. Selection, "Dinorah" .. .. Meyerbeer
7. Overture, "Tancredi" .. .. Rossini


EVENING, at 8

MENDELSSOHN'S ORATORIO ELIJAH

With the following powerful cast: Madame GABRIELLA BOEMA, Madame CHRISTIAN, Mrs. Kingsland, Miss Porritt, Miss Willey Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS Mr. FRANK H. MORTON Mr. J. H. Williams, Mr. Harrison Master Horace Stevens
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers
Organist - Mr. GEO. PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Reserved seats 4s; second seats 2s. 6d; galleries 1s


[Advertisement], The Argus (22 November 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6909895



Friday 23 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ENGLISH BALLAD AND GLEE CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor: Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

1. Chaconne and Rigadon "D'Aline" .. .. Monsigny
2. Minuet from "Castor and Polux" .. .. Rameau
3. Graceful Dance ("Henry VIII") .. .. Sullivan
4. Hungarian Dances Nos.5 and 6 .. .. Brahms
5. Slavonic Dance No.1 .. .. Dvorak
6. Swedish Wedding .. .. Sodermann
7. Kamarinskaja .. .. Glinka
8. Waltz, "Neu Wein" .. .. Strauss
9. Tarantella ("Masaniello") .. .. Auber
10. Castellane and Navarraise ("Le Cid") .. .. Massenet

ADMISSION FREE


[Advertisement], The Argus (23 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6910098



Saturday 24 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. COWEN'S "SCANDINAVIAN" SYMPHONY (Second performance)
2. "Waldweben" (Siegfried) .. .. Wagner (First time)
3. Spanish Rhapsody .. .. Chabrier (First time)

Body of Hall, 1s. Galleries and Under galleries FREE


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT

The programme will consist of works by FELIX MENDELSSOHN-BARTHOLDY

Artists: Miss COLBOURNE-BAUER, Miss CHRISTIE FULLER, Mr. EDWIN J. HILL, Mr. F. C. BARKER (harp), and Mr. THEO LIEBE (violoncello)

1. Overture, "Ruy Blas" (The ORCHESTRA)
2. Andante from "Italian" symphony (Do.)
3. Air, "But the Lord Is Mindful" (St. Paul) (Miss CHRISTIE FULLER)
4. Song, "The First Violet" (Mr. EDWIN J. HILL)
5. Allegro from "Reformation" symphony (The ORCHESTRA)
6. Songs, "Zuleika", "Spring Song" (Miss COLBOURNE-BAUER)
7. Romance for violoncello (Mr. THEO LIEBE)
8. War March of the Priests ("Athalie") (The ORCHESTRA)
9. Song, "Cradle Song" (Miss CHRISTIE FULLER)
10. Song, "On Wings of Song" (Mr. EDWIN J. HILL)
11. Solo Harp, "Songs Without Words" (Nos.1 and 5) (Mr. F. C. BARKER)
12. Scherzo from "Scotch" Symphony (The ORCHESTRA)
13. Duets, "O Wert Thou In the Cold Blast"; "Autumn Song" (Miss COLBOURNE-BAUER and Miss CHRISTIE FULLER)
14. Wedding March from "Midsummer Night's Dream" (The ORCHESTRA)

Concert Admission, 1s


[Advertisement], The Argus (24 November 1888), 20

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6910305



Monday 26 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor: Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Ruins of Athens" .. .. Beethoven (First time)
2. Bridal Song, from Symphony "Country Wedding" .. .. Goldmark
3. Overture, "Andromeda" .. .. Gadsby (First time)
4. Serenade for strings .. .. Haydn
5. Mazurka from "Coppelia" .. .. Delibes
6. Prelude, "King Manfred" .. .. Reinecke
7. "Fête Boheme", from "Scénes Pittoresques" .. .. Massenet
8. Overture, "Le Philtre" .. .. Auber


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Manfred" .. .. Schumann (First time)
2. Fragments from "Manfred" .. .. Schumann (First time)
3. Spanish rhapsody .. .. Chabrier
4. Ballet music, "Colomba" .. .. Mackenzie (First time)
5. Minuet .. .. Boccherini
6. Triumphal March, from "Alfred" .. .. Prout (First time)


[Advertisement], The Argus (26 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6910396



Tuesday 27 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTHAL CONCERT
By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA (Augmented to 74 Performers)
Conductor: Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

1. Symphony in F Minor, "The Irish" .. .. Stanford
2. Slavonic Dances Nos.5, 6, and 8 .. .. Dvorak
3. Overture, "Mignon" .. .. Thomas


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON SAME PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (27 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6910565



Wednesday 28 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor: Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Hebrides" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Andante from "Clock" Symphony .. .. Haydn
3. Overture, "Freischütz" .. .. Weber
4. Ballet music, "Colomba" .. .. Mackenzie
5. Elf Land .. .. Barnett
6. Triumphal March from "Alfred" .. .. Prout


EVENING

NO CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (28 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6910687



Thursday 29 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor: Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Andromeda" .. .. Gadsby
2. Larghetto from Symphony in C (No.1) .. .. Beethoven
3. March from "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
4. Mélodie "A l'Espagnole" .. .. Cowen
5. Ballet music from "L'Africaine" .. .. Meyerbeer
6. Overture, "Le Brasseur de Preston" .. .. Adam


EVENING, at 8

SULLIVAN'S "GOLDEN LEGEND"

Characters: Eisle .. .. Mrs. PALMER
Ursula .. .. Madame CHRISTIAN
Prince Henry .. .. Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS
Lucifer .. .. Mr. FRANK H. MORTON
A Forester .. .. Mr. A. HARRISON
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers
Conductor: Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN


[Advertisement], The Argus (29 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6910832



Friday 30 November 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

GRAND VOCAL, INSTRUMENTAL AND ORGAN CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

GRAND PLEBESCITE CONCERT
By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Specially Augmented to 74 Performers
Conductor: Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Symphony in F, "The Pastoral" .. .. Beethoven
2. Overture, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
3. Largo for organ, harp, and strings .. .. Handel
4. Hungarian Rhapsody (No.1) .. .. Liszt
5. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner


[Advertisement], The Argus (30 November 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6910935



December 1888


All TROVE items tagged Centennial Orchestra for December 1888

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Centennial+Orchestra&q&l-decade=188&l-year=1888&l-month=12  (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

Saturday 1 December 1888

AFTEROON, at 3.30

GRAND PLEBISCITE CONCERT
By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Specially Augmented to 74 Performers
Conductor: Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Symphony in F, "The Pastoral" .. .. Beethoven
2. Overture, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
3. Largo for organ, harp, and strings .. .. Handel
4. Hungarian Rhapsody (No.1) .. .. Liszt
5. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner

Admission to all parts of the Concert-hall ONE SHILLING


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT
Conductor, Signor ALBERTO ZELMAN
Accompanist, Herr Benno Scherek

1. Overture, "Prometheus" .. .. Beethoven
The ORCHESTRA.
2. Song, "Yeoman's Weddingg Song .. .. Poniatowski
Mr. THOMAS GILPIN
3. Aria, "Roberto tu che Adoro" .. .. Meyerbeer
Mrs. BETHELL.
4. Overture, "Zanetta" .. .. Auber
The ORCHESTRA
5. Song, "The Star of Bethlehem" .. .. Adams
Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
6. Fantasia, bassoon, "We Won't Go Home till Morning" .. .. -
Mr. P. LANGDALE
7. Song, "I Attempt from Lovoe's Sickness to Fly" .. .. Purcell
Mr. THOMAS GILPIN
8. Selection, "Lucia" .. .. Donizetti
The ORCHESTRA.
9. Waltz, "Il Bacio" .. .. Arditi
Mrs. BETHELL.
10. Song, "All in All" .. .. Cowen
Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
11. Fantasia, trombone "Sonnambula" .. .. Worsley
Mr. W. WORSLEY
12. Duet, "One Word at Parting" .. .. Nicolas
Mrs. BETHELL and Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
13. March from "Eli" .. .. Costa.
The ORCHESTRA

Concert Admission, 1s; a few front Seats, 2s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (1 December 1888), 18

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911139 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (3 December 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193397597 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. GRAND PLEBISCITE CONCERT", The Argus (3 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911190 

"EVENING POPULAR CONCERT", The Argus (3 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911189 



Monday 3 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA.
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN.
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Prelude, "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
3. Hungarian Dances Nos 5 and 6 .. .. Brahms
4. Gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine" .. .. Cowen
5. Ballet music from "Feramorz" .. .. Rubinstein
6. "Elf Land" .. .. Barnet
7. March Romaine .. .. Gounod

Admission Free - A Few Front Seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture, "Egmont" .. .. Beethoven
2. Entr'acte from "Egmont" (first time) .. .. Beethoven
3. Overture, "Struensee" .. .. Meyerbeer
4. Dance of Priestesses, from "Samson" (first time) .. .. Saint Saëns
5. Valse from "Coppélia" .. .. Delibes
6. Auf der Wacht ("Sentinel", first time) .. .. Heiler
7. March, "Der Recrut" .. .. Gung'l

Admission Free - A Few Front Seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (3 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911294 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (4 December 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911395 

"THE EVENING CONCERT", The Argus (4 December 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911398 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (5 December 1888), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193394614 


Gavotte, "Yellow jasmine", no. 4 from set 1 of The language of flowers, suite de ballet, composed by F. H. Cowen

(London: Metzler, n.d. Plate M. 7167 [? 1880])

http://imslp.org/wiki/Special:ReverseLookup/81158 (DIGITISED)



Tuesday 4 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT.
By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA.
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN.
Leader - Mr Geo. Weston.
Principal Viola - Mr. Zerbini.

1. Symphony in C, No. 6 (first time) .. .. Mozart
2. "Waldweben" (Siegfried) .. .. Wagner
3. Hungarian Rhapsody No. 4 .. .. Liszt
4. Overture "La Nonne Sanglante" .. .. Gounod

Admission Free. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

SAME PROGRAMME REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (4 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911425 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (5 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911569 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (5 December 1888), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193394614 



Wednesday 5 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT, By the
CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA.
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN.
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston.

1. Symphony in B flat, No 12 .. .. Haydn
2. Overture "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
3. Auf der Wacht (The Sentinel) .. .. Hiller
4. Invitation to the Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
5. Air Varié (Coppelia) .. .. Delibes

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

GRAND VOCAL, INSTRUMENTAL, and ORGAN CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (5 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911566 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (6 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911756 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (6 December 1888), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193401438 



Thursday 6 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.3O

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT, By the
CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston.

1. Overture, "Flying Dutchman" .. .. Wagner
2. Andante and Minuet from Symphony in C minor, No. 1 (first time) .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Ballet music from "Le Cid " .. .. Massenet
I. Pizzicato from "Sylvia" .. .. Delibes
6. Overture, "La Noone Sanglante" .. .. Gounod

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

SECOND PERFORMANCE OF
SULLIVAN'S "GOLDEN LEGEND"
In the Presence of Lady LOCH and SUITE

Characters:
Elise .. .. Mrs. PALMER
Ursula .. .. Madame CHRISTIAN
Prince Henry .. .. Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS
Lucifer .. .. Mr. FRANK H. MORTON
A Forester .. .. Mr. A. HARRISON
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers
Leader - Mr. GEO. WESTON
Organist - Mr. GEO. PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN

The peal of bells to be used has been specially cast by Messrs. Danks and Son and is kindly lent tor the performance of this work.
Reserved seats, 4s.; second seats, 2s. 6d ; galleries, 1s. Box plan now open at Allan and Co.'s. Book of words, price 6d.


[Advertisement], The Argus (6 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911723 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (7 December 1888), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911808 

"GRAND CHORAL CONCERT", The Argus (7 December 1888), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911807 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (7 December 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193394348 



Friday 7 December 1888

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

GRAND WAGNER CONCERT, By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA Conductor - Mr. F. H. Cowen Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Siegfried Idyll
2. Overture, "Tannhaüser"
3. Waldleben ("Siegfried")
4, Entr'acte, "Lohengrin" (act 3)
5. Introduction and Closing Scene ("Tristan und Isolde")
6. March from "Tannhaüser"

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (7 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911818 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (8 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6911977 

Yesterday afternoon a concert was given by 1,000 children from the Catholic schools, which is noticed in another column. The evening performance consisted entirely of selections from Wagner which have been given before, namely, the "Siegfried Idyll," the overture to "Tannhauser," the "Waldweben," from "Siegfried," the entr'acte preceding the third act of "Lohengrin," the introduction and closing scene from "Tristan und Isolde," and the march from "Tannhauser." The hall was crowded, and the audience was well pleased with the performance.

This afternoon [Saturday] there will be repeated a great work by Hector Berlioz, the "Symphonie Fantastique," which has already been heard in Melbourne, but not with such power for fine interpretation as may do expected to gratify all hearers on this occasion. There will be a "popular concert" in the evening.

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (8 December 1888), 11

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193396524 



Saturday 8 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT (With largely augmented orchestra)
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston
Principal Viola - Mr. Zerbini

1. BERLIOZ'S GREAT "SYMPHONIE FANTASTIQUE."
("Episode in the Life of an Artist")
2. Overture, "Carnaval Romain."


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT
Artists:
Miss ELSA MAY
Miss FREDERlCA MITCHELL
Mr. T. BERGIN
Mr. F. C. BARKER (Harp)
Mr. B. RAWLINS (Cornet)
Accompanist - Herr BENNO SCHEREK
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Euryanthe" .. .. Weber
The ORECHESTRA
2. Air, "Nobil Signor" (Ugonotti) .. .. Meyerbeer
Miss FREDERICA MITCHELL
3. Allegretto and Finale from "Military Symphony" .. .. Haydn
The ORCHESTRA
4. Song, "Thou art my soul" .. .. Sir W. Robinson
Mr. T. BERGIN
5. Song, "The Power of Love" (Satanella) .. Balfe
Miss ELSA MAY
6. Solo harp, "Study in imitation of a mandoline" .. .. Alvars
Mr. F. C. BARKER
7. (a) Ballet air, No. 1 (Rosamunda) .. .. Schubert
7. (b) Turkish march (Ruins of Athens) .. .. Beethoven
The ORCHESTRA
8. Song, "Good Bye" .. .. Tosti
Miss FREDERICA MITCHELL
9. Solo cornet, "The Reaper and the Flowers" ... Cowen
Mr. K. RAWLINS
10. Song, "The King's Minstrel" .. .. Pinsuti
Mr. T. BERGIN
11. Song, "My Faded Violet" .. .. Plumpton
Miss ELSA MAY
12. Fantasia on Welsh Airs .. .. Hecker
The ORCHESTRA

Concert admission, 1s. ; a few front seats, 2s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (8 December 1888), 18

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912055 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (10 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912176

"EVENING POPULAR CONCERT", The Argus (10 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912177 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (10 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193401060


Thou art my soul, song, words from the German (Ruckert), the music by sir William C.F. Robinson (Melbourne: Nicholson & Co., n.d.)

