THIS PAGE FIRST POSTED 15 JANUARY 2017 IN MEMORIAM RICHARD DIVALL

LAST MODIFIED Monday 11 June 2018 20:30

Carl Linger

Dr GRAEME SKINNER (University of Sydney)


THIS PAGE IS ALWAYS UNDER CONSTRUCTION


To cite this:

Graeme Skinner (University of Sydney), "Carl Linger", Australharmony (an online resource toward the history of music and musicians in colonial and early Federation Australia): http://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/linger-carl.php; accessed 21 June 2018






Carl Linger, c. 1860; State Library of South Australia

https://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/B+6746 

LINGER, Carl Ferdinand August (Charles LINGER; Carles; Mr. LINGER; Herr LINGER; Herr Carl LINGER)

Professor of music, pianist, conductor, composer

Born Berlin, Prussia (Germany), 15 March 1810
Arrived Adelaide, SA, 7 August 1849 (per Princess Luise, from Hamburg, 23 March)
Died Adelaide, SA, 16 February 1862

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.party-485449 (NLA persistent identifier)

http://worldcat.org/identities/lccn-n2010009658 (WorldCat identities)

LINGER, Wilhelmina (Minna LINGER)

Amateur musician

Died Adelaide, SA, April 1860


LINGER, Marie Louise Feodora

Born at sea 1849 (daughter of Carl LINGER and Whilhemina)

CRANZ, Mathilde (HOGREFE; HOGGREFE)

See MAIN ENTRY



LINGER, Carl Otto August

Born SA, 6 May 1861 (son of Carl LINGER and Mathilde CRANZ; SA Births 1842-1906 b. 20 p.101)




Page directory

>  Summary


>  Documentation 1849-63

      >  1850

      >  1851

      >  1852

      >  1853

      >  1854

      >  1855

      >  1856

      >  1857

      >  1858

      >  1859

      >  1860

      >  1861

      >  1862

      >  1863


>  Documentation since 1863


>  Musical works (extant)


>  Musical works (presumed lost)


>  Bibliography




Summary

This pages collates basic biographical and musical documentation, focussing on Linger's Australian years, his musical activities and associations, and his documented compositions.

The data presented serves not only as a chronology of Linger's documented activities, but also as chronicle of one strand of public concert life in the city of Adelaide during the 1850s and 1860s.

Of course, surviving documentation mainly concerns only Linger's most public activities, and then principally as a concert artist, rather than as a teacher, and even less as an individual.

Nor should this chronicle be read as anything more than a partial account of Adelaide's musical life in these years. Linger's principal engagements were clearly with the middle and upper echelons of society, and even then he is only rarely documented as being connected with theatrical or operatic performances.

Many working class South Australians, even those with a keen interest in music, may not even have heard of Linger, at least until after the Gawler Prize late in 1859. And even then, Heinrich Schrader and his brass band probably loomed larger in their lives, and in their estimations.

Linger worked with a very wide range of individuals and groups, amateur and professional, vocal and instrumental, and most of these associates are identified below, on or soon after their first appearance, their respective names live linked their main entries.

*

Sadly, most of his compositions appear to be lost; and several important manuscripts, extant until relatively recently, are now unaccountably missing, or - at very least - their present whereabouts are not generally known.

For those survivals of Linger's music that are still accessible today, we have largely to thank the diligence of the late Richard Divall. As he explained, in the introduction to his 2013 edition of the motet Oh Lord who is as thee:

Six sacred works . . . were found in the Tanunda Liedertafel Library in 1938, and were subsequently housed in the Lutheran Archives in Adelaide. The originals have now disappeared, but not before photocopies of the manuscripts were organised by the Editor around 1968 for the ABC's Musica Australis project. These photocopies are now held in the NLA.

In particular, the apparent loss, since 1935-36, of the original score (? and parts) of Linger's Concert overture is mysterious and vexing.


In addition to the selection of documentation presented below, much further information has been collected and is now immediately accessible in what is, effectively, a Carl Linger virtual archive created inside TROVE.

As of early 2018, well over 440 TROVE items have been tagged "Carl Linger"; use the following permalink URL to go to, or share, these tagged items:

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)


See also some important data, below, on Linger's late relationship with Mathilde Cranz, apparently not, as was sometimes claimed, a legal marriage, but nevertheless, one that produced a child.


*


It is sad, but fitting, that I found myself updating this entry on the days after 15 January 2017, the date of the death of Richard Divall, AO OBE, who was assiduous in his efforts to bring us all to a fuller knowledge of colonial music, but also of the historical Linger in particular.


For Richard's Linger editions (also listed separately below), see his important legacy at the Monash Digital Archive of Early Australian Music:

http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/music-archive/publications/#Music-Archive 


See also "Mrs. Carl Linger"; photograph supposed to be of Carl Linger's wife; his first wife, Wilhelmine (Minna), died of consumption in 1860; it is perhaps more likely to be his second common-law wife, Mathilde Cranz (Christiane Mathilde Hogrefe); State Library of South Australia

https://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/B+11213 




Documentation

See also below documentation relating to performances of individual Musical works


As generally in this site, the document transcriptions below preserve as closely as practicable the orthography of the originals, and spellings and other oddities are standardised or corrected only where confusion would otherwise arise.


  1849




23 March 1849, departure Hamburg, Linger (emigrant)


Letter, Carl Linger, Hamburg, to Dr. Moritz Lowinsohn, Berlin, 23 March 1849; State Library of South Australia, MS D 8003/1

https://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/D+8003(L)

https://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/D+8003/1(L) (DIGITISED)


*


7 August 1849, arrival Adelaide, Linger (immigrant)


"ARRIVED", South Australian Register (8 August 1849), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50248195

Tuesday, August 7 - The ship Princess Louise, 356 tons, Bahr, master, from Hamburg and Rio Janeiro. Passengers - F. Mucke, Dr. C. Mucke, wife, three children and mother-in-law . . . Linger, wife, brother and one child . . .


ASSOCIATIONS: Carl Muecke (fellow passenger); see also corrected and annotated Passenger list; on connections between the 1848 revolutions in Germany and the 1849 voyage, see also Jürgen Tampke, The Germans in Australia (2006), 17

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=_TNTocDZr0MC&pg=PA17 (PREVIEW)


30 August 1849, application for naturalisation as a British subject; certificate dated 1 September 1849

"SOUTH AUSTRALIA, No. 147. ALIENS NATURALIZED TO JUNE, 1872", Proceedings of the Parliament of South Australia . . . volume 3 (Adelaide: Government Printer, 1873), 9

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=zNdMAQAAIAAJ&pg=PR132 


  1850



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1850:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1850 


*


17 December 1850, concert, Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (pianist)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (17 December 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article206988436 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY. Under the Patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Young. GRAND CONCERT OF CHORAL AND MISCELLANEOUS MUSIC, AT THE EXCHANGE ROOMS, ON Tuesday, this Evening, Dec. 17th.
THE Committee have great pleasure in announcing that the Orchestra has been greatly augmented since their last Concert by several new and talented Performers, among whom are the principal MEMBERS of the LIEDERTAFEL, AND MR. J. W. DANIEL, Late Principal Tenor, and Conductor of the Bath Madrigal, Athenaeum, and Choral Societies.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture - "Samson" - Handel
2. Semi-Chorus and Chorus - "Lift up your heads" - Handel
3. Song - "Though I trace each verdant flower" - Haydn
4. Quartett - "The Lord will comfort Zion" - Haydn
5. Chorus - "O Lord, in thee have I trusted" - Mozart
6. Song - "See around the throne of God" (with Flute Obligato) - Mr. J. W. Daniel - Neukomm
7. Quartett and Chorus - "Judge me, O Lord," "I will give thanks," - Mozart
PART II. 1. Overture - "William Tell" - Rossini
2. Solo and Chorus - "Come with the Gipsy Bride" - Balfe
3. Cavatina with Flute Obligato, "I tuoi frequenti palpiti" - Pacini
4. Song - "The Gambler's Wife" - Russell
5. Trio - "The Curfew" - Attwood
6. Romanza - "O yes, I marked the secret tear" - Mr. J. W. Daniel - Donizetti
7. German Quartett
8. Chorus - "Vive le Roi" - Balfe
Leader - MR. F. W. OSBORNE.
Pianists - MRS. MURRAY and MR. LINGER.
Tickets 5s. each, to be had of Messrs Platts, D'Arcy, Dehane, at the Exchange, and of the Secretary. Children half-price. Doors to be opened at half-past Seven. Concert to commence at 8 o'clock. Books of Words, 6d each, may be had at the Door.
E. PARIS, Hon. Sec.


"CONCERT", Adelaide Times (18 December 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article206988442 

The Choral Society's concert of choral and miscellaneous music took place last night at the New Exchange. Among those present were the patrons of the concert, his Excellency and Lady Young, but the attendance was far from being numerous. The hall was lighted up more brilliantly and neatly than usual on such occasions, all the chandeliers being fancifully wreathed with garlands of variegated flowers. The proceedings commenced with Handel's overture of "Samson," which was executed with great steadiness and perfection. The semi-chorus and chorus of "Lift up your heads," from Handel, was given with well-regulated precision and effect, and was deservedly applauded. Mrs. Murray, in the song, "What though I trace," was in better voice than at her previous appearance, and she sang with good judgment; but we were particularly pleased with the sweetness of Mr. Linger's piano accompaniment. The quartett from Haydn, promised in the promised in the programme, was passed over, and Mozart's Chorus was given with some spirit at the conclusion, but otherwise with little effect. Mr. J. W. Daniel's song, "See around the throne of God," was sung with great confidence, but there was more power than sweetness in his voice, and the flute obligato was merely nominal. Mozart's quartette and chorus, "Judge me, O Lord," and "I will give thanks," concluded the first part, and was decidedly the gem of it. The conclusion of the chorus was particularly effective.

The second part commenced with Rossini's overture "William Tell," which was decently got through. The succeeding solo and chorus from Balfe, "Come with the Gipsy Bride," was tolerably well got through, and the cavatina with flute obligato was a dead and uninteresting affair, especially the obligato. The next was Russell's celebrated song, "The Gambler's Wife," which was sung fairly by Mr. Stephen; but Mr. Linger's accompaniment was miserable. The trio, "The Curfew," was tedious and lifeless, a characteristic of which Mr. Daniel's Romanza, "Una furtiva lagrima" also partook, but his good judgment, and being a new hand, secured to him an encore. It is but justice to him, however, to say that his second effort was a great improvement on his first, and the singer may be considered a good acquisition to the Society. A quartette, by members of the Deutsche Liedertafel, not set forth in the programme, followed, and was most deservedly encored. The last piece was Balfe's chorus, "Vive le Roi," from the "Siege of Rochelle," which was not at all equal to the concluding chorus of the first part. The company then sang "God Save the Queen," in which all present joined standing, which ended the concert.


MUSIC: probably recte "What though I trace each bud and flower" from Handel's Solomon; "Judge me, O Lord" and "I will give thanks to thee", from anthem Plead thou my cause, adapted by John Pratt from "Mozart's Twelfth Mass" (actually by Wenzel Müller); The gambler's wife (Henry Russell); the romanza from Donizetti's L'elisir d'amore.

PEOPLE & ORGANISATIONS: Josiah Wyke Daniel (tenor vocalist); Georgiana Murray (vocalist, pianist); Ferdinand Osborne (violinist, leader); Eugene Paris (secretary); Adelaide Choral Society (performers); Deutsche Liedertafel (performers)



  1851



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1851:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1851 


*


21 January 1851, concert, George Fischer (presenter); Linger (pianist, composer)


[Advertisement], South Australian Gazette and Mining Journal (18 January 1851), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article195941552 

UNDER DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE - GRAND CONCERT OF GEORGE FISCHER, On Tuesday next, the 21st instant, at the New Exchange.
PROGRAMME.
1. Overture - Don Giovani [sic] - by the Orchestra
2. Quartett and Grand Chorus - The Day of the Lord - Deutsche Liedertafel
3. Solo - Piano - H. Herz, with Quartett accompaniment - Mr. Ellard
4. Duet - Mendelssohn - Mrs. Murray and Mad. Cranz
5. Solo - Violin - Mr. Moore
6. Song - Mrs. Moore
7. Solo, Quartett - Members of the Liedertafel
8. Grand Chorus, with Trumpet accompaniment - Deutsche Liedertafel.
PART II.
1. Overture - Le Cheval de Bronze - Orchestra
2. Grand Chorus - Deutsche Liedertafel
3. Duet, Piano - C. M. v. Weber - Mrs. Murray and Herr Linger
4. Quartett - C. Linger - Messrs. Wallace, Hunerbein [sic], and Mater
5. Duet - Mad. Cranz and G. Fischer
6. Solo, Violin - 6th Air De Beriot - Mr. Wallace
7. Song - Mr. Ellard
8. Quartett Tirolienne - Mad. Cranz and Herr Cranz, Gentlemen Amateur & G. Fischer
9. Grand Chorus - Weber's celebrated Lutzow's Wild Chase - Deutsche Liedertafel
Tickets, 6s. each, to be had at Mr. Platts's, the principal hotels in town, and at the door. Concert to commence at eight o'clock.


"LOCAL NEWS", South Australian (24 January 1851), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71685907

Tuesday was an unfortunate evening for Mr. Fischer's concert. The sporting world had been engaged at Brighton, and the party at Government-house attracted most of the usual supporters of musical entertainments. Add to this the extreme heat of the day, which induced many to pass the evening at home. Thus the room was hardly half full, and the company, such as it was, consisted chiefly of Germans. We regret this, as Mr. Fischer deserves well of the musical public and his concert ought to have been profitable . . . The only other piece we need notice is a pianoforte duet from Weber, by Mrs. Murray and Herr Linger, which deserves every commendation. The whole was rather too long, it being eleven o'clock before the concert was ended.


ASSOCIATIONS: George Fischer (vocalist); Frederick Ellard (pianist, vocalist); Mathilde Cranz (vocalist); August Cranz (vocalist); Andrew Moore (violinist); Rachel Moore (vocalist); Spencer Wellington Wallace (violinist, flautist); August Huenerbein (instrumentalist); Charles Mater (instrumentalist)


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", South Australian Register (24 January 1851), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38437897 

The annual meeting of this society was held at the Freemason's Tavern, on Wednesday evening, Dr. Kent in the chair . . . The following report was read to, and adopted by, the meeting: - . . . The Committee have to express their warmest thanks to Mr. Murray and Mrs. Osborne for the zeal they have displayed for the welfare of the society in kindly offering their very efficient services gratuitously. The Committee have also much pleasure in stating the valuable addition which has been made in the orchestra by the admission of several of the leading members of the Liedertafel, Mr. Linger and Mr. Daniel . . .


*


9 April 1851, concert, Mrs. Edward Jupp (presenter): Linger (? pianist)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (8 April 1851), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38439327 

GRAND EVENING CONCERT. Under the Patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Young. MRS. EDWARD JUPP has the honour to inform her friends and the residents of Adelaide generally that her CONCERT of Vocal and Instrumental Music, under the direction of Mr. S. W. WALLACE, will take place on WEDNESDAY EVENING, April 9th, in the Commercial Exchange, King William street, when she will be assisted by Madame Allen, Mons. Del-Sarte (who has kindly offered his valuable assistance on this occasion), Mr. S. Wallace, Mr. F. Ellard, Mr. J. W. Daniel, Mr. C. Walsh, Herr Linger, Mr. Bennett, Herr Mater, Herr Huenerbein, Herr Keidle, Herr Ziegler, Mons. Paris, Mr. Osborne, Mr. Lee, Mr. Chapman, Mr. Harwood, Mr. McCullagh, the Messrs. Cobbin, &c. &c. Mrs. Jupp trusts that the above concentration of talent will ensure the patronage and support of the lovers of music in Adelaide and its vicinity . . .


ASSOCIATIONS: Mrs. Edward Jupp (vocalist, pianist); Charles Walsh (bass vocalist); George Bennett (pianist); Herr Keidel (instrumentalist); Herr Zeigler or Ziegler (instrumentalist); Philip Lee (violinist); William Chapman (violinist, brass player); William Harward [sic] (brass player); Robert McCullagh (brass player); William Cobbin senior and junior (violinists)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (21 May 1851), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38434977 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY. WE the undersigned Members, in accordance with with Rule number "15" of the above Society, providing for "Special General Meetings," request that a MEETING of the MEMBERS of the "ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY" may be convened for the purpose of revising the following Resolution, passed on the 14th of April by the Committee of the above Society:-

"Resolved - That Mr. Thurlow's letter, not containing any satisfactory reason for his absence, this Committee consider him no longer a Member of this Society, and that the same be communicated to him by the Secretary." And, for the further purpose of enquiring into the cause and justification of the above Resolution, we further request that the Minutes of the Committee, and all correspondence that may have passed in reference thereto, be produced and laid before the said Meeting, in order that the above Resolution may be decided by a majority of the Members present.

W. F. Osborne; Aug. Fried. Cranz; Redford Clisby; Wm. Harris; John Snaith; Wm. Chapman; Wm. Cobbin; C. Linger; Matthew Sharp; Robert Wiener; D. J. Hiskens; Amil R. Weber

To the Secretary of the Adelaide Choral Society. In accordance with the above Requisition, I do hereby convene a General Meeting of flic Members of the Adelaide Choral Society, for SATURDAY EVENING next, at 8 o'clock, at the Freemasons' Tavern. E. PARIS, Hon. Sec. May 13th, 1851.


ASSOCIATIONS: Redford Clisby (member)


*


17 September 1851, concert, German and British Hospital, Linger (pianist)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (17 September 1851), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38448674 

CONCERT IN AID OF THE FUNDS OF THE GERMAN AND BRITISH HOSPITAL.
THIS EVENING (Wednesday, September 17th) a GRAND VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT will be given at the EXCHANGE, King William-street (which has been kindly and gratuitously lent for the purpose by Mr. Parrot), by THE DEUTSCHE LIEDERTAFEL, assisted by a Grand Orchestra, and the principal Musical Merit of this colony, who have most liberally volunteered their services. The Concert will be under the immediate patronage of Lady Young, and the other Ladies who formed the Committee of the German and British Hospital.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture, "La Gazza Ladra," Rossini, arranged by Herr Huenerbein - Grand Orchestra.
2,. Grand Chorus, "March from Zoellner" - Deutsche Liedertafel.
3. Air from the Opera "Robert le Diable," Meyerbeer - Made. Caperre.
4. Solo, Pianoforte, "Caprice Brilliante," Herz - Mr. F. Ellard
5. Trio, "The Rural Elves," by Glover - Mrs. Murray, Miss Coglin, Mr. Daniels.
6. Solo, Flute, from the Opera 'La Fiancée," Auber - Mr. S. W. Wallace.
7. Romance, "Le Joli Petit Pied" - Mons. Del Sarte.
8. Song, from the "Bohemian Girl," Balfe - Mrs. Moore.
9. Grand Chorus, from the Opera "Euryanthe," C. M. v. Weber, with Bass Accompaniment by Messrs. Chapman, F. Coppin, Herren Huenerbein, Keidel, and Ziegler - Deutsche Liedertafel.
PART II.
1. Overture, "The Caliph of Bagdad," Boildieu - Grand Orchestra.
2. Song, "The Pretty Swiss," by G. Linley - Made. Francisca [sic] Allen.
3. Comic Duetto from "Cinderella," "Sir a secret," Messrs. G. Coppin and John Lazar.
4. Solo, Cornopean, from "La Boindine," [sic] - Mr. F. Coppin.
5. Comic Song, "A modern Young Lady's idea of Education,' by F. Parry - Mr. F. Ellard.
6. Solo, Violin - Mr. Moore.
7. Chorus, "The Bill of Fare," - Deutsche Liedertafel.
8. Symphony, from Beethoven - Grand Orchestra.
God save the Queen, given by the whole strength of the performers.
Pianists, Mrs. Murray, Messrs. Bennett, Ellard, Herr Linger. Director of the Deutsche Liedcrtafel, Herr Cranz. Tickets, 5s. each, to be had at Mr. Parrot's, Exchange; Mr. Platt's, Hindley-street; Mr. Dehane's, King William-street; Monsieur Paris's, Tavistock-buildings, Rundle-street; Mr. Schmidt's, Royal Exchange Hotel; the Blenheim Hotel; and at the door of the Concert Room. Doors' open at half past 7 o'clock; the Concert to commence at 8 o'clock precisely


ASSOCIATIONS: Madame Caperre (vocalist); Miss Coglin (vocalist); Camille del Sarte (vocalist); Frederick Coppin (instrumentalist); George Coppin (comic vocalist); John Lazar (comic vocalist); Francesca Allen (soprano vocalist)


*


15 October 1851, concert, Richard Bancroft, Linger (pianist)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (15 October 1851), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38440391 

THIS DAY. GRAND. VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT. UNDER THE DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE OF HIS EXCELLENCY THE LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR SIR HENRY AND LADY YOUNG. MR. R. BANCROFT respectfully announces to the Gentry and Inhabitants of Adelaide and its vicinity, that his FAREWELL CONCERT will take place, in the EXCHANGE, THIS EVENING (Wednesday), October the 15th, 1851. Principal Vocal Performers - Mrs. Murray, Madame Francesca Allen, Mrs. Bushell, Mr. J. W. Daniel, Mr. Mitchell, and Mr. Bancroft; the Choral Society and the German Chorus. Leader of the Band - Mr. W. F. Osborne. Pianists - Mrs. Murray, Mr. G. Bennett, and Herr Linger. Conductor - Herr Cranz . . .


ASSOCIATIONS: Richard Bancroft (vocalist); Rebecca Bushell (vocalist); Mr. Mitchell (vocalist)


*


19 October 1851, opening, Pirie Street Wesleyan Chapel, Linger (organist [? harmonium])


"OPENING OF THE NEW WESLEYAN CHAPEL", South Australian Register (20 October 1851), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38436148 

The weather yesterday was not propitious, but the attendances at the opening services, nevertheless, evinced the extreme interest which pervaded all ranks, and influenced Christians of every persuasion, to testify by their presence joyful sympathy with their Wesleyan brethren, and a desire to afford every manifestation of regard upon the occasion of very gratifying consummation . . . The choir from the (now) old chapel in Gawler-place had been voluntarily reinforced by able contingents from town and country congregations, and "Lift up your heads," &c., sung with fine effect, and accompanied by the organ, preceded the morning service; the same vocal and instrumental combination being subsequently employed in chaunting a delightful "Jubilate" between the prayer and the reading of the Scriptures . . . An immense number thronged around the entrance, anxious but unable to obtain admittance. M. Linger presided at the organ, which is pronounced to be a very fine instrument . . .


On the new chapel and organ, see:

"THE NEW WESLEYAN CHAPEL IN PIRIE-STREET", South Australian Register (18 October 1851), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38449537 

A permanent pipe organ, imported from London (now in Pilgrim Church, Adelaide), was not installed until 1855.



  1852



Currently there are no TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1852


Carl Linger, letter to his mother, from Adelaide, 20 March 1852, State Library of South Australia, MS D 8003/2

https://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/D+8003(L)

https://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/D+8003/2/1(L) (DIGITISED PAGE 1)

Translation by L. A. Treibel (Triebel 1963); typescript, State Library of South Australia

https://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/D+8003/2/TRANS1(L) (DIGITISED PAGE 1)

Adelaide, South Australia, 20 March 1852.

Dear Mother, At last, after 3 years, I am taking up my pen in order to give definite news of myself and family. It was not, however the few lines that Heinrich, who lived with Mad. Richter, recently brought me, that decided me to write; it is rather the circumstances and conditions which have completely changed and thereby altered my position. Of course I can tell from the little letter that unauthorized strangers ID report on my situation and, however sad the news may have been, I can only confirm it.

On leaving Berlin, I told everybody that as soon as things were going well with me here and I found them as reputed, I would at once write. If things went badly, I would not write, and this had indeed been the case. However, I prefer to give you an orderly account. We left Hamburg on 23rd. March 1849 and were at sea next day. The first few days on board are the worst: you haven't settled down; you can't get used to the available space and there is much disorder. The food and other things are strange but all this changes after you have been at sea a while. On 27 th. March, at 4 o' clock in the afternoon, my wife happily gave birth to a healthy girl. It was in the North Sea near the Island of Texel, latitude 53 - 50 North and longitude 5 - 4 East of Greenwich, whilst the seas were running high. The small creature was received with three hearty cheers by the passengers and crew, whilst the ship the "Princess Louise" had to be festively flagged.

Without anything noteworthy happening, we reached the South American coast on the day before Whit-Sunday, and towards evening, we entered the Harbour of Rio de Janeiro. I shall not embark on a description of the noble beauty and attraction of this spot, otherwise my letter might become many pages in length. Here we, passengers for the most part, left the ship. For ourselves, I rented a rural dwelling on the hills, from where I could overlook the city and the splendid Harbour with its bay. Here we lived for 10 days in the enjoyment of nature and went on short excursions into the hills. Up to now our journey had been rather slow but from this point on, things moved all the faster and a strong wind carried us quite close to the tip of Africa. The Cape of Good Hope was doubled during a moderate storm. Without untoward occurrences, we sailed past Kangaroo Island and entered Port Adelaide on 7th August.

Ours was an exceptionally long voyage, for which the blame lay partly with the captain's carelessness and partly with the quarrel between him and the helmsman. Other ships after us often made the journey in 90 days and even in 78 - 82 days from England. At the end of our journey, I must honestly say that there is no real danger in a long sea journey, only the ship must be a good one, the captain at his post and you yourself must be of good cheer. Boredom is really the worst thing. Seasickness is unimportant and many don't get it at all (Minna, for example, had no trace of it. I felt unwell for just one day and Hermann for a day and a half.) Everybody, even those who were seasick throughout, were afterwards all the stronger and healthier.

Having arrived in Adelaide, I first tried hard to find work as a music teacher but no one held out any hopes for me, partly because the country generally is not as yet very advanced culturally, and partly because I had not as yet mastered the English language. On the contrary, I was told that only land and its ownership were the soundest financial investment. All this determined me to purchase a parcel of land, 80 acres in extent, from a gardener, who claimed to know his business perfectly and promised me the world. The spot was quite well chosen, 18 miles (a 4-hour walk) from Adelaide and half that distance from Gawlertown. The allotment lay in the Munno Para at the end of a wood, in the plain, at 1 1/2 hours distance from the hills. A small portion of it had trees, the rest was cleared. The soil was very good but we had been mislead as regards water, as in the two wells, 65 and 38 feet deep respectively, we found the water to be very bad indeed. Here we started building, erected a house costing over 60 pounds, (400 Taler) felled trees, dug the land, ploughed, planted potatoes, manured the soil, etc.

However, it turned out that my partner had not invented gunpowder, and had up to now been a lazy worker, who if possible deterred others. Our money soon ran out and we got into debt. No further progress resulted and as I soon realized that we had too much land and were not equally keen, indeed were not at all suited to each other, I separated from my partner and left him half the land, kept the house and inventory but also most of the debts. Now I set myself to work hard, during the most intense heat of the January and February sun I fenced in all my land alone, axed the trees and split the wood myself. Such a fence is most important, it must be strong and durable in order to keep off animals even bulls. I acquired cows, calves, pigs, hens, etc. Now butter and cheese were produced, eggs sold things were beginning to show progress.

However, I had bad German neighbours, friends of my former partner, who did me every possible harm. Finally, when they interfered violently with my animals and my best cow was killed through them, I decided, whatever might happen, to go to the city and try my fortune there. I had lived for 1 1/2 years on the land and toiled, had borne troubles and care, had seen my wife wasting away as she was unaccustomed to the hard work and physically unfitted for it. Our child was ill, unable to live or die, a doctor and medicines were difficult to obtain, there was no money, scarcely any proper food, and now quarrels began with neighbours. This had led to lawsuits, they were of course punished but I got nothing. We had endured all this within a short time. I left my wife in the country with her brother, Hermann Komoll, and with 16 Groschen (two shillings) in my pocket I made for the city to chance my luck.

Three days later I appeared at a public concert, but of course, with my rough woodcutter's hands, I could do no more than sing and accompany the violin. However, from the way in which I performed, people sensed the musician differing from earlier exponents. I tuned pianos and soon adapted myself to this business, which together with the notation of music scores, brought in money. Moreover, I was asked to play dance music in English private society circles. I accepted and earnt money. Three weeks later I had my wife and child come to town. During this time I had not only supported myself and had a pair of boots soled but had already been able to pay off 21 Taler (Dollars ?) in debts.

An English lady, Mrs. Murray, herself as well trained as a professional musician, took a special interest in me. She obtained lessons for me and through her effort I had access to the best English families, where I instructed; soon I had no time to tune pianos and play dance music, which, incidentally, is nothing less than a disgrace. Here it is especially the case that work, of whatever kind, is honourable; hence the German nobility plays a very sad role here and is held in contempt.

I leased out my land but was cheated over it. The lessee was a disreputable fellow and ran away. I was held responsible for the very high interest and got nothing from the land, which I therefore surrendered to meet the debt on it. I had sufficient other debts to pay. In this way I had staked my whole wealth and had a debt of almost 700 Taler (Dollars?) hanging over me. All the toil and hardship on the land had been in vain, all our cares and sorrows were fruitless.

A new life began for me in the city. Here I have ample work, I am now well off, earn more money than I ever did during my eminent, I, am generally at ease, with the prospect that things will be even better when conditions improve somewhat, as hey may well do within a few months. During the 14 months that I have been living in the city, I have made headway: I have no more debts, have bought new furniture and a magnificent instrument for 300 Talers, (Dollars?) have sent my wife for 2 months to the Bay at the seaside and I, am now again living in a beautiful house, very respectably, on North Terrace near the Governor, with the park and the river Torrens in front of me, the hills to the right and the sea on the left. If God in His goodness will grant me further health and strength, for I have to work very hard, I can within a few years see a lovely goal reached: Full independence, ensuring me a peaceful retreat for my old age at the foot of the hills, where I shall grow vegetables and fruit for our domestic use and lead a life of pleasurable ease. So much for myself and my circumstances.

My wife, although no longer ill, is still rather weak. As yet, she will not have a servant, maids are very expensive here,- it is her opinion that we should not think of comfort until we have saved rather more. Our daughter, who when we landed from the ship at Adelaide, was baptised and named Luise Marie Feodore has, with God's help, and our careful nursing and attention, grown into a pretty, healthy little girl. All day long she eats drinks and plays in the yard. She chatters equally well in German and in English and now tells everybody that her dear Granny is coming tomorrow. My brother-in-law, Hermann, is also very well. He stood by me faithfully on the land and endured much, if not everything, together with us. Just six days ago he left for the goldfields in order to try his luck. Many thousands just now are acquiring a fine capital sum there within a short time. He, too, might do so. In September, (Spring), I may give my pupils 3 months holiday and go there myself, where gold nuggets are to be found. Even if he had no luck, anyone can earn about 10 Taler (Dollars?) a day and the work is not so hard for the man who can and will work. Your few lines, Dear Mother, pained very, very deeply and caused me many a sad hour.

How greatly has so much changed for the worse in so short a time! Still cannot bring myself to understand that fate, dear Mother, has dealt so harshly with you. But be undismayed, perhaps a way out can here also be found, with God's help.

It will be clear to you, dear Mother, that I can't return from here to disturbed Europe, for what prospects of advancement could I find there? In any case I would first have to look for work and wages there, which I have in full measure here. With all my efforts and straining, I was unable to earn as much as I do now. Therefore please accept my heartful thanks for the help you offered me. The offer means as much to me as if I had received it. Now I come to the most important thing of all. It would be my warmest wish to see you here and if you were to be able to make the decision to come, you would be received by us with open arms. I think it would not be so impossible. As I have already remarked, the sea voyage is not so bad and even less dangerous. One survives the hundred days. Only your eyes would be a difficulty, which might, however, also be overcome. You would have to bring a person, best of all a respectable girl, with you, one whose fidelity and reliability you have tested for yourself and who would dutifully look after you on the journey. If such a person could be found, you could in any case assure her of free passage. On her arrival here, a respectable girl would find not one but ten positions in which she would certainly be four times better off than in Germany under the same conditions. If you should not know where such a person is to be found, I would propose Marie, my wife's youngest sister, now 18 years old and a girl with a quiet, modest disposition and of fine feeling. She might perhaps be inclined to come to us. I shall willingly repay her passage money and other expenses, whilst I do not in the least fear for her future here. Not only is there a great need of decent servants but also of young German housewives. You could certainly discover the whereabouts of this Marie if you applied to my brother-in-law Ehrenberg and he would, I feel sure, undertake the necessary correspondence.

The best time for leaving Hamburg is October or November, again. If the matter takes longer, March or April. But, as regards your coming, you should not delay overlong, this letter, according to my calculations, will have reached you before the end of June. You would of course have to sell everything at any price and keep only the necessary clothes, two dark suits and a warm cloak, a good bed with a horsehair mattress, and as much laundry as is needed for the journey. In all, as little luggage and as few small cases as possible. You should act as follow with your money: give notice regarding it at Brunzlow's and then, through a reliable man, for example, my friend W. Ebel, who will receive a letter from me by the next ship, or H. Dallach, Uncle Linger, etc., write and make the whole business known to the firm of Blass and Schomburgk, Neueburg in Hamburg, considered to be one of the best. Tell them to change all your money, with bills of credit on the South Australian Banking Company in London. Even so such bills of exchange and papers present great difficulties here as everything is so different and they often run the risk of considerable loss. That's why you have to pay 2% extra which unimportant. Such bills is 52 made out in triplicate: you receive the first and bring it; the second goes by another ship and I receive it; Blass and Schomburgk in Hamburg keep the third in case the first two are lost. Further, Blass and Schomburgk must book your passage hither. Also my advice is to take no other ship than one of the best of Peter Godefroi and Son’s in Hamburg. These ships are all commanded by reliable captains and are good in every respect. They are well and plentifully provisioned. Nearly all the captains are polite and obliging men. I know several of them here. These ships of Godefroi's are praised by all passengers here and no one has heard any complaint. Even the steerage is good and cabins are excellent. I would, dear Mother, recommend the second, or, if need be, the first cabin for you. Your money would also be advantageously invested here and earn more interest than in Germany, as here the usual, not usurious rate of interest is 20%. That will not always remain so, now that we have so much gold and money here but we can still reckon on 10 to 15% over some years. Just think this over for yourself and consider your position in Berlin: think, too, of the great joy that would be ours, if we had you here with us.

The country is a good one, offering many amenities; the climate, like central Italy's, is also good and especially suited to elderly people. The heat is not insufferable and the winter consists of only 4 to 5 weeks of rainy weather. The soil is very fertile. We have all the European fruits in excellent quality. Bread and meat are excellent and cheap. If my wish should be fulfilled and I should soon have a property in the hills, how grand it would be for us to share everything with you. Then you could, after your years of trouble and hardship, spend the evening of your life in peace, with your children and grandchildren near you. Just try and set about it in earnest; you will see that it can be carried out.

Now I must think of ending. Greetings to all my friends, relatives and acquaintances, especially to my brother and Otto; if you have the opportunity, give our greetings also to Agthes [sic] and Otto in Artillery Street, to Dr. Wilde, Wm. Ebel at 37 Sebastian Street, my Brother-in-law Ehrenberg and his Wife, Dr. Loewinsohn, the Linsens and all friends. Best wishes to Aunt Rosa and her daughter. I did not think that Uncle Rosa would leave us so soon. I was shocked at Dorta [sic] Koch's death. It was to be foreseen that her son August would become a fine fellow. Perhaps he'll turn up in Australia some day. Now farewell and do meanwhile soon give us cause to rejoice at the news that you will come.

You're loving son and daughter, Carl and Minna Linger.

P.S. Letters from here go quickest by Overland mail and for Berlin they go cheapest via Trieste. Letters for here come quickest, not by Overland, but via London, from where ships leave every week. We can't frank any letters here but pay only the sea postage. Please pardon the poor quality paper. The letter was to be thin one, My permanent address is: Mr. C. Linger, Adelaide, South Australia, North Terrace [sic] near Scotch [sic] Church.

[P.P.S.] Also I, my dear Mother, send from abroad hearty, fond greetings and kisses, and combine my request with that of my husband, namely that I very soon may be able to take you into my arms. Until then, look after yourself, and favour us with the joy of seeing each other again. Minna Linger.



  1853



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1853:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1853 


*


1 March 1853, concert, Frederick Strebinger, Linger (pianist, accompanist)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (1 March 1853), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38461889 

PROGRAMME of MR. STREBINGER'S CONCERT, Exchange Rooms, on TUESDAY EVENING, March 1st, 1853; to commence at half-past 7 o'clock.
PART I.
Concerto (1st), Violin, Mr. Strebinger - De Beriot.
Air du Val d'Andore, Mr. B**** - Halevy.
Air from Figaro, Mme. Cranz - Mozart.
Romance, Un auge an bord de mon chemin, Mr. C**** - Arnaud.
Romance, with Violin Obligato, Mme. Cranz - Fruehlings Wanderschaft, Mr. Strebinger - Kucken.
PART II.
Solo, Violin, Rondo Russe, Mr. Strebinger - De Beriot.
Romance, Si Loin, Mr. C**** - Henrion.
Song, The Nightingale's Death Song, Mme. Cranz - Lodge.
Romance, Le Docteur Noir, Mr. B**** - Abadie.
Solo,. Violin, Fantasie sur la Marche d'Otello, Mr. Strebinger - Ernst.
Mr. Linger will preside at the Piano.
Tickets, 5s. each, may be had at Platts's Library, York Hotel, Freemasons' Tavern, and of Mr. Strebinger, Exeter Hotel.


"M. STREBINGER'S CONCERT", Adelaide Morning Chronicle (4 March 1853), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66450798 

On Tuesday evening last a concert was given at the Exchange by a new aspirant for Australian honors in the person of M. Strebinger . . . Madame Cranz sang her best, and M. Linger presided at the piano . . .


ASSOCIATIONS: Frederick Strebinger (violinist)


*


14 April 1853, concert, Mathilde Cranz (benefit), Linger (pianist, accompanist, composer, arranger)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (14 April 1853), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38458626 

CONCERT. MADAME M. CRANZ'S CONCERT will take place at the Exchange, THIS EVENING, Thursday, 14th April, under the patronage of His Excellency and Lady Young.
PROGRAMME.
PART FIRST.
1. Jubel -Ouverture, for Pianoforte, Weber - Mrs. Young and Mr. Linger.
2. Scena and Air, from Der Freischutz, Weber - Mad. Cranz.
3. Chorus, Im Walde, Kücken - German Chorus.
4. Duetto, The Sailor's Sighs, Balfe. Mr. Murray and Mr. J. W.Daniel.
6. (By desire) Fruehlings Wanderschaft, - Cornopean obligato, Kücken - Mad. Cranz and Mr. Chapman.
6. Two Vocal Quartette, a) Die Nelken und die Rosen; and b) Die Nachbarin, Linger and Bank- Mrs. Murray, Mad. Cranz, and Amateurs.
7. Ballad, I would not if I could forget, Hawes - Mr. J. W. Daniel.
8. Serenade and Studenten Gruss, Adam and Berner - German Chorus.
PART SECOND.
1. Ouverture from Tancred, Rossini - Mrs. Murray and Mr. Linger.
2. Chorus, Kuessen und Weinen, Otto - German Chorus.
3. Duetto, Treibe Schifflein, treibe, treibe, Kücken - Mrs. Murray and Mad. Cranz.
4. The Standard Bearer, with Cornopeon obligato, Lindpaintner - Mr. J. W. Daniel, Mr. Chapman.
6. Chorus and Quartett, Die jungen Musikanten, Kücken - German Chorus.
6. Solo for the Pianoforte, Fantasie militaire, from La Fille du Regiment, Herz - Mrs. Murray.
7. Quartett, Over the dark blue Waters, from Oberon, Weber - Mrs. Young, Mad. Cranz, and Amateurs.
8. God save the Queen, Solo, Quartett, and Chorus, written expressly for this Concert, Carey and C. Linger.
Mr. Linger will preside at the Piano.
To commence at 8 o'clock precisely. Tickets 5s. each, to be had at Messrs. Dehane's, Platts's, at the usual places, and at the residence of Mrs. Cranz, North terrace, East near the Scotch Church. Books of the words, in English and German, will be mid at the doors. In consequence Mr. Strebinger's departure for Melbourne the above programme has unavoidably suffered some alterations.


"MADAME CRANZ'S CONCERT", Adelaide Observer (16 April 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158093517 

. . . The evening's amusements were concluded with a new version of the National Anthem, written expressly for this concert. We were not surprised to perceive that few Englishmen attempted to join in the parody. Those who have long learned to venerate the beautifully simple strains of God Save the Queen, could only regard as a sort of profanation any attempt to embellish so bright a gem of our national genius with adornments foreign to the melody and the harmony of that spirit-stirring anthem . . .


"MADAME CRANZ'S CONCERT", Adelaide Times (16 April 1853), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207011728 

Oh Thursday evening last this Concert came off at the Exchange. The room was crowded to excess, the whole of the seats being occupied, and the intermediate spaces densely packed. His Excellency and Lady Young with a great number of the Government coterie, were present, as were also many of the principal city families. An apology was made for Mrs. Murray, whose name was down in the programme for several pieces, on the score of indisposition. What the malady was that prevented the attendance of the fair musician, we know not; but we sincerely trust that it was not one of that singular class, almost peculiar to vocalists, the symptoms of which are so latent that their appearance is generally concurrent with that of the matured disease, and is manifested in full virulence on the eve of a concert. Fortunately enough, in this instance, the audience did not suffer from Mrs. Murray's involuntary defection, for although the programme had to be in some slight degree departed from, the number of pieces was not lessened.

The Concert commenced with a pianoforte version of Weber's Jubilee Overture, arranged for four hands, which was done full justice to by Mrs. Young, a debutante, and M. Linger. The effects of this brilliant composition cannot be properly rendered on the pianoforte at any time, and in this instance the particular instrument used was by no means a good one. Madame Cranz, whose appearance upon the platform was hailed with loud applause, gave the difficult scene from the Freischutz with her accustomed ability, and was well accompanied by M. Linger. This lady subsequently sung a pretty little English triple with Mr. Daniel, and the piece narrowly escaped an encore. Several German chorusses were given by the Liedertafel, with their usual spirit and precision; the corps however appeared to be rather weak in the middle voices, and the crowded state of the room, by preventing any reverberation, greatly marred the effect of their performance. The training of this little band of true musicians is admirable, there is no "bolting," and their ensemble is generally all that can be wished for. There are some splendid voices among them, and we may include in this category the brilliant ringing alto of M. Rodeman, and the rich bass of M. Weiner. The selection of chorusses was not as a whole fortunate. Although the conductors of the Concert had so far provided for the enlightenment of the English section of the audience, as to have caused translations of the German libretti to be published, yet the music of Berner and Kuken which is totally destitute of originality, palls on ears accustomed to receive with delight the beautiful and over fresh melodies of the glee composers of their native land. The repertoire of the Liedertafel no doubt contains the standard chorusses of the great German musicians, and it would be a much greater treat to an English audience to occasionally hear a selection from them. The wild melody of Weber, the grandeur of Beethoven, the voluptuous strains of Mozart, the serene and plaintive beauty of Mendelssohn, and the richly organized harmonies of Spohr, would be sure to be fully appreciated; and we fearlessly assert that the German chorus are equal to the rendering of what we ask of them. We trust, therefore, that at the next public performance of the Liedertafel, we shall find that our hint has not been thrown away, and that the programme will not be choked up with the titles of pieces of so meretricious a character as those which were announced fur performance on Thursday.

Mr. J. W. Daniel did his utmost in the morceaux entrusted to him; this gentleman's voice is not, however, sufficiently powerful to do justice to the the spirited though hackneyed song, "The Standard Bearer." The second Overture, "Tancredi," was given too slowly, and the lady performer appeared to be suffering from nervousness.

The concert concluded with the National Anthem, harmonized for the occasion by Mr. Linger. The ornate vocalization of the performers was not at all relished by their English auditory, and indeed the innovation was not pleasant. The simple yet grand melody of Dr. Bull requires no deviation from the usual score, and any attempt to embellish it has always proved a signal failure. It was so in this instance, for although the air of England's great musical prayer is well enough known over the continent of Europe, yet the noble words to which it has been allied, form so great a part of the whole effect, that any elaboration of the original music must inevitably mar it.

The absence of instrumental music was greatly felt, but this, we are bound to say, was no fault of Madame Cranz or her advisers. The promoters of the Concert had, as they imagined, secured the services of Mr. Strebinger, whose recent successful debut in the colony as a violinist, we recorded at the time of its occurrence. That gentleman, however, probably disgusted at the want of support which he experienced, has, since the first publication of the programme, left the colony for Melbourne, where it seems his talents are more likely to meet with substantial appreciation. We are happy to state that since the Concert, we have learnt that more than five hundred tickets were sold, and that the fair beneficiaire will have a surplus of at least £100.


ASSOCIATIONS: Mrs. Young (pianist)


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21 June 1853, concert, Deustche Liedertafel, Linger (pianist, accompanist)


"THE LIEDERTAFEL", South Australian Register (23 June 1853), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38465435 

This much admired musical institution of our German fellow-colonists, established four years ago, gave a most handsome and agreeable entertainment on Tuesday evening last, in the saloon of the Hamburg Hotel, which was fitted up by Mr. Koepke, expressly for the occasion, in a style which combined exquisite taste with effective display. The middle part of the handsome apartment was decorated with the flags of England and Germany harmoniously blended, while at the upper end the combination of drapery formed a beautiful pavilion, which was provided with a fine toned piano, surmounted by a lyre, and embellished by a pleasing arrangement of vases, with bouquets and branches of the palm and the olive, and several emblematical designs. In the pavilion the members of the Liedertafel took their stand, and performed some of their most striking national chorusses. Madame Cranz having offered her valuable assistance, several scenas from Don Giovanni were most effectively given, Herr Linger presiding at the piano. The guests, to the number of about 100, comprising the principal German families in Adelaide, were then ushered into the supper-room, where they did full justice to a sumptuous repast, which was enlivened by the strains of harmony and song of the Fatherland, among which Am Rheim am Rheim was a deserved favourite. The supper was followed by a ball, and dancing was kept up with great spirit until the hours of early rising in the morning. Altogether it was admitted to have been one of the pleasantest reunions of German families from the commencement of the colony.