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/7297548 


The reaper and the flowers, words by H. W. Longfellow, music by Frederic H. Cowen (London: Boosey, n.d.)

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/44401998 


My faded violet, song, poetry by Rea, the music composed by Alfred Plumpton (London: Robert Cocks; Melbourne: W. H. Glen & Co., n.d. [?1875])

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/23805421 



Monday 10 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "L'Etoile du Nord" .. .. Meyerbeer
2. Adagio from Scotch Symphony .. .. Mendelssohn
S. Scotch Rhapsody .. .. Mackenzie
4. Romance for Orchestra (first time) .. .. Wesché
5. Ballet music from "Reine de Saba" .. .. Gounod
6. Guildhall March (first time) .. .. Mazzoni

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Symphony in B Minor (unfinished) .. .. Schubert
2. Exhibition Overture .. .. Cowen
3. Scherzo from "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
4. Selection from suite "From Foreign Parts" .. .. Moskowski
5. Fantasia on Welsh airs .. .. Hecker

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (10 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912126 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (11 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912291 

"EVENING CONCERT", The Argus (11 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912292 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (11 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193398638 



Tuesday 11 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
(With augmented orchestra)
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston
Principal viola - Mr. Zerbini

1. Symphony in F (No. 3) .. .. Brahms
2. Overture, "Meistersinger" .. .. Wagner
3. Entr'acte, No. 2 (Rosamunda) .. .. Schubert
4. March (Cornelius) .. .. Mendelssohn

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

THE SAME PROGRAM AS ABOVE REPEATED

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (11 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912255 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (12 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912421 

"THE NO.3 SYMPHONY BY BRAHMS. TO THE EDITOR", The Argus (13 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912616

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (12 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193394852 



Wednesday 12 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Fidelio" .. .. Beethoven
2. Minuet and Finale from Symphony in C (No. 6) .. .. Mozart
3. Concert Overture in F (first time) .. .. Wingham
4. Tarantelle .. .. Raff
5. Le dernier Sommeil de la Vierge .. .. Massenet
6. Slavonic Dances (Nos. 7 and 8) .. .. Dvorak
7. Overture, "La Dame Blanche" .. .. Boieldieu

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (12 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912376 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (13 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912617 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (13 December 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193395380 



Thursday 13 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Exhibition Overture .. .. Cowen
2. Largo in F sharp, for strings .. .. Haydn
3. Overture, "Ruy Blas" .. .. Mendelssohn
4. (a) Petit mari et femme (Jeux d'enfants) .. .. Bizet
4. (b) Minuet (L'Arlesienne) .. .. Bizet
5. Shawl Dance (Dieu et Bayadère) .. .. Auber
6. Gavotte, "Tripping" .. .. Berger
7. Overture, "Nozze di Figaro" .. .. Mozart

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

COWEN'S "SLEEPING BEAUTY"
(First Time in Melbourne)
And also
COWEN'S "SONG OF THANKSGIVING"
In the Presence of HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR And LADY LOCH

"SLEEPING BEAUTY" CHARACTERS.
The Princess .. .. Miss COLBOURNE-BABER
The Wicked Fay .. .. Madame CHRISTIAN
The Prince .. .. Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS
The King .. .. Mr. J. GLADSTONE WRIGHT

The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers
Leader -Mr. GEO. WESTON
Organist - Mr. GEO PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Reserved seats, 4s.; second seats, 2s 6d; galleries, 1s.


J. W. Lindt, photography of Exhibition Building, December 1888, with sign on fence advertising "Cowen's Sleeping Beauty / Song of Thanksgiving"; State Library of Victoria

http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/267459 (DIGITISED)


[Advertisement], The Argus (13 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912593 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Argus (14 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912675 

"GRAND CHORAL CONCERT", The Argus (14 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912674 


Sleeping beauty, a cantata in a prologue and four scenes, poem by Francis Hueffer, music by Frederic H. Cowen, composed expressly for the Birmingham Festival, August 1885 [vocal score] (London: Novello, Ewer & Co., n.d. [1885])

http://imslp.org/wiki/Special:ReverseLookup/174448 (DIGITISED)


A song of thanksgiving, for chorus and orchestra, the words selected from the Psalms, the music composed expressly for the opening of the Melbourne Centennial Exhibition, 1888 (London: Novello, Ewer & Co., n.d. [1888])

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-175120394 (DIGITISED)



Friday 14 December 1888

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

REPETITION OF PLEBISCITE CONCERT [1 December] By the
CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader, Mr. Geo. Weston
At the special request and in the presence of His Excellency the GOVERNOR and Lady LOCH

1. Symphony in F, "The Pastoral" .. .. Beethoven
2. Overture, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
3. Largo for organ, harp, and strings .. .. Handel
4. Hungarian Rhapsody (No.1) .. .. Liszt
5. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner

Admission to all parts of the Concert-hall ONE SHILLING


[Advertisement], The Argus (14 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912753 

"EXHIBITION CONCERTS", The Age (15 December 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193402517 



Saturday 15 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
(With augmented orchestra)
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader, Mr. Geo. Weston
Principal Viola. Mr. Zerbini

1. Symphony (No 5) in E, "The Leonore" (first time) .. .. Raff
2. Introduction to Act III, "Meistersinger" (first time) .. .. Wagner
3. Marche Hongroise "Faust" .. .. Berlioz

Body of hall, 1s; Galleries and under galleries, free.


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT
The "CECILIA" DOUBLE QUARTETTE
OLD ENGLISH GLEES, PARTSONGS and BALLADS
Conductor .. .. Mr. WALTER J. TURNER
Miss KATE MAHER; Miss ADA BLOXHAM
Miss CHRISTIE FULLER; Miss VERA GOAD
Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS; Mr. W. P. LITTLE
Mr. THOMAS GILPIN; Mr. J. GLADSTONE WRIGHT
The CENTENNIAL ORCHESIRA
In POPULAR SELECTIONS
Solo Cello, Mr. THEO. LIEBE
Conductor, Mr. A. ZELMAN

1. Overture, "L'Italiana in Algeri" .. .. Rossini
The ORCHESTRA
2. Part-songs (a) "Hush thee my baby", (b) "The British grenadiers" .. .. Sullivan
The "CECILIA" DOUBLE QUARTETTE
3. Song, "The Englishman" .. .. Blockley
Mr. THOMAS GILPIN
4. Song, "The Lost Chord" .. .. Sullivan
Miss VERA GOAD
5. Overture, "Le Domino Noir" .. .. Auber
The ORCHESTRA
6. Song, "My pretty Jane" .. .. Bishop
Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS
7. Organ solo selection, "Faust" .. .. Gounod
Mr. W. J. TURNER
8. Part-songs, (a) "Best of all, (b) "Annie Laurie" .. .. Moir
The "CECILIA" DOUBLE QUARTETTE
9. Solo violoncello, Nocturne .. .. Chopin
Mr. THEO. LIEBE
10. Scotch air, "Auld Robin Gray"
Miss CHRISTIE FULLER
11. Selection, "Ernani" .. .. Verdi
The ORCHESTRA
12. Organ solo, "Boys of the Old Brigade" (Barri) .. .. Hoyte
Mr. W. J. TURNER
13. Part-songs, (a) "Little pilgrims", (b) "Good night" .. .. Pinsuti
The "CECILIA" DOUBLE QUARTETTE
14. Overture, "Zampa" .. .. Hérold

Concert admission, 1s.; a few front seats, 2s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (15 December 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912936 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (17 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912997 

"EVENING POPULAR CONCERT", The Argus (17 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6912996 

"THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION", The Age (17 December 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193395285 



Monday 17 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Max Klein

1. Overture, "Sylvana" (first time) .. .. Weber
2. Intermezzo, from Symphony in F .. .. Goetz
3. (a) Prelude, (b) Entr'acte (Act III), "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
4. Entr'acte from "Colombe" .. .. Gounod
5. Ballet music, "Resurrection of the Nuns" ("Robert le Diable") .. .. Meyerbeer
6. Romance for Orchestra .. .. Wesche
7. Overture, "Il Barbiere de Siviglia" .. .. Rossini

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture in C, "Namen-feier" (first time) .. .. Beethoven
2. March from "Leonore" Symphony .. .. Raff
3. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber
4. Introduction to Act III, "Meistersinger" .. .. Wagner
5. Gavotte, "Mignon" .. .. Thomas
6. Ballet suite, "Sylvia" .. .. Delibes

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (17 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913075 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (18 December 1888), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913155 

"EVENING CONCERT", The Argus (18 December 1888), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913098 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (18 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193399476 



Tuesday 18 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
By the CENTENNIAL ORCHSESTRA (Augmented to 74 performers)
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader, Mr. Max Klein
Principal Viola, Mr. Zerbini

1. Symphony in B flat minor, "The Welsh" (First time in Australia) .. .. Cowen
2. Andante and variations from quartet in D minor (for all strings) (First time) .. .. Schubert
3. Valse, mazurka, and air varié from "Coppelia" .. .. Delibes

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (18 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913156 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (19 December 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913226 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (19 December 1888), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193400776 




Proposed permanent orchestra


"THE EXHIBITION ORCHESTRA", The Argus (19 December 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913250 

Yesterday afternoon a meeting of gentlemen interested in music, which had been convened by the sub-orchestral committee of the Centennial International Exhibition, was held in the Town hall, for the purpose of considering the advisability of maintaining the orchestra as a permanent institution for Melbourne. Colonel Sargood was voted to the chair, and amongst the other gentlemen present were the Rev. Dr. Strong, Messrs. J. Blyth, G. L. Allan, T. S. Grimwade, J. W. Hunt, C. M. Longmuir, and F. Tate ...

"A NATIONAL ORCHESTRA", The Age (19 December 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193400787 



Wednesday 19 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader, Mr. Max Klein

1. Symphony in E flat .. .. Mozart
2. Hungarian Rhapsody No. 4 .. .. Liszt
3. Prelude, "King Manfred" .. .. Reinecke
4. Selection from "Carmen" .. .. Bizet

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (19 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913318 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Argus (20 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913462 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (20 December 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193395925 



Thursday 20 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader, Mr. Max Klein

1. Overture, "Namensfeier" .. .. Beethoven
2. Introduction and Closing Scene ("Tristan und Isolde") .. .. Wagner
3. Turkish Rondo .. .. Mozart
4. Melodie and a' 1'Espagnole .. .. Cowen
5. Saltarelle .. .. Gounod
6. Elfland .. .. Barnett
7. Overture, "Le Lac de Fées" .. .. Auber

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

COWEN'S "SLEEPING BEAUTY"
(Second performance in Melbourne)
And also
COWEN'S "SONG OF THANKSGIVING"

"SLEEPING BEAUTY" CHARACTERS.
The Princess .. .. Mrs. BETHELL
The Wicked Fay .. .. Madame CHRISTIAN
The Prince .. .. Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS
The King .. .. Mr. J. GLADSTONE WRIGHT

The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers
Leader -Mr. GEO. WESTON
Organist - Mr. GEO PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Reserved seats, 4s.; second seats, 2s. 6d.; galleries, 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (20 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913449 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (21 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913607 

"GRAND CHORAL CONCERT", The Argus (21 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913604 

"ORCHESTRAL AND CHORAL CONCERTS", The Age (21 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193395822 



Friday 21 December 1888

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader, Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, Prometheus" .. .. Beethoven
2. Nocturne from "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
4. Gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine" .. .. Cowen
5. Ballet music from "Le Cid" .. .. Massenet
6. Overture, "William Tell" .. .. Rossini

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (21 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913601 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (22 December 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913690 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (22 December 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193394898 



Saturday 22 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
(With Augmented Orchestra)
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader, Mr. Geo. Weston
Principa Viola, Mr. Zerbini

1. Symphony in C Minor (No. 5) .. .. Beethoven
2. Serenade and allegro giocoso .. .. Mendelssohn
Pianoforte, Mdme. MADELINE SCHILLER
3. Waldweben (Siegfried) .. .. Wagner
4. March (Prophète) .. .. Meyerbeer

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (22 December 1888), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913678 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (24 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913888 

"THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (25 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193394327 



Monday 24 December 1888

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING (CHRISTMAS EVE), at 8

"MESSIAH"
HANDEL'S SACRED ORATORIO

Principals:
Mrs. PALMER
Madame CHRISTIAN
Mr. Armes BEAUMONT
Mr. Gordon GOOCH, A.R.A.M
(Trumpet Obligato - Mr. E. RAWLINS.)
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA of 800 performers.
Leader -Mr. GEO. WESTON
Organist - Mr. GEO PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Reserved seats, 4s.; second seats, 2s. 6d.; galleries, 1s.