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24 June 1853, concert, North Adelaide Mechanics' Institute, Linger (pianist, accompanist)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (20 June 1853), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207012861 


"NORTH ADELAIDE MECHANICS' INSTITUTE", Adelaide Observer (25 June 1853), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158094218 

. . . Last evening a lecture on chemistry was delivered by Henry Watson, Esq., to a numerous and highly respectable audience, in the Lodge-room behind the Queen's Head, in North Adelaide, Peter Cumming, Esq., President, in the chair . . . After the lecture a very interesting musical treat was given, in which Messrs. Linger and Daniels and Madame Cranz were the chief performers. The general feeling expressed on the occasion was one of unmixed gratification, particularly as it was understood that a similar intellectual entertainment would take place at no distant period. We hope this example will not be lost upon the members of the South Adelaide Mechanics' Institute.


"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE", Adelaide Times (16 December 1853), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207122019 

. . . IMPORTS. Cargo per Colibri - 8000 bricks, Order; 1 pkg Mathews: 192 cases, 2 sample ditto, Amsberg and Co; 16 cases toys, 1 ditto ribbons, 4 ditto cotton handkerchiefs, 1 box samples, 2 ditto merchandise, 1 sample parcel, 1 case, 2 pkgs, Amsberg and Co; 1 case, Linger . . .



  1854



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1854:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1854 


*


18 July 1854, concert, Mrs. Young, Linger (pianist, accompanist, composer, teacher)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (18 July 1854), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207016711 

GRAND EVENING CONCERT. Under the Patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Young. MRS YOUNG begs to announce that her first CONCERT of Vocal and Instrumental Music, under the patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Young, will take place on TUESDAY, the 18th instant, at the Pantheon, King William-street.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
Overture, Don Giovanni - Mrs. Young and Mr. Linger - Mozart. Scena and Aria, "Clemenza di Tito" - Madame Cranz - Mozart.
Solo, Pianoforte, "Non Piu Mesta" - Mrs. Young - Herz.
Song, "Scenes that are Brightest" - Miss Pettman - Wallace.
Duett, Cornopeans, "Deh, Conte" (Norma) - Messrs. Chapman and McCullagh - Bellini.
Song - Mr. Daniels.
Song, "You'll Meet me, won't You" (by particular desire) - Miss Pettman.
Variations, Pianoforte, with accompaniments - Miss Rowe (pupil of Mr. Linger) - Herz.
PART II.
Overture, "The Combat with the Dragon" - Mrs. Young and Mr. Linger - Linger.
Duetto - Madame Cranz and Mr. Daniels - Linger.
Solo, Cornopean, with accompaniments - Airs, Sonambula - Mr. McCullagh - Bellini.
Song - Miss Pettman.
Solo, Pianoforte - Mrs. Young. Variations from "Norma" - Czerny.
Song - Mr. Daniels.
Scena and Aria - Madame Cranz - Linger.
National Anthem, Pianoforte - Mrs. Young, with accompaniments.
Doors to be opened at 7 o'clock, and to commence at half-past 7. Tickets, 5s; Reserved Seats, 8s; to be had at the Pantheon; Mr. Platts, Hindley-street; Mr. Henry Watson, Chemist, North Adelaide; and of Mrs. Young, Wiltshire-buildings, Wellington-square, North Adelaide.


"MRS. YOUNG'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (19 July 1854), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49201372 

The grand concert announced for last evening was not only honoured by the attendance of His Excellency and Lady Young, but the intimation of their patronage seemed to have been remarkably successful, in aid of professional inducements, in securing a highly respectable and very numerous attendance. The programme was adhered to as closely as possible, and to those absentees who were favoured with a copy, it will only be necessary to state that Mrs. Young's performances as a pianiste were much and deservedly admired. The flattering but onerous tribute of the encore was first conferred upon Miss Petman, who sang "You'll meet me, won't you?" with great taste and feeling. Miss Rowe (a pupil of Mr. Linger's) only in her twelfth year, gave many gratifying proofs of the successful culture of musical talent; her performance on the pianoforte, with accompaniments, having been greatly admired. Mr. Daniel's first song enlisted the favour of the audience, and after his appearance in the duetto with Madame Cranz, it was ditlieult to say whether the warmest greetings and plaudits were intended for the fair and much admired vocalist or himself. The applause elicited by the duet, cornopeans - by Messrs. McCullagh and Chapman - manifested the popular desire to encourage the production of harmonious sounds, whether vocal or instrumental; and the Concert, altogether, was a pleasing instance of successful design, supported by excellent performances, and perfected by the results of very judicious arrangements.


"MRS. YOUNG'S CONCERT", Adelaide Times (20 July 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207016744 

The lovers of good music had on Tuesday a treat which they have not enjoyed since the days of Ellard and Wallace; and we were delighted to see that a crowded audience had assembled in anticipation of it. We had had the Overtures to Tancredi and Fra Diavolo over and over again, ad nauseam, and hailed the performance of the noble Overture to Don Juan as the prelude to something of a higher class than we have lately heard. We were not disappointed; it was followed by the delicious air from La Clemenza di Tito, sung by Madame Cranz to Mr. Linger's accompaniment, in the true spirit of the composer. The novelties of the evening were the selections from a piece entitled "Der Kampf mit dem Drachen," a dramatic poem of Korner, which Mr. Linger has set to exquisite music. Mr. Linger is a zealous disciple of Mozart, and having said that his melodies lost nothing by following two of the favourite productions of his great master, it is unnecessary to add more to their commendation. The overture, brilliant and rich in harmony, was beautifully played by himself and Mrs. Young. The voices of Madame Cranz and Mr. Daniels blended sweetly in the duet, and if the scena lost anything of its effect, it was from the evident nervourness of Madame Cranz, consideration for which alone prevented an encore. The great ease and absence of "thump" in Mrs. Young's execution imparts a peculiar charm to her playing, but we could have wished that she had chosen some less hackneyed piece for its display then Kerry's "Non piu mesta." Messrs. MacCallagh and Chapman performed two pieces on cornopeans, which were warmly and deservedly applauded. Miss Pettman's song, "You'll meet me" was encored, for what particular merit, either in the singing or composition, we did not understand. A pupil of Mr. Linger's, Miss Rowe, who made her debut, as a pianiste, gave considerable and satisfactory proof of her own cleverness and of the excellence of her teacher's system of tuition. Sir Henry and Lady Young were present, and the room was crowded by those of our citizens who generally congregate on occasions where good music is to be listened to, and a beneficent purpose effected.


ASSOCIATIONS: Mary Ann Pettman (vocalist); Louisa Jane Rowe (pianist)


*


3 August 1854, concert, Mrs. Edward Jupp, Linger (pianist, composer)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (3 August 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207017031 

EVENING CONCERT. - Under the Patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Young. MRS EDWARD JUPP Has the honour to inform the residents of Adelaide generally, that her CONCERT of VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC Will take place in MR. GREEN'S NEW EXCHANGE, King William-street, THIS EVENING, August 3rd, On which occasion she will he assisted by the principal members of the profession.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture, "Tubal," Mrs. Young and Mr. Linger (C. M. Weber).
2. Song, "Pretty Flower," Mrs. Jupp (Halevy).
Song, "Shall I wasting in Despair," Mr. J. W. Daniel (H. Phillips).
4. Scena and Aria, "Through long dull Years," Madame Cranz, by desire (Linger).
5. Rosellen's celebrated Reverie in G., Mrs. Jupp.
6. The Song of Charlotte Stanley, Miss Chalker (Glover).
7. Duetto, "The Swallows," Madame Cranz and Mr. J. W. Daniel.
PART II.
1. Overture to "Zampa," Mrs. Jupp and Mr. Bennett (Herold).
Duetto, "M'Abbracia," Miss Chalker and Mr. Mitchell (Rossini).
3. Song, "Sweet May," Mrs. Jupp (Kuchen).
4. Song, Mr. Daniel.
5. Song, When Sorrow Sleepeth," Miss Chalker (E. Lamb).
6. Fantasia Brilliante, Mrs. Jupp (Herz).
7. Song, "Andie Bluman," Madama Cranz (Walfram).
Song, "Wanted a Governess," Mrs. Jupp (Parry).
9. National Anthem.
Mrs. Jupp begs to state that Miss Horn having received her Harp from England, has kindly offered her assistance on the occasion of her Concert this evening.
Doors open at half-past 7; to commence at 8 o'clock. Tickets, 5s. each; can be obtained from the Secretary of the New Exchange; Dr. Franks, King William-street south; the Exchange and York Hotels; Mr. Dehane, King William-street; Mr. Dale, Hindley-street; Mr. G. T. Light, Rundle-street; and at Mrs. Jupp's, Mill-street, adjoining the Adelaide Steam Mills.


ASSOCIATIONS: Marie Chalker (vocalist); Annette Horn (harpist); Mr. Mitchell (vocalist)


*


11 October 1854, concert, Mary Ann Pettman and William Chapman (presenters), Linger (pianist)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (11 October 1854), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207018507 

THIS EVENING. GRAND EVENING CONCERT. MISS PETTMAN and MR. W. CHAPMAN beg to inform their friends and the public generally, that they will give a GRAND CONCERT of Vocal and Instrumental Music on the evening of WEDNESDAY, OCT. 11th, 1854, at the PANTHEON, King William-street, for which occasion MR. P. LEF. has kindly offered his services, as also the following well-known talent: -
VOCALISTS:
Miss Chalker, Miss Pettman, and Mr. Marshall (being his first appearance.)
INSTRUMENTALISTS:
1st Violins - Mr. P. Lee and Mr. Chapman
2nd Ditto - Mr. Wm. Cobbin, jun., Mr. Watts and Mr. Mark Thayer, who has also kindly offered his services.
Viola - Mr. W. Cobbin, sen.
Violincellos - Mr. J. R. Smith and Mr. Swift
Contra Bass - Mr. Betteridge.
Cornet-a-Piston - Mr. McCullagh.
Flutes - Mr. R. Clisby and Mr. Phillips.
Oboe - Mr. Sumsion.
Pianists - Mrs. Young and Mr. Linger.
PROGRAMME.
PART 1.
1. Overture, Don Juan, Orchestra - Mozart
2. Song, My Father Dear, Miss Pettman - S. Nelson
3. Song, England, England, Glorious Land, Mr. Marshall, his first appearance
4. Solo, Cornet a Piston, Cavatina, from the Opera Romeo and Juliet, Mr. McCullagh - Bellini
5. Song, Dream on Young Hearts, Miss Chalker - Sporle
6. Song, the Maid of Switzerland, Miss Pettman - J. H. Tulley
7. The Star of the Night Valses, Orchestra - Par Charles D'Albert.
An interval of fifteen minutes.
PART 2.
1. Overture, Il Barbiere di Siviglia, Orchestra - Rossini
2. Song, An Angel Bright, Miss Pettman - Donizetti
3. Quartette, Slow Movement, Messrs Chapman, Watts, W. Cobbin, Sen., and J. R. Smith - Haydn
4. Song, Miss Chalker
5. Solo, Pianoforte, La Pluie de Perles, Mrs. Young - Osborne
6. Song, England, Home of Freedom, Mr. Marshall - Hopkinson
7. Song, As if you didn't know, Miss Pettman - L. Phillips
8. The Etna Galop, Orchestra - Par Charles D'Albert.
Tickets, 5s each, Reserved seats 7s 6d, to be obtained at Platts's Library, Hindley-street; Hugall, Confectioner, Hindley-street; Wigg's Stationery Warehouse, Rundle-street; Hill's Berlin Wool Repository, Rundle-street; Mr. W. D. Wigzell, Fruiterer, Rundle-street, near Plough and Harrow; Barnard's Exchange; and at the Pantheon. Doors open at half-past seven, to commence at eight o'clock. September 30.


ASSOCIATIONS: Mr. Marshall (vocalist, ? = Samuel Marshall); James Watts (violinist); Mark Thayer (violinist); John R. Smith (cellist); Thomas Swift (cellist); Henry Betteridge (double bassist); Mr. Phillips (flautist) Mr. Sumsion (oboist)


*


27 October 1854, concert, Adelaide Choral Society (presenter), Linger (director, conductor, pianist)


Linger had only very recently assumed the directorship of the Adelaide Choral Society, following the death of its previous director, George Bennett, on 22 September 1854, aged 37.


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY", South Australian Register (26 October 1854), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49204283fChoral

The Society's next concert is fixed for to-morrow evening, under the able leadership of Mr. Linger. The rehearsal last evening was very satisfactory. Several clever instrumentalists have recently joined the Society.


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (27 October 1854), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207018934 

THIS EVENING. ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY. - Under the patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Young. The Subscribers of the above are respectfully informed that their next QUARTERLY CONCERT will take place on FRIDAY EVENING next, 27th instant, at the Hall of the Freemasons' Tavern, Pirie-street, when the following Programme will be performed: -
PART I.
1. Overture, "Othello" - Rossini
2. Chorus, "Hunter's Farewell to the Wood" - Mendelssohn
3. Cavatina, "Still Live on," from Anna Bolena - Donizetti
4. Duo, Harp and Piano - Donizetti
5. Quartett, "Pieta de Noi" - Martini
6. Chorus, "The Minstrels" - Gährich
An interval of ten minutes.
PART II.
7. Symphony - Haydn
8. Song, "The Bride's Greeting" - Curschman
9. Dun, Harp and Piano - Bochsa
10. Duet, "Farewell" - Bellini
11. Chorus, "The Parting Hour" - Mendelssohn
12. Song, "Merry Zingara" - Balfe
13. Glee, "Hail, Magic Hours" - Macfarlane
National Anthem.
Conductor, Herr Linger.
Doors open at a quarter past 7; performance to commence at 8 precisely. Subscribers must produce their tickets.
W. COBBIN, SEN., Hon Sec. October 23, 1854.


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", Adelaide Times (28 October 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207018951 

The Quarterly Concert of this Society was given last evening, in the room adjoining the Freemasons' Tavern, and was, notwithstanding the extreme sultriness of the weather, crowded to excess. The performances evidenced a steady progress on the part of the Society, which was more especially apparent in the greatly increased strength of the orchestra. We have not space to notice in detail the various parts of the programme; but we may state that the audience appeared much gratified with the singing of Miss Chalker and Mr. Mitchell, as well as with the performances on the harp and pianoforte by Miss Horne and Mr. Linger. Two causes for dissatisfaction must be mentioned, namely, the smallness and inadaptibility of the room for musical requirements, and the excessive time spent in tuning the instruments. We recommend these important points to the attention of the management as susceptible of amendment.


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (30 October 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49201686

The Society's quarterly concert, on Friday evening, at the Freemasons' Tavern, was well attended notwithstanding the extreme heat of the atmosphere. Many who were unable to obtain seats, being captivated by the performance in general, or well disposed to linger, watched the orchestral performances, and applauded, as he deserved, the new conductor. The several pieces included in the programme were performed with more than usual accuracy, and the advantages of the Society's reorganization were more strongly manifested than on any previous occasion since that event. The improvement among the instrumentalists was marked by the superior manner in which Haydn's symphony was performed; and the duo, harp and piano, by Miss Hall [recte Miss Horn] and Mr. Linger, captivated the audience. Miss Chalker never sang better or more judiciously, her very fine voice having been employed with skill and discrimination throughout, and not too exclusively with a view to startling effect. The success of the concert, however, ought not to preclude criticism, and under this impression we may be allowed to say the chorus singers are too apt to imagine that, having command of the volume of sound, they cannot issue it too extensively. This is a great mistake, and it is to be hoped that a gentle remonstrance, most kindly intended, will not discourage efforts calculated (under judicious control) to render the periodical performances of the Society highly acceptable and excellent.


*


22 December 1854, concert, Adelaide Choral Society (presenter), Linger (director, conductor)


"MUSICAL", South Australian Register (9 December 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49198731 

The fourth quarterly concert of the Adelaide Choral Society is expected to take place on Friday evening, the 22nd instant. Several additional instrumentalists have recently joined the orchestra, which is now more powerful than at any previous period since the establishment of the society. The vocal department has also received an accession to its numbers, particularly as to the soprano. Under the able leadership of Mr. Linger, there is every probability that the coming concert will be a brilliant affair. The Choral Society recently established at North Adelaide, continues its rehearsals every Wednesday evening, at Christchurch School-room. There are about 30 members connected with the orchestra, principally vocalists. This society can scarcely be considered as a rival to that of South Adelaide, inasmuch as it is established for the special, if not exclusive cultivation of sacred music. Mr. Greenwood, the organist of Christchurch, is the leader, and Mr. Lillywhite, the conductor. A code of laws has been agreed upon, for the regulation of the society, in which hitherto the greatest harmony has prevailed. The vocal department includes no fewer than from 10 to 12 ladies, whose sweet soprano and contralto voices contribute in no small degree to produce those mysterious influences which harmoniously blended voices exercise on the rapt auditor, and by which "the captive soul is charmed away."


ASSOCIATIONS: North Adelaide Choral Society; William Lillywhite (conductor); Samuel Greenwood (leader)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (22 December 1854), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207020434 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY. - Under the Patronage of his Excellency and Lady Young. Subscribers to the above are respectfully informed that the Society's FOURTH and LAST CONCERT of the season will take place at Green's Exchange, King William-street, on Friday Evening, 22nd inst. The following is a Programme of the intended performances:
PART I.
1. Overture, "Clemenzie de Tito" - Mozart
2. Harmonised Song, " Outshining Day" - Mendelssohn
3 Song, "The Gipsy Girl" - Glover
4. Glee, "Let us, my Lesbia" - Smith
5. Song, "The Forest Queen" - Nelson
6. March and Chorus, from Tito - Mozart
An interval of ten minutes.
PART II.
7. Symphony, No. 7 - Haydn
8. Glee, "Hail Ever-pleasing Solitude" - Alcock.
9. Chorus, "Glory to the Caliph," from Oberon - Weber
10. Rondo, "Down, Down a Thousand Fathoms Deep" - Keller
11. Aria, with Chorus, from Tancredi - Rossini
12. Chorus, "The Gipsies find a Home Somewhere" - Balfe
Finale, "God Save the Queen."
Conductor - Herr Linger.
Doors open at half-past 7. Performances to commence at 8 o'clock precisely. Subscribers will please deliver their tickets. W. COBBIN, SEN., Hon. Sec


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (23 December 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49202979 

It is little more than a year ago that about half a dozen gentlemen, including Dr. Kent, C. Mann, Esq., and G. Stevenson, Esq., met at the Freemasons' Tavern, to consider the best means to be adopted for the reorganization of the Choral Society, then almost defunct. For more than two years, it might have been said, "the Temple of Apollo has been shut up; the harp and the lyre remain unstrung upon its untrodden floor, and the voice, of joy and gladness, no longer reverberate within its precincts." But the genuine lovers of "music's mystic numbers," though discouraged by the obstacles which beset their path, determined to persevere. Hope, "with eyes so fair," urged them onwards, "and still it whispered promised pleasure, and bade the lovely scenes at distance, hail!" The "little band," with a determination which refused to be baffled or repulsed, profited by a train of circumstances, which issued in the re-establishment of the Society.

The fourth quarterly concerts was performed last evening at Green's Exchange, King William-street. But the most sanguine of those who interested themselves in the re-organization of the society at the commencement of the year could have anticipated the pleasure of witnessing at its close so numerous, efficient, and well-trained an orchestra as that which assembled last evening, comprising, as it did, performers on the pianoforte, eight violins, a viola, violoncello, double-bass, three flutes, clarionette, three cornopeans, and a trombone; besides more than twenty vocalists, of whom nearly one-half were ladies. The performance was commenced with Mozart's Overture, "La Clemenzie di Tito," which, with the other instrumental pieces in the programme, was performed with more than usual spirit and precision, and evinced the care with which the performers have been trained by their leader, Herr Linger. Miss Chalker sang Hobb's beautiful song, "The Captured Greek," with great taste and feeling, though an apology was made on her behalf, in consequence of a slight indisposition, and but for which it was evident that a hearty encore would have been awarded her. Miss Petman sang Nelson's "Forest Queen" in the first part, and we think was never heard to greater advantage. The triumphal march and chorus, from Mozart's "Tito," concluded the first part, and was certainly performed with greater accuracy and spirit than any other piece during the evening. It deserved the encore, which was rather injudiciously bestowed on the air and chorus from "Tancredi," in the second part.

Several glees were given during the evening, which served agreeably to vary the performance. "God save the Queen," was, of course, the finale. We do not know whose arrangement was selected, but its great defect was its redundancy. The composer had evidently attempted to polish the diamond, and in doing so has marred its brilliancy. Yet, notwithstanding this, and a few other slight blemishes observable during the evening, the concert was undoubtedly the best ever given under the auspices of the Choral Society.



  1855



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1855:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1855 


*


14 February 1855, concert, Linger (pianist, conductor, composer)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (14 February 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49308713 

GRAND CONCERT. - Under the patronage of His Excellency the Officer administering the Government, Mrs. Finniss, and J. H. Fisher, Esq., M.L.C.
Mrs. MITCHELL begs to inform her friends and the public in general that she purposes giving a GRAND CONCERT, at Neales's Exchange, King William-street, on WEDNESDAY Evening, the 14th instant.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture, "Figaro," Mr. Linger and his pupil Miss Rowe - Mozart.
2. "Soare Immegine," Mrs. Mitchell - Mercadante.
3. Duo, "Fo L'udia," from Torquato Tasso, for Harp and Piano (by desire), Miss Horne and Mr. Linger - Donizetti.
4. Fruhlings wanderschaft, with Cornopean, Mad. Cranz and Mr. Chapman - Kirchner.
5. "My Pretty Page," Mrs. Mitchell and Amateur - Bishop.
6. Divertissement for Piano, with Quartetto, Miss Rowe - Herz.
Interval of fifteen minutes.
PART II.
7. Overture, "The Combat with the Dragon," Miss Rowe and Mr. Linger - Linger.
8. Scena, "Il Soanè e bel contento," Mrs. Mitchell - Pacini.
9. Trio, "Forse un' destin," for Harp, Violin, and Piano, Miss Horn, Messrs. Chapman and Linger ... Bochsa.
10. Songs, "Shells of Ocean," "Wilt Thou be My Bride, Kathleen," (by desire), Mrs. Mitchell.
11. "Voglen mein Rose," with obligato Violin, Mad. Cranz & Mr. Chapman - Kucken.
12. Italien Notturno, "Vadda in bando," Mrs. Mitchell and Amateur ... Paer.
Conductor - Herr Linger.
National Anthem.
Single Tickets, 7s. 6d. each; Family Tickets, 5s. each. may be had at Wigg's, or of Mrs. Mitchell, Grenfall-st., corner of Hindmarsh-square.


"MRS. MITCHELL'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (15 February 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49304932 

The attendance last evening at Neales's Exchange was very large, and the spacious room was well filled. His Excellency the Acting Governor and suite arrived precisely at 8 o'clock, but from some unexplained cause the audience was detained for full 20 minutes beyond the time before a note was struck, with the exception of the harmonious tones produced by the tuning of instruments. At length, however, Mrs. Mitchell was introduced by J. H. Fisher, Esq., who in the kindest terms intimated that that lady was so much indisposed as to have been urged by her medical adviser to refrain from attending that evening. Mrs. Mitchell had determined, however, to exert herself to the utmost in acknowledgment of the very flattering attendance with which she had been honoured. The programme was strictly adhered to: but it was evident from the first that Mrs. Mitchell sang with difficulty, and this impression during her execution of the celebrated operatic parts she had selected became anxious and even painful. Mrs. Mitchell evidently had to contend with an afflicting visitation, and it was therefore difficult to form an adequate opinion as to her vocal capabilities. We hope ere long to have an opportunity of hearing Mrs. Mitchell under more favourable circumstances and in better voice. Miss Rowe, a very young lady, and one of Mr. Linger's pupils, was greeted with considerable applause during her performance on the pianoforte with her accomplished tutor. Her execution is remarkably even and correct; but some of the finest passages in the first part were scarcely heard, having been overpowered by the more vigorous touch of Mr. Linger. Madame Cranz sang in both parts of the concert with her usual good taste, and was deservedly applauded. But the pieces which most delighted the audience were Bishop's, "My Pretty Page," and an Italian duetto (Vada in bando), in both of which Mrs. Mitchell and a gentlemen amateur were the vocal performers, accompanied by Herr Linger on the pianoforte. They were both loudly encored. Thu performances were closed shortly before 11 o'clock by the National Anthem.


ASSOCIATIONS: Madelina Forbes Mitchell (vocalist);

*


30 March 1855, concert, Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor)


"CHORAL SOCIETY", South Australian Register (29 March 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49304184 

We remind the subscribers to the Choral Society and the lovers of music generally, that the first quarterly concert for the season will be held to-morrow evening in Green's Exchange. It is to be wished that intellectual and harmless amusements were more frequent in Adelaide, and better supported. A large race of young colonists is springing up, and unless rational recreations are provided for them, it will be no matter of wonder if they should seek amusements of a more questionable kind, and form habits which must rather tend to lower than to raise them in the scale of society. It is a matter of regret that the Choral Society should ever have been suffered to fall into abeyance; for among amateurs continued orchestral practice is especially requisite for concerted pieces. It is now, we believe, so thoroughly revived, that there is little chance of any further suspension; but of course the attendance and encouragement of the colonists will greatly tend to secure the double object of the Society's prosperity, and the frequency of its public concerts. The programme for to-morrow is judiciously selected; and the last rehearsal took place yesterday evening, when the performers, both vocal and instrumental, about forty in number, under Mr. Linger's leadership, acquitted themselves in a style which promises a very brilliant display on Friday.


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (30 March 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49301823 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
Under the Patronage of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.
Subscribers to the above are informed that the FIRST QUARTERLY CONCERT of the season will take place on FRIDAY EVENING next, 30th March, 1855, at Green's Exchange.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. National Anthem
2. Overture, "La Prisoniere" - Mehul.
3. Chorus, "Come, gentle Spring" (from the Seasons) - Haydn.
4. Song, "Should he upbraid" (with orchestral accompaniments) - Bishop.
5. Solo, Violin - De Beriot.
6. Song, "Beautiful Flower, Herald of Spring" - Cherry.
7. March and Chorus from "Tancredi" - Rossini.
An interval of ten minutes.
PART II.
8. Symphony, Grave, Allegro, Andante, with variations and finale - Haydn.
9. Song, "The Lonely Harp" - Cowell.
10. Chorus, "Victoria, Hurrah" (from "Der Freischutz") - Weber.
11. Prize Glee, with Chorus, "Music, Love, and Wine" - Farmer.
12. Song, "Dream no more of that sweet time" - Linley.
13. Duet from "Norma" - Bellini.
14. Chorus, "To thee doth Rome owe Liberty" - Spontini.
Conductor - Herr Linger.
As only a limited number of tickets will be issued, Subscribers for the past year who wish to renew the same are requested to forward their names and addresses to the Secretary immediately, as on no account will money be taken or tickets issued at the doors. Intending Subscribers are requested to furnish themselves with tickets, to be obtained of Mr. Snaith, Hon. Secretary, Leigh-street; or of the Secretary of Green's Exchange. Doors open at half-past 7 o'clock. Concert to commence at 8 o'clock precisely. None but Members of the Orchestra will be admitted at the back entrance to the Exchange in Gilbert-place J. SNAITH, Hon. Sec.


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", Adelaide Observer (31 March 1855), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158102881 

The Adelaide Choral Society's first quarterly concert of the present year, which took place last evening at Green's Exchange, was exceedingly well attended. Nearly every seat in the body of the hall was filled shortly after the doors were opened; and before the first note had been struck it was found necessary to occupy the corridor which surrounds the upper part of the edifice. The performances commenced with the National Anthem, arranged as a solo, semi-chorus, and chorus, with full orchestral accompaniments. This fine production of musical genius, which will never grow old whilst a Briton lives to appreciate the sterling compositions of his native land, was performed in excellent style, and produced a thrilling effect. It was followed by the overture "La Prisoniere," in which the several instrumentalists acquitted themselves admirably, even in the execution of the most elaborate passages. The instrumental band is upon the whole well balanced, though it would be still further improved by the addition of two or three more bass instruments, which would serve as a counterpoise to the shrill notes of the brass instruments, and add a depth of tone and vigour to the whole. The overture was succeeded by Haydn's beautiful chorus from the Seasons, "Come Gentle Spring," after which Miss Chalker sang one of Bishop's touching melodies, "Should he Upbraid," in which this lady's fine soprano voice was heard to great advantage. This was succeeded by a solo on the violin, performed by one of the gentlemen amateurs of the orchestra. As we listened to the brilliant tones produced at the commencement of the solo, and marked the rapidity of execution with which it closed, we thought we had heard in South Australia nothing equal to the performance since the visit of the accomplished violinist Ravac to this colony. With regard to the performance of the remaining concerted pieces included in the programme, we may remark that the performers, both vocal and instrumental, well deserved the plaudits bestowed upon them, severally and conjointly. There were indeed some defects, which discernable by the dullest ear, particularly in the symphony, with which the second part opened, and which had apparently not been sufficiently rehearsed. Miss Petman was deservedly encored in the song "Beautiful Flower," which formed a portion of the first part of the programme. This lady is fast rising in general estimation as a public vocalist. Her voice possesses considerable compass, and her articulation is remarkably distinct. In the second part Miss Chalker was also highly complimented after Cowell's touching ballad "The Lonely Harp," in which her remarkably sweet soprano voice was heard to great advantage. The performances were closed at half-past 10 o'clock, by the performance of the spirit-stirring chorus "To thee doth Rome," in which the whole strength of the orchestra was very effectively engaged.


ASSOCIATIONS: Leopold Ravac (Rawack) (violinist, visited Adelaide, 1846)


*


29 May 1855, concert, Marie Chalker, Linger (conductor)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (28 May 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49307205 

VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT.
MISS CHALKER has much pleasure in announcing that her SECOND ANNUAL CONCERT will take place at the Exchange on Tuesday next, 29th May, when she will be assisted by Miss Pettman, Mr. J. Daniel, and the CHORAL SOCIETY.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture, "La Clemenza di Tito" (Mozart).
2. Song, Miss Chalker.
3. March and Chorus from "Clemenza di Tito" (Mozart).
4. Song, "The Rival Cavaliers" (Glover), Miss Petman.
5. Duet, "Bright Morn is Breaking' (Romer), Miss Chalker and Amateur.
6. Glee, "Hail, Magic Hours," Miss Chalker, Mr. Mitchell, Amateur, and Mr. J. W. Daniel.
7. Piano, Waltz, "Helene," a Lady Amateur.
S. Solo and Chorus, "Gipsies' Tent" (Cooke).
An Interval of a Quarter of an Hour.
PART II.
1. Overture, 'Otello' (Rossini).
2. Duet, "Ah, se de mali miei" (Rossini), Miss Chalker and Mr. Mitchell.
3. Song, "Beautiful Flower" (Cherry), Miss Petman.
4. Duet, Cornopeans, Messrs. Chapman and McCullagh.
5. Trio, "Here's a Health to the Outward Bound" (Barker), Miss Chalker, Mr. Mitchell, and Mr. J. W. Daniel.
6. Duett, "The Conscript's Return" (Glover), Miss Chalker and Mr. J. W. Daniel.
7. Solo and Chorus, "Song of the Danube" (Glover), Miss Chalker and Chorus.
Finale, "God save the Queen."
Conductor - HERR LINGER.
Leader - MR. CHAPMAN.
Tickets, 5s.; to be obtained at the Exchange, Mr. Platts's, Hilton & Co.'s Printing Office, and of Messrs. Mitchell & Snaith, Leigh-street. Doors will be opened at half-past 7, Concert to commence precisely at 8 o'clock. None but members of the Orchestra will be admitted by the Gilbert-place entrance to the Exchange.


"CONCERT", Adelaide Observer (2 June 1855), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158103818 

Miss Cbalker's second annual concert took place on Tuesday evening at the Exchange. It was exceedingly well attended, the body of the hall being completely filled by a most respectable audience. The programme included no fewer than sixteen pieces of music, by composers of high reputation, including Mozart, Rossini, Glover, and Cooke. The performances were commenced by the Overture to Mozart's "Titus" and when we state that the large force of the instrumentalists connected with the Choral Society was present, under the able leadership of Herr Linger, it will be readily believed that full justice was done to this masterly effort of musical conception. The same remark is equally applicable to the performance of the no less difficult and elaborate Overture to Rossini's "Othello," which formed the first piece in the second part. We question whether a more efficient corps of amateur instrumentalists exists in any of the Australian colonies than that which contributed so much to the success of this concert. The first overture was followed by Glover's "Oh, not for me," which was sung by Miss Chalker with remarkable power, consummate taste, and judgment. We do not remember any occasion on which we have heard that lady to greater advantage. Scarcely had the echoes of her fine voice died away on the ear, before the stately march and full chorus from the Opera of "Titus" transported the thoughts and sympathies of the audience to the startling scenes and circumstances of ancient times, when assembled warriors raised the enthusiastic shout -
"Preserve, ye gods, great Titus,
Our true friend and deliverer."
The performance of the chorus embodying the above words was truly excellent, and produced a thrilling effect upon the audience. We cannot, in this brief notice, allude particularly to each of the other pieces included in the programme; but we must not omit to state that Miss Petman sang, during the evening, two of the genuine ballads in which she so much excels. These were "The Rival Cavaliers" and "Beautiful Flowers" in both of which she fully sustained her former reputation. The latter, especially, was enthusiastically encored. The performance of a "lady amateur" on the piano was received with marked expressions of approbation. Her performance combines firmness and delicacy of touch with rapidity of execution, and gives promise that by careful training the now youthful pianist will in a few years become a highly accomplished performer on that instrument. Amongst the other pieces which were most successfully performed may be mentioned a duet, "Ah, se de mali miei," by Miss Chalker and Mr. Mitchell, Cooke's solo and chorus, "The Gipsy's Tent," "The Outward Bound," and "The Conscript's Return." The three last-named pieces were loudly encored. The national anthem concluded the performances, and reflected no small degree of credit upon the collective efforts of the performers.


*


6 July 1855, concert (2nd quarterly), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor, composer)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (5 July 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49297375 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
- Under the Patronage of His Excellency Sir R. G. and LADY MACDONNELL. - Subscribers are respectfully informed that the Second Quarterly CONCERT of the Season will take place at the Exchange, King William-street, on Friday Evening next, the 6th July, when the following programme will be performed:-
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture, "The Interrupted Sacrifice," - Winter.
2. Serenade, "Maiden, Listen," - Adam.
3. Duet, "A Voice from the Waves," - Glover.
4. Chorus, "Flowers and Fragrance," - Geyer.
5. Song, "Song for Song," with Violin obligato - Molique.
6. Trio - Violino, Piano, and Viola - Mozart.
7. March, Recitative, and Chorus, from "Oberon" - Weber.
PART II.
8. Symphonie - No. 3 in G - Haydn.
9. Song, "Smiling Faces," - Glover.
10. Chorus, "Terror is Spread," from "Tancredi," - Rossini.
11. Duet - Introduction, from "Figaro," - Mozart.
12. Glee, "Spirit of Nature," - Fawcett.
13. Aria, "Through long dull years," with Orchestra - Linger.
14. Chorus, "Raise high your Voices," from "Alexander's Feast" - Handel.
Conductor, Herr Linger. Leader, Mr. Chapman.
Doors open at half-past 7; the Concert to commence at 8 o'clock precisely.
JOHN SNAITH, Hon. Sec.


"CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (7 July 1855), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49301225 

The quarterly concert of the Choral Society at the Exchange, yesterday evening, was more fully attended than any other of the series. Lady MacDonnell and suite arrived at a few minutes after 8, and among the numerous visitors we observed the talented vocalists Madame Carandini and Mons. Coulon. Her Ladyship was received with every mark of respect, and the performances were immediately commenced by the magnificent overture to Winter's "Interrupted Sacrifice," which was given with precision and spirit. The serenade "Maiden, listen" is a sentimental affair, of no great merit, and gained very little admiration; but Glover's solo and duet, "A voice from the waves," made ample amends. It was most effectively sung by Miss Chalker and another lady, who, we understand, had never before appeared in public as a vocalist. The words will interest those of our readers who remember "Dombey and Son," or who have heard the popular duet, to which it is in reply, "What do the wild waves say?" as sung by the Misses Birch or the Misses Williams:- . . .

Mr. Chapman's violin obligato accompaniment to "Song for Song" merits especial attention. The concluding march from Oberon, with the recitative and chorus, "Hail to thee, Knight," which formed the finale to the first part, was executed in a manner reflecting the highest credit on the amateurs. The second part commenced with Haydn's beautiful symphony, No. 3 in C [sic], most admirably performed; after which Miss Chalker sang "Smiling faces" so sweetly as to surround herself with the objects of her commendation, and to elicit a rapturous encore. Another very successful piece was a composition by Mr. Linger, consisting of a soprano solo, with orchestral accompaniments, entitled "Through long dull years," and performed by Miss Petman and the band. The plaintive strains with which the piece commences were strikingly contrasted by the vigorous and elaborate construction of that part of the composition which follows the opening movement. Miss Petman performed even the most difficult passages of the song with marked precision; but her voice was at times scarcely audible above the united tones of about 30 instruments. At the conclusion she was loudly applauded, and greeted, with a general encore. Handel's spirit-stirring chorus, "Raise high your voices," from Alexander's Feast, formed the finale; for, by a strange oversight, the national anthem was wholly omitted.


ASSOCIATIONS: Maria Carandini (soprano vocalist) Emile Coulon (bass vocalist)


*


July - August 1855, Maria Carandini and Emile Coulon season, Linger (pianist, conductor, composer)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (25 July 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207071930 

ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE.
MADAME CARANDINI'S BENEFIT. POSITIVELY THE LAST APPEARANCE OF HERSELF AND MONS. EMILE COULON In South Australia,
(As they leave for Melbourne on Saturday),
Owing to the inclemency of the weather, is unavoidably POSTPONED till FRIDAY EVENING, JULY 27, 1855.
When they will be assisted by MISS CHALKER AND HERR LINGER, The latter having kindly volunteered his services to conduct the Orchestra and Preside at the Piano. Also, will be produced, Scenes (in character) from DONIZETTI'S SPLENDID OPERA OF THE "DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT".
PROGRAMME.
PART FIRST.
Celebrated Overture, from the Opera "Othello" (Orchestra) - Rossini
Ballad - "I Strive to Forget Thee," Miss Chalker - Linley
Aria Buffo, "Figaro, Barber of Seville," Mons. Emile Coulon - Rossini
Recitative and Air - "Fly Hence, each Idle Fear," from the Opera "Matilda," with Violin Obligato and Piano, Madame Carandini, Mr. Linger, and Mr. Chapman - Wallace
Ballad - "The Captive Greek Girl," Miss Chalker - Hobbs
Ballad - "I Cannot Sing To-night," Madame Carandini - L. H. Lavenu
PART SECOND.
Selections (in Character), from Donizetti's Opera, THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT.
Maria (Daughter of the Regiment) Madame Carandini
The Marchioness - . . .
Sulpizio (Sergeant) Mons. E. Coulon
ACT FIRST.
Overture - Orchestra
Scena and Aria - Sergeant Sulpizio
Military Song - Maria
Grand Duetto - Maria and Sulpizio
Scena and Aria Finale - Maria
ACT SECOND.
Introduction - Orchestra
Song - "Vive l'amour et le Cognac" - Sulpizio
Grand Scena and Aria - "All this Splendour" - Maria
Grand Trio Finale - Maria, Marchioness, and Sulpizio
Conductor - Herr Linger
Leader - Mr. Chapman.
Prices of Admission - Parquette and Dress Circle, 7s. 6d.; Upper Boxes, 3s. Seats may be secured by applying at the Theatre between the hours of 10 and 3 o'clock. Doors open at a quarter-past 7; Concert to commence at 8 o'clock precisely.


MADAME CARANDINI'S BENEFIT", South Australian Register (28 July 1855), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49293800 

The Theatre was crowded last evening in every part, and the fair beneficiaire had, as she so well deserves, "a bumper." The entertainment was all - and more - than the programme promised. The orchestra was complete, and evidently well practised, while the pianoforte accompaniment to the singing by Herr Linger was all that could be desired. Madame Carandini was in exquisite voice, Mons. Coulon in excellent spirits, consequently the performance gave intense delight to probably the largest audience ever assembled in the Theatre. With the inimitable acting of Coulon, and the thrilling notes of the fair cantatrice still haunting us, a lengthened notice of the concert may well be excused. We must say, however, that those who were not present lost a treat which will not, we fear, soon be equalled; and we may add the hope, as the Havilah will not be dispatched for some days, that Madame Carandini and Mons. Coulon may be induced to give another performance. Even if the term for which the Theatre was taken has expired, we may remind Mr. Griffin, the energetic and courteous manager, that the Exchange in King William-street, might possibly be secured for one or more evenings.


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (31 July 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207072115 

NEALES'S EXCHANGE.
THIS EVENING, TUESDAY, JULY 31.
IN consequence of the unavoidable detention of MADAME CARANDINI AND MONS. EMILE COULON in Adelaide, and the prior engagement of the Theatre, they will have the honour of appearing at the above room
FOR ONE NIGHT ONLY IN A GRAND CONCERT,
on which occasion Madame Carandini will sing the QUEEN'S LETTER, and some of her most favourite Ballads, in addition to which the Services of MISS CHALKER have been secured. Also, a FULL and EFFICIENT ORCHESTRA will be in attendance, conducted by Herr Linger; Leader, Mr. Chapman.
PROGRAMME.
PART FIRST
Overture (Orchestra) - Rossini.
Ballad - "Remember Thee," Miss Chalker - Mrs. Mackinlay.
Grand Aria, from the Opera "Le Chalet," Mons. Emile Coulon - Adam.
Recitative and Air - "Fly Hence, each Idle Fear," from the Opera "Matilda," with Violin Obligato and Piano, Madame Carandini, Mr. Linger and Mr. Chapman - V. Wallace.
Ballad - "Farewell," Miss Chalker - T. O. Allman.
Aria - "Le Nozze di Figaro," Mons. Emile Coulon - Mozart.
Ballad - "Why do I Weep for Thee," Madame Carandini - Wallace.
PART SECOND.
Overture (Orchestra) - Rossini.
Celebrated Duetto - "L'Elisire d'Amour" - Madame Carandini and Mons. Emile Coulon - Donizetti.
Ballad - "Friends of my Youth," Miss Chalker - G. Barker.
Aria Buffo - "Miei Rampolli," Mons. Emile Coulon - Rossini.
Ballad - "The Irish Emigrant," Madame Carandini - G. Barker.
Ballad - "Think of Me," with Accompaniment on the Violin, Miss Chalker and Mr. Chapman - Lachner.
French National Hymn - "LA MARSEILLAISE" (by desire), Mons. Emile Coulon
Celebrated Song - "THE QUEEN'S LETTER," Madame Carandini - Hobbs.
Price of admission, 7s. 6d. Tickets may be had at the Exchange-room, between 10 and 3 o'clock, and at the doors, on the night of the Concert. Doors open at a quarter-past 7; to commence at 8 o'clock.


"CONCERT AT THE EXCHANGE", South Australian Register (1 August 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49300356

Madame Carandini and Mons. Coulon gave a concert last evening in Neales's Exchange, assisted by Miss Chalker, Herr Linger, and a full orchestra. The pieces selected for Madame Carandini were sung with exquisite taste and great effect, and we need scarcely say that she was vociferously encored in every one of them. In the "Irish Emigrant," for which, when called back, she substituted, by desire, "Coming thro' the Rye," she received a double encore. Those who have heard this lady will long remember her fine powers of vocalization, and those who have not heard her have missed a treat such as does not often present itself to them. Mons. Coulon was, as usual, well received. He was warmly encored in the "Marseillaise," which he sung with much spirit. Miss Chalker sung with her accustomed sweetness, and the orchestral performances added greatly to the general effect. We may remark that the Adelaide special correspondent of the Argus has not done justice either to Madame Carandini or our own citizens, in saying that her concerts have been but thinly attended. She has, in fact, drawn by far the largest audiences that ever assembled within the Theatre. It is true that on one or two occasions the inclemency of the weather kept many away; but, on the whole, we think neither Madame Carandini nor Mons. Coulon see any reason to regret their visit to Adelaide. As a proof that they are as satisfied with their success as the public have been delighted with them, we may state that Mr. Griffin has induced them to perform for five more nights at the Theatre. It is, we understand, the intention of this spirited gentleman to restore the house to its original arrangement of boxes, pit, and gallery. He will produce vaudevilles and operatic pieces, in which Madame Carandini will perform with Mons. Coulon, aided by competent assistants. The price of admission will be reduced to a scale so reasonable, that every one who has "music in his soul" may enjoy an entertainment, the like of which we may not for some time see again.


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (3 August 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207072246 

ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE.
N. L. GRIFFIN, SOLE LESSEE AND MANAGER. FIRST NIGHT OF THE OPENING. REDUCTION OF PRICES.
The Manager has great pleasure in announcing to the Public generally, that he has secured the services of those justly Celebrated Artists, MADAME CARANDINI, AND MONS. EMILE COULON FOR FOUR NIGHTS ONLY Who will appear in OPERA, VAUDEVILLE, FARCES, &c. Also, the services of Mrs. LAMBERT, Mr. Melville, Mr. Ransford, Mr. Buckingham, Mr. Williams, Mr. Wesser, Messrs. Russell and Young.
THIS EVENING, FRIDAY, AUGUST 3, 1855, will be produced,
Two Acts of DONIZETTI'S Opera of the DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT! To conclude with the Splendid Comedietta, entitled PERFECTION, or the LADY OF MUNSTER! as performed by MADAME CARANDINI, through all the Colonies upwards of One Hundred Nights! Kate O'Brien - Madame Carandini.
To commence with Selections (in character) from DONIZETTI'S SPLENDID OPERA of the DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT!
Maria (Daughter of the Regiment) - Madame Carandini
The Marchioness - ...
Sulpizio (Sergeant) - M. Emile Coulon.
ACT FIRST.
Overture - Orchestra
Scena and Aria - Sergeant Sulpizio
Military Song - Maria
Grand Duetto - Maria and Sulpizio
Scena and Aria Finale - Maria
ACT SECOND.
Introduction - Orchestra
Song - "Vive l'amour et le Cognac" - Sulpizio
Grand Scena and Aria - "All this Splendour" - Maria
Grand Trio Finale - Maria, Marchioness, and Sulpizio
Conductor - Herr Linger
Leader - Mr. Chapman.
To conclude with the celebrated Comedietta entitled
PERFECTION; Or, THE LADY OF MUNSTER.
In the course of the piece, Madame Carandini will Sing the following Songs: - "I'll be no submissive Wile," "Lend unto Time thy Wings," "Kate Kearney," and the Celebrated Waltzing Song, "When Harmony Awakens."
Characters:
Charles Paragon - Mr. Melville.
Sir Lawrence Paragon - Mr. Buckingham.
Sam - Mr. Ransford.
KATE O'BRIEN (Lady of Munster) - MADAME CARANDINI
Susan - Mrs. Lambert.
Conductor, Herr Linger. Leader, Mr. Chapman.
PRICES REDUCED, as follows: - Boxes, 5s.; Pit, 3s.; Gallery, 2s. Seats may be secured by applying at the Theatre, between the hours of 10 and 3 o'clock Doors open at a quarter-past 7, Concert to commence at 8 o'clock.


"ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE", South Australian Register (4 August 1855), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49294096 

. . . Of the operatic portion of the entertainment it it impossible to speak too highly. The orchestra, conducted by Herr Linger, and under the leadership of Mr. Chapman, gave the overtures and airs with correctness and spirit; while the clever acting of Mons. Coulon, added to the skilful management of his fine voice in Sergeant Sulpizio, well supported the exquisite impersonation of the "Daughter of the Regiment" by Madame Carandini . . .


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (4 August 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207072282 

ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE. MONDAY NIGHT, AUGUST 6th. SECOND NIGHT of the appearance of MADAME CARANDINI and MONS. EMILE COULON. First appearance of Madame Carandini as GERTRUDE, in the splendid operatic Farce, entitled THE LOAN OF A LOVER, in which character she stands unrivalled in the Southern Hemisphere. Second night of Scenes from the magnificent Opera of DON PASQUALE, in which both of the above celebrated artistes will appear . . .


"VICTORIA THEATRE", Adelaide Times (9 August 1855), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207072476 

We understand that on account of the performance of Madame Carandini taking place on Friday evening at the Theatre, the usual rehearsal of the Choral Society will take place on Thursday evening . . .


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (10 August 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207072504 

ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE . . . THIS EVENING (FRIDAY), AUGUST 10.
FAREWELL BENEFIT OF MONS. COULON, and the Last Appearance of MADAME CARANDINI . . .
First Night of the Splendid Comic Opera, by Donizetti, of the ELIXIR OF LOVE.
Adina (Paysanne) - Madame Carandini,
Dalcamar (Quack Doctor) - Mons. Emile Coulon . . .
After which, Selections (in character) from Donizetti's Splendid Opera of
THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT . . .
Conductor, Herr Linger. Leader, Mr. Chapman . . .


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (14 August 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207072675 

CONCERT FOR THE BENEFIT OF MADAME CRANZ,
Under the Patronage of His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief and Lady MacDonnell. A VOCAL and INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT Will take place at NEALES'S EXCHANGE, KING WILLIAM-STREET
On TUESDAY EVENING, August 14.
MADAME CARANDINI and MONS. COULON have, in the handsomest manner, promised their gratuitous assistance, as also have MISS CHALKER, Miss PETTMAN, many Members of the Choral Society, and several German Amateurs. HERR LINGER has volunteered to preside and conduct.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture - "La Clemenza di Tito" - Mozart.
2. Aria - "Chalet," Mons. EMILE COULON - Adam.
3. Song. - "Voglein mein Bothe," with violin obligato, Madame CRANZ and Mr. CHAPMAN - Kucken.
4. Chorus - "Bergmannslied," German Amateurs.
5. Ballad - "Estelle," Madame CARANDINI.
6. Duetto - "O give Faith and in the heart," Madame CRANZ and an Amateur - Linger.
7. Song - "Should he upbraid," with Orchestra, Miss CHALKER - Bishop.
PART II.
8. Overture - "II Barbiere de Seviglia," - Rossini.
9. Duetto - "Puritani," Mons. EMILE COULON and an Amateur - Donizetti.
10. Scena and Aria - "Mathilda," with violin obligato, Madame CARANDINI and Mr. CHAPMAN - Wallace.
11. Chorus - "Battle Song," German Amateurs.
12. Song - "An Angel bright," Miss Pettmann - Donizetti.
13. Aria - (Freischutz), "Kommt ein schlanker Bursch," Madame CRANZ - Weber.
14. Song - "Minnie," Miss CHALKER - G. Linley.
15. Duetto Buffo - "Don Pasquale," Madame CARANDINI and Monsieur EMILE COULON - Donizetti.
National Anthem.
Leader - Mr. Chapman.
The following gentlemen have formed themselves into a Committee for making the necessary arrangements: - Messrs J. H. Fisher, Edward Stephens, J. B. Neales, John Hector, J. Amsberg, A. Gaedechens, John Brown, L. Rodemann, G. Stevenson, H. Heuzenroder, T. Butefisch, A. Beyer, Drs. Bayer and Gosse.
The doors will be opened at half-past 7, and the Concert will commence at 8 o'clock precisely.
Tickets, 5s. each: Reserved Seats, 7s. 6d., of which there are only 120. The reserved seats must be occupied before the end of the 3rd piece of Part I. Tickets may be obtained from any member of the Committee, and at Mr. Platts's, Hindley-street; Messrs. Wigg and Gries, Rundle-street.


"MADAME CRANZ'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (15 August 1855), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49301025 

The large room known as Neale's Exchange was filled last evening by a most fashionable audience, and the gentleman who acted as the Committee have reason to congratulate themselves and the amiable beneficiaire at the complete success of their benevolent undertaking . . . The orchestra was admirably led by Mr. Chapman; and the overtures, and, in fact, all the instrumental performances as conducted by Herr Linger, deserved and received repeated rounds of applause.


"MADAME CRANZ'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (8 September 1855), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49300367 

We are requested by the committee for conducting the late concert to inform the subscribers that, after paying all expenses, the sum of £150 has been secured for Madame Cranz and her children. The committee further state that this result is mainly to be attributed to the exertions of Mr. Linger, who not only conducted the concert gratuitously, but transferred for the benefit of Madame Cranz the valuable assistance of Madame Carandini and Mons. Coulon, first offered to himself.


*


25 September 1855, sacred concert, Linger (conductor, pianist, composer)


"HERR LINGER'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (24 September 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49301574 

On Saturday evening, there was a rehearsal of Herr Linger's concert of sacred music to be performed to-morrow evening at Neales's Exchange. Having been present at the rehearsal, we can with confidence assure those who may be disposed to patronise our talented fellow-citizen that there is every probability of the concert being the most brilliant and successful concert of sacred music yet given in South Australia. It will be seen that the programme, which appears in another column, includes selections from some of the most eminent masters, including Handel, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Bergt, Beethoven, and others. The pieces chosen for the occasion, are also very diversified in their character, embracing almost every variety of composition, from the elaborate overture to the simple aria. Where such a mental feast has been prepared, there can be little reason to apprehend a want o£ guests. His Excellency and Lady MacDonnell are expected to be present.


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (25 September 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207073715 

CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC.
UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR-IN-CHIEF AND LADY MACDONNELL.
CARL LINGER respectfully announces that his CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC will take place on TUESDAY, the 25th September, at Neales's Exchange. C. LINGER will be assisted by the whole Vocal and Instrumental strength of the ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY, including Miss Chalker, Madame Cranz, Miss Petman, &c., &c.; by the GERMAN AMATEUR CHORUS; and by several amateur Vocalists, who have kindly offered their services.
PROGRAMME.
PART 1.
1. Overture to the Oratorio, "Saul," - G. F. Handel
2. Quartette - "Tuba mirum," from the "Requiem," - Mozart
3. Chorus, "Dies irae," from the "Requiem," - Mozart
4. Aria - "No more on Jordan's banks we stay," from the Oratorio, "The deliverance of Israel from Babylon," - Jackson
5. Der 93rd Psalm - "Der Herr ist Koenig," "The Lord is King," - C. Linger
6. Alto Aria - "O rest in the Lord," from the "Elijah," - Mendelssohn
7. Quartette and Chorus - "Hear my crying, O God, give ear," from the "3rd Mass," - F. N. Hummel
PART II.
8. Overture - "The deliverance of Israel from Babylon," - Jackson
9. Aria - "My Saviour, I am thine," - J. A. P. Schulz
10. Aria, "The Trumpet shall Sound," from the " Messiah," G. F. Handel
11. Quartetto - "Lord of Mercy," from the " Requiem in E Minor," - P. de Winter
12. Lobgesang in der Hoehe - "Gloria," from the "Mass in Bb," - C. Linger
13. Duetto - "What holy Calm," - Beethoven
14. Hymn - "Herrlich ist Gott," "Great is the Lord," - Bern. Klein
15. Chorus - "Praise the Lord," - C. S. A. Bergt
Leader - Mr. Chapman.
Doors will be opened at half-past 7, Concert to commence at 8 precisely.
Tickets 5s. each; Reserved Seats, 7s. 6d.; to he had from Mr. Linger, at his residence, North-terrace; Mr. Platt's, Hindley-street; and Mr. Wigg, Rundle-street. Programmes, with the words of each piece, will be distributed.
September 13, 1855.


"HERR LINGER'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (26 September 1855), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49298377 

There was a large and highly respectable attendance at the concert of sacred music given by Herr Linger last evening at Neales's Exchange. His Excellency and Lady MacDonnell were present. The performances commenced with Handel's stately overture to the oratorio of "Saul," which was performed with spirit and precision by a full and efficient band. The quartette and chorus "Tuba mirum," and "Dies irae," from the Requiem of Mozart, followed. Its solemn strains formed a striking contrast to the joyous, spirit-stirring overture which preceded it, as well as to the sweetly simple aria which followed. The latter, "No more on Jordan's banks we stray," was sung by Miss Chalker with all the gracefulness and pathos which usually characterize that young lady's vocal performances. It was loudly and deservedly applauded. The performance, of a composition of Herr Linger by the members of the Liedertafel, entitled "Der Herr ist Koenig,' with orchestral accompaniments, followed. It contains many beautiful passages, and was apparently executed with great accuracy. The contralto solo from Mendelssohn's Elijah, "O rest in the Lord," was sung with great taste by a lady amateur, who has on two or three former occasions appeared before a South Australian public, and each time has elicited deserved applause. A quartette and chorus from Hummel's Third Mass concluded the first part.

One of the most striking features in the second part was Handel's celebrated solo, "The trumpet shall sound," from the Messiah. We confess that we were somewhat surprised when we first saw that this magnificent conception of genius was included in the programme. To give it due effect requires on the part of the vocalist the power, energy, and expression of a Braham - a voice that should be heard above the trumpet-blast of a Harper. This, of course, we did not expect, but we must do the gentleman who sang the solo the justice of saying that he did not disappoint us. His voice is rich and full, and every note was given with perfect precision. The obligato accompaniment of Mr. McCulloch on the cornopean, combined with the subsidiary aid of the other principal instrumentalists, added to the general effect. Amongst the other pieces included in the second part deserving special notice, were the solo, "My Saviour, I am Thine," sung by Miss Pettman; a quartette by Winter, "Lord of Mercy and of Might;" Beethoven's exquisitely beautiful duett, "What holy calm;" and Bergt's glorious chorus, "Praise the Lord." Each of these, with the exception of the finale, was encored. The orchestra was led by Mr. Chapman, who is fast rising in public estimation as a skilful violinist. Taken as a whole the concert was eminently successful.


"HERR LINGER'S CONCERT", Adelaide Times (26 September 1855), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207073763 

. . . The choruses were most effectively sustained, and with the utmost precision, reflecting in their training the highest eulogium upon the careful rehearsals of their conductor, Herr Linger. The most effective of the choruses was the last, "Praise the Lord." It contains much harmony in the instrumentation, and was most favourably received by the audience . . . The performance altogether passed off with the greatest eclat, and appeared to give the highest satisfaction to the audience.


ASSOCIATIONS: Amateur contralto soloist = Rosa Derrington


*


2 October 1855, concert (3rd quarterly), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (2 October 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49295276 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY. - Under the Patronage of His Excellency the GOVERNOR-IN-CHIEF and LADY MACDONNELL. Subscribers to the above are informed that the THIRD QUARTERLY CONCERT of the Season will take place on Tuesday evening next, the 2nd of October, at the Exchange, King William-street.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture, "The King's Command" - Schmidt.
2. "The Hunter's Farewell" - Mendelssohn.
3. Song, "The Forest Queen" - Nelson.
4. Chorus, "Joy of our childhood" - Geyer.
5. Song, "I'm leaving thee"
6. Glee, "The winds whistle cold" - Bishop.
7. March and Chorus, "Rejoice ye people" from Tancredi - Rossini.
An interval of ten minutes.
PART II.
8. Symphony in B - Haydn.
9. Song, "The light of other days" - Balfe.
10. Quartette, "The forest, give me the forest" - Mendelssohn.
11. Chorus and Solo, "Raise high your glad voices" from Titus - Mozart.
12. Song, "When by the cooling breeze" - Street.
13. Duette, "The myrtle bower" - Balfe.
14. Chorus, "To thee doth Rome owe liberty" from the Vestal - Spontini.
Anthem.
Leader, Mr. Chapman. Conductor, Mr. Linger.
Doors open at half-past 7 o'clock, Concert to commence at 8 o'clock precisely. Subscribers are requested to produce their tickets at the doors, as on no account will they be admitted without them. JOHN SNAITH, Hon. Secretary.


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY", Adelaide Times (3 October 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207073969 

Last evening the above Society gave their third quarterly concert at Exchange, under the patronage of his Excellency the Governor, who, with Lady Macdonnell and Miss Macdonnell, honoured the Society with their presence. The room was tilled with a highly respectable and fashionable audience. The programme consisted of numerous gems, both instrumental and vocal, the productions of Mendelssohn, Bishop, Rossini, Haydn, and Mozart. The first part commenced with an overture, "The King's Command," which was executed by the orchestra with much precision and effect. "The Hunter's Farewell," by Mendelssohn, was very admirably rendered, followed by "The Forest Queen," a very pleasing and flowery melody by Nelson. Miss Chalker, as on most occasions, contributed in no small degree to the delight and satisfaction of the audience. "I'm leaving thee in sorrow, Annie " was sung with much feeling and simplicity, and which was loudly redemanded. Her most successful effort, however, was in the song, " When by the cooling breeze," a composition by Street, of much sweetness, in which she displayed great pathos and purity of expression, and which elicited a rapturous encore. A duetto, perhaps one of Balfe's best productions, "The Myrtle Bower," was beautifully sung by Miss Chalker and a lady amateur, in which they were both remarkable for the happy blending and modulation of their voices, the mezzo soprano of the one contrasting with the pure soprano of the other. The chief feature in the instrumental selections was Haydn's symphony in B, which was effectively executed, notwithstanding that the resources of the Society being limited in power, did not admit of full justice being done to the great maestro, which otherwise they would have accomplished. "The light of other days" was rendered with much taste and correct ness of style by an amateur, although there was an uncertainty in the intonations of his voice, which is very musical, arising probably from nervousness. The choruses, as usual, were very painstaking and efficient, although we noticed some indecision and dissonance in "To thee doth Rome." The chorus and solo, "Raise high your glad voices," by the immortal Mozart, which contains the most sublime choral harmony, was very ably performed, as also the march and chorus, "Rejoice ye people," from Tancredi. The concert terminated with the national anthem, the audience, on dispersing, expressing themselves much gratified by the successful efforts of the Society. We cannot conclude our brief notice without a word of praise to Herr Linger for the ability and energy displayed as chef de baton; nor to Mr. Chapman, for his able leadership; and we have to thank them and the ladies and gentlemen of the Society, for familiarising to the public, through their endeavours, works of such a varied and pleasing character.


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (3 October 1855), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49298004 

Last evening a large and brilliant assemblage at Green's Exchange testified by its presence to the sterling and improving character of the concerted productions of this Society. As must have been felt on former occasions, the performances suffered under the unfavourable structure of the building; the deeply-panelled ceiling and open gallery acting prejudicially in dividing and multiplying tone and producing confused sounds. It is on such occasions as these that the suggestion of the erection of a Music Hall involuntarily offers itself, for with the exception of Neales's Exchange there is not a single building in the city in any degree suitable for the purposes of a concert. But to proceed with a notice of the performances themselves. We gladly remark on the increasingly English character of the selection; for hitherto some slight dissatisfaction has been felt, on the ground that the compositions produced were either so thoroughly German in their style, or belonging to such an antiquated school of operatic music, as to seldom please an English audience . . .

The Symphony in B, a well-known chef d'oeuvre of Haydn's most eminent days of musical composition, was selected as the opening piece for the second part, but was not played with the precision and smoothness required to give it its proper effect. The old favourite sing, "The light of other days," descriptive of its own fate by its title, banished, as it has been, by Jullien polkas and the endless creations of fashionable common-places, from the boudoir and the music-room, was selected by a young German gentleman, who sang it with great purity of accent, but not in so finished a style as we had anticipated . . .

. . . On the whole, the concert was a good one, although there were many defects. Herr Linger contributed to it his great powers as a musician, and ably filled the office of conductor; while Mr. Chapman's exertions as leader were equally praiseworthy, but he laboured under the disadvantage of inadequate support from the chief stringed instruments. There was a noticeable improvement and convenience for which the Committee deserve our thanks - the publication of the words of the several pieces. We wish them every success in their endeavours to promote other improvements.


ASSOCIATIONS: Sidney Nelson (composer; had visited Adelaide in 1853)

*


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (11 October 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207074237 

TO ORGANISTS. THE NEW ORGAN for the Wesleyan Chapel, Pirie-street, having arrived, the Trustees will receive APPLICATIONS for the SITUATION of ORGANIST, which will state the amounts of Salary expected. Further particulars may be obtained from Mr. Colton, Hindley-street, where applications may be left, on or before the 20th instant. Adelaide, October 9, 1855.


"ORGANIST AT PIRIE-STREET CHAPEL", South Australian Register (5 November 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49299345 

Tenders for the appointment of organist at the Pirie-street Chapel, have, we understand, been sent in by Messrs. Linger, Allen, and Dawes. The choice is at present in abeyance. The new organ, recently imported from England, is in course of erection by Mr. Shakespeare.


ASSOCIATIONS: Mr. Allen (? Allan) (applicant); Robert Daws (applicant, appointed organist); Joseph Shakespeare (organbuilder)


*


15 November 1855, concert, in aid of St. Luke's Church, Linger (conductor)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (15 November 1855), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207075423 

CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC.
Under the patronage of Has Excellency the GOVERNOR-IN-CHIEF and LADY MACDONNELL.
THE above CONCERT in aid of the ST. LUKE'S CHURCH BUILDING FUND, will take place on Thursday, the 15th instant, at NEALES'S EXCRANGE. The ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY, Miss CHALKER, Madame KRANZ, Miss PETMAN, Mr. J. W. DANIEL, and several Ladies and Gentlemen Amateurs have kindly volunteered their services.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture to the Oratorio "Saul," - Handel.
2. Chorus - "Die Himmel ruemen des Ewigen Ehre" - Beethoven.
3. Duetto - "What holy calm," Madame Cranz and a Lady Amateur - Beethoven.
4. Aria - "My Saviour, I am Thine," Miss Petrnan - J. A. Schulz.
5. Terzetto - "Day of Gladness," Madame Cranz and Amateur - A. Bergt.
6. "Hark a Glad Voice," Miss Chalker - S. Glover.
7. Psalm VIII - "Herr unser Herrscher," German Amateurs - Th. Hahn.
PART II.
8. Overture in C - Mozart.
9. Duetto - "My Song shall be always Thy mercy," Miss Chalker and Mr. J. W. Daniel - Mendelssohn.
10. Sonate for four hands (andante and allegro), Mr. Linger and his pupil, and Miss F. Rowe [sic] - Mozart.
11. Chorus - "Der Tag des Herrn," German Amateurs - Kreutzer.
12. Solo Basso, "The Last Man," Mr. J. W. Daniel - Callcott.
13. "Thou art gone to the grave," a Lady Amateur - Miss H. Aldham.
14. Chorus - "Praise the Lord," - A. Bergt.
Conductor, Mr. Linger. Leader, Mr. Chapman.
Tickets, to be had at Mr. Platts's and Mr. Wigg's, 5s.; reserved seats, 7s 6d. each. November 13, 1855.


"CONCERT IN AID OF St. LUKE'S CHURCH", South Australian Register (16 November 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49297776 

Last evening this concert was given at Neales's Exchange, under the patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady MacDonnell and the conductorship of Herr Linger; Mr. Chapman leading. The attendance was select rather than numerous - a circumstance for which we can scarcely account, except, perhaps, because the programme was not so suited to English tastes as it should have been. There was only one English chorus - or, rather a chorus with English words - one by a German composer, Bergt; and the other three choruses possessing all the characteristics of German compositions - close harmony and general heaviness. In justice to the gentlemen who sang, it should be said that the second chorus, "Herr unser Herrscher," eminently surpassed the first in execution and effect. We must also except from stricture, and accord praise to Kreutzer's "The Sabbath Call." However, the concert was relieved in a very effective manner by the introduction of solos and duets sung by Miss Chalker, Mr. Daniel, Miss Pettman, Madame Cranz, and a lady amateur. Beethoven's duet, "What holy calm," was a prettily-performed composition, and appeared to please. It has been produced for an Adelaide audience once before, rather recently, as also the air, "My Saviour I am Thine," in which Miss Pettman (who appears to be rapidly improving in style) obtained an encore. The terzetto sung by Madame Cranz and amateurs is also worthy of notice. It was very carefully sung; the bass and treble were very firm and good, and the general effect pleasing and graceful. Miss Chalker sang one of Glover's songs, "Hark, a glad voice," and so far won upon public opinion as to obtain an universal re-demand, with which she complied, substituting a tasteful performance of the beautiful air from the Messiah, "Come unto me all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest." The duetto from Mendelssohn's "Hymn of Praise," sung by Miss Chalker and Mr. Daniel, was one of the most pleasing productions of the evening - light, airy, and graceful, with Mendelssohn's own peculiar style broadly imprinted upon it. Mr. Daniel, always a careful and finished singer, appeared to have seized the conception of the composer finely, and a literal rendering was the result. It did not appear to have suited the taste of the audience, however - it is known that Mendelssohn's music is never appreciated on a first hearing. Mr. Daniel appeared to great advantage, also, in Calcott's "The Last Man," especially in the opening, which is so full of descriptive grandeur -
"All worldly shapes shall melt in gloom,
The sun himself must die
Before this mortal shall assume
Its immortality."
The remaining portion passing from the descriptive recitative to the melody so full of resignation - "this spirit shall return to Him" - enhanced the brilliant whole. It wound up with a stirring passage, and was, as might hare been expected, loudly encored. The song following it, a favourite one of Bishop Heber's compositions - "Thou art gone to the grave," sung by a lady amateur, laboured under the disadvantage of being placed last but one in the programme; but it was favourably received, and the encore was decided and hearty. The closing chorus, "Praise the Lord," was very well performed, and the whole concert passed off very agreeably. We must not omit to mention the Sonata by Mozart for the pianoforte, performed by Herr Linger and his pupil, Miss Rowe, which reflected the highest credit on master and student. The Instrumental portion was very effective, and great praise must be awarded to Herr Linger for the mode in which he, under many difficulties, produced a very excellent concert.


"THE CONCERT LAST NIGHT", Adelaide Times (16 November 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207075440 

. . . A sonata of Mozart's for four hands was executed by Herr Linger and his pupil. Miss R. Rowe [sic] - a young lady of about sixteen years of age - in a very efficient manner, and we predict a very successful and brilliant career for this young lady, who already possess[es] great rapidity of execution, combined with a natural and easy touch. The concluding pieces were creditably executed; and we must not forget to particularise the effort of Mr. Daniels, who produced a great sensation in his solo, "The Last Man," which he was compelled to repeat. This gentleman is evidently a musician, but we scarcely think his style adapted to that particular class of music. The entertainment seemed to afford every one the greatest satisfaction. A word of praise is due to Herr Linger for his able conductorship, as also to Mr. Chapman, as leader.



  1856



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1856:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1856 


*


13 March 1856, concert (4th quarterly of previous year), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor)


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", Adelaide Observer (8 March 1856), 1 supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161257440 

We find that this Society contemplates giving a concert on Thursday evening next, in Green's Exchange with a full orchestra and an excellent programme. A rehearsal was held yesterday evening, when the overture to "Jean de Paris," a most beautiful composition by Boieldieu, and De Winter's admired overture to "The Interrupted Sacrifice," were performed with precision, and in a manner which premised a rich treat to the musical connoisseur at the forthcoming concert. The vocal parts of the programme have been carefully selected, and will no doubt be successfully performed under the conductorship of Herr Linger; for after the many musical treats given to the Adelaide public recently it will require something really good in selection and brilliant in execution to obtain general approval. We learn that there will be another rehearsal on Tuesday evening.


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (12 March 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207090149 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
THE SUBSCRIBERS are respectfully informed that a
CONCERT will take place at Green's Exchange,
on THURSDAY evening, the 13th inst.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture - "Jean de Paris" - A. Boieldieu.
2. Prize Glee - "Music, Love, and Wine" - J. Farmer.
3. Song - "Oh, yes; thou'rt remembered" - Hall.
4. Serenade - "Maiden, Listen" - A. Adam.
5. March - Orchestra - Gung'l.
6. Aria and Chorus from "Tancredi" - Rossini.
An interval of ten minutes.
PART II.
1. Overture - "The interrupted Sacrifice" - P. de Winter.
2. Song - Miss Chalker -
3. Overture - "Othello" - Rossini.
4. Duett - "The Sailor sighs" - Balfe.
5. Trio - "Here's a health to the Outward Bound" - Barker.
6. Chorus - "Let Virtue and Pleasure," from Tancredi" - Rossini.
7. "God save the Queen."
Conductor, Herr LINGER. Leader, Mr. CHAPMAN.
Subscribers are requested to bring their tickets.
On no account, can admission be allowed, by payment at the doors.
Those Subscribers who may not yet have had their tickets, can procure them by applying to the Treasurer. Doors open at half-past 7 o'clock. Concert to commence at 8 o'clock precisely. WM. THOMPSON, Hon. Secretary.
11th March, 1856.


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", Adelaide Times (14 March 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207090227 

The last of this season's concerts was given by the above-named Society yesterday evening, at Green's Exchange. The attendance, although not so large as it is sometimes, was, nevertheless, very good, and those who were present seemed highly satisfied with the entertainment throughout. Many of the pieces, both vocal and instrumental, were exceedingly well performed, as indeed, some would say, they ought to be, since they are regularly given and rr-given at every one of the concerts which takes place. This we merely throw out as a hint, which the Society will no doubt take in as good a spirit as it is given. Some of the pieces, however, were comparatively fresh, and they also were rendered in a manner which did credit to the Society. Miss Chalker was encored, in one of her pretty songs, as was also the trio - "Here's a Health to the Outward Bound," an energetic ballad, which is one of those that will bear the quarterly repetition with which the Society honoured it. The absence of female voices in the choruses we do not believe is an advantage, nor is the very unsuitable form of the building in which the concerts are given; but we suppose those are drawbacks which cannot for the present he avoided. The members of the Society deserve all praise for having done as much as they have.


*


22 May 1856, concert (1st quarterly), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor)


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", South Australian Register (17 April 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49748230 

The Committee of this Society having issued circulars, announcing the recommencement of the usual annual series vocal and and instrumental concerts on the 22nd proximo, the assistance of Mr. Linger, as conductor, and Mr. Chapman, as leader (both gentlemen favourably known to the musical public of Adelaide) has been secured; and it is expected that the concerts of the coming season will exhibit a marked improvement on any hitherto given by this Society. It is stated that the Society is composed of amateurs whoso love for music leads them to promote its cultivation, and the Committee, in their circular, have very properly represented the desirability of early subscriptions to enable them to carry out their arrangements in a vigorous and efficient manner. We sincerely hope that their exertions will meet with due appreciation, and enable them to place the Society in a position to meet the popular demand for good music ably interpreted. The rehearsals will take place on Tuesday evenings, in the Exchange, and are, we understand, open to subscribers.


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (22 May 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49746020 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
Under the patronage of His Excellency Sir Richard MacDonnell. -
The Subscribers are respectfully informed that the FIRST CONCERT for the season will be held in Green's Exchange,
This Evening (Thursday), the 22nd instant. The Committee have much pleasure in announcing that
MADAME CLARISSE CAILLY has very kindly consented to sing for the Society. In the course of the evening she will introduce two of her most celebrated morceaux.
PROGRAMME.
PART FIRST.
1. Overture - "Men of Prometheus" - Beethoven.
2. Chorus - "Spring's delights" - Müller.
3. Song - "Oh! wer't thou but my own love" - Kucken.
4. Rondo - (from "Linda di Chamounix") MADAME CLARISSE CAILLY - Maratzek.
5. Trio - Violin, Violincello, and Piano - Hummel.
6. Song - "Be but the same" - Linley.
7. Introduction from "Norma" - Bellini.
PART SECOND.
8. Overture - "Achille" - Paer.
9. Song - "The Rose of Tralee" - Glover.
10. Cavatina - "Casta Diva" (from "Norma") MADAME CLARISSE CAILLY - Bellini.
11. Song - "Search through the wide world" (from "La Fille de Regiment") - Donizetti.
12. Song - "Beautiful flower" - Cherry.
13. Polonaise and Chorus - "The Soldier's Farewell" - H. Godecke.
National Anthem.
Conductor, Herr Linger; Leader, Mr. Chapman.
Doors open at half-past 7 o'clock, Concert to commence at 8 o'clock precisely.
Subscribers are requested to bring their Tickets.
Tickets can be procured from Members of the Committee, also from the Honorary Secretary, who will attend from 7 o'clock at Green's Exchange.
WM. THOMPSON. Adelaide, April 21, 1856.


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", South Australian Register (23 May 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49746085 

Last evening, the first concert of the present season given by this Society was patronized by His Excellency the Governor, Miss MacDonnell, and a large number of the most influential residents in Adelaide and the neighbourhood. The programme on this occasion consisted of well selected compositions for both voices and instruments; and in justice to the performers of the latter we feel bound to say that they were creditably produced - something more than the usual attention having been evidently bestowed on them. Beethoven's overture to "Men of Prometheus" was decidedly well performed, as was also the trio by Hummel for the violin, violoncello, and piano, performed by Mr. Chapman, Mr. Allen, and Herr Linger. We must confess, however, that this latter composition appeared rather too heavy for the concert-room. The accompaniment to the vocal parts in the introduction from "Norma" was rather too forte, but the instruments kept well together. Miss Chalker was applauded in her song, "Oh! wer't thou but my own love," and Miss Pettman (who, as we have before remarked, is very much improved in style and voice) received an encore for her song, "Be but the same" (Linley), and then sang a tolerably new production, founded on the incidents in "Uncle Tom's Cabin," called St. Clair.

The second part opened with a nicely executed overture by Paer, "Achille," and Miss Chalker followed with a pretty song, "The Rose of Tralee," by Glover, in which she obtained an encore, when she gave one of her favourite songs. This young lady also gained applause and a re-demand for her rendering of the popular song from Donizetti's "La Fille du Regiment," "Search through the wide world." The song she substituted, "I love to gaze on smiling faces" was given with more freedom and better enunciation of the words than ordinarily characterize this young lady's vocal performances. Miss Pettman obtained a very flattering tribute of applause also for her song, "Beautiful flower," in which she undulated the tones in a manner which convinced us that with a little more cultivation of the middle range of her voice she would become a pleasing and very popular singer. A serenade, "Lady of beauty," for two tenors and a bass, was also encored; having pleased, apparently, because of the simplicity of its melody. The Polonaise and chorus, "The soldier's farewell," was chiefly noteworthy from the very finished rendering of a violin solo by Mr. Chapman. On the whole the concert was decidedly successful, and of an encouraging character, though on this occasion there was a disappointment caused by the absence of Madame Clarisse Cailly, who had been announced to sing two of her favourite compositions. It was stated by Dr. Wyatt that this talented artiste was suffering under severe indisposition, and he begged the sympathy and indulgence of the audience - no sooner asked than accorded. We cannot conclude without alluding to the excellent manner in which M. Linger conducted the concert, and the equally excellent arrangements of the Committee.


ASSOCIATIONS: Clarisse Cailly (soprano vocalist)


*


13 and 16 June, 23 and 30 June, and 14 July 1856, concerts, Clarisse Cailly, Linger (piano duettist, conductor)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (13 June 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49745845 

NEALES'S EXCHANGE ROOMS.
MADAME CLARISSE CAILLY, at the request of her friends, has the honour to inform the public that she will give another GRAND CONCERT, THIS EVENING (Friday), June 13,
On which occasion the Members of the ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY have kindly consented to add an attraction to the Concert by their valuable assistance. Herr LINGER has also volunteered his services, together with Miss L. J. ROWE, his Pupil.
Miss MARIA CHALKER and Herr KUNZE will also assist.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
Overture - "La Dame Blanche," Herr Linger and his Pupil, Miss L. J. Rowe - Boieldieu.
Ballad - "One Faithful Friend," Miss Maria Chalker - Blockley.
Glee - Members of the Choral Society.
Aria - "Los Pajaritos," Madame Clarisse Cailly - Donizetti.
Ballad - "Friends of my Youth," Miss Maria Chalker - Barker.
Cavatina - "Lucia di Lamermoor," Madame Clarisse Cailly - Donizetti.
The beautiful Duet from Donizetti's celebrated Opera, "Maria Padilla," Madame Clarisse Cailly and Miss Maria Chalker.
An interval of fifteen minutes.
PART II.
Overture - "Zampa," Herr Linger and his Pupil, Miss L.J. Rowe - Herold.
Ballad - "Merry is the Greenwood," Miss Maria Chalker - Glover.
Scena and Aria - "I Masnadieri," Madame Clarisse Caiily - Verdi.
Ballad - "The Dreams of the Past," Miss Maria Chalker - Linley.
Ballad - "La Sirene," Madame Clarisse Cailly - Auber.
Glee - Members of the Choral Society.
To conclude with the celebrated Duet, "Deh Conte" (Norma), Madame Clarisse Cailly and Miss Maria Chalker - Bellini.
Conductor - Herr Kunze.
Admission - Reserved seats, 7s. 6d.; unreserved.
Tickets can be obtained at the Blenheim Hotel, Hindley-street; of Mr. Platts, stationer, Hindley-street; Mr. Hillier, stationer, Hindley-street; at the Napoleon Bonaparte and York Hotels; and at the Exchange Concert Room on the Evening of the Concert.
Doors open at half-past 7, to commence at 8 o'clock.
On MONDAY EVENING, June 16, most positively the LAST CONCERT, at Neales's Exchange.


"MADAME CAILLY'S CONCERT", Adelaide Observer (14 June 1856), 4 supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161259409 

A numerous and fashionable audience graced this talented artiste's concert last evening, and it appeared very clear that the audience was an appreciative one. The prima donna was most successful throughout all her difficult compositions, receiving so many encores that she was at last compelled to abstain from re-appearing, in answer to the very warm re-demands. Miss Chalker, too, was very charming in her ballads, and received some very flattering tokens of applause. The novel feature in these concerts of pianoforte duets was introduced by Herr Linger - so well known as the possessor of musical talent - and his very clever pupil, Miss Rowe, in a manner that deserved and obtained a very considerable amount of approbation, and the overture to "Zampa" was very heartily encored. We understand that the Choral Society had promised to assist at this concert; but, owing to unavoidable circumstances, they were prevented doing so, and three or four of the members of the Society, at the last moment, were called upon to sing some glees. This statement will probably explain why there were two rather old glees introduced, and also afford a good reason why they were not quite so successfully rendered as they might have been had a little time been allowed for preparation. We perceive that the last concert given by Madame Cailly, in Neales's Exchange will take place on Monday; and we would recommend those who have not availed themselves of previous opportunities of hearing this lady not to allow the forthcoming opportunity to escape.


ASSOCIATIONS: Carl Julius Kunze (pianist)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (16 June 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207092956 

NEALES'S EXCHANGE ROOMS.
MADAME CLARISSE CAILLY'S GRAND YOOAL and INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT,
Positively the last at Neales's Exchange, THIS EVENING, MONDAY, JUNE 16,
With the kind assistance of the ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
HERR LINGER has also volunteered his services, together with MISS L. J. ROWE, his pupil.
MISS CHALKER and HERR KUNZE will also appear.
Amongst other pieces, the Programme will include:-
CAVATINA - "Barber of Seville," Madame C. CAILLY.
By request. SCENA and CAVATINA - "Casta Diva," Madame C. CAILLY.
ARIA - "The Marvelous Water," Madame C. CAILLY.
CAVATINA - "Fausta," Madame C. CAILLY.
BALLAD - "Haydee," Madame C. CAILLY.
DUET, Overture for Piano - "The Tragedy Egmont," (Beethoven), HERR LINGER and Miss ROWE.
DUET, Overture for Piano - "Fidelio," (Beethoven,) HERR LINGER and Miss ROWE.
FIVE BALLADS Sung by Miss CHALKER.
SEE THE PROGRAMME.
June 15, 1856


"MADAME CAILLY'S CONCERT", Adelaide Times (17 June 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207092983 

We were sorry to see that the audience yesterday evening were far from numerous; yet the usual taste was manifested in the selection of the pieces, and the brilliancy of execution on the part of Madame Cailly was as attractive as ever. Miss Chalker, Miss Rowe, and Herr Linger, contributed to the evening's amusement.

"MADAME CAILLY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (17 June 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49745708 

. . . The entertainments were also varied by the performances of two duets on the pianoforte by Herr Linger and has talented pupil, Miss Rowe. This accomplished young lady has very much improved since she first appeared in public, and under the able tuition of Herr Linger promises to attain to considerable eminence. Madame Cailly and Miss Chalker were accompanied by Herr Kunze, who also performed his arduous part with his usual precision and effect.


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (23 June 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207093129 

VICTORIA THEATRE. THIS EVENING, MONDAY, JUNE 23.
GREAT ATTRACTION!! FOR ONE NIGHT ONLY!
MADAME C. CAILLY has the honour to announce that she will give a Grand PERFORMANCE in CHARACTER, on which occasion she solicits the support of her friends and the public at large.
The MAD SCENE from "Lucia di Lamermour," in character, with Scenic Decorations. Mdm. CAILLY as LUCIA, in which character she stands unrivalled.
HERR LINGER has kindly volunteered his valuable services, MISS CHALKER, MISS PETTMANN, and HERR KUNZE will also appear.
PROGRAMME.
PART FIRST.
Overture, Orchestra.
Duet - "Maria Padilla," Madame CLARISSE CAILLY and Miss Maria Chalker - Donizetti.
Ballad, Miss Pettman.
Ballad - "Still live on," Miss Maria Chalker - Donizetti.
Scena and Aria - "Ernani," MADAME CAILLY - Verdi.
Ballad, Miss Pettman.
Ballad - "I love the Merry Sunshine," Miss Maria Chalker - Glover.
AN INTERVAL OF TEN MINUTES.
PART SECOND.
Overture, Orchestra.
Ballad, Miss Pettman.
"Deh Conte," (Norma), MADAME CLARISSE CAILLY, and Miss Maria Chalker - Bellini.
Ballad - "The Old Man's Chair," Miss Maria Chalker - Lacy.
The Favourite Rondo Final - "Linda di Chamounix," MADAME CLARISSE CAILLY - Donizetti.
Ballad, Miss Pettman.
"Search through the Wide World," Miss Maria Chalker - Donizetti.
AN INTERVAL OF TEN MINUTES.
PART THIRD.
Overture, Orchestra.
The Celebrated MAD SCENE from Donizetti's Opera Lucia di Lamermour, in character, with scenic decorations!
LUCIA MADAME C. CAILLY . . .
. . . . . .
Conductor, Herr Linger. Leader, Mr Chapman.


White's Assembly Rooms; photograph c. 1870s; State Library of South Australia

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/228757221 

https://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/B+4722 


ASSOCIATIONS: George White (venue proprietor)


[Concert bill printed on silk] Grand vocal and instrumental concert; Monday evening, June 30th, White's Concert & Assembly Rooms, King William Street . . . [text approximately as below]; State Library of South Australia

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/244207086 


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (30 June 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49746145 

PUBLIC OPENING OF WHITE'S CONCERT AND ASSEMBLY ROOMS, KING WILLIAM-STREET.
MADAME C. CAILLY has the honour to announce to her friends and the public at large, that she will give a GRAND VOCAL and INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT,
THIS EVENING (Monday), June 30,
under the Patronage of the DEPUTY PROVINCIAL GRAND MASTER, and the various LODGES of FREEMASONS, upon which occasion Madame Cailly most respectfully solicits the support of the public generally. His Excellency Bro. SIR R. G. MACDONNELL and MISS MACDONNELL will honour the Entertainment with their presence. By the kind permission of the Stewards, the whole of the Decorations used on the night of the Grand Masonic Ball will remain for this occasion.
The CHORAL society have kindly offered their efficient assistance, including the Vocal and Instrumental Departments.
Mr. J. W. DANIEL, HERB LINGER, MISS ROWE, MISS CHALKER, and HERR KUNZE have kindly volunteered their services.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
Overture to "Achille" (Paer) - Full Orchestra.
Duet - "The Farewell," Miss Chalker and Mr. J. W. Daniel - Bellini.
Ballad - "Farewell to Old England," Amateur - Russell.
Song - "Home of my Father," (Lucretia Borgia), Mr. J. W. Daniel - Donizetti.
Cavatina - "Opera Bettly," (first time) Madame Clarisse Cailly - Donizetti.
Masons' Glee - Hail to the Craft," (Parry) - Members of the Choral Society.
Song - "Yes, 'tis a Spell," Miss Maria Chalker - Duggan.
Grand Duetto - "I Masnadieri," Madame Clarisse Cailly and Mr. J. W. Daniel - Verdi.
An interval of fifteen minutes.
PART II.
Overture - "King's Command," (H. Schmidt) - Full Orchestra.
National Song - "Britannia the Pride of the Ocean; or, the Red, White, and Blue," - Amateur.
Grand Air - "Robert le Diable" (En vain J'espere), first time, Madame Clarisse Cailly - Meyerbeer.
Grand Aria from "Gustavus", "When Time hath Bereft Thee," Mr. J. W. Daniel - Auber.
Ballad - "Norma's Song," Miss Maria Chalker - Bellini.
Duet for Piano - "Zampa" (by desire), Miss L. J. Rowe and Herr Linger.
"Casta Diva," (from Norma), Madame Clarisse Cailly - Bellini.
Ballad - Miss Maria Chalker.
Chorus, with Orchestra, from "Tancredi," The Choral Society - Rossini.
Duet - "The Soldier's Return," Miss Maria Chalker and Mr. J. W. - Daniel Glover.
N.B. - A splendid Grand Piano has been engaged for the occasion.
Prices of Admission, 5s.; Reserved Seats, 7s. 6d.; Children under 12, half price. Tickets can be obtained at the Blenheim Hotel, Hindley-street; of Mr. Platts, Stationer, Hindley-street; Mr. Hillier, Stationer, Hindley-street; at the Napoleon Bonaparte and York Hotels; and at the Adelaide Concert and Assembly Rooms, on the evening of the Concert. Doors open at half-past 7, Concert to commence at 8 o'clock precisely. Carriages to be ordered for half past 10.


"GRAND CONCERT", Adelaide Times (1 July 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207093418 

Madame Cailly's concert came off last evening, in White's New Assembly Rooms, and notwithstanding the threatening aspect of the weather, the concert was exceedingly well attended, there being about 400 persons present . . . We must not omit to notice Miss L. J. Rowe, whose duet with Mr. Linger was exceedingly commendable. Though young in years, her execution would be creditable to those of senior age, and she promises a future successful career . . .


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (14 July 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49753493 

WHITE'S SPLENDID CONCERT AND ASSEMBLY ROOMS, King William-street.
THIS EVENING (Monday), July 14th, 1856.
MADAME C. CAILLY begs to return her sincere thanks for the extensive patronage she has hitherto enjoyed, and trusts her
FAREWELL CONCERT (which she dedicates to the inhabitants of Adelaide) will meet with the same success that has attended her former efforts in Adelaide.
On this occasion MADAME CAILLY will be assisted by Miss M. CHALKER, Miss L. J. ROWE, Herr LINGER, Mr. C. W. DRAEGER, Herr KUNZE, and Amateurs.
A full and efficient Orchestra has been engaged.
Conductor, Herr Linger; Leader, Mr. Chapman.
New Pieces by Madame Cailly, which she will sing for the first time in Adelaide.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
Grand Overture - Full Orchestra.
Ballad - "The Rose of Tralee," Miss Maria Chalker - Glover.
Cavatina - Opera "Lucia Strozzi," Madame Clarisse Cailly - Sanalli.
Ballad - "Our Gondola Floats," Miss Maria Chalker - Horetezkey.
Brilliant Variations for Flute, with Piano-forte accompaniment, Mr. C. W. Draeger - Caroli.
Aria - Opera "Niobe," Madame Clarisse Cailly - Paccini.
Ballad - "Scenes that are Brightest," Miss Maria Chalker - Wallace.
An interval of fifteen minutes.
PART II.
Grand Overture - Full Orchestra.
Ballad, - "Rose di Mai," Miss Maria Chalker - Barker.
Ballad - "Philomelo," with Flute Obligato, and Pianoforte accompaniment, Madame Clarisse Cailly and Mr. C. W. Draeger.
Duet for Pianoforte - "La Dame Blanche," Miss L. J. Rowe and Herr Linger - Boieldieu.
Cavatina - Opera "Beatrice di Tenda," - Madame Clarisse Cailly - Bellini.
Ballad - "Come, come with me," Miss Maria Chalker - Cherry.
Grand Scena and Duet from Donizetti's Opera "Lucia di Lamermoor," Madame Clarisse Cailly and an Amateur - Donizetti.
Price of Admission, 6s.; Reserved Seats, 7s. 6d. Children, half-price.
Tickets can ha obtained and seats secured at Mr. White's Rooms only, Monday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and at the door of the Concert Room on the evening of the Concert. Notice - Plans of the Rooms may be seen at the above place. N. B. - In order to prevent the Room from being cold, the ventilation will be shut as at the first Concert. Doors open at half-past 7; to commence at 8. Carriages to be ordered from 10 o'clock.


"MADAME CAILLY'S FAREWELL CONCERT", South Australian Register (15 July 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49760057 

We are sorry to have to state that a rather small audience assembled on the occasion of Madame Cailly giving her farewell concert last evening, in White's Concert and Assembly Rooms. The programme was of a more than usually well-selected character, and an additional feature was given by the introduction of two overtures, which were very effectively performed by some orchestral members of the Choral Society, under the leadership of Mr. Chapman. The beneficiare was in excellent voice, and gave to all her parts the admirable richness and effect which usually distinguish her vocalization. Mr. C. W. Draeger performed his variations and accompaniment with the flute exceedingly well; and the duet for pianoforte, "La Dame Blanche," by Miss L. J. Rowe and Herr Linger, was creditably produced . . .


*


18 July 1856, concert (2nd quarterly), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor, composer)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (17 July 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49756021 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
Under the patronage of His Excellency the Governor. - The SECOND CONCERT of the above Society will take place at Neales's Exchange, on Friday Evening next, the 18th instant, on which occasion they will be assisted by MADAME CAILLY, should the White Swan not sail prior to that time.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture - "Le Fidele Berger" - Adam.
2. Song - "Norah McShane" - Blewitt.
3. Chorus of Indians from the "Interrupted Sacrifice" - Winter.
4. Duo for Pianoforte with Saxhorn accompaniment - Hummel.
5. The celebrated Witches' Glee - King.
6. Wedding March from "Midsummer Night's Dream" - Mendelssohn.
An interval of ten minutes.
PART II.
7. Overture to Shakspeare's "Cymbeline" - C. Linger.
8. Song - "I'll Speak of Thee", M. B. Hawes.
9. Cavatina from 'Anna Bolena' ... Donizetti.
10. Huntsman's Chorus from "Der Freischutz" - Weber.
11. Song - "Llewellyn's Bride" - Barker.
12. Song - "Children of Earth, Farewell" - Lacy.
13. March and Chorus from 'Tancredi" - Rossini.
Leader, Mr. Chapman; Conductor, Herr Linger.
Doors open at half-past 7 o'clock. Concert to commence at 8 o'clock precisely.


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (19 July 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49760521 

The Choral Society's second concert of the season was performed yesterday evening at Neales's Exchange Hall. Thgre was a large and fashionable attendance, including a fair proportion of ladies. As none but subscribers and their friends are admitted to the concerts of this Society, we infer, from the full attendance, that it continues in a very flourishing condition. The services of Madame Cailly were secured, whose brilliant execution of the most elaborate passages of operatic music elicited repeated and prolonged applause. On each occasion of her singing she was encored. Mrs. Wallace appeared for the first time in connection with this Society, and was honoured with encores in Blewitt's "Nora McShane" and Lacy's "Children of earth, farewell." Her enunciation is extremely distinct, and, in addition to this, she has the power of expressing the composer's ideas with great pathos. Miss Pettman was also received with cordial greetings. We were particularly gratified with the style and manner in which she gave the song "Llewellyn's Bride." It was warmly encored. Madame Cranz made her appearance again before the public by singing a very pleasing song, "I'll speak to thee," which was well received. Miss Bowe, the pupil of Herr Linger, was very successful in a duet for the piano, which she performed with her tutor, accompanied by two of the orchestral members on the Saxehorn. Several choruses, with full orchestral accompaniments, were performed during the evening. Of these, the celebrated Huntsman's Chorus, from Der Freischutz, was exceedingly well executed. It has been said of this spirited conception that within a year of its composition by Weber it was heard in the streets of every city of Europe. Its revival at the antipodes, after a lapse of 30 years, is an evidence of its sterling merit. The productions of genius are always new. There were three or four overtures and other concerted pieces performed by the Band, which now consists of more than 20 instrumentalists, who, under the able training of Herr Linger, have attained to a high degree of perfection. It would require a very acute ear to detect in their performances, a false note. We were specially delighted with the spirited manner in which Mendelssohn's "Wedding March," from the "Midsummer Night's Dream," was performed. It will well bear a repetition at a future concert. The march and chorus from Rossini's "Tancredi," "Hail, mighty conqueror," concluded the performances. On the whole, the concert was one of the most successful the Society has ever given.


ASSOCIATIONS: Maria Wallace (soprano vocalist)


*


18 August 1856, concert to celebrate the peace in Crimea, Linger (musical director, conductor, composer)


"CELEBRATION OF PEACE", South Australian Register (11 July 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49761424 

Among other symptoms of satisfaction at the close of the war, and the establishment of what it is hoped will prove to be a lasting peace, we may notice the intention that has been announced of giving a concert of sacred music, on a grander scale than usual, in the new and capacious room erected by Mr. White. The proceeds of the concert are to be devoted to the aid of the War Relief Fund, and for so praiseworthy an object there is little doubt a handsome sum will be realized. His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief and Lady MacDonnell have, we believe, agreed to patronise the concert, conditionally upon circumstances allowing of their presence at it. An influential committee are to superintend the arrangements. The outline of the programme comprises music of the highest class: most of the amateur and professional musical talent here are expected to give their assistance; and that the entire musical arrangements are to be placed in the hands of Herr Linger, who has kindly volunteered his valuable services, may betaken as a guarantee that this concert will be of as high a character as can be obtained in the colony. We shall have particulars to announce in a day or two.


"THE CONCERT ON MONDAY. To the Editor", Adelaide Times (16 August 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207094730 

Sir - When a man is at a loss for an excuse, it is pleasing to see him exercise a little ingenuity in manufacturing one, but there appears to me to be a sad lack of invention in those who intend to refuse spending five shillings for Monday's concert, because the proceeds are not to he applied to the proposed Reformatory Refuge. If they would take the trouble to read the programme, they would see that the music has a special reference to the late war and present peace, and that four pieces have been written or arranged by Herr Linger expressly for this occasion. The concert was proposed before the Refuge was thought of, and to divert it to another object would make it ridiculous. Besides, let us not think that the miseries of the war have ceased because peace his been proclaimed. Sorrow, suffering, and privation will long remain in the homes of thousands, claiming all the help and sympathy they are likely to have. We need not fear doing too much.
Yours, &c., ONE OF THE COMMITTEE.


"THE PEACE CONCERT", Adelaide Observer (16 August 1856), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161260680

The Concert to be given on Monday next, in celebration of the restoration of peace, promises to be one of the best that has been given in the city. Under the conductorship of Herr Linger frequent rehearsals have taken place, and the progress made is said to he very satisfactory. The orchestra will consist of upwards of one hundred vocal and instrumental performers, and will comprise the greatest amount of efficient choral strength yet gathered at any one time in this colony. There can be little doubt but that Mr. White's spacious room will he completely filled, when the attractive character of the programme is considered.


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (18 August 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207094774

PEACE REJOICING.
UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.
GRAND CONCERT of SACRED MUSIC, for the BENEFIT of the WIDOWS and ORPHANS
of the SOLDIERS who FELL in the LATE WAR, will be held in White's Assembly Room,
THIS EVENING, MONDAY, the 18th instant, when the following programme will be performed:-
PART I.
To the Memory of the Fallen Heroes - Prelude for the Orchestra in G minor - Prologue.
1. Funeral March on the Death of a Hero - Beethoven.
2. Chorus - "Sweetly rest in God's own peace"
3. "The Prayer of the Dying Soldier" - Meyerbeer.
4. Funeral Anthem - "I am the Resurrection"
5. Song - "The Last Man" - W. H. Callcott
6. Hallelujah Chorus, from the "Messiah" - Handel.
AN INTERVAL OF A QUARTER OF AN HOUR.
PART II.
Praise and thanks to the Lord for Victory and Peace -
Prelude for Orchestra, in D major - Prologue.
7. Overture to the Oratorio "Saul" - Handel.
8. Chorus "Praise the Lord" .... Beigt.
9. Duetto from the 95th Psalm - "In His hands are all the corners" - Mendelssohn.
10. Air - "My Saviour, I am thine" - J. A. P. Schulz.
11. Chorus - "Praise the Lord, O my Soul."
12. Quartette, with accompaniment - " Praise the Lord, ye Heavens, adore Him" - Kreutzer.
13. Te Deum, Chorus, Solo, and Orchestra - C. Loewe.
National Anthem.
The two Preludes and Nos. 1, 2, 4, and 11 were expressly composed and arranged for this Concert by Herr Linger.
Conductor, Herr Linger. Leader, Mr. W. Chapman.
Doors open at half-past 7; Concert to commence at 8 o'clock. The Adelaide Choral Society, the North Adelaide Choral Society, the Choir of the Pirie-street Wesleyan Chapel, and other amateur performers, who have volunteered their services, will form a more powerful musical force than has ever yet been assembled in this province.
Books of words will be printed.
Tickets, 5s. each, may be obtained at Mr. Platt's, Exchange library; at Mr Wigg's and Mr. Mullett's, Rundle-street; Mr. Clisby, Rundle-street; Mr. Hillier and Mr. Fooks, Hindley-street; Mr. Brenton, Gawler-place; Mr. White's, King William-street, or of any member of the Committee; also, from
W. G. HARRIS, Hon. Sec.
August 12, 1856.


"THE PEACE CONCERT", Adelaide Times (20 August 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207094834

The Concert to celebrate the restoration of peace, and to contribute towards the fund for the widows and orphans of the soldiers, who fell in the late war, came off on Monday evening last in White's large Assembly Room. The room was crowded, his Excellency the Governor, Lady Macdonnell, and Miss Macdonnell being present, as also a large and highly respectable audience. It was almost more than could have been expected, considering the boisterous state of the weather. But the ardour of public sympathy in the cause of the needy and distressed was not to be damped in Adelaide by such a contingency as this. Before the concert began, the Rev. C. W. Evan was called upon by Mr. Linger to introduce it in a brief speech, with which the reverend gentleman complied. This struck us as a most unusual course, nothing of the kind having occurred at any former concert we had ever attended. In fact, we were quite at a loss to discover the aim or end of the speech when it was over. The musical performances their commenced. Without wishing to depreciate the value of colonial musical compositions generally, we think, on an occasion like the present, they might have been withheld, considering the sublime compositions of the old masters ready at our hands. The music set to the "Funeral Anthem" - "I am the Resurrection and the Life" - was strangely out of keeping with the words. The "Funeral March," Beethoven's, on the death of a hero, was far from being effectively performed. We do not remember to have heard it before, but it failed to represent to our mind the solemnities attendant upon that last and mournful crisis - death. The solemn influence of the muffled drum was wanting, the performance on that instrument being more like the heat of a native corroboree than what it should be. In honour of the great meister, we must insist that this performance was very ineffective. Campbell's [sic] "Last Man," sung by Mr. J. W. Daniel, and the "Hallelujah," from the Messiah, were the only pieces in the first part that struck us as pleasing. The second part was more successful. The chorus "Praise the Lord," was given effectively; and Miss Pettman, in the air, "My Saviour, I am thine," was deservedly encored. The quartetto, with accompaniments, in which a lady from the North Adelaide Choral Society sang, was also encored. The "Te Deum" was the most combinedly effective performance of the evening, and well made up for former deficiences. The "National Anthem" concluded the evening's entertainment. We congratulate those gentlemen, to whose philanthropy this concert is to be attributed, on the successful issue of their endeavours; and we feel pleased in having to record the hearty response of our fellow-colonists to their call. They showed themselves, by their attendance, not forgetful of those who have fought, bled, and perished in their country's cause.


"GRAND CONCERT", Adelaide Observer (23 August 1856), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161260830

The grand concert of sacred music for the benefit of the widows and orphans of the soldiers who fell in the late war was held on Monday evening, in White's Assembly-room. His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief, the patron of the entertainment, was present, with Lady MacDonnell and Miss MacDonnell. The large room was quite full, there being, it was estimated, upwards of 600 persons present, including all the elite of the city, and also many gentlemen from the country. This large attendance was the more gratifying from the fact that the weather was stormy all day and the evening sufficiently unfavourable to deter most persons from leaving home, except on a work of duty or an errand of mercy. As announced, the concert was conducted by Herr Linger, and Mr. Chapman was the leader. The band of instrumentalists and the choir of vocalists were more numerous and complete than on any former musical festival within our recollection in Adelaide. After the prelude to the memory of the fallen heroes, composed expressly for the occasion by Herr Linger, the Bev. C. W. Evan delivered a prologue as follows: -

"I have been requested to offer a few remarks upon the subject of this evening's proceedings . . . [full transcript follows] . . ."

The rev. gentlemen was heard with great attention, and at the close of his remarks was warmly applauded. Then followed the musical entertainment. Of the first part we may mention that it was, with a few trifling exceptions, well performed. "The Last Man," by Mr. Daniel, in particular, was worthy of even more applause than the hearty round it received. In the second part, "My Saviour, I am Thine," by Miss Pettman, was beautifully rendered - the music correct, and the articulation distinct. It was deservedly honoured with an enthusiastic encore. The quartette, "Praise the Lord," in which a young lady, a member of the North Adelaide Choral Society, took a part, was also delightfully executed, and again called for. The choruses generally were correctly and effectively given, but the Te Deum was decidedly the grandest musical effort, instrumental and vocal, ever heard in Adelaide. It was, as a performance, worthy of the occasion, of the company, and of the splendid room in which its effects were heard to the greatest possible advantage. It is to be hoped that similar effects will henceforth be frequently produced by a junction of the musical talent that is scattered over North and South Adelaide.


MUSICAL CONCORDANCES: Carl Loewe, Te Deum (1841):

https://imslp.org/wiki/Special:ReverseLookup/64254 


*


2 October 1856, concert (3rd quarterly), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (2 October 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49754428 

ADELALDE CHORAL SOCIETY. - The
THIRD CONCERT of the Season will be given on Thursday Evening next,
the 2nd October, at NEALES'S EXCHANGE, when the following Programme will be performed:-
PART I.
1. Overture to the Opera "Libella" - Reissiger.
2. Ballad - "On the Banks of Guadalquivir" - Lavenu.
3. Chorus - "Raise high your Voices" from "Alexander's Feast" - Handel.
4. Romance - "When leaving Normandy's lov'd Land" - Meyerbeer.
6. Song - "See'st thou at Morning the Mountain's Height," with Violin Obligato - Kalliwoda.
6. Finale from the Opera "Oberon" - Weber.
PART II. 7. Overture - Neukomm.
8. Introduction to the Opera "Othello" - Rossini.
9. Song - "Mirth" - Linley.
10. Polonaise Chorus - "The Soldier's Return to his Native Land" - Goedecke.
11. Ballad - "From a Dream of the past I'm waking" - Mrs. F. H. St.Leger.
12. Song - "Dermot Asthore" - F. N. Cronel.
13. "Rule Britannia," Quartetto, Chorus, and Orchestra - Dr. Arne.
An interval of 10 minutes between the parts.
Doors open at half-past 7; to commence at 8 o'clock precisely. W. G. HARRIS, Hon. Sec.
September 30, 1856.


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (3 October 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49758941 

The Adelaide Choral Society, which was originated more than twelve years ago by a few ardent lovers of music, after having passed through many of the vicissitudes incident to most societies of a similar character, seems to be at length firmly established as one of the permanent institutions of the colony. With such a conductor as Herr Linger, and such a leader as Mr. Chapman, the Society can scarcely fail to secure extensive patronage if its members take but ordinary pains to deserve it. We remarked, at the concert given last evening at Neales's Exchange, that the number of instrumentalists greatly predominated as compared with the vocal performers, and the former also acquitted themselves with much greater credit than the latter. The overtures and other instrumental pieces included in the programme were given with spirit, promptitude, and precision, deserving the most unqualified praise. The vocalists, on the contrary, manifested a want of energy and of the confidence necessary for the efficient performance of the very fine choruses in which they took part. There was one exception to this. The grand march from Weber's opera of "Oberon" was performed with all the energy necessary to give effect to that very fine creation of genius. It was not, but deserved to be, encored. The principal solo singers were Madame Cranz, Mrs. Wallace, and Miss Petman. The first-named lady was particularly happy in a very pretty song, "See'st thou at morning," with violin obligato by Mr. Chapman. In this sweet composition the voice and the instrument blended most harmoniously together, delighting the audience by its simplicity as well as by its artistic beauty. Mrs. Wallace was evidently nervous in her first song, "On the banks of Guadalquivir;" but she made full amends by the very pleasing and spirited manner in which she gave "Dermot Astore." Her rendering of this sterling composition elicited an enthusiastic encore. On her reappearance she gave the cheerful ballad, "I breathe my native air again," which was also warmly applauded. Miss Petman sang two of her favourite songs during the evening. One of these was Mrs. St. Leger's very sweet ballad, "From a dream of the past I am waking," which was encored. The following words, which form the concluding lines of the song, were given with very great taste and feeling:-
"Farewell, oh, how sad is the feeling
To bid love a lasting adieu;
For in silence the canker is stealing
The heart that beats only for you."
The performances were concluded with "Rule Britannia," arranged as a quartette and chorus, with full orchestral accompaniments.


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", Adelaide Times (3 October 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207096055 

The third season concert of this amateur society was given at Neales's Exchange, on Thursday evening, and notwithstanding the rival attractions of the Theatre, there was a very numerous and elite attendance. The entertainment commenced with an operatic overture, which was performed by the numerous and complete band in a most vigorous and somewhat effective style. The next in the order of the programme was a ballad, which was sung very prettily by Mrs. Wallace. A grand chorus followed, which was well supported by numerous singers. The subject was "Raise high your voices" [from] "Alexander's feast," to which sentiment justice was certainly fully rendered, the alto being very evident. Miss Petman, who assisted on the occasion, sang a selection from Meyerbeer with much pathos. Madame Cranz, with her fine contralto voice, gave a descriptive song with rich effect, assisted by a skilful accompaniment on the violin by Mr. Chapman. The first part of the evening's amusement concluded with the finale from "Oberon," with occasionally brilliant effect, by the full band and the chorus of gentlemen amateurs. The instrumental department evinced great care, and, under the influence of the ably wielded baton of Herr Linger, played With much unity of tone. Possibly the violin department was comparatively in too great force. The brass instrument accompanyment was remarkably good, without being in the slightest degree too powerful. Mr. Vonderheid sung a solo in the progress of the finale in a very effective manner. The second part of the entertainment, which was of a similar character, was probably the most successful, if the consequent applause be a fair criterion.


ASSOCIATIONS: Lewis Henry Lavenu (composer)

MUSIC CONCORDANCES: On the banks of Guadalquivir (Lavenu)

http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/collection/056/061 


*


11 December 1856, concert (4th quarterly), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor, composer)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (11 December 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49759956 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY. The
Fourth CONCERT for the Season will be performed To-morrow (Thursday) Evening, the 11th inst., at NEALES'S EXCHANGE, when the following Programme will be presented:-
PART FIRST.
1. Overture - "Les Diamans de la Coronne" - Auber.
2. Glee - "Peace to the Souls of the Heroes" - Callcott.
3. Duet - "Come o'er the moonlit sea" - Devereux.
4. "Huntsman's Chorus," from the Opera Libussa - Kreutzer.
5. Aria - "Tearful eye and heart of sadness," from Der Frieschutz - C. M. v. Weber.
6. Divertissement for two Cornopeans and Orchestra, from Donizetti's Belisario - C. Linger.
7. Chorus - "Lo! Norma comes," from Norma - Bellini.
An interval of 10 minutes.
PART SECOND.
8. Overture - H. Schmidt.
9. Song - "We might be happy yet" - Jas. McEwin.
10. Song - "Down by the Chalet" - Venzano & C. Linley.
11. "Wedding March," from Midsummer Night's Dream, by desire - Mendelssohn.
12. Song - "Sweet Love, arise" - P. Henrion.
13. "The Canadian Sleigh Song" - H. Russell.
14. "Market Chorus," from Massaniello - Auber.
Door open at half-past 7; Concert to commence precisely at 8 o'clock.
W. G. HARRIS, Hon. Sec.


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", Adelaide Times (12 December 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207097792 

One of this Society's concerts took place yesterday evening, and passed off with much musical success. In the instrumental department a considerable improvement is evident, evinced in the greater freedom of touch, and the more decisive effects. Several singers appeared, many of whom were deservedly encored. The room was well filled.



  1857



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1857:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1857 


*

12 January 1857, annual meeting, Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor)


"CHORAL SOCIETY", South Australian Register (13 January 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49769492 

The annual meeting of the Choral Society was held yesterday evening at Neales's Exchange. Dr. Wyatt, the President, was in the chair. The following report of the Committee was read and adopted:-
"Neales's Exchange Rooms, 5th Jan. 1857.
"The Committee of the Adelaide Choral Society have much pleasure in presenting their report of the transactions of this Society for the past year, and feel pride in stating that the members have been entertained by the performance of a far greater number of entirely new pieces than have ever been introduced by this Society within the same period of time; no less than twenty concerted pieces and choruses, with full orchestral accompaniments, having been performed during the last year, which have never before been heard in South Australia.
"Your Committee beg to record the high esteem in which they hold the indefatigable exertions of Herr Linger, their conductor, to whom, in connection with Mr. Chapman, the leader, they feel indebted for that degree of efficiency which has been attained by the orchestra of this Society.
"Your Committee feel much gratified that, notwithstanding an unusual number of professional musicians of some celebrity have performed before the public of Adelaide during the past season, the concerts of this Society have always been honoured by a numerous and most select audience; and although the performing members do not assume professional excellence, it is a source of much satisfaction that their efforts have been so favourably received by an assembly well qualified to judge fairly of their merits . . .


*


23 January 1857, concert, Julius Buddee (benefit) and Miska Hauser, Linger (conductor)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (23 January 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207172556 

WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOM.
J. BUDDEE begs most respectfully to acquaint the public that his BENEFIT CONCERT, under the patronage of the DEPUTY PROVINCIAL GRAND MASTER and the BRETHREN of the CRAFT of FREEMASONS, will take place THIS EVENING, FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, when he will be assisted by the celebrated Violinist MISKA HAUSER (who will make his LAST APPEARANCE but one in Adelaide), and MISS CHALKER, MADAME CRANZ, and MR. LINGER, and Mr. EDWARDS, who have kindly offered their services.
Tickets, 5s. each, to be had at Mr. Platts's, Mr. Leon's, Mr. Hillier's, Mr. Wigg's, and at the door. Doors open at half-past 7, Concert to commence at 8 precisely.


"MISKA HAUSER", Adelaide Times (24 January 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207172592 

The last concert but one of the series now being given by this celebrated violinist came off yesterday evening, when Herr Buddee, whose benefit it was, was honoured by a crowded audience, amongst whom was his Excellency and Lady Macdonnell. Of the performance of Miska Hauler we need say nothing - his rendering of the various pieces selected, and of those given on the encores, was in every case exquisite. Herr Buddee well maintained the reputation which has been accorded him, whilst Miss Chalker, Miss [sic] Cranz, Mr. Linger, and a gentleman who, we believe, made his first appearance as a singer, rendered effective service.

ASSOCIATIONS: Miska Hauser (violinist, composer); Julius Buddee (pianist)


*


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY", South Australian Register (2 February 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49764139 

A correspondent says: - "It will be seen by an advertisement that the Choral Society have to some extent modified their terms of admission to the quarterly concert. Family and single tickets may now be obtained. The Society has been in existence for many years, but has never been so efficiently conducted as since the appointment of Herr Linger as leader. The instrumental department in particular has been trained to a high state of excellence. It is hoped that the patronage of the public will enable the Committee to carry out their designs to render the quarterly performances of the Society still more attractive.


*


1 April 1857, concert (1st quarterly), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor, composer)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (1 April 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49767222 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.
The FIRST CONCERT of the Season will be given at White's Assembly Room, on Wednesday Evening next, the 1st April, at which the following Programme will be presented. -
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Concert Overture, composed for opening the Season - Linger.
2. Madrigal - "Down in a Flowery Vale," 1541 - Festa.
3. Duetto - "I know a Bank" - Horn.
4. Triumphal March, from the drama "King Stephen" - Beethoven.
5. "Regret" - Song, with violino obligato - Kalliwoda.
6. "To the Vine Feast" - Rooke.
7. Chorus - "Come, Gentle Spring," from the Oratorio "The Seasons" - Haydn.
An Interval of 10 minutes.
PART II.
8. Overture to the Opera "The Mill of Etaliers" - Reissiger.
9. Romance - "Tears of Memory," from the Opera "Il Trovatore" - Verdi.
10. Quartette - "Over the Dark Blue Water," from "Oberon" - Weber.
11. Variation, Brilliant, for Piano and Violin, composed for the Court Concerts - Herz and Lafont.
12. Song - "There's a Path by the River" - [Edward] Loder.
13. "The Chase," from the Oratorio "The Seasons" - Haydn.
National Anthem.
Leader - Mr. Chapman. Conductor - Mr. Linger.
Doors open at half-past 7. Concert to commence at 8.
Yearly family tickets, £2 2s. each.;
double tickets (for a lady and gentleman), £1 10s.; and single tickets (for single gentlemen), £1;
may be obtained from Mr. White or Mr. Lower, King William-street, or from any Member of the Committee.
Visitors from the country may be admitted to the Single Concert by obtaining a ticket through a subscriber, at 7s. 6d each,


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", Adelaide Times (1 April 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207174201

By a programme winch appears in another portion of the paper, it will be seen that the first quarterly concert of the Adelaide Choral Society, will take place this evening, in White's Rooms. The concert will be under the direction of the able Conductor, Herr Linger, whose perseverance in raising the Society to its present standard, will, no doubt ensure this, one of our first colonial institutions, being supported with some degree of interest.


"THIS EVENING'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (1 April 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49767231 

The first quarterly concert of the Choral Society for the season will take place this evening, at White's Rooms, under the conductorship of Herr Linger, with Mr. Chapman as leader. The programme appears in our advertising columns. We observe that the Society has made some alteration in their terms, by which visitors from the country may obtain tickets of admission through the subscribers. This is a judicious arrangement, and one of which no doubt many will avail themselves. The Society is one of the oldest institutions in the colony, and having, under the careful training of Herr Linger, attained great proficiency - particularly as regards its instrumental performers - will no doubt continue to receive a corresponding amount of public support.


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (2 April 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49767315 

The concert on Wednesday evening in White's Room, King William-street, was one of the best, if not the very best, this popular Society has given. The programme was most happily compiled, and the performers, both vocal and instrumental, were very perfect in their parts. It is really a high credit to Herr Linger and his pupils, if so to a certain extent they may be termed, that amateurs should be able to go through a magnificent production of Beethoven's in the style the members of the Choral Society performed the triumphal march in "King Stephen." Equal praise is due to them for their execution of the overture with which the concert commenced - a brilliant and most effective piece of music composed "for opening the season" by Herr Linger himself. While speaking of the instrumental music, we must refer to the sweet piece played by Herr Linger and Mr. Chapman on the piano and violin, which elicited a warm and merited encore. The vocal portion of the entertainment gave equal pleasure to the audience. Among the lady singers were several faces, well known and always welcome, and one or two others whom we did not recognise, but are happy to greet as forming an effective addition to the Society's orchestra. The duets and song were so generally successful that if we were to attempt to mention those which pleased us, we should probably have to copy the entire list. The concert had one peculiar feature which it is a pity should not be more common, namely, that its interest increased as it proceeded; so much so, that towards the conclusion nearly every piece was encored. The amateurs did not perform to empty benches, for the immense room was nearly full. No other in Adelaide could have accommodated the number of persons present. The company was not only large, but of the highest respectability, comprising His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief and Lady MacDonnell, the Hon. Chief Secretary, and several other "Honourables" and "M.P.'s." The proportion of ladies was very large, and many were accompanied by handsome, well-behaved and highly gratified little boys and girls.


*


8 May 1857, concert, Robert Daws (benefit), Linger (pianist, leader/conductor)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (8 May 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207175024 

GRAND CONCERT OF SACRED VOCAL MUSIC.
COMPLIMENTARY to Mr. DAWES, Organist.
AT WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOMS, THIS EVENING, FRIDAY, MAY 8.
PROGRAMME.
1. Chorus - "Praise the Lord" - Bergt.
2. Air - "In Native Worth" - Haydn.
3. Duetto - "What Holy Calm" - Beethoven.
4. Chorus - "O, Father, whose Almighty Power" - Handel.
5. Air - "My Saviour, I am thine" - Schultz.
6. Quartett - Judge me, O Lord; Chorus - "I will give thanks" - Mozart [Kyrie and Gloria of "Twelfth Mass"]
AN INTERVAL OF FIFTEEN MINUTES
7. Chorus "Worthy is the Lamb" - Handel.
8. Song - "The Home where changes never come" - Jervis.
9. Duet and Chorus - " Hear my Prayer" - Kent.
10. Song - "Rolling and Foaming Billow" - Haydn.
11. Duet - "On Bethel's Plains" - Fawcett, sen.
12. Chorus - "Hallelujah" - Handel.
The Members of the North and South Adelaide Choral Societies and several Amateurs having volunteered their services, and Herr Linger having kindly consented to preside at the Piano, will ensure an amount of talent rarely brought together.
Tickets, 3s. each, to be had of Mr. White, or Messrs. Brenton, Mulleet, Wigg, Platts, Hillier, and Fooks.
Moonlight.


"CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC", South Australian Register (9 May 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49770202 

A grand concert of sacred vocal music was given on Friday evening in White's Room. The ostensible occasion of the concert was a complimentary benefit to Mr. Dawes, the organist. We wish that some ostensible occasion could be found for repeating such performances at frequent intervals. It is impossible to place limits to the beneficial influence which music of the best order, adequately rendered, exerts upon the public mind and heart. That concerts of sacred music, for admission to which a moderate charge was imposed, would secure a large amount of popular support, was evidenced by the numerous attendance on this occasion. In reference to the specific character of the performance on Friday evening, it is scarcely necessary to say more than that members of both our Choral Societies and several amateurs united their abilities to contribute towards the object of the concert, and that Herr Linger presided at the piano. Miss Pettman was deservedly encored in an exquisite aria by Schultz, which she sang with equally exquisite taste and feeling. This lady undoubtedly appears to the greatest advantage in sacred music, but we think she evinces tokens of general improvement in the skill and taste with which she manages her voice. Miss Pettman, in conjunction with a young lady whose name we understood to be Miss Harper, received the honour of a recall in a duet from Fawcett's "Paradise," as also did Mr. Daniel, in the solo "Arm, arm, ye brave!" The choruses were given with great precision, and quite as much effect as could be expected in the absence of instrumental aid.


"CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC", Adelaide Times (9 May 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207175054 

A very successful grand concert was given yesterday evening at White's Assembly Room, by the members of the different Choral Societies of this city. The concert was given as a complimentary benefit to Mr. Dawes the organist. Owing to the circumstance that no programmes were forthcoming, the printer having neglected to forward them, we are unable to particularise the entertainment arising from our unacquaintance with many of the most talented singers present; still the enjoyment of the audience was complete, their hearty applause greeting the termination of the majority of the morceaux of the evening. The management of the choruses, which numbered some fifty voices, reflected great credit on their leader, Herr Linger, who not only gave a skilful piano accompaniment, but at critical moments wielded an imaginary baton with great effect. There were a few solos by Miss Pitman and Mr. Daniels, which were very fine. There were also some very creditable duets and quartetts. Altogether the concert was very attractive, and while it amused, its effect upon the audience was far more beneficial and healthy than ought that could proceed from much of the comic nonsense that audiences hare heard of late. It is to be hoped that the Choral Societies will favour the public with an occasional repetition of such pleasant evenings.


ASSOCIATIONS: Maria Daws, wife of Robert Daws, organist of Pirie-street chapel, was killed in a cart accident on 28 February; see:

"FATAL ACCIDENT NEAR COX'S CREEK", South Australian Register (2 March 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49769449

*


1 July 1857, concert (2nd quarterly of season), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (30 June 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207176627 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR-IN-CHIEF.
THE SECOND CONCERT of the above Society will be given at WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOM.
on WEDNESDAY Evening next, the 1st July, when the following Programme will be performed: -
PART I.
1. Symphony in D - A. Adagio; B. Allegro - Mozart.
2. Cavatina - "I'll follow thee" - H. Farmer.
3. Sinfonie in D - C. Andante - Mozart.
4. Duetto - "Una Candida Columba" - Gabussi.
5. Grand Chorus from Schiller's "Song of the Bell" - Romberg.
6. Song - "Why linger so long" - Ed. Land.
7. Sinfonie in D - D. Finale - Mozart.
An interval of ten minutes.
PART II.
8. Overture - "Le fidele berger" - Adam.
9. Quartetto - "The maid who'd wish to slumber" - Winter.
10. "Guarache" - Air de ballett, from " Massaniello" - Auber.
11. Song - "The Canteneer" - Balfe.
12. Chorus from "Der Freischutz" - Weber.
13. Song - "I shall greet thee no more" - Lavenu.
14. Introduction and Chorus, from "Massaniello" - Auber.
Conductor, Mr. Linger; Leader, Mr. Chapman.
Tickets may be had at Mr. White's and Mr. Lower's, King William-street, and of any member of the Committee, or the undersigned.
G. VON DER HEYDE, Hon Sec.
Doors open at half past 7, Concert to commence at 8 o'clock.

ASSOCIATIONS: Gustav von der Heyde (musical amateur)


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (2 July 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49205896 

The Society's second concert came off most successfully on Wednesday evening at White's Boom, which was exceedingly well filled. His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief and Lady MacDonnell were present, as also the Chief Secretary, the Private Secretary, and a large number of ladies and gentlemen well known as musical connoisseurs. We must here remark that the members of the Society are manifestly and most decidedly improving under the zealous and most judicious guidance of Mr. Linger, who could not but have felt pleased with the way in which the concerted pieces were executed. This observation will apply to every one in the programme, which included three symphonies of Mozart and selections from the works of Auber, Weber, &c. In the vocal department the choruses were deserving of high praise, and there were several sweet songs by Madame Crantz, Miss Petman, and Mrs. Paine. The lady last named has not been very long in Adelaide, but she may be remembered as having sung at the conversazione of the South Australian Institute a short time ago. She was then labouring under indisposition, and was not heard to nearly to much advantage as on Wednesday evening. She is, we understand, a pupil of Ronconi, and the daughter of William Michael Rooke, well known as the composer of "Amilie," one of the most successful operas lately produced at Covent Garden. She was encored in Farmer's cavatina, "I'll follow thee," which she had sung with much effect, and for which she substituted Lacy's Neapolitan air, "Fuor di Parigi." Balfe's "Canteneer" she was also required to repeat; and a similar compliment was justly paid by the audience to their old favourite, Miss Petman, in Edward Land's very pretty song, "Why linger so long." Perhaps the most effective piece of the evening was the chorus from Schiller's "Song of the bell," by Romberg, descriptive of the ravages of fire - a beautiful composition, and exceedingly well sung. It is most gratifying to us to be able to speak in terms so high of the efforts of the amateurs; and we wish the Society all the success which their talent and application not only merit, but most certainly secure.


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY", Adelaide Times (2 July 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207122290 

This Society is advancing very favourably in the estimation of the public, and deservedly so, for almost every successive concert shows a marked improvement in some respect over the preceding one. The concert of last evening at White's Assembly Room, must have been as gratifying to the performers as it certainly was to the audience, who applauded freely and very judiciously. Herr Linger, the conductor of the Society, is deserving of all praise, for the great care he has constantly evinced to render the Society as effective as possible under existing conditions. The excellence of his pianoforte accompaniments must be well appreciated by his pupils, and the choir generally. The instrumental department played effectually with great precision some operatic selection; Mr. Chapman, the leader, cleverly sustaining the difficulties. The choir has now become very numerous, and has attained to a completeness which was finely evidenced in the chorus from "Schiller's song of the Bell." Several ballads were given in the course of the evening. Miss Petman, an acknowledged favourite, rendered the air, "Why linger so long," very sweetly, and an encore was spontaneously demanded. Mrs. Payne, with a fine contralto voice, was equally successful in "The Canteneer" which she sang in an animated style. Some three or four hundred persons were present, including His Excellency and Lady.


*


30 July 1857, concert, North Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (pianist)


"MUSICAL", Adelaide Observer (25 July 1857), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158117999 

We see by an advertisement that the North Adelaide Choral Society's final concert of sacred music is to be performed on Thursday evening next, at White's Room, under the patronage of His Excellency and Lady MacDonnell. The services of Herr Linger and Mr. Chapman, in conjunction with those of Mr. Daniel, are a sufficient guarantee of the success of the performances. The Society intend, we believe, putting forth all their strength on this, their last appearance before the public, and are using every effort to render the concert as effective as possible.


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (29 July 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207123000 

North Adelaide Choral Society.
President - J. B. Neales, Esq., M.P.
Vice-President - The Ven. Archdeacon Woodcock.
CONCERT 0F SACRED MUSIC.
A CONCERT of SACRED MUSIC will take place at WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOM, on
THURSDAY Evening, July 30, under the especial patronage of His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief and Lady Macdonnell.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
Chorus - "Awake, put on thy strength" - Jackson.
Quartette - "Where are thy bowers, O Canaan" (from "Mose in Egitto") - Rossini.
Chorale - "From the Throne of God" - Lindpainter.
Solo - "Veni Sanctus Spiritus," with English words, Mr. Daniel - Neukomm.
Trio - "When shall we three meet again" - Horsley.
Solo - "The Infant's Prayer" - Miss Petman - V. Novello.
Chorale - "The Shepherd's Sabbath Hymn" - C. Kreutzer.
An interval of ten minutes.
PART II.
Chorale - "Fancy Ply - Nabucadonoso" - Verdi.
Trio - "The Sabbath Bells" - Smith.
Solo - "An Angel Bright" - Miss Petman - Donizetti.
Duet - "The Shower of Pearls" - Miss Tozer and Mr. Daniel - Glover.
Chorale - "The Alpine Morning Song" - C. Kreutzer.
Quartette - "Fair is the Warrior's Mural Crown" - Walmisley.
Solo - "Eve's Lamentation" - Miss Tozer.
Solo and Chorus - The Prayer from "Mose in Egitto" - Rossini.
Leader - Mr. Chapman.
Conductor - Mr. Daniel.
Pianist - Herr Linger.
Subscribers, with their Ladies, admitted to the reserved seats on presenting their tickets.
Admission to non subscribers - Reserved seats, 5s.; back seats, 3s. Books of the words, 6d. each.
Tickets may be obtained at Platts's, Hillier's, Wigg's, and G. White's. To commence at 8 o'clock precisely.


"CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC", South Australian Register (31 July 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49206953 

. . . We cannot particularize where there was so much excellence, and shall therefore conclude this brief notice by expressing a hope that the Society, having attained to so great a degree of excellence, will not be dissolved, but, as was intimated by the President during the evening, that it will be reorganized on a more extensive and surer basis. In stating this we believe we express the feelings of all who were present.


"NORTH ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", Adelaide Times (31 July 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207123089 

To a considerable portion of the public, it is an agreeable pastime at this season of the year, in this our not very lively city, to rejoice occasionally at an oasis in the vista of the many dull, monotonous evenings, and enjoy that most delightful of all sensuous pleasures - music. As of late, we have not been much favoured with wandering "stars," or professionals; our own musical resources have become more generally encouraged, and, perhaps, more warmly appreciated. The concert of sacred music given yesterday evening, at White's Rooms, by the North Adelaide Choral Society, showed a marked contrast, in this respect, to any of their previous efforts, for there were probably four hundred persons present. The organization of the society is becoming very complete; the instrumental department would admit of improvement, but the singing was certainly good. Miss Petman and Mr. Daniels added laurels to their already acquired popularity, but the favourite of the evening was Miss Tozer, a young lady, who, with a clear, pure voice, and an unaffected style of singing, created quite an agreeable surprise. Mr. Daniels, as the conductor, was very anxious, and very efficient. During the evening, the Hon. J. B. Neales, the head of the North Adelaide Choral Society, offered a few explanatory remarks to the audience. He expressed his pleasure at witnessing the very general patronage which was shown towards the first efforts of the Society in South Adelaide. They were, like other and larger societies, somewhat in debt, but he was happy to say, that the prospect before them gave promise of the required relief; and in the face of such encouragement, the society would venture to give a second concert in that spacious room, when he felt assured their efforts would be even more satisfactory than they had evidently been that evening. An attempt had been made by another society to induce them to join, with a view to their embracing secular as well as sacred music, but these overtures had been declined. He deprecated associating the two classes of music. It had not been generally found successful in small towns in England to give concerts exclusively of sacred music, but still he had confidence in the success of the society. The subscribers to the society were not very numerous, about forty being the number, but he had been promised several additions that evening, which, there was now a fair probability, would soon be materially increased. He might add that the members of the society received no reward for their efforts, but the smiles and approbation of their friends.

ASSOCIATIONS: Fanny Rooke Paine (vocalist, pianist); North Adelaide Choral Society; John Bentham Neales


*


26 August, concert, Linger (benefit, conductor, ? pianist)


"GRAND CHAMPION PLOUGHING MATCH", South Australian Register (25 August 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49207041 

. . . While referring to the match, we may observe that, though the dinner will not take place till Thursday, the country gentlemen whom the grand event will assemble in Adelaide are not to be without aa evening's amusement, Mr. Linger having, as elsewhere notified, altered the time of his concert from Friday to Wednesday, which will give them an opportunity of enjoying a musical treat, and of securing the same pleasure for their ladies and families.


"NEWS OF THE DAY", Adelaide Times (25 August 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207123575 

The Grand Concert of Herr Linger, the distinguished musical artiste, is announced to come off to-morrow evening. The programme for the evening includes all the available musical talent in the colony. Herr Linger is deserving of a hearty bumper, if it were merely as an acknowledgment of the valuable services he has rendered to the Choral Societies.


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (25 August 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49207024 

CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC. -
HERR LINGER begs to announce that the Concert advertised for FRIDAY, the 28th inst., will take place two days earlier, viz, TO-MORROW (WEDNESDAY), the 26th.
HERR LINGER begs respectfully to announce to the public of Adelaide and its vicinity that he will give a
GRAND VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC
in White's Assembly Room, on the Evening of Wednesday, the 26th August,
under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady MacDonnell, when he will be assisted by the whole of the Adelaide Choral Society and the Choir of Pirie-street Chapel, and also several Ladies and Gentlemen, who have kindly given their services, including all the available talent in the colony.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture to the Oratorio of "Samson" - Handel
2. A - Solo, "Come, let us worship;" B - Chorus from the 95th Psalm - Mendelsohn.
3. Grand Sonata. Pianoforte - Hummel
4. Air and Chorus - "The Lord shall send the rod" - A. Romberg
5. Duetto - "Behold, to us a child is born" - Shultz
6. Te Deum - Composed for the Coronation of the King - Lowe.
PART II.
7. Overture and 8. Chorus, "Sing to the Lord," from the 96th Psalm - Naumann
9. Song - "How sweet, how heavenly is the sight" - Elsasser
10. A - Quartett, "Judge me, 0 Lord", B - Chorus "I will give thanks",
Kyrie and Gloria, from the 12th Mass - Mozart
11. Andantino - Duo, Violin, and Pianoforte - Reissiger
12. Song - "Peace, thou, who art of heavenly birth" - Preyer
13. Chorus - "Hallelujah," from the Messiah - Handel.
Tickets, 5s. each; to be had of Mr. White and Mr. Lower, King William -street, and of all the principal booksellers.
Doors will be opened at half-past 7 o'clock. The performance to commence at 8.
N.B. - Books containing the words to be had at the door.


"HERR LINGER'S CONCERT", Adelaide Times (27 August 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207126416 

There was a first-rate house yesterday evening at White's Rooms, at the concert given by this talented gentleman. The entertainment, which was exclusively confined to sacred music, was highly successful. The chorusses were generally very effective, and some very sweet airs given in the course of the evening by Miss Tozer and Miss Petman.

ASSOCIATIONS: Charles Elsasser (composer)


*


30 September 1857, concert (3rd quarterly of season), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor, composer)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (30 September 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207124341 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
UUNDER THE PATRONAGE OF HIS EXCELLENCY SIR RICHARD MACDONNELL.
PROGRAMME of the THIRD CONCERT, to take place at WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOM,
THIS EVENING, Wednesday, September 30.
PART I.
1. Overture, "Jean de Pris" - Boieldieu.
2. Glee, "Come Silent Evening," - L. de Call.
3. Ballata, " Nella Fatal de Remini," - Donizetti.
4. Chorus, " Vive le Roi," from the Siege of Rochelle - Balfe.
5. Duetto, "I've Wandered in Dreams," - J. A. Wade.
6. Song, "Silent Sorrow," with Violin Obliigato - Kalliwoda.
7. "Triumphal Procession," from the Opera "King Alfred" - C. Linger.
PART II.
8. Overture to the Opera, "The Combat with the Dragon" - C. Linger.
9. Trio, "Stars of Night," - Lindpainter.
10. Song, "Like the Song of Birds in Summer," - J. W. Cherry.
11. "War Match of Priests in Athalia," - Mendelssohn.
12. Song, "Sprites of the Wind," - Samuel Lover.
13. Ballad, "The Heart bow'd down," - M. W. Balfe.
14. Duett, "The Elfin Call," - Stephen Glover.
15. Chorus, from the Opera of the "Vestal," - Spontini.
To commence at 8 o'clock precisely.
Tickets to be obtained from Mr. White and Mr. Lower, King William-street; and Mr. Clisby, Rundle-street.


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", South Australian Register (1 October 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49209786 

The third concert of this Society took place yesterday evening, at White's Boom. The audience was a more than usually large one, there being at least 300 persons present. The first part of the programme, which contained an excellent selection of overtures, glees, choruses, and songs, commenced with one of Boildieu's spirited overtures, from "Jean de Paris," which was followed by a glee, very fairly sung. The best received effort in this part of the entertainment, however, was a duet "I've wandered in dreams," sung by Miss Pettman and Mr. Sanderson. After an interval of ten minutes the second portion of the programme was opened by an operatic overture, many of the effective passages of which were well executed. To this succeeded trios and songs, among which the most noticeable were "Stars of the night," "Like the songbirds in summer," by Miss Pettman; and "Sprites of the wind," by Mrs. Payne. The entertainment concluded with a chorus from the opera of the "Vestal," in which the whole strength of the company was put forth, and in which the precision and carefulness of both instrumentalists and vocalists were evinced to an extent which did great credit to the performers and their conductor, Mr. Linger. The words of this chorus -
"To thee doth Rome owe liberty, the fruit of thy great victory,
Long-wish'd peace sheds her blessings over Rome and the world!
Rule over this our feast as thou hast ruled our fate!
Thou glory of our land! Freedom, glory of this our land!
Hail to our great Hero!" -
were given with an energy which took the audience by surprise; and indeed this, with the concluding piece of the first part, "Triumphal procession from King Alfred," were undoubtedly the masterpieces of the evening, showing, as they did, the perfection at which the Society in their more elaborate performances had arrived. Miss Pettman, Madame Cranz, and Mrs. Payne were encored in more than one of the songs; and the concert which lasted till nearly 11 o'clock was on the whole a highly successful one.