The Messiah, oratorio by Handel; Centennial International Exhibition, Melbourne; the Centennial Choir and Orchestra of 800 performers, conductor - Mr. Frederic H. Cowan [sic] (Melbourne: Centennial Printing and Publishing Coy., [1888])

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/21811926 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-192978272 (DIGITISED)


[Advertisement], The Argus (24 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913815 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. THE MESSIAH", The Argus (25 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913984 

"THE MESSIAH", The Age (25 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193394329 



Tuesday 25 December 1888

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING (CHRISTMAS NIGHT), at 8

"MESSIAH"
HANDEL'S SACRED ORATORIO

Principals:
Mrs. PALMER
Madame CHRISTIAN
Mr. Armes BEAUMONT
Mr. Gordon GOOCH, A.R.A.M
(Trumpet Obligato - Mr. E. RAWLINS.)
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA of 800 performers.
Leader -Mr. GEO. WESTON
Organist - Mr. GEO PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Reserved seats, 4s.; second seats, 2s. 6d.; galleries, 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (25 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913932 

'MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SECOND PERFORMANCE OF 'THE MESSIAH'", The Argus (27 December 1888), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6914209 



Wednesday 26 December 1888

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING (BOXING NIGHT), at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Ruy Blas" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Serenade (for strings) .. .. Haydn
3. March, from "Tannhaüser" .. .. Wagner
4. Hungarian Rhapsody (No. 4) .. .. Liszt
5. Gavotte, from "Mignon" .. .. Thomas
6. Ballet air (No. 3), from "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
7. Pizzicato, from "Sylvia" .. .. Delibes
8. Selection, from "Trovatore" .. .. Verdi

ADMISSION to ALL PARTS of the HALL, ONE SHILLING.


There was no issue of The Argus on 26 December

[Advertisement], The Argus (25 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6913932 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (27 December 1888), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6914210 



Thursday 27 December 1888

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

"MESSIAH"
HANDEL'S SACRED ORATORIO (THIRD AND LAST TIME)

Principals:
Mrs. PALMER
Madame CHRISTIAN
Mr. Armes BEAUMONT
Mr. Gordon GOOCH, A.R.A.M
(Trumpet Obligato - Mr. E. RAWLINS.)
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA of 800 performers.
Leader - Mr. GEO. WESTON
Organist - Mr. GEO PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Reserved seats, 4s.; second seats, 2s. 6d.; galleries, 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (27 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6914103 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. THE MESSIAH", The Argus (28 December 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6914247 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (28 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193402182 



Friday 28 December 1888

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

THIRD PERFORMANCE of the "PLEBISCITE" CONCERT.
In response to numerous requests, and in order to afford visitors to Melbourne during the Christmas holidays an opportunity of hearing this splendid programme ...

By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Specially Augmented to 74 Performers
Conductor: Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Symphony (No. 6) in F, "The Pastoral" .. .. Beethoven
2. Overture, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
3. Largo for organ, harp, and strings .. .. Handel
4. Hungarian Rhapsody (No. 1) .. .. Liszt
5. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner

Admission to all parts of the Hall, ONE SHILLING.


[Advertisement], The Argus (28 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6914288 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (29 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6914469 

"THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (29 December 1888), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193401933 



Saturday 29 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
(With Augmented Orchestra)
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Hebrides" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Solos, violin (a) Romance .. .. Svendsen
    (b) 2nd Mazurka .. .. Wieniawski
Mr. MAX KLEIN.
3. "Eroica" Symphony .. .. Beethoven

Body of Hall, 1s. Galleries and under galleries, FREE.


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (29 December 1888), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6914413 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (31 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6914568 

"THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (31 December 1888), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193396654 



Monday 31 December 1888

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Der Freischütz" .. .. Weber
2. Minuet and Finale from Symphony in B flat .. .. Haydn
3. Overture, "I due studenti" (First Time) .. .. Plumpton
4. Entr'acte (Act III), "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
5. Gavotte (First Time) .. .. Tourrier
6. Dance of the Hours, "Gioconda" .. .. Ponchielli
7. Overture, "Siege of Corinth" .. .. Rossini

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Suite, "Lay of the last Minstrel" (First time) .. .. Barnett
2. Overture, "Struensee" .. .. Meyerbeer
3. Chaccone and Rigodon D'Aline .. .. Monsigny
4. Hungarian Dances (Nos. 5 and 6) .. .. Brahms
5. Turkish March, from "Ruins of Athens" .. .. Beethoven
6. Overture, "La Sirene" .. .. Auber

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (31 December 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6914511 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT. EVENING ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (1 January 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216285 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (1 January 1888), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196997242 



January 1889


All TROVE items tagged Centennial Orchestra for January 1889:

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Centennial+Orchestra&q&l-decade=188&l-year=1889&l-month=1 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

Tuesday 1 January 1889

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber
2. Andante from "Surprise" Symphony .. .. Haydn
3. Wedding March from "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
4. Minuet .. .. Boccherini
5. Ballet music from "Reine de Saba" .. .. Gounod
6. "Liebesliedchen (for oboe and strlngs) .. .. Taubert
7. Overture "Masaniello" .. .. Auber

ADMISSION FREE.


[Advertisement], The Argus (1 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216233 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (2 January 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216354 

Yesterday, evening the concert-hall was crammed to its utmost holding capacity, there being no available standing room. This, taken in conjunction with the extremely unpleasant weather - rain and oppressive heat - is sufficient proof of the interest taken in the orchestral performances. The programme opened with Weber's magnificent romantic "Oberon" overture, which received a spirited rendering. This was followed by the andante from Haydn's "Surprise Symphony," in which, though so frequently heard before, the "Surprise" was sufficiently effective to startle the nerves of many of the audience. The Wedding March (Mendelssohn), which came next, has probably become familiar to many of those who were present under somewhat different circumstances. The Boccherini Minuet - for muted strings - was encored with such unyielding pertinacity as to leave the conductor, Mr. Cowen, little or no choice but to repeat it. In the ballet music, from Gounod's "Reine de Saba," Mr. Weston's violin solo is deserving of special mention as being very well played. In some parts of this number, as well as in others, there was a decided want of unanimity in tempo amongst the various members of the orchestra. As this is an unusual occurrence, we suppose it may be accounted for by the oppressiveness of the atmosphere, and the fact of the date being January 1. The remaining numbers were Taubert's "Liebesliedchen," for oboe and strings, pizzicato, in which the oboe solo part was admirably played by Mr. W. H. Morton; and the overture "Masaniello," Auber. A special word of acknowledgment is due to the management for the excellent manner in which the extraordinary rush for admission was met, so as to cause little or no inconvenience.

"NEWS OF THE DAY", The Age (2 January 1889), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196991744 

Only one orchestral concert was given yesterday, and it took place in the evening. The programme consisted of compositions that had been heard before on sevoral occasions. These were Weber's overture to Oberon, the andante from Haydn's Surprise Symphony, Mendelssohn's Wedding March; Bocchcrini's minuet, the ballet music from Gounod's Reine de Saba; Taubert's Liebesliedechen [sic] for oboe and strings, the oboe solo artistically played by Mr. Morton; and Auber's overture to Masaniello. Excellent renderings of each were given under the conductorship of Mr. Cowen.



Wednedsay 2 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Symphony (No. 1) in E flat (first time) .. .. Haydn
2. Overture, "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
3. Graceful Dance from "Henry VIII" .. .. Sullivan
4. "Au Bord de la Mer" .. .. Dunkler
5. Tarantella .. .. Raff
6. War March of the Priests from "Athalie" .. .. Mendelssohn

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (2 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216305 

"THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (3 January 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196987725 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (3 January 1889), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216393 

The musical performance in the concert hall yesterday afternoon was well attended, and the following musical works were performed, namely: - Symphony in E flat No. 1, by Haydn; overture to "Rosamunda," by Schubert; graceful dance, from "Henry VIII," by Sullivan; "Au Bord de la Mer," by Dunckler; "Tarantella," by Raff, and "The War March of the Priests," from " Athalie," by Mendelssohn. The Haydn symphony was new, in so far as it had not been previously played at these concerts. It is numbered 1 in the Breitkopf and Härtel catalogue, and No. 8 in the sequential list of Haydn's symphonies preserved by the Philharmonic Society in London. It was on his second visit, at Salomon's invitation, that Haydn wrote this full and joyous symphony in London, probably in 1795 - a year which was fraught with much material good to the composer, who netted about £1,200 by his visit, and thereafter was greatly respected on his return home. The symphony consists of the following movements, namely- "Adagio and allegro con spirito," "andante," "minuet," and "allegro con spirito." It is difficult to differentiate the same movements, which occur throughout the symphonies of Haydn, which are all in good form, and show unbounded resource in the matter of tune, and freedom and power in treatment, and variation of theme. After the symphony came the overture to "Rosamunde," [sic] music by Schubert - delightful always, and more and more welcome upon each reproduction. We suggested some months ago that it would be good to give the whole of this noble music with programmes sufficiently well annotated to explain the sentiment of each scene which the music was intended to illustrate - for it should be known that the play itself, as a literary work, has been from the first a conspicuous failure, while the music which was written for it is finding more and more of grateful recognition all over the world, and wherever true music can penetrate. After this Sullivan's "Graceful Dance," from "Henry VIII," was played with such pretty effect that the performance of it very narrowly escaped an encore. A musician so mixed in trivial and serious music as Sullivan requires careful consideration at every hearing, for no other reason than that he gives rise to great expectations, which "The Golden Legend" is beginning to satisfy in the way of "cantata," but which is yet a matter of expectancy as far as grand opera is concerned. The selection "Au Bord de la Mer" served to show in its rather thin composition the noble tone and artistic touch of Mr. Liebe, who played the violoncello solo. Raff's "Tarantella" was repeated with infinitely satisfactory effect, and the performance revealed the mind of a warm hearted and well inspired musician. The "War March of the Priests," from " Athalie," by Mendelssohn, which fairly challenges distinction with the "Wedding March," from the "Midsummer Night's Dream" music, brought the concert to a close.

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (3 January 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196987725 

The orchestral concert given yesterday afternoon, under the conductorship of Mr. Cowen, commenced with Haydn's Symphony in E flat, the first time of its performance. This symphony is the first in Breitkopf and Härtel's edition, but the eighth of the twelve composed for Salomon's concerts. Schubert's overture to Rosamunda, which followed, has been played on several previous occasions, as have also the remaining numbers, Sullivan's Graceful Dance; Dunkler's Au bord de la Mer, with violoncello solo, well played by Mr. Liebe; Raff's Tarantelle, and Mendelssohn's War March of the Priests, from Athalie. This afternoon an orchestral concert will be given, and in the evening Handel's Messiah will be performed for the fourth time.



Thursday 3 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Genoveva" .. .. Schumann
2. Bridal Song .. .. Goldmark
3. Overture, "Egmont" .. .. Beethoven
4. Invitation to the Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
5. Minuet .. .. Prout
6. Angelus - Bolero, from "Scenes Pittoresques" .. .. Massenet

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

"MESSIAH" .. .. [Handel]

Owing to the immense success of this favourite oratorio, and in response to a generally-expressed wish, ONE EXTRA PERFORMANCE

Principals: Mrs. PALMER; Madame CHRISTIAN; Mr. Armes BEAUMONT; Mr. Gordon GOOCH, A.R.A.M; Trumpet Obligato, Mr. A. M. LWASON;
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 performers.
Leader - Mr. GEO. WESTON; Organist - Mr. GEO. PEAKE;
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Concert - Admission - reserved seats, 4s; second seats, 2s 6d.; galleries, 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (3 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216369 

"NEWS OF THE DAY", The Age (4 January 1889), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196987113 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Argus (4 January 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216484 

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT. There was a good attendance at the afternoon concert yesterday. The now rapid approach of the end of "Music at the Exhibition" will, no doubt, fill up the daily returns of visitors, and many will soon regret the opportunities lost ...

GRAND CHORAL CONCERT. Everything belonging to this performance is exceptional. Handel's "Messiah" has been performed for the fourth time in sequence at the Exhibition-building, under the direction of Mr. F. H Cowen, and the crowd to listen to the interpretation of that great work was greater than on the first night it was played, and more people are turned away from the pay-places than on any previous occasion in connection with the performance of that work. The management at the Exhibition, finding the exceptional success which attends the production of Handel's great oratorio, feel inclined to reproduce it next Thursday night.



Friday 4 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Flying Dutchman" .. .. Wagner
2. March from "Leonore" symphony .. .. Raff
3. Overture "Morte d'Arthur (first time) .. .. Bridge
4. Hungarian Rhapsody (No. 3) .. .. Liszt
5. Selection from "Scenes poetiques" .. .. Goddard
6. Selection, "Aida" .. .. Verdi

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (4 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216431 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (5 January 1889), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article19698780 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Argus (5 January 1889), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216562 



Saturday 5 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
(With Augmented Orchestra)
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston
Principal Viola - Mr. Zerbini

1. Symphony (No. 1) in B flat .. .. Schumann
2. Concerto in E minor, for pianoforte and orchestra .. .. Chopin
Madame MADELINE SCHILLER
3. Kaisermarsch ... Wagner

Bodi of Hall, 1s.; Galleries and Under Galleries FREE


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT

1. Symphony in G Minor .. .. Mozart
The ORCHESTRA
2. Song, "Will o' the Wisp" .. .. Cherry
Mr. A. H. GEE.
3. Song, "My Dearest Heart" .. .. Sullivan
Mrs. BETHELL
4. Overture, "Ruy Blas" ... Mendelssohn
The ORCHESTRA.
5. Song, "The Bellringer" .. .. Wallace
Mr. A. H. GEE
6. Selection, "Daughter of the Regiment" .. .. Donizetti
The ORCHESTRA
7. Song, "Best of All" .. .. Moir
Mrs. BETHELL 8. Overture, "Prè Aux Clercs" .. .. Hérold
The ORCHESTRA

Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Accompanist - Herr Benno Scherek

ADMISSION FREE ADMISSION FREE


[Advertisement], The Argus (5 January 1889), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216557 

"THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (7 January 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196986451 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Argus (7 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216656 



Monday 7 January 1889

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

1. Overture, "Fidelio" .. .. Beethoven
2. Minuet from "Samson" .. .. Handel
3. Adagio from "Scotch Symphony" .. .. Mendelssohn
4. Overture, "Meistersinger" .. .. Wagner
5. Prelude, "King Manfred" .. .. Reinecke
6. Ballet music from "Feramorz" .. .. Rubinstein

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (7 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216672 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Argus (8 January 1889), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216779 

"CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (8 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196990732 



Tuesday 8 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
(By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Augmented to 74 performers)
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston
Principal Viola - Mr. Zerbini

1. Symphony (No. 2) in C .. .. Schumann (First time)
2. Adagio from Harp Concerto in E minor .. .. Reinecke (First time)
Harp - Mr. F. C. BARKER
3 Scherzo, Nocturne, Wedding March, from "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAMME REPEATED

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (8 January 1889), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216765 

"CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (9 January 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196989353 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Argus (9 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216824 




The dispute over Alfred Plumpton's Endymion ...


"CENTENNIAL INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION. PERFORMANCE OF LOCAL MUSICAL COMPOSITIONS", The Argus (5 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216529 

[Editorial], The Age (7 January 1889), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196986413 

How rapidly musical taste is developing in Melbourne is manifested by the remarkable fact of the performance of Handel's masterpiece in the largest concert halls, before crowded audiences, five times in eleven days. The circumstance is such which would have excited notice and comment had it occurred in any city of the world, and deserves to be regarded as a set-off against the spirit of gambling and acquisitiveness which had been recently denounced as a prime characteristic of this community. The appropriate rendering of an oratorio like "The Messiah" constitutes a semi-religious festival that has the rare merit of being completely unsectarian, appealing with the same sweet potency to the devout and to those who pride themselves on sitting, like Tennyson's heroine
       - holding no form of creed,
       But contemplating all.
It may he hoped that the Centennial Exhibition will in the long run result in material advantages to the colony more than counterbalancing the heavy outlay on its account; but, however this may be we are already indebted to it for its achievements in popular musical education. Thousands of Victorians have learned to love music in its noblest forms of presentation - have discovered, in brief, for the first time the soul of music, by means of the Exhibition concerts. The immense audiences which have assembled day after day, and frequently twice a day, listening quietly and earnestly to noble oratorio, soul-stirring symphony or selected gems from the best operas and cantatas, have passed through a course of melodious instruction whose benefits are to he looked for in future artistic aspiration and achievement. Whatever may prove to be the per contra, Victoria has secured the principal gain in this harmonious and elevating sphere of art by having assumed the responsibility attaching to an international celebration of the completion of the first Australian century.

We wish that everything connected with the musical section of the Exhibition had been free from reproach, but the conduct of the sub-committee having special charge of this department, in prohibiting Mr. Cowen from producing the Endymion cantata because of its having emanated from a composer residing in the colony, is too extraordinary to fail in eliciting unfavorable comment, both from members of the profession and from the general public. Most persons share the astonishment expressed by Mr. Julius Herz, when the deputation of local musicians waited last Friday on the President of the Commission at the strange fact that at a competitive exhibition held in Victoria, Victorian talent in any line of art should be tabooed. If the gentlemen constituting the orchestral committee were competent judges of musical composition, and had declined Mr. Plumpton's cantata because, spite of Mr. Cowen's and Sir Arthur Sullivan's commendation, they mistrusted its merit, there would have been, of course, no appeal from their decision. But they do not claim to possess any discriminating ability in this direction. All they know is that "The Endymion" is an emanation from a composer who is living here. That shuts it out. Had it been "The Messiah" or "The Creation," the same rule would, it is to he presumed, have applied. Fortunately neither Handel nor Haydn ever sojourned in Victoria, and no difficulty of the kind arises in respect to their productions. It is a wonder that this sapient committee allowed Mr. Cowen's "Ruth," "Sleeping Beauty" and "Song of Thanksgiving" to pass. Possibly he is regarded as merely a bird of passage, and as not having had time to acquire the Victorian taint. This reversal of the policy of Protection by one of prohibition and exclusion of local industries would be grotesque and amusing were it not so gratuitously insulting. We trust that the appeal made to Sir James MacBain may prove efficacious, and that even at the eleventh hour the orchestral committee may discern the absurdity of its position and remove its veto.

"THE ORCHESTRAL COMMITTEE AND LOCAL COMPOSERS. TO THE EDITOR", The Argus (8 January 1889), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216750 



Wednesday 9 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Meerestine" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Prelude, "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
3. Overture, "Reveil du Printemps .. .. St. George (First time)
4. Slavonic Dance No. 5 .. .. Dvorák
5. Larghetto in A .. .. Nesbitt (First time)
6. Valse Lento and Pizzicato, from "Sylvia" .. .. Délibes
7. Overture, "Domino Noir" .. .. Auber

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (9 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216792 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (10 January 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196993070 

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION", The Argus (10 January 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216927 



Thursday 10 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
2. Allegretto from Symphony in F .. .. Beethoven
3. Overture, "I due Studenti" .. .. Plumpton
4. March, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
5. Entr'acte, "Colombe" .. .. Gounod
6. A l'Espagnole .. .. Cowen
7, Overture, 'Felsenmühle .. .. Reissiger

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

FOURTH and FINAL PERFORMANCE Of MENDELSSOHN S GREAT ORATORIO, "ELIJAH"

Principals:
Madame GABRIELLA BOEMA
Madame CHRISTIAN
Mr. C. M. J. EDWARDS
Mr. FRANK H. MORTON
Mrs. KINGSLAND
Miss PORRITT
Miss WILLEY
Mr. J. H. WILLIAMS
Mr. A HARRISON
Master CHAMBERLIN
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 performers
Leader - Mr. GEO. WESTON
Organist - Mr. GEO. PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Concert. - Admission - Reserved seats, 4s.; second seats 2s. 6d.; galleries, ls


[Advertisement], The Argus (10 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6216950 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (11 January 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196987648 



Friday 11 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Leonora" (No. 3) .. ..Beethoven
2. Waldweben (Siegfried) .. .. Wagner
3. Danse Macabre .. .. Saint Saëns
4. Ballet music from "Le Prophète" .. .. Meyerbeer
5. Elf Land .. .. Barnett
6. Overture, "Mignon" .. .. Thomas

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (11 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6217032 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (12 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196996123 



Saturday 12 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
(With Augmented Orchestra)
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Symphony (No. 7) in A .. .. Beethoven
2. Concerto for pianoforte and orchestra .. .. Schumann
Pianoforte - Madame CARLOTTA TASCA
3. Ride of the Walkyries .. .. Wagner

Body of Hall, 1s. Galleries and Under Galleries Free


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT

1. The "Clock" Symphony .. .. Haydn
The ORCHESTRA
2. Song, "I Arise from Dreams of Thee" .. .. Salaman
Mr. J. GLADSTONE WRIGHT
3. Overture , "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
The ORCHESTRA
4. Aria, "Figlio Mio (Prophète) .. .. Meyerbeer
Madame FABRIS
5. Ballet Airs (Nos. 1 and 3) "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
The ORCHESTRA
6. Song, "Queen of the Earth" .. .. Pinsuti
Mr. J. GLADSTONE WRIGHT
7. Romanza, "Non ti scordar" .. .. Robaudi
Madame FABRIS
8. Selection, "Un Ballo in Maschera" .. .. Verdi
The ORCHESTRA


[Advertisement], The Argus (12 January 1889), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6217077

"THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (14 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196988478 



Monday 14 January 1889

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Flying Dutchman" .. .. Wagner
2. Minuet from Symphony in E flat .. .. Mozart
3. Overture, "Euryanthe" .. .. Weber
4. Turkish March .. .. Beethoven
5. Hungarian Rhapsody (No. 1) .. .. Liszt
6. Gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine" .. .. Cowen
7. March, "Le Prophète" .. .. Meyerbeer

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (14 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6217208 



Tuesday 15 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston
Principal Viola - Nr. Zerbini

1. Symphony in F .. .. Prout (First time)
2. Pianoforte Concerto in D minor .. .. Mendelssohn
Pianoforte, Herr OTTO LINDEN
3. Nocturne and Tarantella, "Italian Suite" .. .. Raff (Nocturne first time)

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAMME REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (15 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6217236 

"THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (17 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196992700 



Wednesday 16 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Prometheus" .. .. Beethoven
2. Allegretto ("Military Symphony") .. .. Haydn
3. Concerto for Violin and Orchestra (No. 1) in G minor .. .. Max Bruch
Violin - Mr. RIVERS ALLPRESS
4. Entr'acte No. l ("Rosamunda") .. .. Schubert
5. Shawl Dance, "Dieu et Bayadère" .. .. Auber
6. Overture, "Semiramide" .. .. Rossini

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (16 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6217334 

"THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Age (17 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196992700 



Thursday 17 January 1889

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

GRAND CHORAL CONCERT
Beethoven's CHORAL SYMPHONY & &c.

1. Overture, Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
The CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
2. Part song, "Sweet and Low" .. .. Barnby
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR
3. Song, "Can'st Thou Believe" .. .. Giordani
Madame CHRISTIAN
4. Duet, "Ye Gay and Painted Fair" ("Seasons") .. .. Haydn
Mrs. PALMER and Mr ARMES BEAUMONT
5. Part songs, (a) "The Rose In October" ... Sir W. Robinson (First time)
(b) Now is the Month of Maying .. .. Morley
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR
6. The CHORAL SYMPHONY .. .. BEETHOVEN

Principals:
Mrs. PALMER
Madame CHRISTIAN
Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
Mr. FRANK H. MORTON
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 performers
Leader - Mr. GEO. WESTON
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Concert - Admission - Reserved seats, 4s.; second seats, 2s. 6d.; galleries, 1s


[Advertisement], The Argus (17 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6217476 

"GRAND CHORAL CONCERT", The Age (18 January 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196989966 




Deputation to the Victorian Premier ...


"THE EXHIBITION ORCHESTRA", The Age (17 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196992664 

"MEETING OF THE COMMISSION. THE PERMANENT ORCHESTRA QUESTION", The Age (22 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196990899 



Friday 18 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Melusina" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Chaconne and Rigodon d'Aline .. .. Monsigny
3. Organ Solo, Andante in A, with variations and finale fugato .. .. Smart
Mr. FRANK H. BRADLEY
4. Entr'acte, "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
5. Ballet airs (Nos. 1 and 3), "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
6. Tarantella .. .. Raff
7. Overture, "Mirella" .. .. Gounod

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

1. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber
2. Introduction and Finale, "Tristan" .. .. Wagner
3. Hungarian Rhapsody (No. 4) .. .. Liszt
4. Gavotte, "Mignon" .. .. Thomas
5. Ballet music, "Le Cid" .. .. Massenet
6. Overture, "Crown [of] Diamonds" .. .. Auber

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (18 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6217493 



Saturday 19 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
(With augmented orchestra)
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston
Principal Viola - Mr. Zerbini

1. Air for strings (from Suite [in D]) .. .. Bach
2. SCHUBERT'S GREAT SYMPHONY in C (Second performance)

Body of the hall, 1s; galleries and under the galleries FREE


EVENING, at 8

EXHIBITION POPULAR CONCERT

1. Overture, "Flauto magico" .. .. Mozart
THE ORCHESTRA
2. Song, "Imperfectus" .. .. Sir W. Robinson
Mr. T. BERGIN
3. Cavatina, "Una voce poco fa" (Barbiere) .. .. Rossini
Signorina ALICE REBOTTARO
4. Overture, "Ruy Blas" .. .. Mendelssohn
THE ORCHESTRA
5. Cavatina, "A te diro" (Roberto Devereux) .. .. Donizetti
Mr. W. PARKINSON
6. Solo violin, The Bird on the Tree .. .. Hauser
Mr MAX KLEIN
7. Song, "Roving life" .. .. Boyce
Mr. T. BERGIN
8. Selection, "Carmen" .. .. Bizet
THE ORCHESTRA
9. Chanson Espagnole, "Juanita" .. .. Yradlier
Signorina ALICE REBOTTARO
10. Fantasia Bassoon, "Lucy Long" .. .. Godfrey
Mr. P. LANGDALE
11. Song, "My own, my guiding star (Robin Hood) .. .. Macfarren
Mr. W. PARKINSON
12. Overture, "La Sirène" .. .. Auber
THE ORCHESTRA

Conductor, Signor ALBERTO ZELMAN
Accompanist, Herr Benno Scherek

ADMISSION FREE


[Advertisement], The Argus (19 January 1889), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6217657 

"NEWS OF THE DAY", The Age (21 January 1889), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196988333 

An overwhelming audience attended the special orchestral concert on Saturday afternoon. Extra seats were provided until no more room remained, and the entrances were thronged by those desirous of hearing the music but unable to obtain admission to the hall. The programme consisted of two numbers only, tho first of these being Bach's air for strings from his orchestral suite in D. This has been made familiar by means of arrangements for violin and violoncello, and has been played at these concerts before in its original form, as on Saturday, its broad and serene flow of melody, with rich, harmonic accompaniment, gained the entire appreciation of the audience. Schubert's symphony in C, the remaining number, has also been heard once before at these concerts. It is the composer's greatest instrumental work and his last. It is also of unusual length, but so full of beauties that no one could wish it curtailed by a single bar. The performance, under Mr. Cowen's masterly conductorship, was exceptionally fine.

In the evening the usual miscellaneous concert was given, the vocalists being Signorina Alice Rebottaro and Messrs. W. Parkinson and T. Bergin. Mr. Max Klein obtained an encore for his clever performance on the violin of The Bird on the Tree, giving in response Raff's Cavatina. Mr. Langdale created amusement and obtained applause by his fantasia on the bassoon. Most of the orchestral selections were performed in a very indifferent manner, chiefly owing to the insubordination of some members of the orchestra shown in laughing and amusing themselves and disregarding their conductor, Signor Zelman. Herr Scherek accompanied the vocal numbers on the pianoforte. There was an immense attendance.