*


18 November 1857, concert, William Chapman (benefit), Linger (conductor, composer)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (18 November 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207125541 

GRAND CONCERT, under the distinguished Patronage of his Excellency the Governor and Lady Macdonnell, in WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOM,
MR. W. CHAPMAN begs respectfully to inform the Public of Adelaide and its vicinity, that he will give a GRAND CONCERT of VOCAL and INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC,
This Evening, "WEDNESDAY, November the 18th, 1857, when he will he assisted by the Adelaide Choral Society, and the following talent, viz., Madame Cranz, Miss Petman, Mrs. Paine, Miss Tozer, Herr Linger, Mr. Daniel, and several others who have kindly given their services.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture di Concerto in C - C. Linger.
2. Glee, "O'er the Wave with me," - Devereaux.
3. Rondo Brilliante, for Violino - Mayseder.
4. Song, "Tears of Memory," - Verdi.
5. Wedding March, from "Midsummer Night's Dream," - Mendelsohn.
6. Song, "Sweet Love, I'll not forget thee," with Violin Obligato - Lachner.
7. Introduction and Chorus, from "Masaniello" - Auber.
Interval of 15 minutes.
PART II.
8. Overture, "Le Diamans de la Couronne," - Auber.
9. Song. " Good by, Sweetheart, good by," - Hutton.
10. Variations Brillantes, Violin and Piano - Herz and Lafont.
11. Song, "The Outlaw," with Orchestra, Mr. J. W. Daniel - [Edward] Loder.
12. Guarache Air de Ballet, from "Masaniello" - Auber.
13. Duet, "O what various charms unfolding" - Haydn.
11. Market chorus, from "Massaniello" - Auber.
Tickets 5s. each, may be had of Mr. White, King William-street; Mr. Lower, King William and Rundle-streets; Mr. Clisby, Rundle-street; and all the principal Booksellers. Doors open at half-past 7 o'clock; performance to commence at 8 precisely.


"MR. CHAPMAN'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (19 November 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49208704 

Mr. Chapman's Grand Concert came off yesterday evening, in White's Assembly Rooms, and fully realized all the expectations we entertained and had expressed respecting it. The company was large and highly respectable, including His Excellency the Governor-ln-Chief and his Private Secretary, Mr. and Miss Finniss, Mr. Torrens, and many other leading colonists. The performances, both vocal and instrumental, were almost without an exception worthy of all praise, and the fact that the audience was kept in delighted attention for nearly three hours is a sufficient proof of the excellent taste displayed in the selection of the music, and of the masterly style in which the pieces selected were rendered. It may appear a work of supererogation to offer any criticism on the powers of performers so well known amongst us as those to whom we owe this evening's gratification, and it may be considered more suitable to say what they did than to describe how they did it. We must, however, remark in general that the performances even of those with whose abilities we are most familiar surprised us on this occasion, as they appeared to surpass their ordinary selves. Probably Miss Pettman never sang better than she did last night in "Tears of Memory," and in her old favourite "Good-night," which she gave in the second part in substitution for a song announced in the programme, but which had to be superseded in consequence of the illness of Mrs. Payne. In Verdi's song we were forcibly impressed with the perfect taste of Herr Linger's pianoforte accompaniment, which was precisely modulated so as to sustain without in the slightest degree embarrassing the songstress. This was the more strikingly apparent, perhaps, from the contrast afforded by the violin obligato accompanying Madame Cranz's song in the first part, which, though rendered with exquisite taste and feeling, was partially marred by the greater power of the instrumentation. Mr. Daniel sang "The Outlaw" with his usual vigour and success, eliciting an encore - an honour which was also awarded to Miss Tozer and himself in Haydn's duet, "O what various charms unfolding," for which they substituted "Fondest, dearest, fare thee well." The instrumental gems of the evening were the concerted pieces for the violin and piano, in which Mr. Chapman and Herr Linger evinced the most consummate mastery over those instruments respectively. Two or three choruses from Massaniello, with instrumental accompaniments by the entire orchestra, were given with great spirit and effect. In fact, as a whole, the concert was one of the most successful which has been given in Adelaide.


*


21 December 1857, concert (4th quarterly of season), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (19 December 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207126262 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
SUBSCRIBERS and the Public are informed that the LAST CONCERT for the Season 1857, will take place at White's Assembly Room,
on MONDAY evening next, the 21st instant, when the following Programme will be presented: -
PART I.
1. Overture, "Di Concerto" - Kalliwoda
2. Gipsey March and Chorus, from "Preciosa" - Weber
3. Song, "Forget and forgive" - Glover
4. Rondo Brilliante for Violin (by desire) - Meyseder
5. Ballad, "O Charming May" - Rodwell
6. Finale, from the Opera "Semiramide" - Rossini
Interval of quarter of an hour.
PART II
7. Overture to the Opera "Libella" - Reissiger.
8. Ballad, "Good-bye, sweetheart, good-bye" - Hatton.
9. Duetto, "Ladies, fly from Love's smooth tale" - Balfe.
10. Polonnaise for Orchestra - Goedecke.
11. Song, "The Music of the Past" - C. K. Sala.
12. Chorus and Solo, "Merry boys, away" - Bishop.
National Anthem.
Doors open at half-past 7; Concert to commence at 8 o'clock precisely.
Non-subscribers and Visitors from the Country may be admitted on the introduction of a Subscriber by payment of 7s. 6d. each.


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (22 December 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49212709 

The fourth concert of the Adelaide Choral Society for the year was performed on Monday evening in White's Assembly-room. His Excellency and Lady MacDonnell were present. There was also a good attendance of the subscribers and their friends. The instrumentalists have acquired, under the able conductorship of Herr Linger, a degree of proficiency which is highly creditable both to him and to them. There were several overtures and other concerted pieces performed, during the evening in a style which would not disgrace any similar Society either in the colonies or in England. Mrs. Paine added much to the pleasure of the audience by the display of her vocal powers in Rodwell's sweet ballad "O charming May," and the no less pretty song "Good-by, sweetheart, good-by." The former was encored. Miss Petman was as effective as ever. Her rendering of Sala's song of "The music of the past" was highly applauded and encored. But the gem of the evening, in our opinion, was a rondo by Meyseder for the violin, with pianoforte accompaniment, in which Mr. Chapman displayed his skill as a violinist. He is gradually but surely rising to a high degree of perfection in the use of that very difficult instrument. The execution was fully appreciated, and the performance elicited an encore. With regard to the choruses, we think there was a too great preponderance of the instrumental over the vocal performers, and which we hope to see remedied on future occasions. Bishop's "Market Chorus" would, perhaps, have been rendered with greater accuracy, or at least with more effect, had it been more carefully rehearsed. It is at all times a difficult performance, and ought not to be introduced to the public without great care. Upon the whole, the concert was well received, and deservedly so. The National Anthem was given with the whole force of the orchestra as a finale. The performances were over soon after 10 o'clock.


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", Adelaide Times (24 December 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207126340 

This Society gave another of their periodical concerts at White's Rooms, in the presence of a very numerous auditory, including his Excellency and Lady Macdonnell. The most conspicuous part of the entertainment was the masterly conductorship of Herr Linger, to whose untiring exertions the Society's band has attained to a very creditable degree of precision and efficiency. In the course of the evening a few well-selected airs were very sweetly and effectively sung by Mrs. Paine and Miss Pettman. The concert generally gave great satisfaction.



  1858



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1858:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1858 


*


18 January 1858, annual general meeting & conversazione, Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor)


"THE ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONVERSAZIONE", Adelaide Times (19 January 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207158629 

The Adelaide Choral Society held their annual meeting last evening, in White's Rooms in the form of a conversazione, at which His Excellency the Governor, the patron of the Society, was present. The attendance was far from being numerous. The proceedings of the evening were initiated by the Secretary, Mr. Betteridge, reading the annual report, after which Dr. Davis rose and explained, in a few words, the position of the Society, stating that through the non payment of promised subscriptions, the balance sheet, did not present that favourable aspect which it would have done otherwise, as it appeared from the Report which had been read by the Secretary that they were in debt some £17. The Chairman put the adoption of the Report to the meeting, which was declared to be carried unanimously . . .

The proceedings were interspersed with some exceedingly good music - orchestral and solo. A lady amateur rendered two exceedingly pretty songs, one of which received an encore. We cannot speak too highly of Herr Linger's leadership, nor of Mr. Chapman's performances, who may be termed "the father of the violin in South Australia." The music throughout was good. Messrs Linger and Chapman, and the whole, in fact, of the lady and gentleman amateur performers deserve great praise for the industrious manner in which they apply themselves to the objects of the society, the production of choice and select musical recreation for the public; and we hope the aforesaid public will appreciate their much to be applauded efforts by coming down handsomely, as they say, with their subscriptions, and paving off "old scores" without delay.


*


4 February 1858, South Australian Institute, Linger (pianist)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (3 February 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207159072 

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE.
LECTURE AND CONCERT. SUBSCRIBERS and the Public are informed, that on the evening of Thursday next, the 4th inst., the periodical LECTURE AND CONCERT will take place in Mr. White's Room, King William-street. His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief will preside.
The Lecture will be delivered by G. W. Francis, Esq. Subject - "The Wonders of the Vegetable Kingdom."
PROGRAMME.
Glee - "Awake, AEolian Lyre" - Danby.
Song - "Excelsior" - Lindsay.
Duet - "I've Wandered in Dreams" - Wade.
LECTURE.
Glee - "Hail, thou merry May" - Weber.
Rondo - Violin and Piano.
Duet - "Farewell! awhile we sever - Mozart.
Song - "Kathleen Mavoureen" - Crouch.
Glee - "Spring's Delights" - Muller.
Herr Linger will preside at the Piano.
Subscribing members will be admitted free on delivery at the door of their tickets for the current year or quarter, which will be returnable to them in the Library on the following day, or whenever demanded. Each Subscriber may introduce a Lady free of charge. Doors will be opened to Subscribers precisely at 7 o'clock. Should the room not be filled at a quarter to 8 Admission Tickets may then be obtained by non subscribers at the door of the room, price 2s 6d. each Proceedings will commence at 8 precisely. Persons desirous of joining the Institute, or of renewing their tickets, are particularly requested to do so immediately.
NATH. HAILES, Secretary. February 1, 1853.


"SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE", South Australian Register (5 February 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49776358 

The members of this popular Institution had another opportunity on Thursday last of spending an evening in a most pleasing and interesting manner by attending the conversazione at White's Assembly Room . . .

In addition to the lecture, noticed below, a number of songs, duets, glees, and other musical compositions were performed during the evening, including Danby's much admired glee "Awake AEolian Lyre;" Wade's "I've wandered in dreams;" a duet by Miss Petman and Mr. Sanderson; a rondo for the violin and piano, by Mr. Chapman and Herr Linger; and Mozart's "Farewell, awhile we sever," by Mr. Daniel and Miss Tozer. The two last-named pieces were loudly encored, as was also a very pretty ballad sung by Miss Petman in excellent style. His Excellency read a note from Mrs. Payne, apologizing for her absence on account of hoarseness caused by the late change in the weather . . .


*


25 February 1858, concert, Richard Baxter White (presenter), Linger (piano)


"THIS EVENING'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (25 February 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49771945 

We beg to call attention to the first of Mr. R. B. White's concerts, to be performed this evening, at White's Assembly Room. We observe by the programme that the services of Herr Linger, Mr. Daniel, Miss Rowe, and Miss Tozer have been invoked, to assist in giving variety and éclat to the entertainment. This is, we believe, the first instance in which a native-born youth of South Australia has appeared before the public in a character so prominent, and one involving such arduous duties as those which Mr. White, Jun., has engaged to sustain this evening. We trust be will be honoured with a large attendance.


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (25 February 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207159615 

WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOMS.
MR. R. B. WHITE (from the Royal Academy of Music) begs to announce his
FIRST GRAND CONCERT, On Thursday, February 25, 1858.
PROGRAMME
PART I.
Overture - "La Dame Blanche," Miss Rowe and Herr linger - Boieldieu.
Song - "Martin the Man at Arms," Mr. Daniel - [Edward] Loder.
Fantasia - Violin, " La Fille du Regiment," Mr. White - Sainton.
Song - "A Lowly Youth," Miss Tozer - Wallace.
Fantasia Piano. "The Last Rose of Summer," Miss Rowe - Rosellen.
An Interval of 10 minutes.
PART II.
Overture - " Zampa," Miss Rowe and Herr Linger - Herold.
Fantasia - Violin, "Lucizia Borgia," Mr. White - Sainton.
Duet - "The Sailor Sighs," Miss Tozer and Mr. Daniel - Balfe.
Song - "Philip the Falconer," Mr. Daniel - [Edward] Loder.
Fantasia - Piano, "Standard Bearer," Mr. White - Beyer.
National Anthem.
Doors open at half-past 7; Concert to commence at 8 o'clock.
Tickets of admission, 5s. each, to he had of Mr. White, at the Assembly-rooms; Mr Platts, Mr Wigg, and Mr. Hillier.
Adelaide February 22, 1858.


"MR. R. B. WHITE'S CONCERT", Adelaide Times (26 February 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207159673 

The first concert given by this gentleman at his fathers' rooms last evening was entirely successful. The room was filled by a highly respectable audience, who gave unmistakeable evidence of their appreciation of the whole performance. Mr. White acquitted himself in a manner which exceeded all reasonable, even sanguine expectation previously entertained of him, and was, at the conclusion of each part allotted to him, enthusiastically encored. Herr Linger presided at the pianoforte, assisted by Miss Rowe, the vocal part of the performance being well executed by Miss Joyer [Tozer] and Mr. Daniel, who were also encored in some of the music in the programme.


"MR. R. B. WHITE'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (26 February 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49773027 

There was a large and respectable audience on Thursday evening to witness Mr. White's debut as a professional musician in his native city. Those who witnessed his early promise before his visits to the great metropolis were not disappointed in their expectation of a matured proficiency on his reappearance . . . The old favourites of the musical public, Messrs. Linger and Daniel, Miss Tozer, and also Miss Rowe, a native musician, who, under the able tuition of Mr. Linger, has attained great proficiency, added to the attractions of the evening's entertainments. We understand that it is Mr. White's intention to give a second concert at an early date.

ASSOCIATIONS: Richard Baxter White (violinist, pianist, son of George White)


*


31 March 1858, concert (1st quarterly), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (31 March 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207160507 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
Under the Patronage of His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief and Lady Macdonnell.
THIS SOCIETY will give their first GRAND CONCERT, at WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOM, on WEDNESDAY Evening, March 31, 1858, PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture - "Men of Prometheus." - Beethoven.
2. Prayer and 3rd Finale, from "Massaniello." - Auber.
3. Song - "The last Meeting" - Ricardo Linter.
4. Fantasia, for Piano - "The Last Rose of Summer" - Rosellen.
5. Glee - "Life's a Bumper" - Wainwright.
6. Song - "My Idol Home" - Berger.
7. Chorus - "Lo! Norma comes" from "Norma" - Bellini.
AN INTERVAL OF TEN MINUTES.
PART II.
8. Overture - "Semiramide" - Rossini.
9. Song - "Ever thine" - M. Langen.
10. Trio, for Piano, Clarionet, and Violin - Mozart.
11. Recitative and Aria, from Figaro - Mozart.
12. Air de Ballet - "Le Siege de Corinth" - Rossini.
13. Song - "The Gitana's Lay" - Rodwell.
14. Introduction and Chorus, from "Semiramide." - Rossini.
National Anthem.
Conductor, Mr. Linger. Leader, Mr. Chapman.
Doors open at half-past 7; Concert to commence at 8 o'clock.


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", South Australian Register (1 April 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49772497 

We are glad to find that, notwithstanding the various sources of amusement which, during the present year, have been rendered accessible to the public, our local Societies for the cultivation of music continue to maintain their standing as permanently-established institutions. Music as one of the fine arts must ever tend to refine the taste and improve the tone of the moral and intellectual sentiments and perceptions, in proportion to the extent to which its sublimities are permitted to exert their influence upon the mind. And this result will necessarily follow in the proportion in which the mind is trained to the appreciation of the excellences of the sterling compositions of the great masters of the tuneful art. The inhabitants of South Australia have long been credited for their love of music, and on Wednesday evening they gave another evidence of their desire to patronize its cultivation. On that occasion the Adelaide Choral Society gave its first quarterly concert for the season, which was attended by a large and highly-respectable audience. This was the more gratifying because of a select and recherché entertainment having been advertised for the same evening at Burton's Circus, under the special patronage of the Mayor and Corporation of the city of Adelaide. The programme included several compositions by Mozart, Beethoven, Bellini, Rossini, and Auber, adapted for a full orchestra, and in which the instrumentalists displayed their several abilities to very great advantage. The precision and promptitude with which the concerted pieces were performed elicited, and deservedly so, the hearty plaudits of the auditors.

In the first part of the programme, a fantasia for the pianoforte was performed by Miss Rowe in excellent style, and drew forth a rapturous encore. This young lady, who has been for several years the pupil of Herr Linger, is not only "a child pf promise," but has already attained to a high degree of proficiency as a pianist. In the second part, a trio for the piano, clarionet, and violin was performed by Herr Linger, Herr Heydecke, and Mr. Chapman, and which also was warmly encored. The principal vocalists were, a lady recently arrived from Hamburg, whose name has not been made public, Miss Petman, and Madame Cranz. The lady first alluded to sang a recitative and aria from Figaro, with great effect. Her voice is sweet and melodious, of considerable power and of great compass. Her reception was most enthusiastic. We hope her first appearance before a South Australian public will not be her last. Miss Petman sang two or three charming ballads with her usual taste, and was also honoured with a hearty encore.

Upon the whole, the concert reflected very great credit upon the members; and though a severe critic might perhaps be disposed to complain of the preponderance of the instrumentalists over the vocal performers, and possibly of the brass over the stringed instruments, yet the associated efforts of so large a number of performers, in a community like our own, all of whom have submitted to the most careful training, deserve, and will unquestionably continue to receive, the support of all who can appreciate the spirit-stirring strains of "mystic music."
"For he who is not moved by sweet sounds,
Is fit for treason, stratagems, and spoils."

ASSOCIATIONS: Theodor Heydecke (clarinettist); Sophie Lingelbach (vocalist)


*


31 May 1858, concert, Solomon Edwards (presenter), Linger (pianist)


"CONCERT AT GAWLER TOWN", South Australian Register (28 May 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49777164 

Mr. Edwards, of Gawler Town, has advertised his intention to give a public conceit of vocal and instrumental music on Monday evening next, at the large store in Murray-street, lately in the occupation of Messrs. Collison & Bayly. Schrader's band and several other professional musicians have been enraged, including Herr Linger, Miss Rowe, Miss Petman, and Mr. Sanderson.


"CONCERT AT GAWLER TOWN", South Australian Register (4 June 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49772816 

A correspondent has sent the following:-
"Mr. S. N. Edwards gave a grand miscellaneous concert of vocal and instrumental music, on Monday last, in Mr. Jas. Martin's corn store, assisted by the following professionals:- Vocalists: Miss Lingellbach, Miss Pitman, and Mr. Sanderson. Pianist: Miss Rowe. Mr. Edwards's song, "The Sea King" was encored, as were also two songs by Miss Lingellbach, sung in German. In fact, nearly all the songs and duets were encored, including a song by Miss Petman, "As if you did not know?" . . . The band which was in attendance was highly agreeable. It was to be regretted that Herr Linger was not in attendance, as announced in the programme, on account of sickness. The consequence was, the performance on the piano fell upon Miss Rowe, who played throughout the evening with entire success. Notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather there was a good attendance.

ASSOCIATIONS: Solomon Edwards (vocalist); Francis Sanderson (vocalist); Heinrich Schrader (bandmaster)


*


10 June 1858, concert, Indian relief fund (benefit), Linger (conductor)


[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (15 April 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207160872 

INDIAN RELIEF FUND. CONCERT. THE Musical ladies and gentlemen who intend to assist Mr. Linger and the Choral Society at the Concert to be given in aid of the above object, are invited to attend the first Rehearsal, which will take place at the Assembly Rooms, on Friday next, the 16th April, commencing at 7 o'clock. H. BETTERIDGE.


"INDIAN BELIEF CONCERT. TO THE EDITOR", South Australian Register (28 May 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49777187 

Sir - You are no doubt aware that the Choral Society, under the conductorship of Herr Linger, have been for some weeks past rehearsing for a grand concert of vocal and instrumental music, to be given in White's Room in aid of the Indian Relief Fund. But you may not be aware that attempts have been made to combine in the same concert the performance of sacred and secular music. I am assured that such has been the case, but that the conductor has resisted this violation of every correct principle of taste. I fully agree in the propriety of the step taken by Herr Linger in this respect. To my mind there is something extremely incongruous and even revolting in the proposal. A French savan steps out of the Church of Notre Dame and drives off to the theatre, but Englishmen have been too much accustomed to reverence sacred things to tolerate such associations. The combination at a concert of Handel's "Worthy is the Lamb" with a galopp, or Mozart's "Judge me, O Lord," with "Life's a bumper," is too absurd to be encouraged by a South Australian audience, should any such attempted combination be decided on. Trusting that the Society will confine the performances to either sacred or secular music,
I am, Sir, &c.,
CONSISTENCY.


"INDIAN RELIEF FUND", South Australian Register (2 June 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49774124 

We believe it is intended to close the various subscription-lists, and make up the amount for remittances by the end of the present month. The receipts of the amateur theatrical performance and those of the intended concert will of course be included, and both are likely to be very productive. We heard yesterday morning that nearly all the tickets for the former had been taken, those on hand being only 27 for the pit and some for the gallery. It is due to Mr. Solomon to state that, besides subscribing liberally to the fund, he has given up nearly the whole of his private box: and the additional tickets thus placed at the disposal of the Committee have been purchased by His Excellency the Governor. With regard to the concert, it was stated at the Committee meeting yesterday that Herr Linger had kindly offered to act gratuitously as conductor, and had secured the assistance of several members of the Choral Society. A Sub-Committee has been appointed, consisting of Messrs. Kingston, Dutton, and Ewing, to whom the details of the musical festival are to be confided. It is hoped that it will be one of unusual brilliancy, as in addition to the efficient aid already mentioned, Mr. R. B. White has kindly offered his gratuitous assistance, and the services of Madame Carandini, Mons. Laglaise, Sig. Grossi, and Mr. Lavenue will be brought into requisition. Several amateurs also of distinguished ability have promised to take part in the performance. The arrangement the Committee are desirous of carrying out is - for the first part to consist of sacred music by the members of the Choral Society, under the conductorship of Herr Linger; and for the second part to comprise a general selection of music, under that of Mr. R. B. White. The evening suggested for the concert is Thursday, the 10th inst., by which time the professional celebrities to whom we have referred will have returned from their provincial trip. It is understood that the performance will be patronised by His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief, Lady MacDonnell, and the whole of the members of the Relief Fund Committee.


"MUSICAL", Adelaide Observer (5 June 1858), 1 supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158120284 

We direct attention to the published programme of the concert to be performed on Thursday evening next, in aid of the Indian Relief Fund. The final rehearsal of the choruses took place yesterday evening, at the Shades, beneath White's Assembly Room, at which about fifty vocal and instrumental performers were present. There is every reason to believe that the concert will be one of the most brilliant ever performed in South Australia.


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (9 June 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49777025 

GRAND CONCERT in Aid of THE INDIAN BELIEF FUND,
Under the Patronage of HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR-IN-CHIEF AND LADY MACDONNELL, and the MEMBERS of the INDIAN RELIEF COMMITTEE.
To be held in WHITE'S ROOMS, on the EVENING of THURSDAY, June 10,
for which occasion all the available MUSICAL TALENT has been secured.
Including the Members of the Choral Society, Madame Carandini, M. Laglaise, Signor Grossi, Mr. Lavenu, Mr. R. B. White, and some Gentlemen Amateurs.
PROGRAMME.
PART I - SACRED MUSIC.
Conductor - Herr Linger.
1 Overture and Chorus, from Psalm xcvi. - The Choral Society - Naumann.
2. Aria - "Pro peccatis," from the "Stabat Mater," Signor Grossi - Rossini.
3. Air - "With verdure clad," from the "Creation," Madame Carandini - Haydn.
4. Chorus - "I will give thanks," The Choral Society - Mozart.
5. Aria - "Cujus animam," from the "Stabat Mater," M. Laglaise - Rossini.
6. Aria - "Why da the Nations so furiously rage," from the "Messiah," Mr. J. W. Daniel - Handel.
7. Chorus - "Hallelujah," from the "Messiah," The Choral Society - Handel.
An interval of ten minutes.
PART 2 - SECULAR MUSIC.
Conductor - Mr. Lavenu.
1. Grand Duett, for the Pianoforte - On subjects from Meyerbeer's Opera, "Les Huguenots," the Hon. F. S. Dutton, and A. Ewing, Esq. Commissariat Staff - Osborne.
2. Cavatina - "Come ruggiada cespite," from "Ernani," M. Laglaise - Verdi.
3. Solo, Violin - "Fantaisie Caprice," Mr. R. B. White, Pianoforte, A. Ewing, Esq. - Vieuxtemps.
4. Scena - from "Der Freyschutz," Madame Carandini - Weber.
5. Duetto "Obligato" - from "L'Elisir d'Amore," M. Laglaise and Signor Grossi - Donizetti.
6. National Air - "Rule Britannia," Madame Carandini.
7. Finale - "God Save the Queen," by the strength of the company.
The doors to open at half-past 7 o'clock, the Concert to commence at 8 precisely. Tickets - Reserved scats, 6s.; unreserved, 3s. are to be obtained of Nicholas James, jun., Secretary to the Indian Relief Fund, King William-street, and at the door on the evening of the performance.


"CONCERT IN AID OF THE INDIAN RELIEF FUND", South Australian Register (11 June 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49774419 

This entertainment, given under the patronage of His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief and Lady MacDonnell, took place on Thursday evening at White's Rooms. The promoters of the concert had determined on a somewhat bold experiment in devoting the first put of the programme to sacred music, and the second part to secular music. This would not have been attempted probably under ordinary circumstances, but as in this case it was highly desirable to secure all the available musical talent that could be got, the combination was excusable. It was rendered less apparent, too, and deprived of much of its incongruity, by the care with which the pieces for both parts of the entertainment had been selected. At 8 o'clock His Excellency and Lady MacDonnell arrived, the room being at that time quite filled, notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather.

The performance commenced with an overture and chorus by the Choral Society. The piece selected was a portion of the "Cantanti Domini" [sic] - one of the most magnificent of the Psalms - set to music by Naumann. No composer, perhaps, could clothe the words of this divine "song" in more beauty than that which they possess of themselves, and therefore it was, perhaps, that the overture fell somewhat flat, notwithstanding the care with which it was played. The slow and stately opening movement, the cheerful breaking in of the minor instruments, and the burst of music which follows, seeming to exemplify the words, "Let the heavens rejoice and let the earth be glad," were all carefully rendered, showing that no pains had been spared by the performers to do justice to the work of the composer. Passing over the "Pro Peccatis" of Signor Grossi, which was apparently sung with the disadvantage of a bad cold on the part of the singer, we come to the air "With verdure clad," of Madame Carandini. The talented songstress in this performance appeared in a new and even in a more favourable character than ever before her admirers in this colony. The chaste music of Haydn becomes her admirably - the many beautiful passages of this gem of the "Creation" seeming to gush from her lips almost without effort. It offered her no temptation to exert her voice into a strain - a practice too much encouraged in her operatic performances by the curious custom on the part of many of the audience to applaud most when the singing is loudest. The air being encored, "Angels ever bright and fair" was substituted, and sung with equal grace and feeling. Mozart's Chorus, "I will give thanks," was next given by the Choral Society, and this, as well as their next Chorus, "Hallelujah," was executed in a manner which, considering the calibre of voices at the disposal of the Society and all other circumstances, did them infinite credit. In this part of the programme, too, must be noticed the "Cujus Animam," by Laglaise. This is one of the most difficult airs of the "Stabat Mater" - the "Stabat Mater Dolorosa," known in the English version as "Tribulation." Its long sustained passages, requiring great power and flexibility of the vocal organs, is a severe test of any voice; and it is much to the credit of M. Laglaise to say that he sang it fairly. The disapprobation which accompanied his recall was more directed, we believe, against the practice of encoring such pieces as the one in question than against the performance of the singer.

An interval of 10 minutes followed this part of the entertainment. That having expired, the Hon. F. S. Dutton and Mr. A. Ewing, played a duet from the "Huguenots" on the pianoforte. Their execution was perfect, the latter named gentleman proving himself to be a master of the instrument to an extent seldom looked for and rarely met with in an amateur. On being encored, the overture to "Zampa" was substituted and played brilliantly. It is impossible to notice everything deserving of notice in this part of the evening's performance. A fantasia on the violin by Mr. R. B. White, however, demands special mention. Miska Hauser himself would not have disowned it. Madame Carandini's scena from "Der Freischutz," for which, on encore, she gave "Molly Asthore," was excellently sung. Equally so were the two diets from the "Elixir of Love," by Laglaise and Grossi, one piece including the comic scena between the love-smitten peasant and Doctor Dulcamara, the other the scene in which the lover, not having derived much benefit from the elixir, enlists in the regiment of Captain Belcora. The acting, even without theatrical dresses, was as amusing as the singing was good. "Rule Britannia" and "God save the Queen" followed, and thus concluded perhaps the best musical entertainment that has ever been given in Adelaide. The room was so crowded before the performance ended, that all the standing room near the door was occupied.

ASSOCIATIONS: Jean-Baptiste Laglaise (tenor vocalist); Enrico Grossi (bass vocalist); Francis Dutton (amateur pianist); Alexander Ewing (amateur pianist)


*


17 June 1858, concert, Maria Carandini (benefit), Linger (conductor, ? piano)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (17 June 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49771120 

WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOMS. FAREWELL COMPLIMENTARY BENEFIT TO MADAME CARANDINI. THIS EVENING (Thursday), June 17.
For some considerable time the inhabitants of Adelaide were without any species of public amusement, more particularly in the higher branches of art, until the advent of Madame Carandini and her talented party. We feel much indebted to her for having afforded us the opportunity of hearing the music of some of the great Italian operatic composers, as well as the more simple national ballads, and regret that the changeable season at which she arrived should have so considerably militated against her in a pecuniary point of view. We have, therefore, formed ourselves in Committee for the purpose of tendering her a Complimentary Benefit on Thursday evening, June 17, at White's Assembly Rooms, and trust that our endeavours to promote the interest of this lady, and, at the same time, to preserve our character as a music-loving community, will be well seconded by all those who appreciate talent and art . . .
Principal Performers:
MADAME CARANDINI. MISS TOZER. MONS. LAGLAISE. SIGNOR GROSSI. MR. R. B. WHITE. MR. J. W. DANIEL. MR. LAVENU. HERR LINGER.
And the Orchestra of the Choral Society.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
Overture - Orchestra - Beethoven.
Scena and Aria - "Infelice," from "Ernani" - Signor Grossi - Verdi.
Celebrated Air from Mozart's "Don Giovanni" - "Chide me, dear Masetto," Madame Carandini (Violincello obligato by Mr. Lavenu)
The Popular Song from "La Traviata" - "We'll drink to the beauty," Mons. Laglaise.
Rondo Brillante - Violin, Mr. R. B. White.
Irish Ballad - "Molly Asthore" (by desire), Madame Carandini - Lavenu.
Duet - "The Sailor Sighs," Miss Tozer and Mr. J. W. Daniel - Balfe.
Quartet from "The Puritani" - "A te o cara," Madame Carandini, Mons. Laglaise, Signor Grossi, and Mr. Daniel - Bellini.
An Interval of ten minutes.
PART II.
Selection from "The Siege of Corinth" - Orchestra - Rossini.
Grand Air - "Fly Hence each Idle Fear" (Matilda of Hungary), Madame Carandini (Violin obligato by Mr. R. B. White) - Wallace.
Descriptive Song - "The Newfoundland Dog," Mr. Daniel - H. Russell.
Duet - "Moments so Bright" ("Ernani") Madame Carandini and Mons. Laglaise - Verdi.
Buffo Song - "Miei rampolli" (by desire), Signor Grossi - Rossini.
Song from "The Swiss Cottage" - "Oh, bon heur extreme," Mons. Laglaise - Adam.
Scotch Ballad - "Jessie, the Flower of Dumblane," Madame Carandini.
Comic Duet - "You know," Madame Carandini and Mr. Lavenu - J. Parry.
Conductors - Herr Linger and Mr. Lavenu.


"MADAME CARANDINI'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (18 June 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49774704 

The visit of Madame Carandini to this colony with the professional gentlemen who accompany her as operatic, performers, is generally known to have been not very remunerative. This has resulted from various causes, but it is principally to be attributed to the circumstance that there have been, during the last few months, a greater number of places of amusement simultaneously opened in Adelaide than at any previous period of our colonial history. The demand exceeded the supply [sic]. In consideration of this, and in order to express their appreciation of Madame Carandini's talent as an accomplished vocalist, a number of influential gentlemen recently formed themselves into a Committee for the purpose of securing to her a benefit. A fare well concert was accordingly performed on Thursday evening, at which the company were assisted by several of our resident musicians, including Herr Linger, Mr. J. W. Daniel, Mr. R. B. White, Miss Tozer, and the Band of the Choral Society. The weather was favourable, and there was present one of the largest and most fashionable assemblages ever seen in Adelaide. We scarce need say that the performances were highly satisfactory. It would be difficult to convey an adequate idea of the enthusiasm which the talented "beneficiaire" excited by her finished vocalization. The effect in every instance was electric, and, as a consequence, was followed by thunders of applause. Monsieur Laglaise was also extremely effective, and was frequently applauded. His rendering of the song from the "Swiss Cottage," "Oh bonheur extreme," added very much to the pleasure of the audience, whilst his "Marseillaise Hymn" exhibited him before the company fired with the martial enthusiasm of the patriot, the Frenchman, and the man. Signor Grossi sang several pieces during the evening. The most successful of these was the favourite buffo song, "Miei rampolli," which was given in the confuoco, e brio, e vivace style of an accomplished maestro of sunny Italy. It was rapturously encored. Mr. R. B. White, by his very clever performances on the violin, gave an illustration of the truth of what has been said of another performer - "he produces rapture from a catgut," and of the very great difference which exists between an accomplished violinist and an ordinary fiddler. Mr. J. W. Daniel sang during the evening one of Russell's descriptive songs with great spirit. This gentleman, so well known to the colony for his musical ability, gave in this instance another proof of his excellent vocal powers. Without attempting the meaningless cadenza and unnatural embellishments by which singers of inferior taste and accomplishments seek to impose upon their auditors, Mr. Daniel always succeeds in pleasing those who hear him by his easy, finished, and thoroughly English style. By-the-by, we may here mention that the eight principal performers at this concert included native-born inhabitants of no fewer than five countries, namely, England, France, Germany, Italy, and South Australia. The evening's entertainment was concluded with one of Parry's extremely amusing duets, sung by Madame Carandini and Mr. Lavenu, and which excited the risible organs of the entire audience almost beyond control.


*


14 July 1858, concert (2nd quarterly), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor, composer)


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (13 July 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article781111 

CHORAL SOCIETY - On WEDNESDAY next, 14th July, the Adelaide Choral Society will give their second CONCERT of the Season at White's Assembly Room.
PROGRAMME
PART I.
1. Overture - La Dame Blanche - Boeildieu.
2. Glee - Bring the Song.
3. Chorus - Sacred Protector, from "Siege of Corinth" - Rossini.
4. Song - The Young Crusader's Bride - Glover.
5. Duo, Violin and Piano, from "Torquato Tasso." - Osborne & Jones.
6. Aria, from "Romeo and Juliet." - Bellini.
7. Chorus, from "Clemenza de Tito." - Mozart.
PART II.
8. Overture - Cymbeline - Linger.
9. Song - My Mountain Home - Walter Palmer.
10. Festal March, from "Catherine Cornaro." - Lachner.
11. Glee -The Watchman - Moore.
l8. Final Chorus, from "Idomes" - Mozart.
12. Song - Jenny Lind's Good Night - H. West.
Tickets can be obtained of Mr. Lower, and Mr. George White, King William-street; Mr. Clisby, Rundle-street; Mr. Chapman, or Mr. Linger.


"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", The South Australian Advertiser (15 July 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article781182 

The second quarterly concert of the above Society was given last evening, at White's Assembly Rooms, King William-street; the entertainment provided was most carefully selected, and reflects the greatest credit upon the Committee. The execution of the various difficult pieces was of the highest order; the opening overture selected for the occasion was "La Dame Blanche," by Boildieu; followed by selections from Rossini, Glover, Osborn, and Louis Bellini; and the celebrated chorus from "Clemenza di Tito," by that inimitable composer Mozart, formed the first part; the fire - the melodious-ness - the boldness of harmony - the inexhaustible invention which characterizes this great composer's works, was verified and made manifest in the fullest sense, and the audience seemed fully to appreciate both the beauty of the music, and the ability of the performers; but the great success of the evening was a duo on the violin and piano, from "Torquato Tasso," by Mr. W. Cobbin on the violin, and Herr Linger on the pianoforte, which was rendered in a style which reflects the greatest credit upon the violinist and the veteran of the province, whose execution upon the pianoforte, and profound musical talent, are too well known to require comment, and which elicited a unanimous encore from the audience.

The chorus hymn, "Sacred Protector," from the Siege of Corinth, Rossini, was most effectively performed by both vocalists and instrumentalists. The overture " Cymbeline, Herr Linger, in the second part was deservedly applauded; and the "Festal March from Catharine Cornaro, by Lachner, was efficiently performed by the orchestra. During the evening, Madame Cranz and Miss Pitman sang very creditably; and a glee by Miss Pitman and Messrs. Hill and Pounsett, deserves honourable mention. Mr. Chapman, as leader, merits the usual encomiums to which his excellent performance fully entitles him. The Concert was well attended, and we sincerely trust that this Society will meet the fullest support and encouragement for its disinterested efforts in improving the musical tastes of the public at large.


"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (15 July 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49781322 

The Choral Society's second concert for the season was given on Wednesday evening, at White's Assembly Room, before a respectable though rather a thin audience. The weather was gloomy and threatening in the early part of the evening, which probably deterred many of the subscribers from attending. At a later hour the rain fell in torrents. The performances consisted of several overtures and other concerted pieces, two or three choruses, several solos, glees, &c, all or which, without exception, were rendered in a very creditable manner. The instrumental pieces included an overture composed by Herr Linger. It is written in the true orthodox style, commencing with a stately andante movement, followed by an allegro. It contains many fine passages, some of which reminded us of one of Haydn's symphonies. There is, however, on the whole, great originality of conception, and sufficient indications of the great musical talent which Herr Linger is well known to possess. In the first part of the concert Mr. William Cobbln, a young violinist of great promise, took the audience somewhat by surprise with his very clever performance in a duet, arranged for the violin and piano. We believe it was his first appearance on any stage in so prominent a character. His style is smooth and clear yet by no means wanting in vigour. In the most rapid passages every note was distinctly heard, whilst in the slower movements the performer gave unmistakable evidence that he not only read the music before him, but felt its meaning. The duet was deservedly encored. Miss Pettman sang several songs during the evening. The most successful of these was "Jenny Lind's Good Night," which was given with so much spirit as to elicit a redemand. Madame Cranz also contributed considerably to the pleasure of the audience by her vocalization. The song of "My Mountain Home" in particular was sung by this lady with more than her usual taste and feeling. The "National Anthem" closed the evening's entertainment.

ASSOCIATIONS: William Cobbin junior (violinist); Henry Rothwell Pounsett (vocalist, composer)


*


19 July 1858, concert, Enrico Grossi (benefit), Linger (conductor)


"SIGNOR GROSSI'S BENEFIT CONCERT", South Australian Register (19 July 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49780035 

It will be seen by an advertisement in another part of this paper that Signor Grossi's farewell concert is announced for this evening in White's Assembly Room. During the recent operatic performances this gentleman was deservedly popular, not only as a cultivated vocalist, but also as an actor of considerable power. He subsequently became known as the possessor of very varied acquirements and numerous pupils owe to his tuition their proficiency in many enviable accomplishments. So well and so favourably known, Signor Grossi might perhaps have trusted to his popularity to secure a good benefit; but he had also the gratification of his supporters to consider, and consequently his programme presents a treat which could only be given by concentrating nearly all the musical talent of the city. It will be seen that Signor Grossi will sing some of the best of his buffo songs, and, with M. Laglaise, will give the celebrated duet obligato from "The Elixir of Love" - a performance which strikingly exhibits the superiority of the Italian buffo over English comic compositions. M. Laglaise will, among other charming morceau, give his spirit-stirring "Marseillaise," and two gentlemen amateurs will add their efforts to the vocal attractions of the entertainment. Herr Linger, Herr Kunze, and those young and talented performers Miss Rowe, Miss Pettman, and Mr. Cobbin, will be assisted by Mr. Chapman and the orchestra of the Choral Society, so that equal excellence may be expected in the "vocal gems" and the concerted pieces. It may not be out of place to state that Signor Grossi, although a foreigner, is the subject of a friendly Power, and held a few years ago a commission (we are informed) in a Sardinian cavalry regiment.


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (17 July 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article781262 

WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOMS. SIGNOR GROSSI'S BENEFIT.
MONDAY NIGHT, the 19th July, 1858.
Under distinguished patronage, and assisted by The celebrated Tenor, MONS. LAGLAISE, HERR LINGER and the ORCHESTRA of the ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY, MISS LOUISA ROWE, HERR KUNZE, MR. W. COBBIN, And Two GENTLEMEN AMATEURS.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture - "Hermann Schmidt" - Orchestra.
2. Cavatina Buffo - "Largo al Factotum," Sig. Grossi - Rossini.
3. Song - "I'm leaving thee in sorrow, Annie," Gentleman Amateur.
4. Song - "Then you'll remember me," Mons. Laglaise - Balfe.
5. Duet, Violin and Piano -"Torquato Tasso," Herr Linger and Mr. Cobbin - Osborne St. Louis.
6. (By desire) the celebrated Comic Duet, "Obligate" from the "Elixir of Love," Sîgnor Grossi and Mons. Laglaise - Donizetti.
Interval of 10 minutes.
PART II.
1. Selection from "Masaniello," Orchestra - Auber.
2. Cavatina - "As I view," "Sonnambula," Gentleman Amateur - Bellini.
3. Alia Buffo - "Miei Rampolli," "Cenerentola," Signor Grossi - Rossini.
4. Solo - Piano - "La Rose de Peronne," Miss Louisa Rowe - Henry Rosellen.
5. (By desire) - "La Marseillaise," Mons. Laglaise.
6. Duet - "Sul campo della glorio," "Belisario," Signor Grossi and Mons. Laglaise - Donizetti.
7. Triumphal March from "King Stephen," Orchestra - Beethoven.
Conductors - Herr Linger and Herr Kunze.
Doors open at half-past 7 o'clock; to commence at 8 o'clock precisely.
Tickets, 5s. each, to be obtained at Marshall's Music Repository, Currie-street; at the Blenheim Hotel, at Hillers, and Platts, Hindley-street, and of Mr. White.


"SIGNOR GROSSI'S BENEFIT CONCERT", South Australian Register (20 July 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49779195 

There was a good but not a crowded attendance on Monday evening at the concert given by Signor Grossi. As had been announced the orchestra was most complete, and the vocal department unusually strong. The various buffo airs by Signer Grossi were given with even more than ordinary spirit, and Laglaise, who was in most excellent voice, acted well up to him in the duets, and distanced all competition in his solos. The two gentlemen amateurs acquitted themselves most creditably, and were warmly applauded. The concerted pieces were given with all the precision and effect for which the Choral Society is so well known. Mr. Cobbin again surprised and delighted his hearers by his masterly performance on the violin, with Herr Linger on the piano, of the duet "Torquato Tasso," and Miss Rowe extorted an enthusiastic encore by her brilliant instrumentation of the solo "La Rose de Peronne." Signor Grossi, M. Laglaise, and Miss Pettman gave, on being recalled, substituted airs which were received with favour equal to the announced pieces, and on the whole the entertainment went off to the entire satisfaction of the audience, although we regret to say it was not as profitable as could be wished for Signor Grossi.


*


"ATTEMPTED BURGLARY", The South Australian Advertiser (7 August 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article781991 

An attempt was made early on Thursday morning [5 August] to effect an entrance into the premises occupied by Herr Linger, near North Adelaide. The parties, however, disturbed the inmates, and upon examination it was found that the putty had been removed from a pane of glass in the door leading from the yard into the kitchen. The parties have not yet been discovered.


*


15 August 1858, opening of the Catholic chapel, Port Adelaide, Linger (conductor)


"PORT ADELAIDE. OPENING OF THE CATHOLIC CHAPEL", The South Australian Advertiser (16 August 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article782310 

This edifice, which has recently been finished, was solemnly dedicated on Sundry morning, the 15th instant, as the Church of "The Immaculate Conception." The Very Reverend Mr. Ryan, Vicar-General, assisted by the Reverend Mr. Smith, C.C., Reverend Messrs. Lancioni [sic], Carrew, and Russel formed a procession round the exterior and interior of the building; after which ceremony the consecration took place. The Reverend Mr. Smith preached a most impressive sermon, taking his text from the 25th chapter of Exodus, v. 8. The usual ceremony of mass concluded the service. The Catholic Choir, conducted by Herr Linger, performed several beautiful sacred selections.

ASSOCIATIONS: Maurice Lencioni (priest, choral director, musician)


*


15 September 1858, concert, and 20 September, sacred concert, Mary Ann Pettman (presenter), Linger (conductor)


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (15 September 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article783337 

GRAND CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC.
WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOM.
MISS PETTMAN begs respectfully to inform her Friends and the Public generally that she will give a
GRAND CONCERT of SACRED MUSIC on Wednesday, the 15th inst.,
when she will be assisted by the whole strength of the Adelaide Choral and Sacred Harmonic Societies, and the Choir of Pirie-street Chapel.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture - Naumann.
2. Chorus - "Sing to the Lord" - Naumann.
3. Aria - "He shall Feed His Flock" - Handel.
4. Solo - "Oh! Call me Swift" (with orchestral accompaniment) - E. Taylor.
5. Ave Maria - F. Kuecken.
6. Te Deum Laudamus - Mozart.
Interval of Ten Minutes.
PART II.
7. Overture - Neukomm.
8. Duetto - "What Holy Calm" - Beethoven.
9. Song - "Charity" - Elsasser.
10. Chorus - "Praise the Lord" - Bergt.
11. Duetto - "O, Lovely Peace" - Handel.
12. Solo Pianoforte - "Vesper Hymn" - J. Schubert.
13. Chorus - "Hallelujah," "Messiah," Handel.
Conductor - Herr Linger.
Leader - Mr. Chapman.
Tickets, 3s.; Reserved Seats, 5s.
Tickets can be obtained from Messrs. White, Platts, Wigg, Hillier, Brenton, Lower, Clisby, and at the door on the Evening of the Concert.
Doors open at half-past 7 o'clock, to commence at 8 precisely.