Monday 21 January 1889

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

200th ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
By the CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader, Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Egmont" .. .. Beethoven
2. Andante and march, ("Lenore" symphony) .. .. Raff
3. Overture, "Struensee" .. .. Meyerbeer
4. Nocturne ("Midsummer Night's Dream") .. .. Mendelssohn
5. Suite de Ballet, "Coppélia" .. .. Delibes

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (21 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6217758 

"ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (22 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196990890 



Tuesday 22 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
(With Augmented Orchestra)
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston
Principal viola - Mr. Zerbini

1. Symphony in B flat [no. 4] .. .. Beethoven
2. Andante and Finale from Violoncello Concerto .. .. Goltermann (First time)
Mr. THEO. LIEBE
3. Symphonic Poem, "Le Rouet d'Omphale" .. .. Saint-Saëns (First time)

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

AFTERNOON PROGRAM REPEATED


[Advertisement], The Argus (22 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6217888 



Wednesday 23 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Symphony in D [no. 2] .. .. Beethoven
2. Turkish Rondo .. .. Mozart
3. Invitation to the Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
4. Minuet .. .. Boccherini
5. Entr'acte, "Colombe" .. .. Gounod
6. Overture, "Zanetta" .. .. Auber

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (23 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6217994 



Thursday 24 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelesohn
2. Serenade for Strings .. .. Haydn
3. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber
4. Hungarian Dances .. .. Brahms
5. Prelude, "King Manfred" .. ... Reinecke
6. Saltarello .. .. Gounod
7. Overture, "Merry Wives of Windsor" .. .. Nicolai

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

HAYDN'S CREATION

Principals:
Mrs. BETHELL
Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
Mr. S. MOYLE
Mr. A. H. GEE
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 performers
Leader - Mr. GEO. WESTON
Organist - Mr. GEO. PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Admission - Reserved seats, 4s; second seats, 2s 6d; galleries, 1s.


Haydn's "The creation", an oratorio, book of words (Melbourne: Centennial Exhibition, 1889)

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/21936426 

http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/244623 (DIGITISED)


[Advertisement], The Argus (24 January 1889), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6218183 



Friday 25 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Coriolan" .. .. Beethoven
2. Allegro from "Reformation" Symphony .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Overture, "Meistersinger" .. .. Wagner
4. "La Dernier Sommeil de la Vierge" .. .. Massenet
5. Ballet Suite, "Sylvia" .. .. Delibes

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1, Symphony (No. 8) in F .. .. Beethoven
2. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
3. Ballet Suite, "The Language of Flowers" .. .. Cowen

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (25 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6218336 



Saturday 26 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

LAST GRAND SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS
(With Augmented Orchestra)
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston
Principal Viola - Mr. Zerbini

Consisting of a Selection from the Works of WAGNER
1. Prelude and Entr'acte (Act III), "Lohengrin"
2. Overture, "Tannhäuser"
3. Waldweben, "Siegfried"
4. Overture, "Meistersinger"
5. Introduction and finale, "Tristan and Isolde"
6. March, "Tannhäuser"

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

HAYDN'S CREATION

Principals:
Mrs. BETHELL
Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
Mr. S. MOYLE
Mr. A. H. GEE
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 performers
Leader - Mr. GEO. WESTON
Organist - Mr. GEO. PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Admission - Reserved seats, 4s; second seats, 2s 6d; galleries, 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (26 January 1889), 16

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6218522



Monday 28 January 1889

AFTERNOON

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


EVENING, at 8

GRAND CHORAL CONCERT
Second Performance of Beethoven's CHORAL SYMPHONY & &c.

1. Motett, "Hear My Prayer" .. .. Mendelssohn
Mrs. PALMER and the CENTENNIAL CHOIR. Organ, Mr. GEO. PEAKE
2. Part songs, (a) "Sweet and Low" .. .. Barnby
(b) Now is the Month of Maying .. .. Morley
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR
3. The CHORAL SYMPHONY .. .. BEETHOVEN
4. Hallelujah Chorus ("Messiah") .. .. Handel

Principals:
Mrs. PALMER
Madame CHRISTIAN
Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
Mr. FRANK H. MORTON
The CENTENMAI CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 performers
Leader - Mr. GEO. WESTON
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Concert - Admission - Reserved seats, 4s.; second seats, 2s. 6d.; galleries, 1s


[Advertisement], The Argus (28 January 1889), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6218716 



Tuesday 29 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
(With Augmented Orchestra)
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. GEORGE WESTON
Principal Viola - Mr. ZERBINI

1. Unfinished Symphony .. .. Schubert
2. Concerto Héroïque, for violin .. .. Prume
(Accompanist - Mr. Zerbini)
3. Scherzo and Wedding March, "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING, at 8

SPECIAL ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
(With Augmented Orchestra)
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. GEORGE WESTON
Principal Viola - Mr. ZERBINI

1. Symphony (No. 5) in C minor .. .. Beethoven
2. Introduction and Finale, "Tristan" .. .. Wagner
3. Hungarian Rhapsody (No. 4) .. .. Liszt

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


[Advertisement], The Argus (29 January 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6218868 



Wednesday 30 January 1889

AFTERNOON, at 3.30

LAST ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
Conductor - Mr. F. H. COWEN
Leader - Mr. Geo. Weston

1. Overture, "Egmont" .. .. Beethoven
2. Largo for organ, harp and strings .. .. Handel
Organ, Mr. GEO. PEAKE; Harp, Mr. F. C. BARKER
3. Overture, "Freischütz" .. .. Weber
4. Entr'acte, "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
5. Hungarian Rhapsody (No. 1) .. .. Liszt
6. Ballet air (No. 3) "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
7. Overture, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner

Admission FREE. A few front seats 1s.


EVENING

NO ORCHESTRAL CONCERT


[Advertisement], The Argus (30 January 1889), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6219031 

"LAST ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (31 January 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196988685 

Yesterday afternoon, at the last of the orchestral concerts, not only was the hall densely crowded, but the entrances; the orchestral platform was invaded, dozens of persons sitting and standing on one side behind the performers, and, on the removal of the partition dividing the orchestral portion of the platform from the organ, the whole of the space occupied by the choir at choral concerts was found to be crowded with auditors. The programme contained nothing new, and commenced with Beethoven's overture to Egmont. Handel's Largo for harp, organ and strings, which followed, gained its customary encore, the last part being repeated. After Weber's overture to Der Freischütz came the entr'acte from the third act of Wagner's Lohengrin, a most effective performance being given, resulting in an enthusiastic encore. Liszt's first Rhapsody, the third ballet-air from Schubert's Rosamuda and Wagner's Tannhäuser overture completed the programme. The applause at the conclusion was hearty and long continued. This evening the final choral concert will take place. Mr. Cowen's oratorio, Ruth, is the work to be performed.



Thursday 31 January 1889

CLOSING CEREMONY, Noon

CENTENNIAL ORCHSESTRA

1. Overture, "Leonora" .. .. Beethoven
2. Entr'acte, "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
3. Overture, "Ruy Blas" ... Mendelssohn


EVENING, at 8

LAST GRAND CHORAL CONCERT

Cowen's RUTH (Fifth Performance)

Ruth, Mrs. PALMER
Naomi, Madame CHRISTIAN
Orpah, Miss ELLEN ATKINS
Boaz, Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
A Reaper/An Elder, Mr FRANK H. MORTON
The CENTENNIAL CHOIR and ORCHESTRA Of 800 Performers
Leader - Mr. GEO. WESTON
Organist - Mr. GEO. PEAKE
Conductor - Mr. FREDERIC H. COWEN

Concert - Admission - Reserved seats, 4s.; second seats, 2s. 6d.; galleries, 1s


[Advertisement], The Argus (31 January 1889), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6219220 

"THE LAST EXHIBITION CHORAL CONCERT", The Age (1 February 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196987339 

Tito conclusion of the grand series of concerts organised in the Exhibition Building has at last come, the final one being given last evening, when Mr. Cowen's oratorio, Ruth, was performed, a fitting selection for the occasion, as the composition of the gifted musician who has been the moving spirit of the splendid series of musical performances that ended with last night's concert. During a period of six months about 260 concerts have been given, 30 of them being choral. The undertaking is unprecedented in any part of the world, and nothing but admiration can be expressed for the manner in which it has been carried out by all concerned. Conductor, orchestra and choir have worked together with such earnest good will as to make possible, and an accomplished fact a continuous number of productions of difficult choral works, as many as would under ordinary circumstances have extended over a much longer period of time, and a very high standard of efficiency has been maintained. The Messiah, the Creation and Elijah have each been heard several times; Ruth has, previous to last evening, been performed four times in succession; and numerous shorter, though important works, by Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Gounod, and Cowen, presented. The paid admissions to the concerts have amounted to more than one hundred thousand, besides the larger number of three hundred and fifty thousand who have occupied free seats, so that it is evident that there has been widely spread appreciation of the advantages afforded. At the performance of Ruth last evening the principal vocalists were the same as on the previous occasions of its production, namely, Mrs. Palmer, Madame Christian, Mr. Armes Beaumont and Mr. Frank Morton. The beauties of the work were enhanced by increased familiarity, and its reception was enthusiastic. The lonely pastoral scenes in the cornfield of Boaz, the reapers and gleaners' dances and choruses, and the great chorus, Praise Him, are especially beautiful. The performance was excellent, the choir excelling even their usual standard, and the solo vocalists also seemed inspired with the desire to do the fullest justice to the music. Mr. Beaumont, in particular, gave the fine solo, How Excellent Is Thy Loving Kindness, with remarkable breadth of style and fervor of expression. The hall was crowded in every part. His Excellency the Governor and Lady Loch were present, and the National Anthem was given at the commencement and close of the concert. At the conclusion of the oratorio the whole audience broke into continued cheering, while each member of the choir, the ladies decorated with ears of corn, literally pelted their conductor with bouquets. After this the chorus and orchestra struck up Auld Lang Syne, which was joined in by the audience, and after more enthusiastic cheering and waving of sashes and handkerchiefs by the choir, Mr. Cowen was presented by Lady Loch, on their behalf, with a magnificent trophy of flowers bearing the inscription, "Ruth, F.H.C." Mr. Cowen is evidently highly esteemed by the ladies and gentlemen with whom he has been so closely associated, and he must feel gratified at their enthusiastic appreciation. He leaves for Sydney to-morrow to give 12 concerts there, and on the 14th inst. will give one concert in the Town Hall for the benefit of the Melbourne charities, prior to his departure for England.

"MUSIC AT THE EXHIBITION. LAST GRAND CHORAL CONCERT", The Argus (1 February 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6219480 

"The Last Exhibition Concert", Weekly Times (2 February 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219372277 




February 1889 and after


All TROVE items tagged Centennial Orchestra for February 1889:

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Centennial+Orchestra&q&l-decade=188&l-year=1889&l-month=2 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

Closing summary

"THE CENTENNIAL INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION. THE CLOSING CEREMONY. THE RESULTS OF THE EXHIBITION ... THE MUSIC", The Argus (1 February 1889), 9-10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6219387 

THE MUSIC

On passing in review the musical proceedings of the six months now ended, it must be apparent to the vast majority that the action of the commissioners in arranging matters as they did was far sighted and judicious. Of course, there are sure to be some who will grumble at the heavy expenditure, but such are in a decided minority. Undoubtedly, the coup d'etat was the engagement of Mr. W. H. Cowen, whose name had for many years been familiar to us as a composer, principally by his songs, but who now appears in quite a different light, not only as the composer of such masterpieces as "Ruth" and the "Scandinavian Symphony," but also as a conductor than whom we could certainly have had none better.

Appended will be found a catalogue enumerating all the musical compositions that have been produced at the exhibition concerts, and we have little doubt that had this list been presented to the public view at the beginning instead of the close, there would have been a general feeling of consternation instead of mutual congratulations as is now the case. At the outset Mr. Cowen showed sound generalship in the planning of his campaign, and since then he has displayed all the qualities of an able administrator. He did not make the absurd mistake of commencing at the wrong end of the lane and walking backwards, but began with programmes that were easily understandable, and not above the heads of the audience, in fact, he felt his way cautiously and wisely. The earlier programmes consisted of movements from the symphonies of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, with an admixture of music of a lighter class by Gounod, Auber, Meyerbeer, Rossini, Boccherini, Massenet, Delibes, Bizet, and others too numerous to mention.

The first symphony played in toto was Beethoven's No. 5 in C minor, a work which appeals on a first hearing to the instinct of even the musically uneducated, which was repeated for the fourth time on Tuesday last, when the audience, having by this time become thoroughly familiar with it, expressed unbounded admiration in the most unmistakable manner. The remaining Beethoven symphonies followed in due course, each being played twice, and some oftener, until the climax was reached with the colossal ninth, which was heard for the second and last time on Monday last. Such is the right and proper way of elevating the public taste, a work that pleases most on a first hearing is generally the one to get easily tired of, whereas a great work, full of grand and original thoughts, displayed and worked out with consummate skill, is with many, on a first hearing, little better than mere jargon. On a second hearing the light begins to dawn, whilst on a third the whole appears in dazzling beauty, and after such an experience the listener cares no more for the tawdry, flimsy manufactures that originally pleased. As an example of this, we may mention that at an evening concert on August 25 the programme included a Strauss waltz, which was repeated on November 23, but by that time was so little to the liking of the audience that no more Strauss waltzes were heard in the concert hall.