"MISS PETTMAN'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (16 September 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49780973 

We regret to say that the stormy state of the weather rendered abortive the effort of Miss Pettman's musical friends to give to her a benefit concert on Wednesday evening. The concert was, indeed, performed as announced, but from the thin attendance it is feared that a considerable loss must have been sustained. Two or three alterations were made in the programme, in consequence of the indisposition of Madame Cranz and the absence of a lady pianist, the cause of whose non-attendance was not explained. The principal vocalists were Mrs. Gurner, Miss Pettman, Miss Tozer, and Mr. Daniel. Mr. Linger acted as conductor, and Mr. Chapman as leader. The whole force of the orchestra could not have numbered less than from 60 to 70 performers. This gave to the choruses a degree of power and grandeur, which, in some of the finest passages, approached even to sublimity. Bergt's "Praise the Lord in every nation," and the "Hallelujah" from the Messiah, in particular, were extremely effective. The lighter pieces included a very spirited solo, by E. Taylor - "O, call me swift" - which was sung by Mr. Daniel in his usual finished style, and was most warmly applauded. Miss Pettman sang two or three airs during the evening, the moat successful of which was Handel's "He shall feed His flock." The duett from Judas Maccabaeus, "O, lovely peace," was rendered with considerable taste and expression by Miss Pettman and Mrs. Gurner, and was, as it deserved to be, warmly encored. Previous to the performance of the finale, it was announced by Mr. Chapman that in consequence of the inclemency of the weather it had been arranged to repeat the concert on Monday evening, when he hoped Miss Pettman would be honoured with such an attendance as they all felt she so well deserved. This announcement was received with a hearty round of applause.


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (20 September 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article783495 

GRAND CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC.
Under the immediate patronage of the Lord Bishop of Adelaide.
Miss PETTMAN begs most respectfully to inform her friends and the public generally, that in consequence of the unfavourable weather on Wednesday evening, she has determined to repeat her GRAND CONCERT of SACRED MUSIC in White's Room, on the evening of
Monday, September 20, when she will be assisted be nearly all the musical talent in Adelaide (the members of the various Societies who took part in the Wednesday, evening's performances having again very kindly offered their services.)
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture - Orchestra - Naumann.
2. Chorus - "Sing to the Lord" - Naumann.
3. Aria - "He shall feed his flock," Miss Pettman - Handel.
4. Solo - "O, call me swift," Mr. Daniels - E. Taylor.
5. Duetto (with orchestral accompaniments) - "When through life's wilderness," Miss Tozer and Miss Pettman.
6. Trio - "Hark, the sweet bells of the Sabbath are ringing," Misses Pettman and Tozer and Mr. Daniels - Smith.
7. "Te Deum Laudamus" - Mozart.
Interval of 10 minutes.
PART II.
8. Overture - Orchestra - Neukomm.
9. Trio - "When shall we three meet again," Misses Tozer and Pettman and Mr. Daniels - Horsley.
10. Song - "Charity," Miss Tozer - Elsasser.
11. Chorus - "Praise the Lord" - Bergt.
12. Solo - "Bright Blissful State," Mrs. Gurner - Fawcett.
l8. Duetto - "O Lovely Peace," Mrs. Gurner and Miss Pettman - Handel.
14. Chorus - "Hallelujah," from the "Messiah" - Handel.
Conductor, Herr Linger. Leader, Mr. Chapman.
Tickets, Reserved Seats. 5s.; Back Seats, 3s.; may be obtained of Messrs. White, Platts. Wigg, Hillier, Brenton, Lower, Clisby, and at the door, on the evening of the Concert.
Doors open at half-past 7, to commence at 8 precisely.
Remember - Moonlight Night.


"MISS PETTMAN'S CONCERT . . .", The South Australian Advertiser (21 September 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article783546 

MISS PETTMAN'S concert was not so well attended as the character of the performance deserved. It was rather unfortunate that it should have been appointed to take place on an evening so replete with amusements as that of Monday. His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief and the Lord Bishop of Adelaide were present. The whole of the pieces were given in very good style, but the gems of the evening were the trios by Misses Pettman and Tozer, and Mr. Daniel. It is seldom indeed that Horsley's beautiful "When shall we three meet again," is heard to greater advantage. Not only was the singing excellent, but the symphonies and accompaniments by Herr Linger and Mr. Chapman were admirably performed; and, as well as "Hark the Sweet Bells of the Sabbath are ringing," were deservedly encored. "Ninkomm's Overture," [Neukomm's] at the commencement of the second part, notwithstanding a little fault at the commencement, was very creditably got through. Mrs. Gurner sang "Bright Blissful State," with great feeling, and the concert closed with Handel's Hallelujah chorus, to which the powerful choir and orchestra gave great effect.

ASSOCIATIONS: Mrs. Gurner (vocalist)


*


21 October 1858, concert (3rd quarterly), Adelaide Choral Society, Linger (conductor)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (21 October 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49781017 

CHORAL SOCIETY. - Under the Patronage of His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief and Lady MacDonnell.
THE THIRD GRAND CONCERT Of the Season will take place at WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOMS,
THIS EVENING (Thursday), October 21.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture - Subject, "God save the Queen" - F. Schoreider.
2. Glee - "Hark! the Curfew's Solemn Sound" - T. Attwood.
3. Chorus - "The Stars burn in Heaven," from "Preciosa" - Weber.
4. Song - "The Memory of Thee" - Crouch.
5. Duet - for Violin and Piano - Osborne and Louis.
6. Finale - from Opera "Othello" - Rossini.
PART II.
7. Overture - "To the Mill of Estaliers" - Reissiger.
8. Duet - "On a Sloping Bank Reclining" - A. Keller.
9. Ballet Music - from "Preciosa" - Weber.
10. Song - "Stars of Summer Night" - A. Landon.
11. Ballad - "I'm Leaving Thee in Sorrow Annie"
2. Gipsey March and Chorus - from "Preciosa" - Weber.
Reserved seats, 5s. Unreserved seats, 2s. 6d.
Conductor - Herr Linger. Leader - Mr. Chapman.


"GRAND CONCERT", The South Australian Advertiser (22 October 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article784634 

The Adelaide Choral Society held their third concert last evening at White's Assembly Rooms. The performances were announced to be under the patronage of the Governor, but from some cause or other His Excellency was not present. The audience was tolerably numerous. The orchestra was highly efficient under the leadership of Herr Linger, and the mode in which many of the pieces were preformed would have been highly creditible to a band of professional musicians. Amongst the instrumental performers, Mr. Chapman's manipulation of the violin excited admiration and in the duet, fifth on the list, an encore was loudly called for. Miss Pettman's powerful voice and good execution in the various songs allotted to her told very successfully. Throughout the performances were of a very superior description. It is gratifying to the community in Adelaide to know that so accomplished a band of amateur musicians is to be found as the Adelaide Choral Society contains.


"THURSDAY EVENING'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (22 October 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49785941 

The Adelaide Choral Society, one or the oldest institutions in South Australia, gave its third concert for the season on Thursday evening, in White's Assembly Room. His Excellency the Governor and suite were present. The audience was not so large as we have seen on former occasions, arising probably from the circumstance that there were several private balls and parties the same evening. The programme contained a very choice selection or vocal and instrumental pieces, the greater portion of which were altogether new to a South Australian audience. We refer more especially to some sparkling gems selected from Weber's brilliant opera of "Preciosa," which were executed with considerable skill and spirit. The chorus, "The stars burn in heaven," in particular, was admirably rendered. Amongst the minor pieces deserving special notice may be mentioned a duo for the violin and pianoforte, which was admirably performed by Mr. Chapman and Herr Linger; "Hark! the curfew's solemn sound," sung by Miss Pettmann and Messrs. Pounsett and Hill, and a pretty duet, "On a sloping band reclining," by the two former vocalists. Several of the pieces performed during the evening were encored. The amusements were concluded with Weber's Gipsy March and Chorus, "Viva! Viva!" On the whole the concert was a credit to the Society, and evinced the great care which must have been taken to produce so many new pieces of acknowledged sterling merit, and in such admirable style.


*


"HANDEL FESTIVAL", South Australian Register (26 October 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49785122 

The circumstance of the centenary of the immortal Handel occurring in April, 1859, has suggested the idea of commemorating the event by the performance in Adelaide of two of his most sublime compositions, namely, "The Messiah" and "Alexander's Feast." A preliminary meeting for making arrangements for this purpose was held on Monday evening, at White's Room; the Hon. C. Davies in the chair. Herr Linger, Mr. Daniel, and the leading members or the Choral and Sacred Harmonic Societies were present, and a Sub-Committee was appointed to take the necessary steps to carry out the objects contemplated in a manner in every respect worthy of the occasion. We have no doubt but that the undertaking will produce such a combination of musical talent as has never before occurred in the colony.


"HANDEL FESTIVAL", South Australian Register (2 November 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49781838 

The Committee appointed to make arrangements for the Handel musical festival have determined upon admitting no performers, either vocal or instrumental, to the orchestra, but such as are proficients, the object being to produce the greatest possible effect with the smallest possible number. Circulars have been issued to about a hundred persons of known musical ability, soliciting their cooperation. Arrangements have also been made for an adequate supply of music from Melbourne. The vocalists will be under the conduct of Mr. Daniel, and the instrumentalists under Herr Linger. It is intended that each division rehearse apart weekly, and that full rehearsals take place once a month.


"THE HANDEL FESTIVAL", The South Australian Advertiser (9 November 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article785215 

We are glad to hear that the Committee who have undertaken the duty of organizing a force to celebrate the Handel Festival have reason to hope that their efforts will be satisfactorily aided by the musical talent of the colony. The most efficient members of the Choral and Harmonic Societies have volunteered their services, and there are already upwards of 50 performers down on the Committee's list, although it was only last week that their preliminary rehearsal took place. The Committee, we believe, confidently rely upon at least 100 vocalists and instruments, and they are acting with vigor to secure perfection, having sent to Melbourne for a large quantity of music, which is daily expected. The vocalists, we understand, will be under the conduct of Mr. Daniels, and the instrumentalists under Herr Linger. The services of those only who are proficients will be accepted, so that the performances shall be worthy the occasion. As the festival will not take place till April next, and as each division will rehearse a part weekly, with a full rehearsal once a month, the Committee anticipate presenting to the public such a performance as has never before been got up in these colonies.



  1859



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1859:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1859 


*


18 February 1859, concert, Adelaide Choral Society, Adelaide Sacred Harmonic Society, Linger (co-conductor, composer)


"THE ADELAIDE CHORAL AND SACRED HARMONIC SOCIETIES", The South Australian Advertiser (7 February 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article788692 

The members of these Societies will meet this evening at the Hamburg Hotel, at half-past 7 o'clock, for the purpose of blending both Societies harmoniously together. It is understood that the management of the new Society will be placed in the hands of Messrs. Linger, Daniel, and Chapman, who have so frequently and so ably gratuitously catered for the musical entertainment of the public.


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (17 February 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49902938 

GRAND CONCERT.
On, FRIDAY, the 18th February.
The united Orchestras of the CHORAL SOCIETY and SACRED HARMONIC SOCIETY, assisted by Messrs. Heydecke and Schrader, will give a GRAND CONCERT in AID of the FUNDS for the RELIEF of the SUFFERERS from the BUSH FIRES.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture to the Opera "Euryanthe" - C. M. Weber.
2. Solo and Chorus from "Norma" - Bellini.
3. Ballad, "Are you Coming?" - G. Linley.
4. Variations for Clarionet - Neumann.
5. Duet, "The Sisters' Meeting" - F. Romer.
6. Chorus, "The Many Rend the Skies" - Handel.
Interval.
PART II.
7. Symphony in B flat - F. Haydn.
8. Song of the Blind Girl to her Harp - S. Glover.
9. Air de Ballet, from the Opera "King Alfred" - C. Linger.
10. Finale, from the Opera "Euryanthe" - C. M. Weber.
11. Fantasia, from "Othello," for Cornet a Piston
12. Final Chorus, from "Alexander's Feast" - Handel.
Concert to commence at 8 o'clock precisely.
Admission - Reserved seats, 5s.; unreserved, 3s.
Subscribers to Choral Society admitted on showing their tickets.


"THE CONCERT FOR THE RELIEF OF THE SUFFERERS BY THE BUSH FIRES", The South Australian Advertiser (19 February 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article789300 

The concert given on Friday evening, jointly by the Choral and Sacred Harmonic Societies, at White's Rooms, for the benefit of the sufferers by the late extensive busk-fires, was not very numerously attended, there not being more than about a hundred persons present. Where a number of ladies and gentlemen volunteer to exercise their abilities for the promotion of a benevolent object, it would be ungenerous to criticise too closely, if their performances were considered not quite up to the mark; but in this instance no such consideration interferes with fair comments, the performances being really excellent throughout.


*


13 and 14 April, and 21 April, 1859, concerts, Handel Commemoration Festival, Linger (conductor)


"THE HANDEL COMMEMORATION", South Australian Register (25 March 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49898110 

We stated some months ago that a Committee had been appointed to make arrangements for a grand musical festival, to be held in April next, that being the centenary of the death of the celebrated George Frederick Handel. The Committee having issued numerous invitations to professional and amateur performers, inviting their co-operation, the call was warmly responded to, and during the last three months rehearsals have taken place two and even three times a week. It Is intended to perform "The Messiah" on the anniversary of Handel's death (April 13), and his "Alexander's Feast" on the following evening. The orchestra will be under the joint direction of Herr Linger and Mr. J. W. Daniel, both of whom have entered into the proposal with the enthusiasm of men devoted to the art. His Excellency the Governor has not only promised his patronage, but he expressed himself much interested in the project to the deputation who waited upon him on Thursday afternoon. The Committee have undertaken a work involving great difficulties. We hope their efforts to render the sublime productions they have selected effective will be proportioned to the magnitude of the undertaking, and that the result may be as satisfactory as can either be expected or desired.


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (13 April 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49904836 

HANDEL COMMEMORATION FESTIVAL. PATRONS: His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief . . . On Wednesday next, the 13th instant, the Oratorio MESSIAH, and on Thursday, the 14th instant, ALEXANDER'S FEAST will be performed at White's Assembly Rooms, in commemoration of the immortal Handel, Conductor - Herr Linger. Choral Master - Mr. J. W. Daniel. Leader - Mr. Chapman . . .


"THE HANDEL FESTIVAL", South Australian Register (14 April 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49902126 

All who were at White's Room last evening, at least all who are sensible of the potent influence of that divinest science which
"takes the prisoned soul
And laps it in Elysium,"
must have enjoyed no inconsiderable treat. The very occasion - an In Memoriam to the genius of Handel, to whom belongs, par excellence, the fame of having clothed Christian verities in grandest tones - was attractive and congenial; while the thought that the tribute of admiration was being paid on the very day on which a hundred years before the soul of that mighty musician passed to the quiristry of eternity spread a diapason of deep and solemn feeling beneath the more pleasing emotions which the intention of the evening awakened . . .

The total number of the choir was close upon 70.

The following is a list of the instrumental performers with the instruments which they severally played upon:- Violins - Chapman, White, Lower, King, Schrader; viola - Schrader; violoncellos - Lillywhite, Allen, Marshall, double bass - Betteridge, Schrader; flutes - Proctor, Spiller; clarionets - Heydecke, Sumpse, Clisby; harmonium - Light; saxe horns - Vincent, Wheatley; cornopean - Wheatley.

Misses Pettmam, Tozer, and Rowe were the principal female voices of the evening, Madame Anna Cranz being prevented from singing by an extremely severe cold. Messrs. Daniel and Ball were the principal male voices. Mr. Linger was the conductor and Mr. Chapman leader, while Mr. Daniel filled the important office of choral-master on the occasion.

The oratorio selected was the "Messiah," the greatest of all Handel's compositions, and of which it may be told that one knows not which to admire the more, the majesty of the theme or the pathos and power with which it is musically treated. No one could listen to some of the recitatives, airs, and choruses last evening without being impressed, not only with the ideality of music, the sense being in the sounds as well as in the words, but that Handel, in the soarings of his musical soul, in the creations of his unrivalled genius, had risen to the greatness of that high argument which he desired to illustrate. This may be said with especial reference to the air, "He shall feed His flock," in which there is the sweet ease and simplicity of rural life embodied in the music equally as in the language; and in the chorus, "For unto us a child is born, and His name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor," &c. In each case the music is only a second utterance of that which is embodied in the language - is a tone picture of that which was before the musician's mind - is a melodic conception answering to the mental conceptions of which Handel was the subject when he composed it . . .

The oratorio opened well, the voices and instruments blending admirably and keeping well together, the only fault being, if fault there was, a little flatness, which, however, soon wore off and gave place to a well-sustained vivacity throughout - a vivacity which, with the accuracy and taste by which the execution of the several pieces were characterized, secured the unflagging interest of the audience for a period of four hours. This of itself would be an undoubted testimony to the excellence of the performance were no other judgment exercised about it. But some of the airs and choruses were very sweetly and effectively rendered - as for instance "O Thou that tellest," by Miss Tozer; "He shall feed His flock," by Miss Pettman; and "But Thou didst not leave," by Miss Rowe; "The people that walked in darkness,' by Mr. Daniel; and "The trumpet shall sound," by Mr. Ball. The cornet-a-piston , substituted for the trumpet, lacked a true clarion strain and was somewhat too prominent, but the air, on the whole, was very effectively given. The choruses were generally performed with credit, and in some instances in a manner worthy of the highest encomiums. Among the tatter may be classed, "And He shall purify the sons of Levi," "For unto us a child is born," and the glorious old "Hallelujah," and the terminal chorus, "Worthy is the Lamb." Altogether, the festival, so far as the "Messiah," is worthy of the colony, exhibiting a respectable proficiency in music, and giving promise of still further improvement in that science.

The conduct of the audience, which was one of the most respectable we have ever seen in the room, was of the most chaste and appropriate character - quiet, subdued, and serious, without noisy demonstrations of applause of impatience; indeed for the latter there was no opportunity given.

We are glad to learn that the number of tickets sold amounted to 612, and that something like £90 will have been realized last evening towards the arrears of the two Societies now amalgamated. If this evening's entertainment be equally patronised, it is to be hoped the new Society will be placed in a favourable position for future practice and progress.

We are given to understand that carriages are to be ordered for 10 o'clock this evening.


"THE HANDEL COMMEMORATION FESTIVAL", The South Australian Advertiser (15 April 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article791585 

This grand concert, which we were only able briefly to notice in our issue of yesterday, was, without exception, the best ever given in the colony. White's spacious room was crowded in every part, and a large number of the audience were compelled to stand all the evening. The presentation of the sublime oratorio of the "Messiah" by means of the combined talent of the Choral and Sacred Harmonic Societies, under distinguished patronage, offered such an attraction to the lovers of fine music and intellectual enjoyment as has not been previously afforded in the colony, and the overflowing audience was a sufficient evidence of the appreciation entertained by the Adelaide public for the productions of the illustrious composer. Great praise is due to the Committee for all the arrangements, which appeared to be perfect . . .

THE HANDEL FESTIVAL, SECOND EVENING.

The second performance of the Handel commemoration festival, came off on Thursday evening, April 14, at White's Rooms. The crowd was not so great as on the first occasion, but the room was comfortably full. All the beauty and fashion of Adelaide appeared to be congregated. His Excellency the Governor and suite arrived shortly after the performance commenced. After the opening of the overture the colossal figure of Handel was displayed, and afforded a picturesque back-ground to the choir of singers. The performance consisted of "Alexander's Feast," and the music was of a more lively description than the solemn and pathetic airs with which the Messiah abounds.

The opening recitative descriptive of the hero of the scene and his lovely Thais by his side, was given by Mr. Daniel very effectively. The aria immediately following was allotted to Madame Cranz, but, owing to a severe cold under which she was suffering, it was omitted by that lady and rendered by Mr. Daniel, who kindly undertook the song without any rehearsal. The brilliant chorus, "Happy Pair," was given by the choir with great effect; the performers evidently entering into the spirit of the words "None but the brave deserve the fair" with great zest.

The following recitatives, "Timotheus plac'd on high," by Mr. Daniel, and "The song began from Jove," by Miss Pettman, ushered in the beautiful chorus, "The list'ning crowd," which is more remarkable for the brilliancy of the instrumentation than the vocal part. To this piece the orchestra did full justice. The recitative, "The praise of Bacchus," introduced the principal basso, Mr. Ball, in the character of Bacchus. This gentleman sung the aria allotted to him in his usually good style.

The power of music, represented by the recitative, "Soothed with the sound," was given by Mr. Daniel, and immediately followed by "He chose a mournful muse," sung by Miss Rowe, a young lady fast rising into musical celebrity, but who has not yet had sufficient experience in the style of singing called "recitative," inasmuch as she actually sings the music instead of semi-speaking it; and commits a fault in the use of the glide - an embellishment in the vocal art not required in recitatives. The aria, "He sung Darius, great and good," was very effectively given by Miss Rowe; and the chorus to the same words appeared to be particularly soft and sweet. The concluding bars, "without a friend to close his eyes," were delivered with great precision and feeling. The next aria, by Miss Pettman, "Softly sweet, in Lydian measure," certainly the gem of melody in the ode, was sung very tastefully. Mr. Chapman's obligato on the viola came in with great effect.

The following aria, descriptive of the hero's choice between war and love - "War he sung is toil and trouble" - was rendered by Mr. Daniel in a very spirited manner. Miss Rowe then gave "The prince unable to conceal his pain" tastefully, and the chorus "The Many rend the skies" concluded the first part of the ode.

The second part opened with a very brilliant movement "Now strike the golden lyre again," an accompanied recitative sung by Mr. Daniel, and followed by the startling chorus "Break his bands of sleep asunder," a composition most certainly fitted to destroy all influence of somnolency on the listeners. The baritone aria, "Revenge," was excellently performed by Mr. Daniel. The aria "I have led the way" was then sung by Miss Pettman without, we believe, any previous rehearsal, although this aria was allotted to Madame Cranz. Despite of this, however, the young lady acquitted herself very creditably.

We pass over the next choruses, merely observing that they were given with great precision, especially "Let old Timotheus," a composition which we must certainly set down as especially worthy of the mighty master. The distinct melody continues to pervade the whole, while in point of fugue we have seldom heard anything to excel it. A very sweet duet in the pastoral style was then given by Miss Pettman and Miss Tozer. We regret that the latter young lady had not more work allotted to her in this performance, as she possesses an unusually sweet and flexible voice. The chorus, "Your voices tune," concluded the ode; and we trust, in the words of the last movement, that this Festival "may prove sacred to harmony and love." "God save the Queen" was sung by the full orchestra before the audience separated; and the curtains were, with excellent taste, immediately drawn over the statue of Handel, as if to indicate that the performance of his compositions had ceased.

Thus terminated one of the best musical entertainments ever witnessed in the colony.


"HANDEL COMMEMORATION FESTIVAL", South Australian Register (18 April 1859), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49904207 


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (19 April 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article791723 

HANDEL FESTIVAL. - In consequence of the complete success of the performance last week in honor of the immortal Handel, and the universally expressed desire that the sublime Oratorio of the MESSIAH should be repeated, the Committee have the pleasure to announce its repetition on THURSDAY, April 21 . . .


"HANDEL FESTIVAL. TO THE EDITOR", South Australian Register (20 April 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49900925 

Sir - As a constant reader of your valuable paper I feel called upon to make a few remarks upon last week's performances of Handel's oratorios on the occasion of the centennial anniversary of that great composer's death. All those initiated are acquainted with the vast difficulties which even in Europe beset performances of this kind; and yet there each individual member of the orchestra, each solo singer, each performer in the chorus even, is a finished musician, and the conductor hardly ever hears or knows anything of practice - meetings, rehearsals, and the like - preparatory steps which the is content to entrust to his maitre de concert et de choeurs, taking the chief rehearsals only under his own direction. But how much more numerous are the obstacles that lie in the way of a conductor here as a prelude to such undertakings as the above.

A motley collection of musicians and amateurs for an orchestra, vocalists only in part equal to the execution of such lofty strains, and with such slender materials (for our young colony can muster no better), to have heard an oratorio of Handel's executed with even tolerable precision is surely a sufficient proof of the pains taken by the conductor, and of real zeal on his part to contribute his mite towards the perpetuation of the immortal master's fame.

It is, therefore, with pain and astonishment that I observe how, in your report of Thursday's and Friday's performances, every individual performer receives his due meed of notice or praise, whereas Herr Linger, the man who bore the whole burden, by his exertions earned success for the whole work, is scarcely mentioned, his merits are ignored, his services unrecognised. Doubtless, the modest mind of Mr. Linger can find in the success of his undertaking ample consolation for the indignity thus offered to him, and a sufficient reward for past trouble and anxiety in the consciousness of having well performed an arduous duty; but is it well that this city should, through her press, bear the stigma of ingratitude towards that very one of her citizens who alone enabled her worthily to celebrate Handel's death-day?
I am, Sir, &c.,
GEORGE FISCHER.
Tanunda, April 16, 1859.

[Mr. Fischer, we think, has not read so carefully as he might have done the reports he refers to, or he would have seen Mr. Linger's name mentioned in that of the former of the two concerts as having been leader on the occasion. The commendation bestowed on the execution of the various choruses must necessarily have amounted indirectly to a testimony commendatory of Mr. Linger's skill and pains taking effort prior to tho performances and at the time. In the report which was compiled for the Summary of Monday last the following passage appears: -

"The 'Messiah' and 'Alexander's Feast' were the compositions selected, and the manner in which they were executed reflected the greatest credit on those to whom the supervision of the rehearsals and the conducting of the concerts were assigned, at well as upon the performers in general."

The supervision of the rehearsals mainly devolving upon Mr. Linger, and he being named in the report as having been conductor on the occasion of the public performances, we can safely acquit ourselves of any forgetfulness of the degree in which Mr. Linger, by his exertions and skill, most undoubtedly contributed to the success of the Festival. - Ed.]


"THE HANDEL FESTIVAL", Adelaide Observer (23 April 1859), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158127096 

On Thursday evening the "Messiah" was repeated before a large assembly at White's Room. Probably the audience exceeded 500 persons. We noticed the first performance of this sublime creation of Handel's genius at length, and we think every judicious person who was present on both occasions will agree with us in opinion that the second concert was quite equal to the first in its general effects. It would be absurd to expect anything approaching to the grandeur with which the "Messiah" is produced in Exeter Hall, where all the principal performers are professional musicians, including perhaps many of the most talented vocalists and instrumentalists in the world, our musical societies are almost entirely composed of amateurs, and most of whom have to be subjected to a long course of training in order to render them efficient in their several parts. Taking these considerations into the account, it must be admitted that the performance of the "Messiah," as it was rendered on Thursday evening, was a decided triumph. It is not necessary again so particular the several solos and choruses, any farther than to remark that Miss Rowe sang with considerable taste, and with extreme accuracy the difficult chorus [sic], "Rejoice greatly," which was omitted on the former occasion, in consequence of a severe cold under which Madame Cranz was then suffering. Also, that the air, "How beautiful are the feet," was very well indeed rendered by Master Watson, one of the choristers, we believe, of St. John's Church. The other solos were sung by Miss Pettman, Miss Tozer, Mr. Daniel, and Mr. Ball, all of whom appeared as if inspired with a determination to exert themselves to the utmost in rendering as effective as possible the several parts allotted to them. As a whole, the choruses were performed with marked precision and spirit, though in one or two of those in the first part, which are in the minor key, and contain several intricacies of a singularly elaborate character, some indications of a want of promptitude were discernible. The "Hallelujah Chorus" was, as on the first occasion, performed in a very masterly and spirited manner; as were also, "For unto us a child is born," "All we like sheep," "Their sound is gone out," and "Lift up your heads," to which may be added the finale," Worthy is the Lamb." In concluding this brief notice we cannot refrain from alluding to the extremely effective manner in which the pastoral symphony was performed, or the excellence of Miss Tozer's singing in that exquisitely beautiful air, "He was despised." We must also accord our meed of praise, to Messrs. Ball and Schraeder for their performances in that triumphant song, "The trumpet shall sound." The effect was thrilling. Of Herr Linger, Mr. Daniel, and Mr. Chapman, to whose united exertions we imagine the final success of the performance is mainly to be attributed, it is unnecessary to say more than that we earnestly hope they may remain united, and that at some future time they will achieve even still greater triumphs. Having succeeded so well in their first efforts to produce an entire oratorio, and having been so well patronised by the public, the Society under their training have the strongest inducements to make further attempts of a similar kind and to hope for similar results. We would suggest Handel's "Judas Maccabaeus" and "Joshua," and Mendelssohn's "Elijah" and "St. Paul," as amongst the many compositions of a high classical character which the Society might possibly succeed in producing with credit to themselves, and which we are sure would be appreciated by the public. Let the attempt be made in good earnest and it will succeed.


"HANDEL FESTIVAL", Adelaide Observer (30 April 1859), 1 supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158127152 

The Committee of the recent concerts in commemoration of Handel, the immortal composer, met at the Hotel Europe, Grenfell-street, on the 29th inst., for the purpose of auditing the accounts and for other business relative to the concerts alluded to. Mr. Alderman Glandfield presided. The Secretary read the financial statement, from which it appeared that the total receipts of the three performances amounted to £192 7s. 6d. The expenses were £90 9s 10d., thus leaving a balance of £101 17s. 8d. in favour of the conductors, with which they intend to clear off the old accounts standing against the Adelaide Choral and Sacred Harmonic Societies. A testimonial, thanking the persons who assisted in producing the oratorios for their valuable assistance was drawn up, submitted to the meeting, and, after a few trifling emendations, agreed to, and a lithographed copy of each, signed by the Chairman and the Conductors, directed to be forwarded to the individuals in question. The Chairman intimated that at a meeting of the Agricultural Society that afternoon it was agreed that a memorial be presented to the Government for an Exhibition Building in connection with the Botanical Garden, and which it was suggested might be available for concerts, &c. A proposition, tendering their support to the same, was moved by Mr. Daniel, seconded by Herr Linger, and carried unanimously. A resolution was passed that a general meeting of the new Society be held one day next week, of which due notice will be given in our advertising columns.


*


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (3 May 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article792269 

A REPORT having been extensively circulated that Mr. LINGER is about to leave the colony, he hereby begs to inform his patrons and the public generally that such is not the case. Having a few hours to spare, he is open to receive more pupils for the piano and singing.


ASSOCIATIONS: Frederick Lower (violin) Nicholas Proctor (flute); George Thomas Light (harmonium); Emanuel Spiller (flute); James Wheatley (saxe-horn, cornopean); George Vincent (saxe-horn); Mr. Ball (bass vocalist); Master Watson (treble vocalist)


*


18 May 1859, conversazione, St. Paul's Church, Adelaide, Linger (pianist)


"ST. PAUL'S CHURCH CONVERSAZIONE", The South Australian Advertiser (19 May 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article792966 

A social meeting of the friends of St. Paul's Church was hold on Wednesday evening, May 18, in White's Room. Considering the boisterous and inclement state of the weather, the assemblage was more numerous than could have been expected; and amongst those present we noticed the Lord Bishop of Adelaide, the Ven. Archdeacon Woodcook, Revs. Cannons, Russell, Farr, and many of the clergy of the diocese. The company sat down to tea at 6 o'clock, and the chair was taken by the Lord Bishop at 7 o'clock. After several excellent addresses, the members of the Harmonic Society, who had kindly volunteered their services on the occasion, commenced the musical part of the entertainment with the fine chorus "O, Father," from Judas Maccabaeus, which they rendered very effectively, under the direction of Mr. Daniel. Herr Linger acted as leader on the occasion. The Rev. J. H. Farr then read a paper on "Delhi and its People," contributed by the Rev. J. Stuart Jackson, M.A., late Senior Missionary at Delhi . . .

After a short interval of conversation, Miss Rowe sung the beautiful solo, "Eve's Lamentation." Several portions of this song afforded full scope for the splendid tones of voice which this gifted young lady possesses and those parts wore properly and effectively rendered. There was, however, a want of that expression and animation which should accompany a song of this description. However, it pleased the audience extremely, an encore was called for, and "Star of the Evening" was substituted, a ballad much more suited to Miss Rowe's style of singing. This met with a warm reception. [Next was] A very interesting paper, entitled "Recollections of Sebastopol," by Mr. F. Needham, of H. M. S. Brunswick, lately engaged in the Crimean war . . .

Master Watson, a boy of about twelve years of age, sung "How beautiful are the feet," a very difficult solo and recitative, with surprising accuracy and good taste. The song was loudly applauded, and immediately encored. The grand chorus, "Praise the Lord," by the full orchestra, closed the entertainment, and deserved particular notice, as an example of great practice, accurate time, and excellent taste.


*


15 July 1859, soiree, South Australian Institute, Linger (co-conductor)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (15 July 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49830246 

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE. - SOIREE.
Subscribers and the Public are informed that the QUARTERLY SOIREE will take place in WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOM, THIS EVENING (Friday), July 15, 1859.
His EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR-IN-CHIEF will PRESIDE.
THE LECTURE will be delivered by F. H. NEEDHAM, Esq., R.N. Subject - "Reminiscences of the Sebastopol Campaign."
The Deutsche Liedertafel (under the conductorship of Herr Linger) have kindly given their assistance;
the other portion of the Musical Entertainment will be conducted by Mr. J. W. Daniel.
PROGRAMME.
Chorus - "Mueller's Wanderlied (the Miller's Wander Song), the Deutsche Liedertafel.
Duet - "Oh! Maritana!" (Maritana), Miss C. A. Tozer and Mr. J. W. Daniel - W. V. Wallace.
Solo - Violin, Mr. R. B. White, R.A., accompanied by Miss Polhill - Alard.
Song - "As I View these Scenes so Charming" (La Sonnambula), Mr. H. Christen - Bellini.
Quintett - "The Magdalen College Song" - Monk.
LECTURE.
Chorus - "Coeur Koenig" (the King of Hearts), the Deutsche Liedertafel
Duet - "Well, if I must speak my mind," (Siege of Rochelle), Miss C. A. Tozer and Mr. J. W. Daniel - Balfe.
Solo - Piano, Mr. R. B. White, R.A. - Prudent.
Song - "The Four-Leaved Shamrock," Miss C. A. Tozer.
Chorus - "Lob des Kriegerstandes" (Praise of a Soldier's Life), the Deutsche Liedertafel.
Finale - "Rule Britannia" . . .


"SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE", Adelaide Observer (16 July 1859), 1 supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158128577 

. . . The music of the evening was of a very excellent order, and was led off by the Deutsche Liedertafel, under the conduct of Herr Dinger in admirable style. The chorus performed was "Mueller's Wanderlied," which was given in the precision as to time for which Germans are so noted, and with a great amount of spirit and accuracy in other points of view. Indeed, when speaking of this body of gentlemen, who ministered gratuitously on the occasion, we may say that their performance gave considerable eclat to the conversazione, and their absence on future occasions will cause considerable disappointment. It may be fairly presumed that many of the German portion of the inhabitants of Adelaide and its vicinity avail themselves of the benefits of the Institute; and it is only reasonable to expect that they should contribute in some degree to the success of its conversaziones. The encores which the band received may be a proof beyond anything which a critic might say of the sincere appreciation by the audience of their services. Mr. Christen, also a German, sang a song from "La Sonnambula;" but it was evident he was suffering from some affection of the throat, which prevented him winning upon the audience as he generally does . . .


"THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE", The South Australian Advertiser (15 October 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1198162 

The annual meeting of the members of the South Australian Institute was held on Friday evening . . . THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNORS OF THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE. October 14, 1859 . . . The Board felt themselves under particular obligations to Herr Linger and the members of the Deutsche Liedertafel for their kind assistance in the musical portion of the July soiree, a favor which was so highly appreciated by the audience that the Board intend to ask tor a repetition of it on an early occasion . . .


ASSOCIATIONS: Adelaide Liedertafel ("Deutscher Lidertafel", founded 1858, as distinct from previous groups similarly described)


*


4 November 1859, music prize judging, Gawler Institute; first performance, 12 December; and publication


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (21 September 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1197329 

GAWLER INSTITUTE.
ANNIVERSARY ENTERTAINMENT.
Preliminary Announcement.
The Committee have determined to celebrate the Second Anniversary of the Foundation of this Institute on a day to be named, early in November, by an entertainment to consist of an Amateur Theatrical Performance and Concert.
The prominent feature of the evening will be a patriotic song, the subject appropriate to Australia, the words and music of colonial authorship.
The Committee therefore announce that, so soon as the Judges shall be appointed, and the rules decided on, a prize of Ten Guineas for the words of such song, and a second prize of Ten Guineas for the music, will be offered to the competition of South Australians.
JOHN MITCHELL, Hon. Sec.
September 20, 1859


"GAWLER LITERARY FESTIVAL. TO THE EDITOR", South Australian Register (26 September 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49829959 

Sir _ I see from an advertisement in the Register that the managers of the Gawler Institute have resolved to give shortly ten guineas for the best patriotic Australian song, and ten guineas for the best music to such song. This ought to have the effect of eliciting what the colony is now without - a popular national song not unworthy the people of South Australia. But in order that this result may be realized the names of the Judges should be published as early as possible, so that competitors may be convinced that no undue local interest will be exercised in the matter. It will be also absolutely necessary that the words of the song should be received and adjudicated upon some time before the proposed entertainment, otherwise no chance will be given to those who may compete for the musical prize. I suppose, of course, that it is not expected that the writers of the songs will also compose the music, for that would probably result in the best words being set to the worst times, and vice versa. The only feasible plan, therefore, will be to select the prize song at as early a date as possible, reserving the publication of the writer's name to the day of the entertainment; and to at once publish such song as the one upon which the musical competitors must exercise their prowess. Another reason for the adoption of this course is that it would be absurd to expect the same Judges to decide as to the words and the music of a song.
I am, Sir, &c,
ADELAIDE.


[2 advertisements], South Australian Weekly Chronicle (1 October 1859), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96493554 

A PRIZE of TEN GUINEAS open to South Australia is offered by the Gawler Institute for the WORDS of a PATRIOTIC SONG, to be entitled "The Song of Australia." Copyright of words to which the Prize, may be awarded to become the property of the Gawler Institute. Judges: John H. Barrow, Esq., M.P. Hon. A. Forster, M.L.C., John Brown, Esq., W. C. Wearing, Esq., John Howard Clark, Esq. Competitors are free to adopt any treatment of subject or rhythmical measure, so long as the composition is in accordance with the title and suitable for musical expression. Each competitor to write on the outside of the envelope covering the composition (which must not bear the name of the author, but a motto) the words "Poem for Prize;" and in a second envelope to enclose his name, written outside the motto corresponding with that attached to the composition. Of those letters containing the names of the competitors, that alone will be opened which bears the motto of the successful composition. All communications must be made by October 14. and addressed to George Isaacs, Gawler.

A PRIZE of TEN GUINEAS for Original MUSIC
to "The Song of Australia" will be offered by the Gawler Institute, immediately after the Judges shall have awarded the prize for the Words, when further particulars will be advertised.
Judges for the Music: G. W. Chinner, Esq.; A. Ewing, Esq., D.A.C.G.; F. S. Dutton, Esq., M.P.; W. Holden, Esq.; E. J. Peake, Esq., M.P.
GEORGE ISAACS,
Sec. Institute Committee.


"THE PRIZE POEMS. TO THE EDITOR", South Australian Register (1 November 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49823442 

Sir - I do not like these Gawler Town poems. They may be all very well for what I know, but they are not songs, far less national songs. A national song should be simple - such that every child can learn; it should be set to simple music, that everybody can sing; it should be applicable to times of prosperity and adversity, to all ages, to all classes of people like "God save the Queen," or "Rule Britannia," or "God preserve the Emperor." None of your long poems, with heavens of thousand dyes, and azure tints, and silvery moons, and brilliant suns, and all that sort of thing. None of your Cutolo music, appreciated only by a few; but simple and grand, something Handelish, some thing of the style of "See the Conquering Hero Comes," or perhaps like "The Marseillaise;" and the words of the song, character like Dibdin, or Burns, or Moore, descriptive of the country, and expressing our satisfaction and joy at having it for a resting-place; perhaps praying for its prosperity. As we are not a nation, I confess I do not see how we can have a national song any more than a national flag; but if we do have one, let it be really a song, not a poem which nobody would care to read twice, and which nobody would learn.
I am, Sir, &c., SICNARF.


"GAWLER", South Australian Weekly Chronicle (5 November 1859), 1 supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96495388 

[From our own Correspondent] November 4. In consequence of the great scarcity of news, my communication this week must necessarily be short. On Monday evening last, the 31st ult., the Committee of the Gawler Institute met aud received the musical compositions for the Gawler Prize Poem, which were duly forwarded to the Judges for their inspection and decision. There were no less than 23 compositions sent in for competition, which shows that those who have undertaken to decide will have no easy task. I understand that it is the intention of the Committee to publish 1,000 copies of the first edition of the Song and Music. It is also said that the whole of the rejected poems will be published, excepting in the rare cases where writers have objected to that course being pursued with their compositions.


"GAWLER MUSIC PRIZE", South Australian Register (5 November 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49825647 

The Judges who had undertaken to decide upon the music set to the "Song of Australia" met yesterday, and, after due examination, agreed to the following report: -

"The Judges appointed to award the prize for the best musical composition set to the words of the prize song, entitled "The Song of Australia," met on Friday, the 4th November - present, Messrs. Dutton, Ewing, Chinner, and Holden. Twenty-three compositions were examined, and the prize was unanimously awarded to the composition bearing the motto "One of the Quantity." Those bearing the mottoes "Long Live our Gracious Queen," "Garibaldi," and "Con Amore" so nearly equalled the prize composition in merit that the Judges had great difficulty in coming to a decision.

"Francis S. Dutton.

"A. Ewing.

"Geo. W. Chinner.

"Wm. Holden."

Immediately upon receiving this report we telegraphed to the Secretary of the Gawler Institute to ascertain the name of the successful competitor, and we find from his reply that the composer who has thus distinguished himself is Mr. Carl Linger.


[2 advertisements], South Australian Register (8 November 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49826675 

TO the JUDGES of the PRIZE MUSIC. - Gentlemen - I am instructed by the Committee of the Gawler Institute publicly to tender you their thanks for the very kind manner in which you have carried out their views with regard to the Musical Compositions sent in to compete for the prize offered by them. Yours respectfully, GEORGE ISAACS. Gawler, November 5, 1859.

GAWLER INSTITUTE. - The Secretary of the Entertainment Committee of the Gawler Institute is obliged, in consequence of the numerous communications he has received on the subject of the Prize Poem', to reply to all enquiries by this one notice. He does not feel himself at liberty to return any of the MSS. upon which the Judges were invited to base their decision. He has no power to go beyond the conditions advertised by order of the Committee, though, had leisure permitted, he should certainly have felt pleased to have acknowledged by letter many kind suggestions. All the envelopes enclosing the names of the unsuccessful competitors have been destroyed, excepting such as have been authorised to be opened. Mrs. Carleton's Poem, with Music by Herr Carl Linger, is in course of publication, and a copy will be presented to each party attending the Anniversary Entertainment, to take place in about a fortnight, and of which full particulars will be shortly announced. GEORGE ISAACS. November 7, 1859.


"SIGNOR CUTOLO'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (9 November 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49830288 

After an interval of nearly five months Signor Cutolo gave the public another opportunity on Tuesday evening last of listening to an excellent selection of the classic compositions of some of the great masters of an art in which the Signor himself is no mean proficient. The concert was extremely well attended, White's spacious assembly-room being nearly filled . . . We may here mention that Signor Cutolo, having set the prize "Song of Australia" to music, it was included in the programme, with Miss Bryan's name to it as the vocalist who was to have sung it. But the Committee of the Gawler Institute having claimed the copyright to the song, the Signor, on their remonstrating with him, had struck it out from the programme, and, as we are informed, had also given a written guarantee that it should not be sung. The audience, however, many of whom had probably purchased their tickets on account of the prize poem being included in the programme, and who were also uninformed of the reason of its omission, raised a general demand for its performance. This of course placed the Signor in a dilemma, but the audience were importunate, and the song was sung, encored, and repeated. In all probability, however, this will only increase the desire of the public to hear the composition of Herr Linger, to whom the prize was awarded . . .


"MUSIC FOR THE PRIZE POEM", Adelaide Observer (12 November 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158130602 

The Committee of the Gawler Institute have forwarded the music and poems which prizes have been awarded to Messrs. Penman & Galbraith, of Rundle-street, to be lithographed. We have heard that 1,000 copies are to be struck off.


"THE GAWLER FESTIVAL", The South Australian Advertiser (10 December 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200075 

The long expected concert at the Gawler Institute is appointed to take place on Monday next, on which occasion the Prize Song of Australia, written by Mrs. Carleton, will be sung to the prize music by Herr Linger. The programme of the entertainment will be found in our advertising columns, and we think we are entitled to say that the Committee of the Gawler Institute, from their extraordinary spirit, enterprise, and liberality, in preparing, as evinced in the unusual preparations made for this concert, are fully justified in expecting a large share of public patronage.


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (12 December 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200116 

GAWLER INSTITUTE ANNIVERSARY GRAND CONCERT.
MONDAY, December 12th, 1859.
At the ODDFELLOWS' HALL, GAWLER.
HERR C. LINGER, Conductor.
Assisted by Mrs. Perryman, Miss Rowe, Mr. Daniel, Mr. Oehlman, and the Brunswick Brass Band of eight instruments.
The programme includes
"THE SONG OF AUSTRALIA,"
to which the prize of Twenty Guineas was awarded, and other compositions written expressly for this occasion by C. Linger. Tickets, 4s. each ; reserved seats, 6s.; maybe obtained of any member of the Committee. The holder of each full ticket will be presented with a beautifully lithographed copy of the words and music of "The Song of Australia."


[2 advertisements], South Australian Register (16 December 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49830430

Just. Published, price 2s. 6d., THE SONG OF AUSTRALIA, to which the prize of Twenty Guineas was awarded by the Gawler Institute. To be obtained at the Gawler Institute, and of the following Agents:- Wigg and Clisby, Rundle-street; Rigby, Hindley-street; Barnet, Gawler Town; and Waddy, Mount Barker.

THE "PRIZE SONG OF AUSTRALIA," composed by Herr Carl Linger, may be had at R. Clisby's, Rundle-street.