The educational value of these concerts is rendered all the greater by the various diversity of styles. This will be evident to any who will look over the annexed list. What greater contrast can be found than between Taubert and Wagner, Mendelssohn and Schumann, Handel and Berlioz, or Beethoven and Auber. Whilst the older schools represented by Bach (1685), Gluck (1714), Monsigny (1729), Haydn (1732), Mozart (1756), &c., have been done full justice to, the more modern writings of Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Liszt, Raff, Gounod, Macfarren, Dvorak, Brahms, Cowen, Prout, Sullivan, Mackenzie, Stanford, Parry, Barnett, and, though last not least, Wagner have been made pleasantly familiar. We doubt if any music heard in Melbourne has produced such intensely sympathetic feeling in the minds of the audiences as the various selections from this great man's operas. Now that the door has been thrown open it is likely to be kept open. As showing the effect of the musical education that has been steadily going on, it is noticeable that during the last two months the more elevated the class of music performed the larger has been the audience, until the ordinary ballad concerts (called popular) have fallen into disrepute.

In closing the volume of "Music at the Exhibition," we cannot speak too highly of the splendid musical organisation with which Mr. Cowen has accomplished the wonders he has. The orchestra numbers 68, which, with the exception of 15 players who came out with the conductor, and who have been especially valuable in connection with the following instruments - violins, violoncellos, oboes, bassoons, horns, cornets, and harp - were all selected from this and the adjacent colonies. Mr. Cowen's magnetic influence has gone through them as a body, and the result has been, with but few exceptions, a series of really magnificent performances. Special credit is due to the excellent lender, Mr. G. Weston, who has filled his responsible position well.

It is a matter of no small importance to the colony that the arrangements now pending for retaining the Centennial orchestra should be carried through successfully. There are matters of detail, such us the advisability or otherwise of continuing the concerts week by week all the year round, which may be waived for the present, though they will require careful consideration later on.

A special word of praise is due to the members of the chorus for the painstaking assiduity with which they have attended rehearsals, doubtless often at considerable personal inconvenience, which entitles them to the sincerest thanks from the community at large. On the disbandment of the Exhibition chorus, we presume that a good many of the members will be conscious of a vacuum in their weekly engagements, and we would draw the attention of such to the fact that there is, and has been for many years, a mixed choral society - the Melbourne Philharmonic- which in the natural order of things ought to benefit very materially (as should all musical societies) by the impetus given to musical progress through the events of the past six months, and in its turn ought to prevent that impetus from flagging.

Mr E. Miller, who has had the business management of the "Music at the Exhibition," has fulfilled his arduous task throughout with most commendable tact and energy. Mr. Gibbs is also deserving of mention for his management of the hall arrangements.


LIST OF WORKS PERFORMED

("First performance" means in Melbourne)


CHORAL

[Handel's] "Messiah," four times
[Mendelssohn's] "Elijah," four times
[Rossini's] "Stabat Mater," twice
Beethoven's "Choral Fantasia," twice
Mendelssohn's "Hear My Prayer," three times
Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, twice
[Cowen's] "Ruth," five times (first time in Melbourne)
Sullivan's "Golden Legend," twice
Gounod's "Gallia," twice (first time)
"Sleeping Beauty," twice (first time)
Part songs, &c.
[Haydn's] "Creation," twice
Cowen's "Song of Thanksgiving," five times
King's Centennial Cantata, three times


ORCHESTRAL WORKS

SYMPHONIES

Beethoven - No. 1 in C, twice; No. 2 in D, twice; "Eroica," twice; No. 4 in B flat, twice; No. 5 in C minor, four times; "Pastorale," five times; No. 7 in A, three times; No. 8 in F, three times.
Mendelssohn - "Scotch," once; "Italian," twice; "Reformation" (first time), twice.
Schumann - No. 1 in B flat (first time), three times; No. 4 in D minor (first time), twice; No. 2 in C (first time) twice.
Mozart - "Jupiter," twice; No. 3 in E flat, twice; G minor, three times; No. 6 in C (first time) twice.
Haydn - No. 1 in E flat (first time), once; "Surprise," twice; "Military," once; "Clock," three times; in D, twice; in C, No. 7 (first time), twice.
Schubert - in C (first time), twice; in B minor (unfinished, first time), three times.
Berlioz - "Fantastique," once.
Raff - "Lenore," once.
Liszt - "Les Preludes" (first time), twice.
Cowen - "Scandinavian" (first time), twice.
Stanford - "Irish" (first time), twice.
Prout in F (first time), twice.
Cowen - "Welsh" (first time), twice.
Goetz in F (first time), twice.
Brahms, No. 3 in F (first time), twice.
Also,
Movements from Mendelssohn's No. 1 in C minor, Spohr's "Power of Sound," Goldmark's "Country Wedding," &c. (first time), and movements from many of the above several times.

OVERTURES

(All of them many times)

Beethoven - "Leonora" No. 3, "Fidelio," "Egmont," "Prometheus," "Ruins of Athens," "King Stephen," "Namenspeier," "Coriolan."
Mozart - "Nozze di Figaro,", "Zauberflöte," "Seraglio."
Weber - "Overon," "Freischütz," "Preciosa," "Ruler of the Spirits," "Euryanthe," "Sylvana" (once).
Mendelssohn - "Ruy Blas," "Midsummer Night's Dream," "Son and Stranger," "Hebrides," "Meerestile," "Melusina," "Athalie."
Wagner - "Tannhäuser," "Rienzi," "Flying Dutchman" (first time), "Meistersinger."
Cherubini - "Water-carrier," "Faniska," "Anacreon."
Mohr - "Jessonda"
Schumann - "Genoveva" (first time), "Manfred (first time)
Berlioz - "Carnaval Romaine" (first time)
Handel - "Samson," Occasional Overture
Gade - "Im Hochland" (first time)
Schubert - "Rosamunda" (first time), "Alphonse and Estrella" (first time)
Marschner - "The Vampyr," "Hans Heiling" (first time)
Rossini - "William Tell," "Semiramide," "Italiana in Algieri," "Tancredi," "Siege of Corinth," "Cenerentola," "La Gazza Ladra", "Il Barbieri"
Meyerbeer - "Struensee," "L'Etoile du Nord"
Auber - "Domino Noir," "Massaniello," "Crown of Diamonds," "Fra Diavolo," Lac de Fées," "Le Philtre," "La Sirène," "Zanatta," "Gustav," "Lestocq," "Cheval de Bronze", "Haydée"
Flotow - "Stradella"
Nicolai - "Merry Wives of Windsor"
Adam - "Le Brasseur de Preston," "Si j'étais Roi"
Herold - "Zampa," "Pré aux clercs"
Mehul - "Jeune Henri" (first time)
Sullivan - Ouvertura di Ballo (first time)
Bennett - "The Naiads" (first time), "The Wood Nymphs" (first time)
Macfarren - "Chevy Chase" (first time)
Corder - "Prospero" (first time)
Cowen - "Exhibition Overture" (first time)
Plumpton - "I Due Studenti," "Macbeth"
Wingham - Concert Overture (first time)
Stephens - Recollections of the Past (first time)
Bridge - Morte d'Arthur" (first time)
Gounod - "Mirella" (first time), "Mock Doctor" (first time), "La Nonne Sanglante" (first time)
A. Thomas - "Mignon"
Spontini - "La Vestale"
Suppé - "Poet and Peasant"
St. George - "Reveil du Printemps" (first time)
Gadsby - "Andromeda" (first time)

OTHER WORKS

Beethoven - Entr'acte, "Egmont", Turkish March
Mendelssohn - "Midsummer Night's Dream" music; Marches, "Athalie," "Cornelius"
Schumann - Fragments, "Manfred"
Schubert - Entr'acte and Ballet Music, "Rosamunda;" Andante from Quartet in D Minor
Liszt - Hungarian Rhapsodies (Nos. 1, 3, and 4)
Berlioz - "danse des Sylphes" and March Hongroise, "Faust"; Invitation to the Waltz, Weber
Gluck - Ballet airs, "Iphigenia;" Gavotte, "Armide"
Monsigny - Chaconne and Rigodon d'Aline
Rameau - Suite, "Castor and Pollux"
Bach - Air from Suite in D
Handel - Largo
Haydn - Serenade for Strings,Largo in F Sharp
Wagner - Inroductlon and Closing Scone, "Tristan;" Prelude and Entr'acte, "Lohengrin;" Entr'acte, "Meistersinger; Siegfried, "Idyll;" Prelude, "Parsifal;" Ride of the Volkyries;" [sic] Kaiser March, Huldigung's March, Waldweben ("Siegfried"), Feuerzäuber ("Walküre"), "Tannhäuser" March
Mozart - Turkish Rondo Meyerbeer - "Prophète" March, March des Flambeaux, Schiller Fest March; ballet, "Prophète;" ballet, "Robert le Diable;" ballet, "L'Africaine"
Auber - Ballet, "Masaniello;" Shawl Dance
Delibes - Ballet, "Sylvia;" ballet, "Coppelia"
Saint-Saëns - Danse Macabre, "Rouet d'Omphale" (Valse of the Priestesses)
Gounod - Danse des Bacchantes, Entr'acte "Colombe," Saltarello; ballet music, "Reine de Saba; Funeral March of a Marionette; March, "Reine de Saba;" Marche Romaine; Musette, "Mirella"
Michaelis - Gavotte
Dunkler - Au Bord de la Mer
Boccherini - Minuet
Taubert - Liebesliedchen
Barnett - "Elf land"
Massenet - Scènes Pittoresque[s];" ballet, "Le Cid;" "Dernier Somneil de la Vierge"
Thomas - Gavotte, "Mignon"
Wuersh - "Sous le Balcon"
Hiller - The sentinel
Glinka - Polonaise ("Life for the Czar"), Kamarinskaja
Heinecke - Entr'acte, "King Manfred"
Sullivan - "Graceful Dance"
Raff - Tarantella, movements from Italian Suite
Godard - Movements from Scènes Poetiques
Hofmann - Italian Love Tale
Moskowski - Suite, "From Foreign Parts"
Macfarren - Gavotte
Bizet- L'Arlesienne," Suite, Jeux d'Enfants
Volkmann - Waltz from Serenade
Dvorak - Slavonic Dances
Brahms - Hungarian Dances
Södermann - Swedish Wedding
Rubinstein - Ballet, "Feramorz"
Costa - March, "Eli"
A. G. Thomas - Ballet, "Esmerelda;" prelude, "Nadhesda"
Barnett - Suite, "Lay of the Last Minstrel"
Mazzoni - Guildhall March
Cowen - Suite, "Language of Flowers;" Melodie à l'Espagnole; entr'acte and march, "Maid of Orleans"
Stanford - Movements from Serenade
Berger - Gavotte
Wesché - Romance
Chabrier - España Rhapsody
Prout - Minuet and Trio; march, "Alfred"
Parry - Idyll from Suite
Mackenzie - Scotch Rhapsody; ballet, "Colomba;" intermezzo, "Jason"
[Zelman - Gavotte]

CONCERTOS &c.

Beethoven in E flat (pianoforte)
Mendelssohn in G minor (pianoforte); do. in D minor do.; do. Rondo in B minor, do.; Serenade and allegro giocosa, do.
Schumann - Concerto in A minor
Chopin - Concerto in F minor; do. in E minor
Mendelssohn - Violin concerto
Max Bruch - 1st violin concerto
Beethoven - Romance in F for violin
Gottermann - Andante and finale (concerto for violoncello)
Reinecke - Adagio from harp concerto
Swendsen - Romance for violin
Prume - Concerto Heroïque for violin, &c.

SELECTIONS (Operatic)

"Aida," "Trovatore," "Traviata," "Ballo," "Ernani," "Rigoletto," "Mignon," "Carmen,", "Lohengrin,", "Favorita,", "Lucia,", "Don Giovanni," "Dinorah," "Martha," "Figlia," "Albion,", Welsh airs.




The 13 Sydney concerts


[News and editorial], The Sydney Morning Herald (2 February 1889), 10, 11

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13712816 

MR. COWEN and the Centennial Orchestra, who are to arrive in Sydney this afternoon, will be received at the railway station by Sir Patrick Jennings, Mr. W. J. Trickett, and others. Mr. Cowen will then be taken to the Athenaeum Club and there welcomed.

[11] ... It is a matter for congratulation that Sydney is to have an opportunity of hearing the famous orchestra of the Melbourne Exhibition, under the baton of Mr. FREDERIC COWEN. Although a great many citizens attended the Exhibition, and it is presumed the concerts as well, the great mass of the people have yet to hear the best-sustained orchestral music yet heard in Australia. To-night the series of twelve concerts begin at the Exhibition Building, and if the metropolis possesses the musical taste which is attributed to it there will be a full and continued patronage extended to them. We had little to be proud of in losing the chance of holding the Exhibition here; and it was felt by most people in this colony that Melbourne had shown an enterprise and a decisive public spirit for which it could not but be praised, particularly in arranging the great musical festival that has delighted Australians for so many months. But it may now be placed on record that New South Wales also, if not through public at least through private enterprise, stamps her musical record with a new seal. It is possible to overestimate influences, but there are some vivid impressions given by events which never lose their vitality or freshness. And it more often occurs with things pertaining to the fine arts than to effects through any other medium. A picture, a statue, a song, a chord of music, a great concerted vocal effort leave live-long impressions behind them, and they are generally for good, thanks to the number of devoted artists in the world. But, of all the arts, music is the one we could least do without. It is the most immediately powerful upon tho senses and appeals to all - to those whom a statue would not interest, whom a picture by a great artist would not have power upon. "The concord of sweet sounds" touches the whole body of human sympathy, and, touching it, refines and elevates, even if the refinement and the elevation be more sensuous than moral or more spiritual than intellectual. When the power for such causes lies in the will of such a body of trained and cultivated musicians as those we are to hear to-night and next week, what may not be expected? In Melbourne this orchestra ran the whole range of the musical library, picking from all sources musical themes that would please and instruct. Both pleasure and instruction were given, and especially the former. It is the more important of the two, for if instruction is intended it must occur through things that please. We are not unfamiliar here with good very good music. We have musical societies that give us most pleasing and satisfactory concerts, but it is no disparagement to them to say that this perfectly-trained orchestra has musical resources and powers of expression that they do not possess save in potentiality. The musical people, professional and otherwise, have entered heartily into the preparations for the event, and there seems every probability of an enthusiastic reception for the coming musicians. A good deal may be expected from the impetus that will be given to musical matters here by the present effort, and thereby there will be not only momentary pleasure excited, but permanent benefit conferred.

"AMUSEMENTS. THE COWEN ORCHESTRAL CONCERTS", The Sydney Morning Herald (2 February 1889), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13712712 

"GENERAL NEWS", The Daily Telegraph (4 February 1889), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article235867379 




Saturday 2 February 1889 (Sydney, NSW)

EVENING, at 8

Exhibition Building, Prince Alfred Park, Sydney

Under the Managements of Messrs. RIGNOLD and ALLISON

THE CENTENNIAL MELBOURNE EXHIBITION ORCHESTRA
CONSISTING OF OVER 60 PERFORMERS
FIRST GRAND MUSICAL FESTIVAL

1. Overture, "Oberon" .. .. Weber
2. Larghetto, Symphony (No. 2) in D .. .. Beethoven
3. Overture, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
4. Serenade for Strings .. .. Haydn
5. Hungarian Rhapsody No. 4 .. .. Liszt
6. Gavotte, "Mignon" .. .. A. Thomas
7. Suite de Ballet, "Sylvia" .. .. Delibes


"AMUSEMENTS", The Daily Telegraph (4 February 1889), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article235867399 



Sunday 3 February 1889 (Sydney, NSW)

EVENING, at 8

Exhibition Building, Prince Alfred Park, Sydney

SECOND GRAND ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION ORCHESTRA
Conducted by The World-famed Musician, Mr. F. H. COWEN

1. Overture, "Egmont" .. .. Beethoven
2. Andante, "Clock" symphony .. .. Haydn
3. Overture, "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
4. Entr'acte (No. 2) "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
6. Tarantella .. .. Raff
G. Minuet .. .. Boccherini
7. Hungarian Dances (5 and 6) .. .. Brahms
6. Scherzo, Nocturne and Wedding March ["Midsummer Night's Dream"] .. .. Mendelssohn


"SUNDAY CONCERTS", Evening News (4 February 1889), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108791725 



Monday 4 February 1889 (Sydney, NSW)

AFTERNOON, at 3

Exhibition Building, Prince Alfred Park, Sydney

THIRD GRAND ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Symphony - E flat .. .. Mozart
2. Overture - "Ruy Blas" .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Invitation to the Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
4. Overture - "Meistersinger" .. .. Wagner
5. Graceful Dance, Henry VIII .. .. Sullivan
6. Turkish March .. .. Beethoven
7. Suite de Ballet - "Copplia" .. .. Delibes


EVENING, at 8

Exhibition Building, Prince Alfred Park, Sydney

FOURTH GRAND ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Symphony - C Minor, No. 5 .. .. Beethoven
2. Overture - "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
- INTERVAL OF FIVE MINUTES -
3. Overture - "Euryanthe" .. .. Weber
4. Gavotte - " Yellow Jasmine" .. .. Cowen
5. Hungarian Rhapsody No 1 .. .. Liszt
6. Ballet Music - "Reine de Saba" .. .. Gounod


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (4 February 1889), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28339514 

[Advertisement], The Daily Telegraph (4 February 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article235867406 

"Amusements", Evening News (5 February 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10878809

"AMUSEMENTS", The Daily Telegraph (5 February 1889), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article235863893 



Tuesday 5 February 1889 (Sydney, NSW)

EVENING, at 8

Exhibition Building, Prince Alfred Park, Sydney

FIFTH GRAND ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture - "Leonora," No. 3 .. .. Beethoven
2. Andante - "Italian" Symphony .. .. Mendelssohn
3. Overture - "Oberon" .. .. Weber
4. Prelude and Entr'Acte - "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
- INTERVAL OF FIVE MINUTES -
5. Ballet Music, (Feramorz) .. .. Rubinstein
6. Entr'actr - (Colombe) .. .. Gounod
7. "Elf Land" .. .. Barnett
8. "Turkish Rondo" .. .. Mozart
9. Overture - "Le Lac des Fées " .. .. Auber


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (5 February 1889), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13712846 

"THE COWEN CONCERTS", Evening News (6 February 1889), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108794786 

As showing the power of good music, the Exhibition building was crowded in every part last night to hear another performance of the famous Centennial Orchestra, which, under the baton of Mr. F. H. Cowen, has been simply a revelation in the way of orchestral performances on this side of the equator. His Excellency the Governor, accompanied by Mr. Wallington, his private secretary, and Sir Alfred Stephen, Lieutenant-Governor, were present, and consequently the orchestra, all standing, played the "National Anthem," and, unlike the usual run of orchestras, played it well. The programme was as varied as the most particular could desire, and opened with an overture, Beethoven's "Leonora," No. 3, which, if a little long, was still magnificently played. Mendelssohn's Italian symphony was the next item, and the style of this grand old master was brought out to perfection by Mr. Cowen. The overture to Weber's "Oberon" followed, and to conclude the first portion of the programme the prelude and entr'acte of one of Wagner's finest works, "Lohengrin," was played superbly, and in response to continued applause the entr'acte was repeated. In order not to weary the audience only five minutes interval was arranged for, and the second portion commenced with a fine specimen of the work of Rubinstein, viz., "The Ballet Music" from "Feramorz;" opening with the quaint and beautiful "Dance of Bagaderes," followed by a weird "Torchlight dance," then by a second "Dance of Bagaderes," and winding up with a magnificent and almost majestic "Wedding Procession." Nothing could have better exhibited the wonderful originality of this composer, nor could his work have been more faithfully and magnificently interpreted. A beautiful specimen of the work of the great French composer, Gounod, being an entr'acte from "Colombe," was next given, and then followed what was perhaps the most fully appreciated item on the programme, a pizzicato gem, entitled, "Elf Land," by Barnett. This was most excellently played, and after continual demands, repeated, much to the delight of the audience. A Turkish rondo, by Mozart, and the overture to Auber's "Le Lac de Fees," concluded a most delightful concert, and increased the very genuine feeling of regret that Mr. Cowen and his fine orchestra have so short a time to remain in our midst.

"AMUSEMENTS", The Daily Telegraph (6 February 1889), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article235868179 



Wednesday 6 February 1889 (Sydney, NSW)

AFTERNOON, at 3

Her Majesty's Theatre, Sydney

SIXTH GRAND ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Symphony in A minor - "The scotch" .. .. Mendelssohn - INTERVAL - 2. Overture - "Flying Dutchman" .. .. Wagner
8. Ballet Airs - "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
4. Slavonic Dance (No. 8) .. .. Dvorak
5. Serenade for Strings .. .. Haydn
6. Saltarello .. .. Gounod
7. March, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner


EVENING, at 8

Exhibition Building, Prince Alfred Park, Sydney

SEVENTH GRAND ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
MONSTER PROGRAM with Sydney Liedertafel, under the conductorship of Mr. J. A. DELANY

1. Overture - "Fidelio" .. .. Beethoven
2. "Chaconne and Rigodon d'Aline".. .. Monsigny
3. Part Song - "What care I?" .. . Blumenthal
THE SYDNEY LIEDERTAFEL and CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA.
4. March - "Lenore" Symphony .. .. Raff
5. Prelude - "Le Dernier Somneil de la Vierge".. .. Massenet
6. Overture - "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
- INTERVAL -
7. Overture - "Nozze di Figaro" .. .. Mozart
8. Allegro - "Reformation" Symphony .. .. Mendelssohn
9. Liebesliedchen for Oboe and Strings .. .. Taubert
10. Part Song - "The Long Day Closes " .. .. Sullivan
THE SYDNEY LIEDERTAFEL
11. Ballet Music - "Le Prophète" .. .. Meyerbeer
12. Overture - "Semiramide" .. .. Rossini


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (6 February 1889), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13712994 

[Advertisement], Evening News (6 February 1889), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108794727 



Thursday 7 February 1889 (Sydney, NSW)

EVENING, at 8

Exhibition Building, Prince Alfred Park, Sydney

EIGHTH GRAND ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture - "Prometheus" .. .. Beethoven
2. Andante - "Surprise" Symphony .. .. Haydn
3. Overture - "Struensee" .. .. Meyerbeer
4. Melody and a L'Espagnol .. .. Cowen
5. Hungarian Rhapsody (No. 4) .. .. Liszt
- INTERVAL OF 5 MINUTES -
6. Overture - "Meistersinger" .. .. Wagner
7. Pizzicato - "Sylvia" .. .. Delibes
8. Ballet Music - "Le Cid" .. .. Massenet
9. Tarantella .. .. Raff
10. War March of the Priests - "Athalie" .. .. Mendelssohn


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (7 February 1889), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13713149 



Friday 8 February 1889 (Sydney, NSW)

EVENING, at 8

Exhibition Building, Prince Alfred Park, Sydney

NINTH GRAND ORCHESTRAL MONSTER CONCERT
Augmented by the METROPOLITAN LIEDERTAFEL under the conductorship of Mr. J. Ashcroft Edwards

1. First Movement of Symphony in B flat (No.1) .. .. Schumann
2. Introduction and Closing Scene - "Tristan and Isolde" .. .. Wagner
3. Ode- "To the Sons of Art" .. .. Mendelssohn
The METROPOLITAN LIEDERTAFEL and CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
4. Nocturne - "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
5. Overture - "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
- INTERVAL OF 5 MINUTES -
6. Overture - "Ruy Blas" .. .. Mendelssohn
7. Entr'acte - "King Manfred " .. .. Reinecke
8. Part Songs, (a) "Free as on Mighty Pens", (b) "Evening" .. .. Marschner
THE METROPOLITAN LIEDERTAFEL (conductor, Mr. J. Ashcroft Edwards)
9. Suite - "Aus aller Herren Lander" (From Foreign Parts) .. .. Moskowski
10. Overture - "Merry YVives of Windsor" .. .. Nicolai


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (8 February 1889), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13713292 



Saturday 9 February 1889 (Sydney, NSW)

AFTERNOON, at 3

Her Majesty's Theatre, Sydney

TENTH GRAND ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
The PROGRAMME will include those works which received the LARGEST NUMBER OF VOTES at THE PLEBISCITE in MELBOURNE, and which were performed at the PLEBISCITE CONCERT (repeated three times to crowded audience

1. Symphony in F (No. 6) - "The Pastoral" .. .. Beethoven
- INTERVAL OF 5 MINUTES -
2. Overture - "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
3. Adagio - "Scotch Symphony" .. .. Mendelssohn
4. Hungarian Rhapsody (No. 1) .. .. Liszt
5. Entr'acte - "Colombe" .. .. Gounod
6. Overture - "Der Freischütz" .. .. Weber


EVENING, at 8

Exhibition Building, Prince Alfred Park, Sydney

ELEVENTH GRAND ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
augmented by THE SYDNEY LIEDERTAFEL under the conductorship of Mr. J. A. DELANEY

1. Overture - "Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. Andante - Symphony in C (No. 1) .. .. Beethoven
3. Invitation to the Waltz (Weber) .. .. Berlioz
4. Chorus - "Thou comest here" (Oedipus) .. .. Mendelssohn
The SYDNEY LIEDERTAFEL and CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
5. Entr'acte (No. 2) - "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
6. Prelude and Entr'acte - "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
- INTERVAL OF 5 MINUTES -
7. Selections from Suite de Ballet - "Language of Flowers" .. .. Cowen
8. Chorus - "Fair Semele's High-born Son" (Antigone) .. .. Mendelssohn
The SYDNEY LIEDERTAFEL and CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
9. Minuet .. .. Boccherini
10. Valse and Mazurka - "Coppelia" .. .. Delibes
11. Overture - "La Sirene" .. .. Auber


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (9 February 1889), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13713435 



Sunday 10 February 1889 (Sydney, NSW)

EVENING, at 8

Her Majesty's Theatre, Sydney

TWELFTH GRAND ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

1. Overture - "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
2. March - Lenore Symphony .. .. Raff
3. Finale - Symphony (No. 1 in C) .. .. Beethoven
4. Overture - "Euryanthe" .. .. Weber
5. Serenade for Strings .. .. Haydn
6. Overture - "Tannhauser" .. .. Wagner
7. Hungarian Rhapsody (No. 4) .. .. Liszt
8. Ballet Airs (Nos. 1 and 3) - "Rosamunda" .. .. Schubert
9. Graceful Dance (Henry VIII) .. .. Sullivan
10. Liebesliedchens for Oboe and Strings .. .. Taubert
II. Air Varié - "Coppelia" .. .. Delibes
12. Overture - "Masaniello" .. .. Auber


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (9 February 1889), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13713435 



Monday 11 February 1889 (Sydney, NSW)

AFTRENOON, at 2.30

Her Majesty's Theatre, Sydney

[13TH CONCERT] COMPLIMENTARY BENEFIT To Mr. CHARLES HUENERBEIN, tendered by FREDERIC H. COWEN, Messrs. RIGNOLD and ALLISON, and THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION ORCHESTRA in recognition of The ABLE and ENERGETIC SERVICES in connection with THE COWEN CONCERTS

On this occasion the greater part of the PROGRAMME will be devoted to the works of WAGNER

1. Overture - "Rienzi" .. .. Wagner
2. Prelude and Entr'acte - "Lohengrin" .. .. Wagner
3. Overture - "Meistersinger" .. .. Wagner
4. Introduction and closing scene - "Tristan and Isolde" .. .. Wagner
5. March - "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
6. Andante - "Clock" Symphony .. .. Haydn
7. Turkish March .. .. Beethoven
8. "Elf Land" .. .. Barnett
9. Hungarian Rhapsody, No. 1 .. .. Liszt


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (11 February 1889), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13713607 




"PASSENGERS BY INTERCOLONIAL TRAINS", The Age (13 February 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196989664 

ALBURY. Tuesday. Sydney to Melbourne (express): Fred. H. Cowen, L. J . Cowen, M. A. Phillips, Edward Kerr, A. Peters, J. Twentyman, A. Ceschina, H. Hunter, Jan Meyroos, H. Warnecke, A. H. Huuter, W. R. Morton, A. Flewin, F. Burrough, W. Grainger, J. Gassies, J. W. Lundborg, W. Basset, Mr. and Mrs. T. Richardson, S. Hore, W. Worsley, F. Miller, C. J. Alger, H. Alger, C. R. Berg, W. F. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Thomson, J. Munyard, W. A. Stoneham, W. Stoneham, H. L. Stoneham, F. W. Busch, A. Casiraghi, G. Weston, G. A. Sutch, A. Wentzel, P. G. Langdale, A. M. Lawson, T. Siebe [Liebe], Max Klein, F. Parkin, W. A. Robins, Frank R. Seymour, F. Kruse, C. W. Harrison, W. A. Brown, G. P. Frayling, Fr. Tretwich, Roberto Bimo, A. C. Quin, Barry Stevens (Cowen's Exhibition Orchestra) ...