"GRAND CONCERT AT THE GAWLER INSTITUTE", The South Australian Advertiser (20 December 1859), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200383

The second anniversary of this Institute was celebrated at the Oddfellows' Hall, in Gawler Town, on the evening of Monday, December 12. It had been announced that the National Song would be performed to the air composed by Herr Linger, and a great deal of interest was manifested, many persons having come from town by the afternoon tram. The doors of the spacious room in the Oddfellows' Hall were thrown open shortly after 7 o'clock, and by 8 the hall was nearly full, not fewer than between 200 and 300 persons being present. The assemblage was a very fashionable one, the majority of the audience being in evening dress; indeed, visitors from Adelaide, judging from the appearance of the room, would scarcely have imagined that they were present at a concert in a provincial town. The arrangements seemed to have been very well made. The Stewards were very obliging, and nothing appeared to have been omitted which was required to give eclat to so interesting an occasion.

The first piece on the programme, an overture entitled "The Brewer of Preston," was very well performed by the Brunswick Band. The song "I've Loved Thee Long," followed, and was sung by Miss Rowe, Herr Linger taking the pianoforte accompaniment. This beautiful air was very pleasingly rendered, but the piano was out of tune, and a jarring note occasionally struck unpleasantly on the ear. A buffo duet, sung by Mrs. Perryman and Mr. Daniel, succeeded, the Brunswick band taking the accompaniment. The instrumental portion of this music was much too loud, and drowned the voices of the vocalists completely, none of the words being audible. It is most likely that the Brunswick Band, accustomed to play in very large rooms, were not aware of the power of their instruments, or their effect in the Music Hall of Gawler. The duet was encored, and, possibly owing to a hint received in the interim, the instrumental accompaniment was this time more properly modulated, and the audience had an opportunity of admiring the vocal music, which was much applauded. Miss Rowe then performed a fantasia on the piano, in which she exhibited great execution. "Dearest Home" was then sung by Mr. Oehlmann, after which the "Prize Song of Australia" was introduced, numerous copies of the words and music having been previously distributed throughout the room. The piece was arranged for the concert as a solo and quartette for four voices, and was very favorably received by the audience, who broke into loud applause at the end of each verse. It is likely that this song will become very popular, being not only simple, but pleasing, and as characteristic of a national melody, as an appropriate adaptation to the poem could he expected to be. When the song was finished., the audience manifested great enthusiasm, and loudly called for Herr Linger, who came forward and, bowed his acknowledgments. The verses were sung as solos. - Miss Rowe, Miss Perryman, Mr. Daniel, and Mr. Oehlmann each taking a verse alternately, and all collectively singing the chorus as a quartette. Rendered as the song was on Tuesday evening, it was remarkably successful and appears to have made a favorable and permanent impression.

After a short interval the band performed an overture from "Nebuchadnezzar," which was very much admired. Mrs. Perryman then followed with the song "Beautiful Star," and on on encore being called for, substituted "I'll be a Gipsey," both of which songs were sung with good taste, and did credit to the vocal powers of Mrs. Perryman. Messrs. Schrader and Linger performed an instrumental duet on the cornopean and piano, in which Mr. Schrader exhibited great command over his instrument. "The Sailor's Grave," sung by Mr. Daniel, which followed, was very spirit stirring, and given with Mr. Daniel's usual power and good taste. Miss Rowe performed a fantasia of the "Song of Australia," composed by Herr Linger. This seemed to meet the popular taste, and was very warmly approved by the audience. As a musical composition it may claim almost greater merit than the original air itself. Miss Rowe played it very well, and accomplished the rapid passages with a degree of execution very few ladies possess. The "Laughing Glee" followed, and was rendered very amusing by the clever acting of Mr. Daniel. It pleased the audience so much that they called for its repetition. The concert concluded with a melange, consisting of the national anthems of different countries performed by the instrumental band, that of England being the first, and the "Song of Australia" the last. The audience exhibited their nationality by rising simultaneously during the "English Anthem," and also when the music of the "Song of Australia" was played. After the singing of "God Save the Queen" by the vocal performers, the concert terminated. It was a very successful affair as an entertainment, and must have proved highly gratifying to those gentlemen connected with the Gawler Institute who have been the means of awakening local talent, and giving to Australia the first national melody.


"GAWLER INSTITUTE", South Australian Register (20 December 1859), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49823833 

The concert given at the Oddfellows' Hall, Gawler Town, on Monday evening, the 12th instant, in celebration of the second anniversary of the Gawler Institute, was a great success. The attendance was so numerous as to necessitate the addition of more accommodation than had been provided for the holders of tickets to the reserved seats. The vocal performers were Mrs. Perryman, Miss Rowe, Mr. Daniel, and Mr. Oehlman; the instrumentalists included the Messrs. Schrader, Rowe, Waite, and the other members of the Brunswick Band. The orchestral arrangements were under the direction of Herr Linger, who also presided it the piano.

The performances commenced with an overture by Adam, the elaborate passages of which were executed with so much spirit and precision as to convince the audience, at the very commencement, that the band was fully competent to the performance of compositions of a high order. Miss Rowe followed with a very pretty ballad, "I've loved thee long," which she sung with considerable effect, and which was further heightened by the introduction of a tastefully executed cadenza. The young and accomplished vocalist was warmly applauded. The first part of the programme included several other pieces of sterling merit, amongst which may be mentioned as specially deserving commendation for the spirited manner in which it was rendered, Balfe's celebrated buffo duet from the "Siege of Rochelle," "Well, if I may speak." This was sung by Mrs. Perryman and Mr. Daniel with as much of the scherzandissimo style as to fairly rouse the sympathies of the entire auditory. The same remark applies also to Marten's trio, "Vodasi via di qua," which was sung in the second part by Miss Rowe, Mrs. Perryman, and Mr. Daniel. Both of these spirited compositions were encored. The first part of the entertainment was concluded with "The Song of Australia." Lithographed copies of the words and music had been presented to each person in the hall at the commencement of the concert, but the audience were scarcely prepared for the musical treat which its performance presented. Herr Linger, being himself the composer of the air, and having the arrangements of the concert under his control, appears to have determined to add to his fame as a contrapuntist on the occasion. The song was accordingly arranged and sung as follows: - Verse 1, soprano solo, by Miss Rowe; verses 2 and 4, quartette, by Miss Rowe, Mrs. Perryman, Mr. Oehlman, and Mr. Daniel; verse 3, tenor solo, by Mr. Oehlman; and verse 5, in chorus, with full band accompaniment. The effect was inspiring. The audience frequently gave indications of this during the performance of the song; and at its close their suppressed feelings broke forth in the most vehement applause. Nothing short of a repetition or the whole would satisfy them.

At a later period in the evening the air was presented to the audience under other forms, as arranged by Herr Linger. These were a fantasia for the pianoforte, which was executed by Miss Rowe in as brilliant a style as could possibly be expected, seeing that the instrument was a cottage piano of second-rate tone, and which was evidently out of tune; and a somewhat novel arrangement for the full band of the national airs of various countries. The latter commenced with Old England's "God save the Queen," followed by the recognised national anthems of Prussia, Russia, France, Italy, Holstein, Austria, Holland, and Belgium, with our own, "There is a Land," as the finale. In the last, as in the first, the audience rose en masse and remained standing during its performance. Our readers are intimately acquainted with the words of the song, and as the music may now be obtained by the public, we have no doubt but that in a very short time the air will be heard throughout the settled districts of the colony from Mount Gambier to Mount Remarkable. Its structure is so simple that any person having a knowledge of the first rudiments of music may read it almost at sight; whilst at the same time, if it be performed as it ought to be - con gusto, e con energia, e con entusiasmo - it will not fail to produce a lasting impression upon the mind.

In addition to the compositions already referred to, the second part of the programme included Verdi's magnificent Overture to Nebuchadnezzar, performed by the band; a ballad, "Beautiful star," by Mrs. Perryman; a duet for the cornopean and piano, embracing some of the most celebrated airs of "La Sonnambula," by the Messrs. Schrader and Linger; and Skelton's fine song of "The sailor's grave," by Mr. Daniel. These were all, without exception, rendered very effectively by the several performers. The songs were both encored. For the former, Mrs. Perryman substituted, "I'd be a gipsy, merry and free;" and Mr. Daniel made a sudden transition from "grave to gay" by giving, in place of "The sailor's grave," a spirited little song, in which the invitation, "Kiss me quick and go," was frequently referred to in a style which pleased the audience amazingly. We may mention, in conclusion, that Herr Linger was specially complimented more than once by a call by name, and that the talented composed bowed his acknowledgments, "as in duty bound." The performances were over a few minutes before 11 o'clock.


"THE SONG OF AUSTRALIA", The South Australian Advertiser (24 December 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200542 

The public are aware that in addition to his prize composition adapted to Mrs. Carleton's song, Herr Linger also composed a fantasia upon the same melody, which was performed at Gawler, and has been very highly spoken of. We hear that Mr. Marshall, of Currie-street, has become the purchaser of the copyright of the fantasia, which is now being engraved, and will shortly be ready, for publication.


See also this early ? spoof:

[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (24 December 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200546 

THIS EVENING. AT THE SHADES, The NONDESCRIPT will give his New Song abounding with local hits, particularly upon CLARKS AND TAILORS. THE SONG OF AUSTRALIA, Music by Herr Ling, will be given by an old favorite. Russell's Songs by the Basso. Solos by Messrs. Schrader, White, and Richelieu.


ASSOCIATIONS: Cesare Cutolo (pianist, composer); Brunswick Band; Mr. Richelieu (pianist)


*


14 December 1859, soiree, South Australian Institute, Linger (conductor, pianist)


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (14 December 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200190 

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE. - SOIREE.
Subscribers and the public are informed that the QUARTERLY SOIREE will take place
THIS EVENING (Wednesday, December 14), in White's Rooms, King William-street.
The DEUTSCHE LIEDERTAFEL have kindly given their assistance.
SIGNOR CUTOLO has volunteered his services, in acknowledgment of the support he has received in Adelaide;
this being probably his last performance for the present in this colony.
LAVINGTON GLYDE, Esq., M.P. will read some remarks on W. M. Thackeray, and his "Poetical Miscellanies," with illustrative readings.
PROGRAMME.
Chorus. - "March, Frisch ganze Compangnie" - Liedertafel. - Becker.
Duet - Violin and Piano, Mr. Chapman and Herr Linger - Mayseder.
Cavatina - "Semiramide" - Miss Rowe - Rossini.
Fantasia - Piano - "Lucretia Borgia" - Signor Cutolo - Cutolo.
Chorus - "Our Native Land," (Was ist der Deutsche Vater Landt) - Liedertafel - Reichart.
LECTURE.
Chorus - "War Song" - Liedertafel.
Fantasia - Piano- "Sonnambula" - Signor Cutolo - Thalberg.
Duet - "Slowly and Softly" - Miss Rowe and Mr. Oehlmann - S. Glover.
Divertissement - "Sonnambula" - Cornopean and Piano - Mr. Schrader and Herr Linger.
Chorus - "The Song of Australia," (Gawler Prize Song, written by Mis. Carleton) - Liedertafel - Linger.
Conductor - Herr Linger . . .


"SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE", South Australian Register (15 December 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49830014 

The quarterly soiree in connection with the above Institution was held in White's Assembly Room, King William-street, on Wednesday evening. The attendance was as numerous as on all former occasions, the building being entirely filled . . . The Very Rev. the Dean of Adelaide, who presided on tne occasion opened the proceedings . . .

No financial or other statement was read; but immediately upon Mr. Farrell's resuming his seat, the Deutsche Liedertafel gave the grand chorus, "March, Frisch ganze Compagnie," by Becker. Herr Linger played the pianoforte accompaniment, and the piece went off in most admirable style. It is impossible to say too much in praise of the magnificent voices so well blended, of the precision with which every note was given, or of the tout ensemble which truly made the chorus perfect. We feel that we express the united wish of all who heard the Deutsche Liedertafel on Wednesday evening, when we say that we hope this noble band of vocalists will for the future more frequently favour Adelaide audiences with its beautiful performances.

A duet followed, by Mr. Chapmam and Herr Linger, upon the violin and piano, which was also very justly appreciated and applauded.

Miss Rowe then sang a cavatina from Rossini's "Semiramide," in correct style and with good taste, though she was evidently suffering from the effects of a cold. In the second part the same young lady gave a duet very pleasingly with Mr. Oehlmann, to whom also great credit is due.

In each part Signor Cutolo performed a brilliant piece upon the piano - in the first one of his own, and in the second one of Thalberg's. It is needless to enlarge upon the merits of this accomplished artiste, of whom we have had so frequently to speak in the highest terms. Suffice it to say that he has never been heard to more advantage.

The other pieces by the Liedertafel were the national song, "Was ist der Deutsche Vaterlandt?," a war song, and the concluding piece of the evening - Mrs. Carleton's prize Gawler song to Herr Linger's prize music. We have already spoken of this production, and need only add that it gained, as might have been expected, very much from the union of so many effective voices.

The only piece we have, not yet mentioned, but which deserves as much praise as any in the programme, is the divertissement from "La Sonnambula, by Mr. Schrader and Herr Linger, upon tbe oornopean and piano. The former gentleman is a perfect master of his instrument, and draws from it sounds that are truly magical . . .

At the conclusion of the evening, Mr. HOWARD CLARKE proposed a vote of thanks to Mr. Glyde, the Deutsche Liedertafel, Signor Cutolo, and the other performers, who had so kindly volunteered their gratuitous services. This was seconded by the DEAN, who supplied an evidently unintentional omission of Mr. Clark, by adding the name of Miss Rowe, and, in justice to the gallantry of the audience, we must state that a loud burst of applause followed the mention of the young lady's name.

In looking through this notice, we see that we have been silent on the subject of encores. Let us now add that nearly every piece was redemanded, and in most instances something fresh was substituted.


"THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE SOIREE", South Australian Weekly Chronicle (17 December 1859), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96489157 

The Soiree held on Wednesday evening, at White's Rooms, in connection with the South Australian Institute, was an exceedingly successful affair; indeed, if success is to be tested by the attendance, a little too successful to be pleasant, the room being inconveniently crowded. The Deutsche Liedertafel lent their aid upon the occasion, and rendered the chorus "Our Native Land" in brilliant style, deservedly obtaining an encore. A duet, violin and piano, by Mr. Chapman and Herr Linger, was very much applauded, and also elicited an encore. Mr. Chapman is evidently an accomplished violinist. Signor Cutolo gave probably his last performances for the present in this colony, "Lucretia Borgia," and "Sonnambula," performances too excellent to be permitted to pass without a repetition, which was rapturously called for. Miss Howe and Mr. Oehlmann sung a very pretty duet, "Slowly and Softly," and the chorus "The Song of Australia" was given very effectively by the Deutsche Liedertafel. Lavington Glyde, Esq., M.P., contributed not a little to the amusement of the evening by some remarks on W. M. Thackeray and his "Poetical Miscellanies" with illustrative readings. On the whole a very excellent entertainment, which was probably fully appreciated, was afforded to a very numerous and fashionable audience.




  1860



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1860:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=186&l-year=1860 


*


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (20 January 1860), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49895326 

TO MUSICAL AMATEURS. - Amateurs anxious to join a private self-supporting MUSICAL SOCIETY (Instrumental and Vocal), under the Conductorship of Mr. Linger, are invited to attend a Meeting at Pulteney-street School, on Friday (this) Evening, at 8 o'clock.


"MUSICAL", South Australian Register (20 January 1860), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49895316

We see by an advertisement in another column that a meeting is to be held this evening to organize a Musical Society under the conductorship of Herr Linger, which we hope will be well attended, and that the result will be such as to give premise of a renewal of the musical treats hitherto enjoyed under the conductorship of Herr Linger. We understand the Society will secure the services of Mr. Chapman as leader. At present there is no Musical Society but the German Liedertafel in existence we believe.


ASSOCIATIONS: Port Adelaide Musical Society


*


30 January 1860, soiree, Port Adelaide Institute, Linger (conductor, pianist)


"PORT ADELAIDE INSTITUTE", Adelaide Observer (28 January 1860), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158173249 

The second quarterly soiree in connection with the Port Adelaide Institute is to be held on Monday evening next, at the Theatre, when Mr. J. H. Clark has consented to give some illustrations of Irish humour with remarks. A vocal and instrumental concert will also be given by the assistance of the Deutsche Liedertafel and Messrs. Linger, Schrader, and Rowe.


"PORT ADELAIDE INSTITUTE", South Australian Register (1 February 1860), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49893705 

The quarterly soiree of this Institute was held in the Port Theatre, on Monday evening, January 30 . . . The President, Mr. A. W. Gliddon, occupied the chair . . . He then introduced the Deutsche Liedertafel, consisting of 20 vocal performers, who sang during the evening six choruses with remarkable precision, and were rewarded with the applause they merited. The Messrs. Rowe also sang four well known glees, but we cannot say much for the manner in which they were performed. The first part of the entertainment was concluded with the prize Song of Australia, sung by the Liedertafel, Herr Linger accompanying them on the piano. It was creditably produced, and encored . . .


"PORT ADELAIDE INSTITUTE", The South Australian Advertiser (18 February 1860), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1202373 

The first quarterly soiree of the subscribers and friends of this Institute was held in the Theatre, on the evening of Monday, January 30 . . . The audience were entertained by the Deutsche Liedertafel, assisted by Herr Linger and Schrader, who were most warmly applauded throughout the evening, as also the Messrs. Row, who sang several glees . . .


But see also "A FREE TRANSLATION", South Australian Register (13 March 1860), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49896944 


ASSOCIATIONS: John, Richard, and William Rowe (amateur vocalists)


*


7 March 1860, soiree, South Australian Institute, Linger (pianist, composer)


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (7 March 1860), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1202966 

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE. SOIREE.
Subscribers and the public are informed that the QUARTERLY SOIREE will take place This Evening
(Wednesday, March 7), in White's Assembly Rooms, King William-street.
His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief will preside.
The Lecture will be delivered by the Rev. C. G. Palmer. Subject - "The Latest Ghost Theory."
The Musical Entertainment will be under the direction of Mr. Chapman.
Accompanist, Herr Linger.
PROGRAMME.
Overture - Full Band - Schmidt.
Song - "Good bye, Sweetheart, good bye," Mr. Nash - J. L. Hatton.
Duet - Cornopeans, Messrs. McCullagh and Chapman - Venetian Air.
Song - "Ever of Thee," Mrs. Wallace - Foley Hall.
Waltz - "Il Trovatore," Full Band - Marriott.
LECTURE.
Interval of ten minutes.
Pot Pourri - (On airs from Donizetti's opera "Figlia del Reggimento") Full Band - Arranged by P. Röth.
Song - "The Good Rhine Wine," Mr. Nash - John Gray.
Fantasia - Violin and Piano, Messrs. Chapman and Linger - J. Singelee.
Ballad - "Mary of Argyle," Mrs. Wallace - S. Nelson.
"Song of Australia," Full Band - Herr Carl Linger.
Finale- "God Save the Queen."
Subscribers will be admitted on production of their tickets for the current year or quarter, which will be returned to them afterwards on application at the Institute. Each Subscriber may introduce a Lady free of charge.
Tickets for non-subscribers, 2s. 6d. each. may be obtained at the door.
Persons desirous of becoming subscribers or renewing their subscriptions must do so at the Institute before 5 o'clock. The Doors will be opened at half-past 7, the chair will be taken precisely at 8. N.B. - The Library will be closed at 5 p.m. By order of the Board of Governors,
ROBERT KAY, Secretary.


"THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE", The South Australian Advertiser (8 March 1860), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1202999 

The quarterly soiree given by this Institute took place last evening (Wednesday), March 7, at White's Rooms. His Excellency the Governor presided . . . His Excellency's address was received with universal signs of satisfaction. The entertainment, according to the programme, then commenced by an overture by the full band, which was loudly applauded. Mr. Nash followed, by singing "Goodbye sweetheart, goodbye," and elicited an encore, which was responded to by Mr. Nash singing "Rocked in the cradle of the deep." This was succeeded by a duet on the cornopean, by Messrs. McCullagh and Chapman, executed in a style which we have no hesitation in saying has never been surpassed in this colony. The audience thoroughly appreciated the performance, and unanimously demanded an encore. Mrs. Wallace maintained her well-merited repute as a vocalist, in the following piece, the song of "Ever of thee," and was greeted with a loud encore, to which she responded with "Sweet Home," an air which elicited even louder plaudits than the one that called it forth. "Il Trovatore," by the full band, closed the first part of the programme.

The Rev. C. G. Palmer then delivered a lecture upon "The latest Ghost Theory," an elaborate and detailed account of the experience of the most noted individuals who had travelled through the regions of Ghostdom, amusing the audience with the many wonderful curiosities recorded by those renowned travellers in exploring that remarkable and fantastic land. The only defect in the reverend gentleman's lecture, according to our notion, and also in that of the audience, who exhibited their sentiments towards its close, was that it was too long for the occasion, having occupied an hour and a quarter "by Shrewsbury clock."

The second part of the entertainment opened with "Pot Pourri," by the full band, most admirably executed. Mr. Nash followed with "The good Rhine Wine," so capitally sung that it was encored. A duet by Chapman and Linger no doubt would have got an encore had there been a larger space of time between the hour it was sung and the approaching midnight. The same remark will apply to all that followed, except Mrs. Wallace's song, "Mary of Argyle," which the audience would insist upon encoring . . . The finale "God save the Queen," followed, and brought the evening's entertainment to an end. The room was crowded from the commencement to the close of the evening. With regard to the performance we think the instrumental performers never acquitted themselves in better style.


ASSOCIATIONS: Benjamin Nash (tenor vocalist)


*


"IMPORTS", South Australian Register (10 April 1860), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49889595

IMPORTS. Cargo of the Peter Godeffroy, from Hamburg, via the Cape . . . 1 [case] books, Oscar Reyher; 1 case, H. F. Schrader . . . 1 piano, Alfred Swaine . . . 2 cases pianos, A. Bartels . . . 2 cases musical instruments, 5 cases, M. Heuzenroeder . . . 2 cases, Charles Linger . . .


ASSOCIATIONS: Oscar Reyher (musician); M. Heuzenroeder (? musician)


*


9 April 1860, burial of Minna Linger, Adelaide Cemetery


"FUNERAL OF MADAME LINGER", South Australian Register (10 April 1860), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49889573 

The remains of Madame Linger, whose loss is deeply felt by a large number of colonists, and especially by many of our German colonists who had the pleasure of her acquaintance in life, were interred in the Adelaide Cemetery on Monday morning. The mourners who followed her to the grave were conveyed in five carriages. The Liedertafel, with two of the members of the choir from the Cathedral of St. Francis Xavier, attended on the occasion, and sung some suitable sacred compositions of Mendelssohn, thus doing homage to the musical talent of the deceased, and exhibiting a sympathy with Mr. Linger which will be largely shared in by all who know him and have become informed of his bereavement.


"FUNERAL OF MRS. LINGER", South Australian Weekly Chronicle (14 April 1860), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90247535 

A well-earned tribute of respect was, on Monday, April 9, paid to Herr Linger, on the burial of his wife. About 15 members of the Liedertafel were present before the funeral arrived; and many of the German Rifle Corps gave an hour to pay respect to their chosen musical leader, before attending the rifle shooting at Glen Osmond. The service was most impressive. Previous to lowering the coffin, a hymn from Mendelsohn [sic] was beautifully executed, and after the coffin was placed in the grave, another chant was sung by the Liedertafel. There was scarcely a dry eye amongst the assemblage on the ground, and before leaving each friend of the departed dropped a small portion of earth on the coffin.


*


30 May 1860, first monthly rehearsal, Port Adelaide Musical Society, Linger (conductor, ? pianist)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (21 May 1860), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49890574 

PORT ADELAIDE MUSICAL SOCIETY.
CONDUCTOR - HERR LINGER.
The first MONTHLY REHEARSAL of this Society will be held in the Rooms, White Horse Cellars, on Wednesday, May 30, at 8 o'clock.
Subscribers, who will be required to show their Tickets at the door, are reminded that each has the right to introduce a Lady free for that evening; each Lady Subscriber, a friend of either sex.
Intending Subscribers are particularly requested to apply for admission on or before Wednesday, 22nd inst., to Mr. J. Lake, Hon. Secretary; or to any of the Committee, viz - Dr. Duncan, and Messrs. Gliddon, D. Scott, R. J. Scott, D. Wald, T. J. King, and J. Bennett. Subscription for half-year ending September 22, 10s.


"PORT ADELAIDE MUSICAL SOCIETY", South Australian Register (30 May 1860), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49892561 

This Society, which has only been organized a few weeks, will hold its first rehearsal this evening, at the Institute Rooms, Port Adelaide. Members only, and friends introduced by them, will be admitted. A very attractive programme has been issued, and as the amateurs have attended the weekly practice, under the conductorship of Herr Linger, with great regularity, there is little doubt that the evening's entertainment will be successful.


"PORT ADELAIDE MUSICAL SOCIETY", South Australian Weekly Chronicle (2 June 1860), 2 supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90249181 

A vocal concert, or as the members modestly term it, "the first monthly rehearsal" of the Port Adelaide Musical Society (restricted to subscribers only) was given in the rooms, of the Institute, White Horse Cellar, on Wednesday evening. With a very critical, though, perhaps, partial audience, we may safely say that the performance gave great satisfaction, and was creditable alike to the industry of the members of the choir and their conductor, Herr Linger, and was significant of considerable power as well as knowledge of music. Were we to compare with similar bodies, the Port Adelaide Musical Society, in its present phase of vocal music only, bids fair at least to rival any of its kind in the colony. We trust the public will not now fail to support this most excellent institution for affording rational amusement during the long winter evenings; and though but little is required, the Society cannot expect to meet even the very moderate expenditure in lighting, instruments, conductor, &c, &c., without more subscriptions. We have been requested to remind the public that the half year terminates on 22nd September next, and the cost of a ticket is 10s., which ticket entitles a subscriber entering at this time to four of the very pleasant concerts, for concerts they really are, with the privilege of introducing a lady, or, if so inclined, of joining the first-rate practice every week.


"PORT ADELAIDE INSTITUTE", Adelaide Observer (14 July 1860), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15817598

A soiree in connection with the Port Adelaide Institute was held on Monday evening, in the large room of the White Horse Cellar . . . The room was nearly filled with ladies and gentlemen; and the President (Mr. A. Gliddon) occupied the chair. The President, in opening the proceedings, made some brief remarks on the importance of providing rational amusement and instruction in communities and urged the claims of the Institute for sympathy and support as the most rational means of amusement in the Port, the success of local efforts having been hitherto, hindered by various circumstances. He congratulated the subscribers on the fact that the entertainment would be carried on that evening without foreign assistance - a circumstance which in itself showed that the Institute was doing its work in bringing together for social and rational amusement the available talent of the neighbourhood . . . He then called upon the members of the Port Adelaide Musical Society, who had volunteered to sing a number of choruses during the evening. We may mention that this Society has only been formed about three months, but considering the limited time the members had been practising, the fact that their leader, Herr Linger, was absent, and that the number was decreased owing to the prevalence of the influenza, the pieces were very creditably performed. The lecture was by the Rev. C. Marryat, on "Arctic Expeditions, and the fate of Sir John Franklin" . . .


*


1 October 1860, soiree, Port Adelaide Institute, Linger (conductor, ? pianist)


"PORT ADELAIDE INSTITUTE", Adelaide Observer (6 October 1860), 2 supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158177283 

The first annual meeting of the subscribers to the Port Adelaide Institute was held on Monday afternoon, October 1, in accordance with the rules of the Society, at the Reading-room . . . Mr. A. W. Gliddon was unanimously re-elected President. Votes of thanks were recorded to the Committee and Auditors for their services during the post year, also to Mr. J. W. Smith for his kindness in allowing the Society the room rent free. In the evening the annual soiree was held in the Theatre, when there was a good attendance of visitors. The Port Adelaide Musical Society, under the leadership of Herr Linger, gave its gratuitous services, and sang a number of songs, glees, &c., during the evening, in a creditable and pleasing manner. Mr. Martin, of the Pulteney-street Schools, exhibited a number of dissolving views illustrative of astronomy; also some historical and comic scenes which, although they could not be said to be entertaining, caused a considerable amount of mirth. Mr. Grosse moved a vote of thanks to Mr. Martin, the Musical Society, and the President, without whose aid he felt certain the Institute could not have been brought to its present condition. Mr. A. S. Neill seconded, and the resolution was carried by acclamation.


*


11 November 1860, high mass, St. Francis's Cathedral, Adelaide, Linger (harmonium)


"ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CATHEDRAL", The South Australian Advertiser (13 November 1860), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article826390 

The opening of the chancel-end of this Cathedral, in Victoria-square, was celebrated on Sunday last, the 11th November, in the presence of a very numerous congregation. Shortly after 9 o'clock, a.m., the Rev. J. Smyth, assisted by several members of the Church, sanctified the new buildings, which are a very beautiful addition to the Cathedral, and at 11 o'clock, Pontifical High Mass was celebrated by the Lord Bishop, assisted by the Rev. J. Smyth, deacon, and the Revs. J. Tappeiner and P. Russell, priests. The choral part of the ceremony was very effectively conducted by the Rev. Maurice Lancioni [sic]. Herr Linger presided at the harmonium . . .



  1861



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1861:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=186&l-year=1861 


*


6 February 1861, concert, for the benefit of the family of German composer Carl Zöllner, Linger


[Advertisement], Adelaider Deutsche Zeitung (1 February 1861), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article83789576 


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (6 February 1861), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50019547 

GRAND VOCAL and INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT by the Members of the GERMAN LIEDERTAFEL, the BRUNSWICK BRASS BAND, and several AMATEURS, will take place at the Hotel Europe, on Wednesday, February 6, for the Benefit of the Family of the famous Composer, the late Mr. Carl Zoellner, who died at Leipsic, October 9, 1860, leaving his next relations in most destitute circumstances.
Tickets, 2s. 6d. each, to be had at Mr. F. Armbruster's, 13, Rundle-street; and Mr. C. Gries's, 39, Rundle-street. Doors open at half-past 7, to commence at 8 o'clock.


"VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT", South Australian Register (7 February 1861), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50021435 

On Wednesday evening, the 6th inst., a grand vocal and instrumental concert was given in the large room of the Hotel Europe, Gawler-place, for the benefit of the family of the celebrated composer, the late Mr. Carl Zoellner. There was a large and very respectable audience, including some of our leading German and English colonists. Mr. Treuer opened the entertainment by stating its object, and giving a brief account of the career of Mr. Zoellner. This was followed by an overture by Herold, very well executed by the Brunswick Brass Band. The German Liedertafel, under the leadership of Herr Linger, came next, and gave with good effect one of Mendelssohn's choruses. A duet by Messrs. Schraeder and Heydecke was then played upon the cornet-a-piston, accompanied on the piano by Mr. Kunze. The performance was encored. Mr. Schierenbeek having sung a bass solo, entitled "How beautiful art thou," a chorus by the Liedertafel - "Our German Fatherland" - was given, and a fastasia performed upon the clarionet and cornet-a-piston by Messrs. Heydecke and Schraeder. A chorus called "ABC," the production of the composer for the aid of whose family the entertainment was held, concluded the first part of the performance. The time for the intermission having expired, an overture from "Tancred" was played by the Brunttwick Brass Band. Mr. Von de Heyde then sang, with excellent effect, a ballad by Proch, entitled "Das Erkennen." He was heartily applauded, and a repetition called for. He substituted another musical gem, which was greatly appreciated. The same performers who had taken part in the preceding pieces successively appeared in new selections, all of which met with satisfactory receptions. The entertainment was brought to a termination about 11 o'clock, all having confessedly enjoyed an evening made doubly pleasant by the reflections of the good the subscriptions of the auditory will accomplish. We believe something like 40l. was taken on the occasion.

ASSOCIATIONS: Carl Friedrich Zöllner (1800-1860), German composer (never visited Australia); Brunswick Brass Band; Johann Wilhelm Schierenbeck (amateur vocalist)


*


29 March 1861, sacred concert, Italian Opera Company, interval items by Adelaide Liedertafel, Linger (pianist, conductor)


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (29 March 1861), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article832203 

GOOD FRIDAY EVENING.
GRAND SACRED CONCERT, at WHITE'S ROOMS.
Comprising Selections from the CREATION, STABAT MATER, And the MESSIAH,
Under the following Committee of Gentlemen: WM. GILES, Esq.; F. S. DUTTON, Esq.; Dr. WOODFORDE; Dr. WYATT; Dr. BAYER; S. TOMKINSON, Esq., And other Gentlemen.
The following Artists will appear; - SIGNORA BIANCHI, MISS JULIA HARLAND, SIGNOR BIANCHI, SIGNOR GROSSI, MR. JOHN GREGG.
The German LIEDERTAFEL have kindly consented to assist on the occasion.
CONDUCTOR - MR. LINLY NORMAN, CORNET - MR. KOHLER.
With Band and Full Chorus.
The Members of the Mechanics' Institution on application to the Secretary, will receive Tickets at reduced prices. Tickets - Reserved Seats, 5s.; Unreserved, 3s. Commence at 8 o'clock.


"GRAND SACRED CONCERT", South Australian Register (30 March 1861), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50019373 

The concert of sacred music given by the operatic company on Good Friday evening was attended by upwards of 600 people. White's large Assembly-room was well filled, and the audience included many families of the highest respectability as well as some who do not usually patronize secular music. There was an ample entertainment provided, consisting of selections from Haydn's "Creation," Rossini's "Stabat Mater," and Handel's "Messiah;" in addition to which the Liedertafel, accompanied on the grand piano by Herr Linger, sang two effective pieces in the German language. Throughout the selections from the oratorios the principal vocal parts were sustained by Signor and Signora Bianchi, Miss Julia Harland, and Mr. John Gregg, who were assisted by a very efficient chorus. Mr. Linly Norman was conductor, and Mr. R. W. Kohler was, as usual, great with the cornet-a-piston. These gentlemen were assisted by a small but well-trained band. The opening chorus, "And the Spirit of God," was given with great effect, and loudly applauded - a custom that should not be imported from the theatre to the oratorio. Signor Bianchi's solo, "In native worth," was sweetly rendered as also was the aria, "With verdure clad," by Miss Julia Harland. Mr. John Gregg was more than usually effective in the recitative and air, "Roaming in foaming billows;" but by far the greatest success in this part of the entertainment was the grand chorus, "The heavens are telling." The "Stabat Mater" was beautifully sung throughout, and in it alone the Signora Bianchi appeared. There were five pieces selected from the "Messiah," each of which elicited unmistakable evidence of the success of the performers. It is useless to particularize where all was excellent, but we cannot refrain from noticing Mr. John Gregg's "The trumpet shall sound," with Mr. Kohler's obligato, Miss Harland's delightful aria, "I know that my Redeemer liveth," and the grand "Hallelujah Chorus." Altogether the concert was a great success, and will, we trust, be succeeded by others equally good and equally well supported.


"SACRED CONCERT", The South Australian Advertiser (30 March 1861), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article832279 

. . . In addition to the music set down in the programme, the members of the Liedertafel sang two pieces between the divisions of the concert, to the satisfaction of the audience generally, and of the German portion of it particularly.


"CONCERT AT WHITE'S ROOMS", South Australian Weekly Chronicle (30 March 1861), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90031221 

The Adelaide public not being remarkable at any time for theatre-going propensities, it could not be expected that they would sanction operatic entertainment during Passion Week; and the Italian Opera Company have, therefore, acted very dissreetlv by suspending their performances till Easter. As, hotvever, it would neither have been profitable to themselves nor advantageous to the public if they were to rest entirely from their labors, in the meantime they also deserve credit for announcing the concert that took place last evening in White's Rooms, the principal portion of the programme consisting of Rossin's "Stabat Mater" . . . The oratorio was followed by a miscellaneous concert (for a British audience can digest an entertainment composed of the most heterogeneous materials) composed principally of selections from the various operas that have been produced by the company. Every one of the items was well executed, but a litle unnecessary delay between the pieces caused a few of the audience to leave before the conclusion, which was to be regretted, as in the finale from "La Sonnambula" the whole company - principals, chorus, and orchestra - sang together admirably. There was a thin audience - so thin that it was really a pity to hear so much good music thrown away as it were on a handful of people.


"GRAND SACRED CONCERT", Adelaide Observer (6 April 1861), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158180063 

The concert of sacred music given by the operatic company on Good Friday evening was attended by upwards of 600 people. White's large Assembly-room was well filled, and the audience included many families of the highest respectability as well as some who do not usually patronize secular music. There was an ample entertainment provided, consisting of selections from Haydn's "Creation," Rossini's "Stabat Mater," and Handel's "Messiah;" in addition to which the Liedertafel, accompanied on the grand piano by Herr Linger, sang two effective pieces in the German language . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Giovanna Bianchi (soprano vocalist); Julia Harland (soprano vocalist); Eugenio Bianchi (tenor vocalist); John Gregg (bass vocalist); Richard W. Kohler (cornet-a-piston); Linly Norman (conductor)


*


"THE LATE CHORAL SOCIETY. TO THE EDITOR", South Australian Register (22 June 1861), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50015673 

SIR, - I do not know where your correspondent "Musicus" obtained his information as to the "bickerings and jealousies of the professional assistants" at the Choral Societies formerly existing in Adelaide; but wherever it may be, I think it would not be just to our friends, Messrs. Linger, Daniel, and Chapman, if we who have worked with them were to allow his remarks to pass unnoticed. I was a member of the Sacred Harmonic Society for a long time, and I believe the only jarring note among us was want of funds; and that it was a want of sympathy with us on the part of the public which caused us to break up, and not any internal discord. At the same time, I quite agree with him as to the desirability of having a Society of the kind in Adelaide. By inserting this you will oblige
Yours, &c., BASSO. June 21, 1861.

The above was in reply to "PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY. TO THE EDITOR", South Australian Register (19 June 1861), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50014906 


*


17 July 1861, soiree, Port Adelaide Institute, Linger (conductor)


PORT ADELAIDE INSTITUTE", South Australian Register (19 July 1861), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50084766 

A soiree of the above Institute was held on Wednesday evening, at the White Horse Cellar, in the large room of which house a moderate number of persons assembled, the chair being occupied by Mr. A. W. Gliddon, J.P., the President of the Institute . . . The entertainments of the evening consisted of the vocal performances of a number of gentlemen, members of the Port Adelaide Musical Sqcietv (under the leadership of Herr Linger), who, in tne course of the evening, sang several choruses, glees, and quartetts, the production of favourite composers, in a manner which drew forth considerable applause. After the first portion of the concert, Mr. John Howard Clark was introduced, and delivered a lecture, entitled "Varieties of Self-conceit, as illustrated by some of Shakspeare's characters." The lecture was interspersed by numerous quotations from the plays of Shakspeare, and was both interesting and amusing. Upon the motion of Dr. Millner, seconded by Mr. Tapley, a vote of thanks to the lecturer was put to the meeting, and carried by acclamation. Captain John Hart proposed a similar compliment to the members of the Musical Society, and to the Chairman, remarking that he hoped to see the Institute and the Society prosper. He said he should like to see the Musical Society and Sacred Choral Society amalgamated, by which he thought both would be benefited, and would be able to give either sacred or secular entertainments. He also mentioned that it was the intention of the Society to apply to the Government to be allowed the use of the Court House in which to hold their future reunions. The Rev. C. Marryat seconded the motion, and expressed himself in favour of the union of the two Societies. The vote being carried, the National Anthem was sung, and concluded the meeting.


*


November 1861, musical instruments for sale, Linger (vendor)


[Advertisement], Adelaider Deutsche Zeitung (1 November 1861), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article83790603 


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (21 November 1861), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50080580 

MR. C. LINGER has received a very Superior GERMAN HARMONIUM, which is to be SOLD. For particulars, apply at his residence, George-street, back of Exeter Hotel.


{Advertisement], South Australian Register (26 November 1861), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50079702 

MR, C. LINGER has received two Splendid GERMAN ROSEWOOD PIANOS from one of the very best Manufactories. They are to be SOLD, and may be seen at Mr. Debney's, Rundle-street.


*


"VOLUNTEER SONGS. TO THE EDITOR", South Australian Register (11 December 1861), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50080479 

Sir - Subjoined is a notice of an entirely new volume of volunteer songs, received so recently as by the last September mail. The words I have extracted are extremely good, and I have no doubt the remarks will be accepted. To endeavour to introduce a better class of songs imong the volunteers than they now sing is he reason I have troubled myself with reriewing the book. The work can be seen at Platts's.
I am, Sir, &c, W., December 9, 1861.

Original Songs for the Rifle Volunteers. By Samuel Lover, Charles Mackay, and Thomas Miller. London, C. H. Clarke; Adelaide, Platts, 1861.

. . . The poems by Charles Mackay are equal to any he has yet written, and it seems almost superfluous to comment on that prolific pen, every product of which bears a healthy tone, a hearty vigour, and a graceful expression. The "Undaunted Men of England," in this collection, is a beautiful ballad, and equally fine is the following: -

"UP WITH THE RIFLE.

"He who is wealthy
Hath offers of gold;
He who is healthy
Hath blessings untold.
If mightful, you're rightful;
If weak, you are wrong;
Up with the rifle, lads,
March! and be strong.

. . . [ 2 more stanzas given ] . . .

The work is entirely new, and it certainly contains the best original poetry (and for riflemen the only poetry worthy of the name) which has issued from the press for a considerable period. Could not Herr Linger or Mr. Henry Pounsett adapt the above poem to a simple, spirited melody, with an easy flowing accompaniment, so that our volunteers may have a thorough English song to execute instead of the trashy stuff inflicted at festive boards. W.


"COLONIAL MUSIC", South Australian Register (12 December 1861), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50081069 

A collection of the musical pieces composed and published in the colony would form quite a volume. We remember to have seen the productions of Mrs. A. J. Murray, Signor Cutolo, Herr Linger, Miska Hauser, Mrs. H. F. Price, Messrs. Draeger, O. F. V. Reyher, E. K. Daniel, W. C. Oldham, H. Pounsett and J. Elliott. An addition to the list has recently been made by the publication of "The Adelaide Schottische," composed by Mr. Joseph Elliott, lithographed in Messrs. Penman & Galbraith's best style, respectfully dedicated to the ladies of South Australia, and sold at an unusually low price . . .



  1862



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1862:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=186&l-year=1862 


*


"MUSICAL", South Australian Register (5 February 1862), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article40467997 

Mr. James, of the Norfolk Arms, Rundle-street, has just imported from Germany another self-acting musical instrument, at the cost of £200. It has eight separate cylinders, either of which may be used at pleasure. On three of these are arranged the overtures to Massaniello, Die Zauberflote, and the Caliph of Bagdad. The others contain several polkas, waltzes, galops, &c., some favourite English, Irish, and Scotch airs, and the "Song of Australia," with variations, by Herr Linger.


"DEATHS", South Australian Register (17 February 1862), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article40467438

LINGER. - On the 16th February, at Adelaide, Herr Carl Linger, late of Berlin, aged 52 years.


"THE LATE HERR LINGER", South Australian Register (18 February 1862), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article40469572

The funeral obsequies of the late Herr Linger took place on Monday afternoon. It was not generally known till the Monday morning that this talented musician had died; yet the high esteem in which he was held induced a very large number of persons to avail themselves of the opportunity of testifying their respect to his memory by following his remains to the grave. The funeral procession formed at the residence of the departed in Rundle street, at 3 o'clock, and consisted of the Brunswick Brass Band, the Liedertafel, the hearse, and about 30 coaches and other vehicles, in which were seated the friends of the deceased and other gentlemen anxious to pay the last tribute of respect to a man whose talents as a musician and whose worth as a man have never been disputed. The general arrangements were conducted by Messrs. Eitzen & Co., undertakers, of Rundle-street. Previous to the departure of the mournful procession the Liedertafel sang a solemn dirge, the refrain of which may be expressed in English by the Divine words, "Thy will be done". The Brunswick Brass Band, which preceded the hearse, performed the "Dead March", from Handel's Oratorio of "Saul", and a similar composition by Here Heydecke, as the procession passed along the principal thoroughfares of the city. This attracted several hundreds of spectators, a great many of whom followed the remains of the departed to their last resting-place. A considerable number of the tradesmen, also, whose business premises were situated in the line of the procession, indicated their appreciation of the loss which society has sustained by partially closing their shops. In fact, the appearance of the city during the funeral was that of a general fast. The solemn burial service of the Church of England was read at the grave in in impressive manner by the Rev. D. J. H. Ibbetson, where, also, the Liedertafel again raised their united voices in the choral hymns, "Integer vita"; and "Nacht und Nacht". The "kindred earth" was then deposited over the mortal remains of the departed, and the hundreds of sorrowing spectators slowly dispersed. Herr Linger was a man who stood so high in his profession, and was so very generally respected in private life, that we make no apology for the following brief biographical sketch:

"He was a native of Berlin, and was born on March 15, 1810. His father was an engraver of some eminence; his mother, a lady of respectability and sterling worth, is still living. At a very early age Herr Linger manifested such a decided taste for music that his father determined to give him every facility for the development of his talents in that direction. He accordingly procured an instructor for the child, who made such rapid progress as a performer on the pianoforte as to be able himself to give lessons on that instrument at the early age of twelve years. After this he was placed under Reissiger and Klein, from whom he obtained a thorough insight into the theory of counterpoint and the general principles of composition. He then commenced his career as a composer, and amongst the first fruits of his genius as such were "six sacred songs", which were dedicated to the Princess Royal of Prussia. Their publication in Berlin established the reputation of the young composer in his native land, and induced him to aim at still higher attainments. He accordingly visited Milan, Venice, and other cities of Italy for the purpose of obtaining a practical acquaintance with the Italian school of music, and then returned to Berlin, where he composed a great many musical pieces, some of which are regarded by competent judges as possessing great merit. Amongst these were two entire operas, entitled respectively "The Fight with the Dragon" and "Alfred the Great", three or four masses, several symphonies, cantatas, and other concerted pieces.

There was, however, one marked peculiarity in the disposition of Herr Linger, which, however commendable as a virtue in private life, has almost entirely deprived the musical world of the fruits of his genius. We refer to his extreme modesty - a constant tendency to depreciate his own musical attainments - a virtual disclaimer of talents which were conspicuous in his compositions, which were estimated at their true value by those of his friends who best knew how to discriminate between the productions of true genius and the abortions of the charlatan. When asked why he did not publish his compositions his almost invariable reply was in effect, "Germany has plenty of better music than mine in manuscript". And when his friends expressed a doubt of this, he would shrug his shoulders and reply, "I know better than you". Herr Linger came to South Australia in 1849.