The Melbourne farewell concerts



Wednesday 13 February 1889


"THE METROPOLITAN LIEDERTAFEL", The Argus (14 February 1889), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6222353 

The 129th concert of the Metropolitan Liedertafel was held last night in the Town hall. His Excellency the Governor and Lady Loch were present, and the subscribers and friends of the society assembled in large numbers. In addition to the usual full choral strength of its members, the Liedertafel was aided by Mrs Emery Gould as solo vocalist, and a large orchestra composed in greater part of members of the Exhibition orchestra, under the excellent leadership of Mr. George Weston ... Mr. Julius Herz went through the arduous task of conducting a long concert in excellent style, keeping all his forces in perfect control.

PRESENTATION TO MR. F. H. COWEN

In an interval in the concert Mr. F. H. Cowen, conductor of the Centennial Orchestra, was admitted to the society, and presented with the golden lyre given to distinguished gentlemen on their becoming honorary members ...

Thursday 14 February 1889

EVENING

Melbourne Town Hall

ORCHESTRAL AND VOCAL CONCERT
In aid of the CHARITIES

1. Overture, "Leonora" .. ... Beethoven
The CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
2. Nocturne, "Midsummer Night's Dream" .. .. Mendelssohn
The CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
3. Air, "Che Faro Senza Eurydice" ("Orpheus") .. .. GLUCK
Madame CHRISTIAN
4. Overture, "Tannhäuser" .. .. Wagner
The CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
5. Song, "Adelaida" .. .. Beethoven
Mr. ARMES BEAUMONT
6. Largo, for organ, harp and strings .. .. Handel
Organ - Mr. GEO. PEAKE; harp - Mr. F. C. BARKER
7 (a) "Le Dernier Somneil de la Vierge"... Massenet
7 (b) Pizzicato, "Sylvia" .. .. Delibes
The CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
8. Song, "Tears" .. .. Cowen
Mrs. PALMER
9. Introduction and closing scene, "Tristan" .. .. Wagner
The CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA
7. Gavotte, "Yellow Jasmine" .. .. Cowen
8. Hungarian Rhapsody, No. 1 .. .. Liszt
9. Valse and air varié, with variations, "Coppelia" .. .. De1ibes
The CENTENNIAL ORCHESTRA


[Advertisement], The Argus (14 February 1889), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6222360 

"COWEN'S FAREWELL CONCERT", The Age (15 February 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196990128 

There could not have been desired a more impressive way of saying au revoir to Victoria than that adopted by Mr. Cowen, in giving his valedictory concert at the Town Hall last night in aid of the four hospitals ...

"Last Days of Cowen", Table Talk (22 February 1889), 15

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146023477 



The aftermath


"MR. F. H. COWEN IN ADELAIDE", South Australian Register (18 February 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47053724 

On Saturday a representative of the Register met Mr. F. H. Cowan [sic], the eminent musical composer and the director of the performances given at the recent Melbourne Exhibition. After an introduction by a mutual friend Mr. Cowen at once expressed his dislike to being interviewed, but, nevertheless, with courtesy, expressed his willingness to offer opinions on any musical matters which did not require his criticism of particular persons or Societies. In speaking of the climate of Australia in comparison with that of Italy as being such as to facilitate the production of a good voice he said that the frequent and sudden changes to which Australians are accustomed are undoubtedly disadvantageous; but so far as he could judge by personal experience one soon becomes acclimatised, and voices, with ordinary care, would not suffer. As to whether our Australian artists or the leaders in the musical profession might be expected to compare with Loadon or Continental artists he hardly felt inclined to express a decided opinion, but admitted that there were voices in the colonies of such naturally good quality as to be well worth the training and experience they could get in London or at the other great musical centres where first-class masters were to be found. His experience of both the orchestral and choral abilities of those he had met with in Australia was eminently satisfactory, though perhaps in England those who did know the colonies were hardly likely to believe such a pitch of excellence could be attained. He was abundantly satisfied with the skill of those who had been appearing under his direction, and his expectations had been more than realized. As to the probability of any such great artists as Marie Roza or Sims Reeves visiting the colonies, he thought it most unlikely. Questioned upon his returning to Australia, he mentioned that there were so many things to be considered before such a thing could be arranged that it was impossible to say anything definite. He would, however, be pleased to return at some future time after the successful and pleasing a reception as he had had at the hands of all whom he had met. Generally, Mr. Cowen spoke in the highest terms of the proficiency attained by the colonial performers whom he had met. He was aware that there was a sort of prejudice against what was called "classical" music, the word classical being a bad term; but though he had performed such music he found that it "took" with the people, thus showing that they could and would appreciate good music when properly rendered. Much of his success was attributable to the instrumentalists brought from England, but they were admirably supported by those engaged in the colonies. As a proof of the possibility of cultivating a taste for really good or what many term classical music he mentioned that at first the concerts in Sydney were but poorly attended, whereas later on the audiences increased immensely, and the continued successes of the Melbourne concerts were perhaps unparalleled in the world's history. In leaving behind him those instrumentalists who were specially engaged in London he believed that these would be found to be the nucleus of a thoroughly competent orchestra which would do much to improve the taste for music. In conclusion, he expressed his high appreciation of the manner in which he had been received in every part of the colonies which he had visited, not only for the general cordiality which had characterized his intimacy with those whom he had met, but also for the appreciation which they had shown of the music performed under his direction. On arriving at the Adelaide terminus Mr. Cowen was met by several leading musicians, and proceeded at once to Government House, where he remains as the guest of His Excellency Sir William Robinson during his stay in the city.


"Music in Australia. Mr. F. H. Cowen's Opinions", The Express and Telegraph (25 April 1889), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208529393 

Mr. F. H. Cowen, the well known conductor and composer (says the Pall Mall Gazette of March 22), arrived in London late last night direct from Naples, and our representative found him this morning in his "old familiar haunts" - that is to say, at his home in Hamilton-terrace, St. John's-wood. He was looking very well, though a little fatigued, and was full of enthusiastic reminiscences of his Australian musical "mission."

"Well, Mr. Cowen, have you had a satisfactory experience?" - "Remarkable, and one absolutely unique, I think, in musical circles; from the salary of £5,000 to myself to the entire novelty of the experiment. It was a musical mission, and succeeded beyond the hopes of my most enthusiastic wellwishers. There was a good deal of opposition at the commencement, but the persistency of a few carried it through, and results have proved the wisdom of the arrangements. It is a page of my life worth the perils by land and by water."

"Is it true that the exhibition committee have to face a deficit of £300,000?" - "Not quite. The Government at the early part of the exhibition assessed the coat at £100,000, but the increased expenditure has brought it up to £250,000. The country, however, will recover indirectly more than it has spent upon the the exhibition. They are a very go-ahead people, and they don't mind expense."

"What is your opinion of the musical tastes of the colony?" - "When I arrived there it was a comparatively barren field. They never had the chance of knowing what a complete orchestra was, but I have given them two concerts a day for six months - over 250 in all - and the result has been astounding. At the outset I began at the right end of the lane, forming my programmes from works easily understandable, and not above the heads of my audience, including movements from the symphonies of Beethoven, Mozart, and Haydn, interspersed with lighter music by Meyerbeer, Gounod, Rossini, Auber, Bizet, Massenet, and others. But I had no "exhibition" music, and Strauss's waltzes after a time were not listened to. Until I came no one had dared to give an entire symphony, but I have kept an audience, towards the close of the exhibition, interested throughout Schubert's big symphony, and the choral symphony was a great favorite. Wagner's music was very popular, and when I gave a concert consisting solely of his works the house was filled to suffocation. Their musical taste does immense credit to so young, a country, and the gross attendance at my concerts, four-fifths of which were free, amounted to twice the population of Victoria. I never saw such enthusiasm as on the last night of the exhibition, never such an ovation even to a great statesman. It absolutely rained flowers, and at a given signal all the ladies of the choir took off their red and blue sashes simultaneously and waved them, the whole chorus and band, some 800 strong, striking up "Auld lang syne."

"Did you employ native talent?" 0- "I took out 15 musicians with me, but the leader and the rest of the orchestra were "native," and the entire choir colonial. The instrumentalists long before I left got to play like one man, and I have never heard a better choir, unless it be at Leeds or Birmingham. As an instance of the growth of the popular taste, at the plebiscite concert which I held the works chosen by the audience were the "Pastorale Symphony," the overtures, to "Tannhäuser" and "Rienzi," Liszt's first Hungarian Rhapsody, and Handel's Largo for organ, harp, and strings. This concert was repeated four times, and people came all the way from New Zealand to hear the music. It was a revelation to them. I took the orchestra to Sydney for a week, and the enthusiasm there was almost blinding."

"Are you inclined to change countries?" - "No; Australia is all very well to visit under such favorable circumstances as mine; but it is a different matter when you come to settle down. It would be impossible for any one to meet with a more cordial reception than I did, but in spite of all temptations, I shall remain in England. It is a wonderful country for so young a state - it has not yet got into the "forties". Melbourne is a delightful city, and the inhabitants, essentially a great pleasure loving people, but I am still an Englishman."

I have seen it stated that you are engaged on an Australian symphony?" - "I have seen many things stated with more truth. No, I have not begun, nor do I see my way at present to undertaking any work inspired by the kangaroo, the bush, the 'possum, or the everlasting gum tree. There is really no available local color, and nothing one can illustrate musically. At least, I haven't thought of it. I must mention that I found the press on the whole remarkably well informed and intelligent on all musical matters, and their criticisms especially upon new works most excellent and very unprejudiced."

"And what do you expect will be the result of your "mission?" - "Its results are already apparent, not only in the wide diffusion of musical tastes throughout Australia and New Zealand, but a direct impulse has bean given to orchestral music, and the Government have already guaranteed £3,000 towards the foundation of a permanent orchestra, and I have no doubt that the rest will be easily obtained from private sources. Now that the door has been thrown open it is likely to be kept open."

"By-the-bye," said Mr. Cowen, as he shook hands with our representative, "I have brought over two specimens of native talent, a tenor and a bass, who have come to study music, with me. You shall see them, I hope, next week."



3 Saturday afternoon concerts at the Exhibition Building



Saturday 27 April 1889

Members of the Centennial Orchestra; conductor, Julius Herz


"THE BEETHOVEN ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (29 April 1889), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6242284 

Animated by a worthy artistic feeling, and by a desire for the continuance and increase of that taste for instrumental music which was developed by the late Exhibition concerts, the members of the Centennial Orchestra have associated themselves as a co-operative body for the carrying out of a series of Saturday afternoon concerts, the first of which was given last Saturday in the concert hall of the Exhibition building ...

"EXHIBITION ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (29 April 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196986325 


Saturday 4 May 1889

Members of the Centennial Orchestra; conductor, Julius Herz 


"WAGNER ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Argus (6 May 1889), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6244212 


Saturday 11 May 1889

Members of the Centennial Orchestra; conductor, Julius Herz


"ORCHESTRAL CONCERT", The Age (13 May 1889), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197328016 

It is somewhat disappointing to have to record that the attendance at the orchestral concert given in the concert hall of the Exhibition Building on Saturday afternoon was not sufficiently numerous to give encouragement for continuing these entertainments. The members of the late Centennial Orchestra, who have been the performers at the three concerts already given, themselves undertook the speculation, with a view of providing fairly remunerative employment for each during the interim between the late Exhibition concerts and the practical commencement of their engagement as members of the Victorian National Orchestra. The result has, however, not realised their expectations, and they have declined to carry the experiment any further. Those interested in the cause of music were anxious for the continuance of the orchestral Saturday concerts, as calculated to sustain the public liking for this class of music, and to perpetuate the habit of attending concerts on Saturday afternoon, which was initiated during the Exhibition concerts, and it is much to be regretted that the scheme should have fallen through on account of the want of sufficient public patronage ...



Establishing the permanent Victorian Orchestra


"Mr. Cowen and Australian Musical Taste", Table Talk (17 May 1889), 8-9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146024569 

"The Victorian Orchestra", Table Talk (17 May 1889), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146024568 

"THE NATIONAL ORCHESTRA. APPOINTMENT OF CONDUCTOR", The Age (18 May 1889), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197325845 

"THE CONDUCTOR OF THE VICTORIAN ORCHESTRA", The Argus (20 May 1889), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6248213 


The Victorian Orchestra gave its first concert at Melbourne Town Hall, on Thursday 8 August 1889

For documentation of the orchestra's concerts, see:

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Victorian+Orchestra (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)


Bibliography and resources:

Thérèse Radic, "The Victorian Orchestra 1889-1891: in the wake of the Centennial Exhibition Orchestra, Melbourne", Australasian Music Research 1 (1996), 13-101

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/52202674 

http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=8111425519;res=IELAPA (PAYWALL)







© Graeme Skinner 2014 - 2018