On his arrival he was induced by the representation of his friends to commence farming near Smithfield, where he sank a considerable sum of money. He then sold his country property, and soon established himself in Adelaide as a teacher or music. By his active exertions he succeeded in creating a taste for music in many instances where it did not previously exist, and in cultivating it to a high standard where it did. For several years he was the leader of the Adelaide Choral Society. He was the originator of the present Liedertafel, and was always ready to assist in my undertaking having for its object the cultivation of an art in which he so pre-eminently excelled. He was the successful competitor for the prize offered by the Gawler Institute for the music to the "Song of Australia". South Australia has been occasionally visited by more brilliant executionists, but we believe that none has ever appeared amongst us possessed of such a thorough knowledge of the fundamental principles of music as the man whose loss, not only his more immediate friends, but every true lover of genuine harmony will long deplore. For many months past Herr Linger has been suffering from a complication of diseases, which have at last terminated in death. For some weeks before his demise he appeared so far convalescent as to induce him to write to his aged mother, informing her that he contemplated revisiting his native home, and that he would sail from South Australia about April next. A relapse, however, took place a few days before his death, which occurred on Sunday afternoon last, at about a quarter to 1 o'clock. He had been walking under the verandah of his dwelling house a few minutes before, but appeared conscious that his end was near at hand.


[Obituary], Süd Australische Zeitung (19 February 1862), 2

[Obituary], Süd Australische Zeitung (19 February 1862), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article83804748


[News], The South Australian Advertiser (24 February 1862), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31807909

Herr Linger, the well-known musician and composer, died on Sunday, February 16, at the age of 52. He arrived in this colony in the year 1849, in the same vessel with Dr. Otto Schomburgk, and shortly after commenced farming at Salisbury, but being unable to succeed there, he removed to Adelaide, where he established himself as a teacher of music, which profession he followed till his death. Having had a first-class musical education in his native land, he was well qnalified to impart a knowledge of the science, and he numbered amongst his pupils many of the aristocracy of Adelaide and the neighbourhood. He is said by some to have had the most perfect theoretical knowledge of music poesessed by any of the professors who have established themselves here. He is perhaps more generally known throughout the colony as a composer, by his "Song of Australia" than by his other pieces, although he has set other songs to music, and has also composed operas. He was for years the leader of Die Deutsche Liedertafel, and also of the Adelaide Choral Society while it lasted. His wife died about two years since, and he leaves a danghter of 12 or 13 years of age, who, we presume, will be tofenfaly well provided for. He had been ill for about seven months, but latterly his health had somewhat improved, until a few days ago he had a relapse, and the dropsy, from which he suffered, affected his heart, and death was the result. While the funeral procession was formed in front of his house, on Monday afternoon, the Liedertfel sung the chorus "Es ist bestimnmt in Gotte'e rath," and Schrader's band performed some appropriate music when the coffin waa brought out. The procession moved on in the following order: - Mr. Eitzen, the undertaker, led, followed by the band, playing the Dead March in Saul and other Dead Marches; the hearse came next, followed by the members of the Liedertafel, one of whom carried their banner enveloped in black crape; several mourning coaches and private vehicles, to the number of about 20, completed the procession. The cortege proceeded along Rundle-street, and up King William-street as far as Franklinn-street, where it turned westward to the Cemetery, a large number of spectators watching its progress with considerable interest. The Rev. D. H. Ibbetson read the solemn and impressive service of the Church of England at the grave. When the coffin was lowered the Liedertafel sung "Integer vitae scelerisque purus," and at the conclusion of the ceremony they sung "Nacht to Nacht."

MUSIC: Integer vitae scelerisque purus (probably setting by Friedrich Ferdinand Flemming, publ. Berlin, 1825)


Probate on Linger's will [7 March 1852] (transcript kindly supplied by Cranz descendent, Jan McInerney, May 2013)

Carl August Ferdinand Linger deceased. I the Honourable Benjamin Boothby one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of South Australia Do by these [---] make known unto all Men that on the twenty eighth day of February in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and Sixty two William Ottoman Gerke of Adelaide in the said Province Grocer[?] the executor named in and by the last will and testament of Carl August Ferdinand Linger late of Adelaide aforesaid Professor of Music and deceased a true copy of which said last will and testament is hereunto appear in the Supreme Court aforesaid and claim probate of the said will Whereupon the same was proved approved and registered. And the administration of all and singular the foods and chattels rights and credits and effects of the said Carl August Ferdinand Linger deceased was granted unto the said William Ottoman Gerke. He the said William Ottoman Gerke having first sworn that he believed the paper writing exhibited on this the swearing of the affidavit of the said William Ottoman Gerke marked 'A' and filed in this Honourable Court to be the true last Will and Testament of the said Carl August Ferdinand Linger  deceased. [above is a line of writing] And that the said Wilhelm Ottoman Gerke is the executor named in the said Will And that he the said Wilhelm Ottoman Gerke would well and truly execute the said last Will and Testament of the said Carl August Ferdinand Linger deceased and pay his lawful debts so far as his estates would thereunto extend And that he the said Wilhelm Ottoman Gerke would make and exhibit to this Hon. Court a true  and perfect Inventory of all the goods and chattels rights credits and effects of the said deceased on or before the twenty eighth day of August One thousand eight hundred and sixty two and render a just and true account of his executorship when he should be lawfully called upon so to do And lastly that he the said Wilhelm Ottoman Gerke believes that the goods and chattels rights credits and effects of the said deceased at the time of his death within the said Provence and its dependencies did not exceed in nature the sum on Twelve hundred pounds Given at Adelaide the twenty sixth day of March One thousand and eight hundred and sixty two under my hand and the seal of the Supreme Court of the Province of South Australia. Benjamin Boothby This is the last Will and Testament of me Carl August Ferdinand Linger of Adelaide born Berlin. Firstly I desire That all my just Debts, Funeral and Testamentary Expenses be paid and satisfied by my Executor herein after named as soon as conveniently may be after my decease, and secondly I give divide and bequeath all and every my Household Furniture, Linen and Wearing Apparel, Books, Plate, Pictures, China, Horses, Carts, and Carriages, and also all and every sum and amount of Money which may be in my house or about my person or due to me at the time of my decease and also all other my Stocks, Funds and Securities for money Book Debts, Money on Bonds, Bills, Notes or other Securities and all and every other my Estate and Effects whatever and whichever both real and personal whether in possession reversion remainder or expectancy unto Christiane Matilde Cranz born Hoggrefe to and for her own use and benefit absolutely. And nominate constitute and appoint Mr. Wilhelm Ottoman Gerke Grocer of Adelaide to be Executor of this my last Will and hereby revoking all former or other Wills and Testaments by me at any time hereto before made. I declare this to be my last Will and Testament. In Witness whereof I the said Carl August Ferdinand Linger have to this my last Will and Testament set my hand the Thirteenth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and Sixty. Carl August Ferdinand Linger Signed by the Testator Carl August Ferdinand Linger and acknowledged by him to be his last Will and Testament in the presence of us present at the same time and subscribed by us as Witnesses in the presence of the said Testator and of each other. J. W. Schierenbeck [President of the Adelaide Liedertafel]. C. Rischkirch[?].


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (15 April 1862), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50170484 

THIS DAY (Tuesday), April 15, at 11 o'clock. BY ORDER OF THE EXECUTORS OF THE LATE C. LINGER. GREEN, PARK, & LUXMOORE are instructed to sell, at the Mart, as above - All the MUSIC, BOOKS, and PIANO, the property of the late C. Linger. Removed to the Mart for convenience of Sale.


"PROBATES AND ADMINISTRATION", South Australian Register (23 April 1862), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50175070

Carl August Ferdinand Linger, professor of music, Adelaide, died 10th February; probate granted 7th March; Wilhelm Attomar Gerke, sole executor; personal property sworn under £1,260. All real and personal estate to Matilda Cranz.


"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE", South Australian Register (24 April 1862), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50160458 

CLEARED OUT. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23. WANDRAHM, ship, 564 tons, Meyer, master, for London, via Cape of Good Hope. Passengers - Mr. and Mrs. H. Fock, Mrs. Linger and family, and Messrs. J. H. and Frederick Peel, in the cabin . . .


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (4 July 1862), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50157106 

LAND MART.THIS DAY (FRIDAY), JULY 4th. 1862, at 11 o'clock precisely. GREEN AND WADHAM will offer for sale by auction - Lot 8. BY ORDER OF THE EXECUTORS OF THE LATE HERR LINGER. ST. LEONARD'S. VALUABLE BUILDING SITES, consisting of Blocks 98 and 100 in the Plan, well situated and containing about One Acre of Land each . . .


"TOPICS OF THE DAY", The South Australian Advertiser (3 September 1862), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31814326 

The first concert of the Adelaide Philharmonic Society took place last night at the Adelaide Assembly Room, which, notwithstanding the threatening weather, was quite full . . . Mr. Linly Norman presided at the piano and was most invaluable at that instrument. Altogether we must congratulate the Society on its opening concert, the goodness of which greatly exceeded our expectations. With earnest study, and not mere superficial practice, but such as Linger used to give them, the Adelaide Philharmonic Society bids fair to succeed. It has our best wishes.



  1863



To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1863:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Carl+Linger&q&l-decade=186&l-year=1863 


*


"TOPICS OF THE DAY", The South Australian Advertiser (19 June 1863), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31824881 

We learn with pleasure that it is in contemplation to erect a monument to the memory of Herr Linger, and that a concert is to be given with a view to raising funds for the purpose. To this talented master South Australia was indebted for the introduction of a higher and more classic style of music than had been cultivated here before his time, or has been much encouraged since. A musician in the strictest sense of the term, he tolerated with impatience the popular and ephemeral sing-song which prevailed; and as Conductor of the Choral Society, afforded us many a treat which is still remembered with pleasure and regret. We hope that while paying this tribute to the talent of Carl Linger it will be appropriately commemorated by the performance of some of his compositions. To the later colonists he is best known by the patriotic "Song of Australia;" but his countrymen, and those who were in the habit of attending the concerts of the Society before alluded to, will remember the choruses from his "Alfred," and "Der Kampf mit dem Drachen," and we trust that the opportunity thus afforded of showing that his reputation does not rest upon a solitary production will not be neglected. Herr Linger was much respected in private life; and although this testimonial is intended principally to the artist, it is the more hearty that it is also paid to the memory of an amiable and estimable man.


"MONUMENT TO HERR LINGER", South Australian Register (7 July 1863), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50165419 

A meeting, called by circular, and attended by 42 gentlemen, was held at the Hamburg Hotel, on Monday evening, to arrange the necessary preliminaries for raising funds for the erection of a monument to the memory of the late Herr Linger. It was unanimously agreed that a public concert should be the means employed in carrying out the object, that the assistance of all the musical talent available should be solicited, and that the programme should consist solely of selections from Herr Linger's compositions. Mr. Spiller consented to act as Secretary, a working Committee was appointed, and the meeting then adjourned till a date to be advertised. It is intended that the concert shall come off about the latter end of next month, and a strong determination is evinced to make it a very brilliant affair.

ASSOCIATIONS: Emanuel Spiller (organiser)


[Advertisement], South Australian Register (9 July 1863), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50159668 

A MEETING of the LINGER MEMORIAL COMMITTEE will be held This Evening, at the Hamburg Hotel, Rundle-street, at 8 o'clock. E. SPILLER, Hon. Sec.


"LINGER MEMORIAL CONCERT", South Australian Register (15 July 1863), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50159358 

The first rehearsal of music for the Linger Memorial Concert took place on Tuesday evening, at the South Australian Institute, at which above fifty performers, vocal and instrumental, attended, under the conductorship of Mr. L. Norman. Amongst the instrumentalists present we noticed Messrs. R. B. White, S. Mocatta, and T. P. Addison, in addition to the leader (Mr. Chapman) and members of the Philharmonic Society. Judging from the interest manifested, both by the English and German friends of their late conductor, the concert bids fair to be a great success as regards orchestral proficiency. We understand that Wednesday evening for the future will be the evening of rehearsal.

ASSOCIATIONS: Linly Norman (conductor); Solomon Mocatta (instrumentalist); Thomas Plummer Addison (instrumentalist)


"THE LINGER MEMORIAL CONCERT", Adelaide Observer (5 September 1863), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article159519898 

There was a full rehearsal on Wednesday evening, at the Institute, of the concert to he given on Thursday evening next, towards raising funds for the erection of a monument to the memory of the late Herr Linger. Whilst the compositions of the deceased composer will form a prominent part of the entertainment, the Committee have judiciously varied the programme with selections from others.


[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (10 September 1863), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31827812 

LINGER MEMORIAL. -
A GRAND VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT
will be given on THURSDAY EVENING, September 10,
at WHITE'S ASSEMBLY ROOMS.
in aid of the funds for the above object.
Conductor - Mr. L. Norman.
Leader - Mr. Chapman.
Solo Violin - Mr. R. B. White, R.A.
Harmonium - Mr. Compton.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
Overture - "Concert" - Band - Linger
Motett - "When to our prejudiced errors" - Linger
Song - "Through long dull years we know fell sorrow" - Mrs. Smart - Opera M.S. - Linger
Chorus - "Liebchen's Schätze," "Sweet-hearts Treasures" - Liedertafel - Linger
Song - "Adelaide" - Mr. Oelmann - Beethoven
Solo, Harmonium - "Guillaume Tell" - Mr. Compton - Rossini
Chorus - "March" - Liedertafel
An interval of 10 minutes.
PART II.
Overture - "The King's Command" - Band - H. Schmidt
Chorus - "The Stars burn in Heaven so brightly," "Preciosa" - Weber
Song - "There is a Flower that Bloometh" - Mrs. Wishart - Wallace
Trio - "Sanctus et Benedictus" - Lady Amateur, Mr. Oelmann, and Mr. Bell, Mass in B flat - Linger
Solo, Violin, Mr. R. B. White, R.A.
Chorus - "Drinking song" - Liedertafel - Linger
Song - "In happy moments" - Mr. Edwards [Wallace]
Song - "Song of Australia" - Linger
Reserved Seats, 3s.; Unreserved Seats, 2s.
To commence at 8 o'clock precisely.
E. SPILLER, Hon. Sec.


"The Linger Memorial Concert . . . ", The South Australian Advertiser (26 September 1863), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31828429 

The Linger Memorial Concert took place in the Assembly Rooms on Thursday evening. The room was very well filled, and the concert went off as well as could have been wished. Many of the pieces performed during the evening would have pleased Linger himself. Mr. Linly Norman presided at the pianoforte, and Mr. Compton at the harmonium. Mr. Chapman led the band, and Herr Kunze conducted the Liedertafel. The programme commenced with a Concert Overture by Linger, a very elaborate composition. It was performed creditably by the band, though the effect would hare been improved by a little more attention to the soft passages, and the lights and shades of the piece. The band was exceedingly well balanced as to instruments, and this of course greatly aided the effect. The next piece was a Motett, also by Linger, which, though it was scientific enough to satisfy the most devoted lover of counterpoint, was far too heavy, and Mr. Edward's song which followed was felt to be a relief. The members of the Liedertafel, to whom it is always a pleasure to listen, sang a chorus by Linger, "Liebchen's Schätze," which was encored. Mr. Oehlmann was ambitious enough to sing Beethoven's "Adelaida," the unrivalled queen of love-songs. He acquitted himself very creditably, though to our taste his voice was scarcely suited to the song, and his delivery was not sufficiently impassioned. Mr. Compton's fantasia on the harmonium from "William Tell" was highly successful. An admirable March sung by the Liedertafel concluded the first part of the programme.

After an interval of about 20 minutes the band commenced the second part of the concert by the overture "The King's Command" (Schmidt), an old Choral Society favorite. A chorus from "Preciosa" followed, the beautiful running accompaniment being effectively performed by the orchestra. Mrs. Wishart sang the ballad "There is a flower that bloometh," and then followed a trio song by a lady amateur (who has an excellent voice), and Messrs. Oehlmann and Ball. The trio comprised the Sanctus and Benedictus from Linger's Mass in B flat. This was the best composition of Linger's performed during the evening; solemn and slow, it has passages of much beauty and graceful modulation, while its harmony is admirable. It was very well sung. Mrs. Smart sang the song, from a manuscript opera, by Linger, "Through long dull years of sorrow," which was produced some years ago at one of the Choral Society's concerts. Mr. R. B. White performed portion[? s] of Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto with great brilliancy and effect. "The Song of Australia" was the last piece on the programme, and was performed by the entire strength of the chorus. The Liedertafel sang the first verse, the other chorus the second, and both the third verse. This last was perhaps the finest chorus ever heard in Adelaide, and will not soon be forgotten. It was quite worthy of our national song. The encoring during the evening was carried to a ridiculous extent as usual. There were 15 pieces on the programme, and eight of these (including the second overture) were encored, making 23. It was altogether too much of a good thing. From what has been said, our readers will perceive that the concert was highly successful, indeed its equal has not been heard in Adelaide since Linger's death. We cannot conclude this notice without mentioning, in terms of high commendation, the names of Mr. E. Spiller, the energetic Secretary of the Committee, and Mr. J. Bastard, with whom the idea of the concert originated. To these gentlemen we in a great measure an indebted for the musical treat we enjoyed.

ASSOCIATIONS: John Bastard (organiser); Mr. Ball (bass vocalist)


"LINGER MEMORIAL CONCERT", South Australian Register (26 September 1863), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50170068 

The concert given with a view to the erection of a monument to the memory of the late Herr Linger was performed on Thursday week, in Whites Assembly Room, before one of the largest audiences that for a very long time has been attracted together by the charms of music within that spacious hall. Mr. Linly Norman acted as conductor, and Mr. Chapman as leader of the band. The principal vocalists were Mrs. Wishart, Mrs. Smart, a lady whose name has not been made public, and Messrs. Oehlmann, Edwards, and Ball. The gentlemen of the Liedertafel also assisted in the performances. The band consisted of about 12 or 14 instrumentalists, and the choruses were sustained by about 40 voices. The concert was further rendered attractive by the masterly performances of Mr. R. B. White on the violin and of Mr. Compton on a powerful harmonium kindly lent for the occasion by one of the gentlemen of the orchestra.

The compositions of Herr Linger formed a prominent part of the programme. Herr Linger was a Prussian by birth, a South Australian by choice, and a cosmopolitan in feeling and sentiment; and it was not difficult on Thursday evening to trace in his musical compositions something of this universality. Thus, his "Sanctus" and "Benedictus" is remarkable for the richness of its harmonies, and is quite in the alla capella style. His motett, "When to our prejudiced errors," recalls to the mind the somewhat quaint compositions of the early English school. In the song, "Through long dull years," we have a dash of the florid compositions of sunny Italy; and in the "Liebchen Schätze" and "Drinking Song," the joyous hilarity which characterises some of the choicest productions of the composer of "Der Freischtz" and "Oberon" was conspicuous.

The overture with which the concert commenced was also one of Linger's compositions. It opens with a slow movement, commencing with a few bars in unison, and in the minor key; after which there are some rich harmonies thrown into the composition, and these again are succeeded by and allegro movement, in which full scope is given to the display of the peculiar powers of a variety of both wind and stringed instruments. But we think the composition is defective from the absence of any leading passages in the melody to give it a distinctive character. Or it may be that the compose intended it to be performed by a fuller band and a greater variety of instruments. It was, however, very well received on his occasion.

We cannot in this brief notice refer specifically to the numerous compositions which followed, and it would be difficult to make a selection of those which were the best performed and the most appreciated. To do the former would be to reprint the whole of the programme with some additions, and to do the latter might be invidious. We may, however, state in general terms that the concert was very successful; that Mrs. Wishart was enthusiastically received; that the other vocalists named above were warmly applauded; that the instrumentation of Mr. Compton on the harmonium and of Mr. R. B. White on the violin was of a masterly character; and that the choruses, with one exception, to which it is scarcely necessary to refer more particularly, were rendered with admirable precision. The evening's entertainment was concluded with the first two and the last verses of the Song of Australia and the first verse of the National Anthem. There were numerous encores, by which the performances were prolonged till after 11 o'clock.




Documentation since 1863

"THE LINGER MEMORIAL. TO THE EDITOR", The Adelaide Express (20 May 1865), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207601524 

SIR - It will be in the recollection of many of your readers that some considerable time ago a concert was given and subscriptions raised for the purpose of erecting a suitable monument to the late Carl Linger, to whom music in South Australia is so greatly indebted. I understand that about £10 were collected for this purpose, which still remains in the hands of the Treasurer to the Fund. As it appears that nothing more is likely to be obtained for this object, and as the amount in hand is insufficient for the original object, I beg to suggest through the medium of your columns that the money should be remitted to Germany as a present to the only daughter of Herr Linger. I believe that this would be a graceful and suitable way of expressing to the young lady in question the estimation in which her father was held. I am, Sir, &c., A SUBSCRIBER TO THE FUND.


"THE LINGER MEMORIAL", Adelaide Observer (21 October 1865), 3 Supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article159498595 

Some time in the year 1862 a concert was given in White's Assembly Room to provide funds for a monument to the memory of Herr Linger. The net proceeds were however, much less than had been anticipated, and the Committee were consequently placed in a difficulty as to their disposal. But, after various delays, a monumental tablet has been engraved on silver by Mr. Payne, of Currie-street, from a design gratuitously furnished by Mr. L. J. Pelham, and which, with the consent of the Governors of the Institute, will be placed upon one of the walls of the Reading-room. The design represents various musical instruments grouped together. The figure of a weeping female is shown on the right; an open volume, containing the "Song of Australia," surrounded with a wreath, appears on the lower part of the design; and a scroll is seen in the centre containing the following inscription: "In memory of Carl G. Linger, musical composer and orchestral conductor, many years resident in South Australia. Born in Berlin 15th March, 1810. Died at Adelaide 16th February, 1862." The engraving is supported by a frame work of oak designed and manufactured by Mr. D. Culley, of Flinders-street.


"TOPICS OF THE DAY", The South Australian Advertiser (1 December 1866), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28793352 

The first of the series of monthly popular concerts took place at the Town Hall on Friday evening. The attendance was very large, and the affair passed off most successfully . . . the first part of Friday evening's concert was occupied with Weber's compositions, commencing with the overture to "Oberon." This was well played by the band, which numbered 16 performers, and was under the conductorship of Mr. George Loder . . . For some time past - in fact since the death of Herr Linger - our music has wanted some one in whom perfect confidence could be reposed to conduct it. Such a person has now been found in Mr. George Loder, and it is an undoubted privilege to have so accomplished a musician amongst us . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: George Loder


"PRESENTATION", Evening Journal (3 March 1871), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197654819 

On Thursday evening, March 2, during the interval of the rehearsal of the Philharmonic Society, an address was presented to Mr. E. Spiller, the conductor, with a baton of beautiful and elaborate workmanship . . . Mr. Spiller, on receiving the address and testimonial, said . . . He wished to state also that it was from the late Mr. Linger, during his connection with the Choral Society, that he was first made acquainted with the manner of conducting an orchestra of vocal and instrumental music. He regarded Herr Linger as the father of that kind of music in the colony . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Emanuel Spiller


"THE PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY'S CONCERT", The Express and Telegraph (21 March 1873), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207745200 

Handel's music to Dryden's Ode of "Alexander's Feast," was the piece chosen by the Philharmonic Society for their third concert of the current season . . . The instrumental scoring in use by the Philharmonic Society is that of the late Herr Carl Linger, whose appreciation of the full and massive works of Handel is evidenced by the masterly manner in which his work has been performed as respects "Alexander's Feast" . . .


[Editorial], Yorke's Peninsula Advertiser and Miners' News (28 July 1874), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article215906253 

. . . When the late Herr Linger was told that the music of the "Song of Australia" was not of a first-class character, he replied "De music is as goot as de vorts" . . .


[William Holden], "THE SONG OF AUSTRALIA", Evening Journal (20 December 1878), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197720358 

. . . The song has been out of print for several years, but it has just now been republished by Marshall & Sons. The title page exhibits the Australian Arms, and the work has been got up in the first style of art. We imagine that it will command an extensive sale.


"FRIDAY EVENING'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (29 March 1879), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42969529 

The Philharmonic Society gave its second season concert on Friday evening, in the Town Hall, before a rather small audience . . . The first part of the concert consisted of selections from Handel's "Alexander's Feast." This splendid creation of genius was first performed in Adelaide on the occasion of the Handel centenary festival, just twenty years ago; and we believe we are correct in stating that the band parts scored by the late Herr Linger for that special occasion were used on Friday night . . .


"ADELAIDE JUBILEE INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION. THE SONG OF AUSTRALIA", South Australian Register (24 May 1887), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46096017 

The "Song of Australia" will be performed at the opening ceremony. The news that the difficulty which arose between the Exhibition authorities and Messrs. Marshall & Sons, the owners of the copyright, has been settled will be received with pleasure by those who would not have liked this national song omitted at the opening ceremony. The agreement made is that Professor Ives may arrange the song if he choose, but the name of the composer (Carl Linger) must also appear. Messrs. Marshall and Sons will supply the requisite copies of the song so arranged to the choir to be returned to them, and the Exhibition authorities will have no right to publish the piece.


"MUSICAL CELEBRITIES. [BY C. W.] MR. C. J. STEVENS", Port Adelaide News and Lefevre's Peninsula Advertiser (23 March 1888), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article195884292 

Nearly eighteen months ago an English music teacher, class conductor, and country organist, in pursuit of health, came to this colony unparagraphed and almost unknown; but by keeping the even tenor of his way, and by simple merit alone, he is now recognised by amateurs and professionals as the head of our resident musicians . . . But we are all best acquainted with him as the conductor of the " Adelaide Musical Association." Here he has made his mark. Without the fussiness of Carl Linger, or the choice vernacular of George Loder, he combines the tact, knowledge, and practical efficiency of both . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Charles Joseph Stephens


"THE ADELAIDE LIEDERTAFEL", The Register (22 September 1908), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58932800 

From "One of the Originators": - "The interesting account of the growth and progress of the Adelaide Liedertafel, as given in The Register of September 17, is worthy of a little further elucidation. The original founders were all members of the Deutscher Club, which used to meet at the Hotel Europe, at the corner of Gawler place and Grenfell street. A party of younger members who, under the leadership of Herr Carl Linger, carried out the musical programme of the club, having had a slight dissension with some of the older and less hilarious members, broke away from the Deutscher Club altogether, and assembled at the Hamburg Hotel, where they were heartily welcomed by "Father" Kopke. A set of rules having been drawn up and passed, Mr. Fritz Armbruster was elected President, and Mr. Schluter hon. secretary and librarian. The leadership was again undertaken by Herr Linger, and the members were:

First tenors, Messrs. Julius Eitzen, Nitsche, Reinhardt, and Schluter; second tenors, Messrs. Louis Maraun, Nettlebeck, and F. Wurm; first basses, Messrs. Oscar Ziegler, Braun, Schlemich, and Bielefeld; second basses, Messrs. F. Armbruster, Schierenbeck, and Eimer.

Thus in September, 1858, the Adelaide Liedertafel was founded; and from then on, under the conductorship of the beloved leader and under fresh and unrestrained conditions, was formed a new brotherhood. The words of the old "Waffenschmidt" express the personal reminiscences of the writer "Das war eine Kostlicke Zeit." Herr Spitzka, who joined about three years later, afterwards succeeded Herr Linger at leader, and occupied that position until his death through an accident. It is hardly correct, however, to say that this was the first "Adelaide Liedertafel," as a society under that name used to meet in 1854 and 1855 at Messrs. Wiener & Fischer's Coffee Rooms, in Rundle street. Mr. Fischer was a very sweet tenor, and among other members one recalls the names of Messrs. von der Heide, Schomburg, Henry Wurm, Lellman, and Butefisch; also Mr. Schulze, whose death was announced in The Register recently. Herr Carl Linger was also leader of this society, and the writer recalls many happy evenings spent in their midst. This select little company, which comprised many prominent singers and talented musicians, broke up when Messrs. Wiener and Fischer left Adelaide for Tanunda.


"OVERTURE BY CARL LINGER. Work To Be Produced By Mr. Thomas Grigg, By H. BREWSTER JONES", The Advertiser (22 November 1935), 24

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36198443

The veteran Adelaide conductor. Mr. Thomas Grigg, who is in his 77th year, hopes to produce an orchestral overture of Carl Linger, the MSS. score and parts of which are in his possession, at a Centenary concert next year. The "Concert Overture for Full Orchestra", as it is described on its title page, in a happy combination of German and English (it is signed "Charles" Linger, not "Carl"), is dated November, 1856, and was apparently composed in Adelaide. The scoring is that of the earlier symphony orchestra with cornopions in G (the obsolete appelation for comets), and saxhorns replacing trumpets and French horns. The overture, which has an "andante" introduction in C minor, leading to an "allegro ma non troppo" in the tonic major, employs a number of classical devices, and is written with a definite knowledge of the orchestra and orchestral color. Its performance in Adelaide will be of considerable musical interest, and will throw a new light upon the popular composer of "The Song of Australia". Carl Linger was the first conductor of the Adelaide Liedertafel, from 1858 to 1864, so that this concert overture was written two years before the foundation of this society. Herr Carl Linger was then one of the most renowned musicians in this State.

ASSOCIATIONS: Hooper Brewster Jones (musical journalist); Thomas Grigg (conductor)


"EIGHTY-YEAR-OLD MUSICAL FIND. Carl Linger's Concert Overture. By H. BREWSTER JONES", The Advertiser (11 December 1935), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36203385

Considerable interest has been aroused by the discovery, in the library of Mr. Thomas Grigg, of the "Concert Overture" for orchestra, by Carl Linger, which is to be performed for the Centenary. Upon Mr. Grigg bringing it under the writer's notice a few days ago, a cursory examination was made and an estimate, published in "The Advertiser" of November 22, of its musical value; the present owner being advised to bring it forward at a special concert next year. The opinion then expressed that "the overture . . . employs a number of classical devices, and is written with a definite knowledge of the orchestra and orchestra color", has been fully endorsed by the joint views of Professor E. Harold Davies and Mr. Harold Parsons, who have been given an opportunity to inspect the score. "Surprising and Interesting" Dr. Davies expresses himself as follows: "The Concert Overture of Carl Linger, dating back to 1856, is as surprising as it is interesting. It is undoubtedly written in the good old "Kapellmeister style", but that is only to say that Carl Linger was a very thorough musician, skilled in form and the art of orchestration - and obviously saturated with classical idioms. I wonder whether my old friend, Mr. Grigg, has any more treasures like this overture; for in these sophisticated days, when we musicians are prone to exaggerate our own importance, it is refreshing to find that our South Australian predecessors of nearly a century ago were such competent fellows. He might perhaps "rub it in" a bit more with other similar works of the old days. And the proper humility that we all may feel is further increased when I look back to the splendid records of the Adelaide String Quartet Club which did so much for chamber music as long ago as 1880. In that connection it is particularly interesting to know that Percy Grainger's father - J. H. Grainger - was a moving spirit as well as the indefatigable secretary and organiser of the club." Mr. Parsons, who examined the work with the writer, evinced enthusiasm at its general lay-out and skilled workmanship - furnishing the following encomium of this eighty-year-old find: "I have just spent a very interesting morning perusing the orchestral score of a concert overture by Carl Linger. The title page informs me that the work was composed in the year 1856. The composer has adhered to the traditional style of that period and earlier, and has demonstrated by means of the overture that he was a musician of more than ordinary ability. The thematic material is of considerable interest, and evinces a very happy melodic sense. Moreover, he knew how to write suitably for the various instruments of the orchestra. It is rather interesting to note that sax horns are used in the place of French horns, the latter instrument being invariably utilised by composers in this type of composition. I am inclined to think that the substitution is due to the fact that French horn players were not to be obtained in these early days of music in Adelaide. I am glad to know that Mr. Thomas Grigg has a performance of the overture in view, and I look forward with considerable interest to hearing the work." The recent history of the score and parts was supplied by Mr. Gus Cawthorne, who remembers his late father, Mr. Charles Cawthorne, presenting them to Mr. Grigg upon his own abandonment of orchestral activities about 10 years ago. Mr. Cawthorne had often intended producing the work, but somehow the suggestion had remained shelved. "Other Manuscripts" Mr. Miller, the associate of Mr. Cawthorne, remembers other manuscripts of Carl Linger being in the latter's possession, and efforts will be made to see that they are traced and brought to light for the Centennial music festival . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Charles Cawthorne (musician); E. Harold Davies (Elder professor of music); John Henry Grainger (Adelaide String Quartet Club)


"FIRST TO CONDUCT 'MESSIAH' HERE. Carl Linger's Career Recalled. By H. Brewster Jones", The Advertiser (10 February 1936), 14

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35407613 

During this, our Centennial year, as our thoughts turn back to the past, we are naturally grateful to those early South Australian pioneers of culture who have left an artistic legacy as our inheritance. The name of Carl Linger, the composer of "Song of Australia," naturally comes to our mind in this respect. Whether his name will go down in history as a musical composer of importance is a matter for posterity to decide, but, certain it is, the name of Carl Linger will always be associated with the first hundred years of the musical life of this State.

Besides writing the music of our most popular song, and a number of other characteristic works, he had the distinction of conducting the first performance of Handel's "Messiah" in South Australia in 1859. This work made such an impression that its repetition at the "Adelaide Rooms," King William street, Adelaide, was given within a few days - and it is interesting to note that its local popularity has never waned from that day to this.

It is possible that more than one of Carl Linger's compositions will be performed during the Centenary musical festival this year, and we may then reflect upon the romantic arrival here of this talented composer in the small vessel of 350 tons in which he voyaged thousands of miles to a new country, with his wife and child, nearly 90 years ago; and we may wonder what his impressions were, and how they affected his creative musical efforts during the twelve remaining years of his life spent in this State. The "Song of Australia," by which we all know Carl Linger, has the advantage of being easy to sing because of its simple rhythmic flow and its moderate melodic range of an octave: and it is happily set to the words of Mrs. Carleton, which appeal equally to the child or adult mind. In his more ambitious compositions, two of which the writer has examined - an orchestral overture and a choral mass - there is a certain quality which proves this composer's musicianship.

Any act by which the name of Carl Linger may be perpetuated in this State is dearly worthy of our support: and the erection of a memorial, and a pilgrimage to his grave by school children, as is contemplated, will be a gracious act of courtesy to one who has bequeathed a fragrant musical memory of the past. Contributions to the fund may be sent to "The Advertiser," and they will be acknowledged each day . . .


"CARL LINGER MEMORIAL", The Advertiser (14 February 1936), 25

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74163389 

Further Discovery Of Manuscripts. PENNY FUND.

General approval of the idea to renovate the grave of Carl Linger in the West Terrace Cemetery, and to erect a suitable memorial or tablet in honor of the composer of the "Song of Australia," has been expressed throughout South Australia. Contributions received yesterday included a guinea from the Director of the Elder Conservatorium (Dr. E. Harold Davies), who is heartily in accord with the scheme.

Discoveries of Linger manuscripts continue to be made as the result of interest aroused through "The Advertiser" appeal. Mr. A. R. Mumme, whose uncle, Charles Mumme, was a co-conductor of the Adelaide Liedertafel with Carl Linger, has a number of manuscripts which were handed down to him, and a careful scrutiny is being made of the scores to discover their musical worth. Mr. Gus Cawthorne is also keenly interested in anything to do with Carl Linger, because his father, the late Mr. Charles Cawthome, handled most of Carl Linger's manuscripts. Valuable information regarding a number of them is being collected. It is believed that the original manuscript of the "Song of Australia" has been lost and great difficulty is being experienced in finding even a copy of the original, the accompaniment of which was slightly different from the present well-known arrangement . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Charles Mumme (member Adelaide Liedertafel)


"VOCAL MUSIC BY CARL LINGER. Important Discoveries at Tanunda. BROADCAST FROM 5 AD ON MARCH 29. By H. BREWSTER JONES", The Advertiser (27 February 1936), 19

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35411694

The discovery of six vocal compositions by the late Carl Linger, in the library of Mr. Theo. Geyer, Tanunda, is of considerable musical importance to this State. Although two of these works have been performed in the Langmeil Lutheran Church, Tanunda, they are all unknown to the general public, and arrangements have been made to broadcast a special programme of Carl Linger music from station 5 AD on Sunday, March 29. Several motets for unaccompanied voices, and a scholarly setting of "Vater Unser", "The Lord's Prayer", for five voices and organ, which belong to the Tanunda collection, will be presented. The appreciative review, the Carl Linger concert overture for full orchestra, which appeared in these columns several weeks ago, has been fully endorsed by leading Adelaide musicians. The motets and other vocal compositions, the manuscripts of which have been given careful perusal, are apparently of even greater musical significance, and it is no exaggeration to say that they stamp Carl Linger as a composer of unusual quality and musical erudition. "Scholarly Musician" This opinion is whole-heartedly supported by the Director of the Elder Conservatorium (Professor E. Harold Davies), who says: "After perusing the overture for orchestra, it is an even greater delight to discover, in the manuscripts of vocal works of Carl Linger, now made available for inspection, that he was not only a scholarly musician but that he possessed creative gifts of an exceptional order. The motets, the anthem, for voices and orchestra, and the setting of the Lord's Prayer for voices and organ, which I have looked at, are quite impressive. It is evident that Linger was a devoted follower of both Schubert and Beethoven, but particularly the former. His glowing melody and many of his harmonic idioms are reminiscent of that great master. I sincerely hope for an adequate performance of these works during the Centenary year." The newly discovered compositions are "Vier Motetten" (four motets) for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass, dated 1845-46. They are: 1) "Almighty, I lift up my eyes on high"; (2) "Thy holy birth"; (3) "Come to Him all ye who labor"; (4) "When to our prejudiced errors no ray breaks through". "Dignity And Majesty" There is dignity and almost majesty about the musical quality of these works. There is no lack of contrapuntal invention, and still no paucity of harmonic coloring. Fugal entries and canonic imitation are happily introduced, and other devices such as the "pedal point" effectively employed. The arrangement of "Vater Unser", a setting of "The Lord's Prayer", for soprano, alto, tenor, and two bass voices in organ accompaniment, also dates from 1846. The anthem, "O Lord, who is as Thee", for four voices and full orchestra, is dated 1851, and is signed "Carles Linger", no doubt as a partial concession to the English language, which is employed also in the setting. There is evidence of a thorough musical training in all these compositions, and we may be proud to claim this pioneer composer, who set such an excellent standard in his day. Linger was an exceptionally modest artist, and we are indebted to his friends and their descendants who have carefully preserved his music for future use. The further discovery of interesting manuscripts leads the writer to appeal to readers who may have either Linger or other MSS. hidden away in their musical libraries to bring them forward for the purposes of research or public performance.

ASSOCIATIONS: Theodor Geyer


"OLD PUPIL OF CARL LINGER. Legacy Of Life-Long Love of Music. BY H. BREWSTER JONES", The Advertiser (16 March 1936), 20

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35416218

No one could say that the spirit of Carl Linger is dead after hearing his pupil, Mrs. Liston, of Marlborough road, Westbourne Park, play, at the age of 90, with the same enthusiasm and delightful touch that she evidently had at the age of 13. Her actual recollections of the personality of Linger are slight, but he bequeathed her the legacy of a life-long love of music. Mrs. Liston has never-ceasing praise and respect for the maestro. Mrs. Liston's voice is remarkably well preserved, and her intonation, in an average mezzo range, is perfect. With such a sense of pitch she shames many professional vocalists of today. Although Mrs. Liston both sang and played in public as a girl, her name did not actually appear for, as she says, "in those days they had a way of keeping ladies' names out of programmes." Mrs. Liston was Miss Marian Jane Hughes, and she treasures a piece of music "Der Sturm" of Steibelt, given her as a prize, and inscribed by C. Linger.

Another Old Pupil.

As a child she attended Mrs. Woodcock's private school, held at the parsonage of Christ Church, Palmer place, North Adelaide, where Carl Linger gave music lessons. A fellow pupil was Mrs. Cross, now in Tasmania, who, at the age of 95, still plays the piano. In a recent letter to Mrs. Liston she attempted to give an opinion as to the color of her old master's hair and eyes at the request of Miss S. E. Smith, of Blackwood, who is painting a portrait of Carl Linger from the only photo available. She wrote, "I cannot be sure whether his eyes were blue or grey."

Of the "Song of Australia," she wrote:

"Linger entered three compositions, and gave me the other two to play over at Mrs. Woodcock's. We both liked them better than the one the committee chose. I wish I had the others."

Mrs. Cross is a member of a well-known Adelaide family, her father being Robert Stuckey, of Palmer place, North Adelaide. She modestly attempts to correct the idea that she, as Bessie Stuckey, was Linger's best pupil, saying that Mrs. John Parkin (nee Rowe) should have the honor.

Programme Being Rehearsed.

The programme of compositions by Carl Linger, which will be broadcast from station 5 AD on Sunday evening, March 29, is now being rehearsed. The newly discovered manuscripts of motets, written in the obsolete clefs of the period, have been transcribed into modern notation. There is still one motet with its words written untranslated, and this will be placed in the hands of an expert.

Contributions to the Penny Fund, which will be used to renovate Carl Linger's grave in West Terrace Cemetery and erect a suitable memorial, may be sent to "The Advertiser" office and will be acknowledged each day . . .


"Monument To Carl Linger Unveiled", Chronicle (18 June 1936), 41

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article92344693 

COMPOSED "SONG OF AUSTRALIA". Big Gathering Round Grave. SPECIAL BROADCAST IN BERLIN.

A tardy act of recognition to the composer of South Australia's national anthem, the "Song of Australia," was paid on Wednesday afternoon, when a monument to the memory of Carl Linger, erected by public subscription, was unveiled in the West Terrace Cemetery, over the grave, in the presence of about a thousand spectators, among whom were many notable citizens, including the Premier (Mr. Butler), Messrs. H. Krawinkel, A. W. Langhams, honorary architect; Mr. V. H. Ryan, the Centenary organiser; Mrs. W. Ray, granddaughter of Mrs. Carleton and Jocelyn Ray, great-grand-daughter; and Dr. Harbison brought a party from Wallaroo. The singers comprised 20 members of the Adelaide, and 60 of the Tanunda Liedertafels, and a choir of 200 school children. Berlin's Lord Mayor was represented by a laurel wreath. Among other floral tributes were wreaths from the Liedertafel, South Australian school children, and other societies, grouped round a monument of Basket Range stone, upon the front of which was engraved in gold raised letters, "Carl Linger," and underneath, "Composer of the Song of Australia." On an other side of the monument was written "Sacred to the memory of C. A. F. Linger, late of Berlin, who departed this life on the 16th February, 1862. Aged 52."

The set portion of the proceedings commenced with the united singing of the National Anthem.

The Premier, whose speech was broadcast, paid a generous tribute to the central figure of the occasion. He said:-

"Today we are gathered together to pay homage to a pioneer who worthily played his part in the laying of the foundations of our State. In this, our Centenary year, it is fitting that we should reverently recall the names of all who in their day and generation assisted in the founding of a new portion of the Empire."

Mr. Butler referred to the early German settlers who came out to a new land in search of religious freedom, and who, together with those staunch pioneers from the old country, endured great hardships, and faced almost insuperable difficulties in blazing the trail in a new country. These early pages of history made wonderful reading, and should be an inspiration to every one. The first batch of these settlers from Germany arrived in 1839 and settled at Klemzig. Carl Linger only lived to spend 13 years in South Australia, and yet in that time he won an honored place in the musical life of the community. Continuing, the Premier said:-

"Little did Carl Linger realise when he composed the music to the Song of Australia that the song would be sung with patriotic fervor almost every day by countless thousands of people of this country. Could any man render a greater service to his country? Little did he realise that 74 years after his death the people would be assembled around his graveside to do honor to his memory. His name will ever be remembered for what he did in setting to music those inspiring verses of Mrs. Carleton's verses that thrill one with their typically Australian sentiment and atmosphere."

The Premier added:-

"Probably the authorites of the Gawler Institute little thought 77 years ago that the competition they conducted would give them a song that would live through the years like this one has."

Unfortunately, some of the other States had their own songs, but the time was long overdue when they should have a National Song for Australia and that song should be their own Song of Australia. The drawback was that it was so little known outside of South Australia. Surely there were opportunities to make it better known throughout the Commonwealth. They in South Australia were doing their part, especially in the schools, and he could not help expressing his appreciation of the manner in which the children all over the State put their whole heart and soul into the singing of their National Song.

Turning to the Monument, the Premier concluded:-

"And now to the Memory of Carl Linger - a pioneer whose name down through the ages will ever be remembered and revered - I unveil this memorial."

Mr. Krawinkel read telegrams from various notable organisations and then spoke of the pleasure and privilege it was to them all to witness the unveiling ceremony. He was sure that Carl Linger must have been very fond of South Australia, the land of his adoption, for he expressed that affection in music and his music like the man, was simple and came from the heart. The speaker thought that the melody had inspired South Australians to a greater love for their country. He hoped that future generations would continue to sing the "Song of Australia" with the same feeling of enthusiasm as the children had done that day.

A musical programme followed. The contributors being the choir of school children, conducted by Mr. F. L. Gratton, and the Adelaide and Tanunda Liedertafel conducted, by Mr. Fritz Homburg. The children's voices were beautifully modulated in "Thanks Be to God." No finer company of male singers could be imagined anywhere than the combined Liedertafel rendering "Das Ist Der Tag Des Herren," "Still Richt Der See," and "O Schone Zeit, O Seel'ge Zeit."




Musical works (extant)


Geistliche Lieder und Gesänge (sacred songs; voice and piano) [? before 1849]

Geistliche Lieder und Gesänge für eine Singstimme mit Begleitung des Piano-Forte, componirt von Carl Linger

(Berlin: Tautwein, n.d.); copy at Berlin, Staatsbibliothek

https://www.vifamusik.de/metaopac/search?View=mus&authorid=141731141 

http://stabikat.de/DB=1/XMLPRS=N/PPN?PPN=755292723 

Enth. Widmung an Königin Elisabeth von Preussen; Texte überw. von C. J. P. Spitta, teilw. von A. Knapp oder C. F. Gellert

Enth: Andacht

Kehre wieder!

Lob Göttlicher Führung

Die Stunde des Herrn

Wir sind des Herrn

Geduld

Preis des Schöpfers

Luft von Morgen



Vier Gedichte (songs; voice and piano) [before 1849]

Vier Gedichte (in Musik gesetzt fur eine Sopran oder Tenorstimme mit Begleitung des Pianoforte; von Geibel, Kletke, Platen, Trutz von Carl Linger [also includes a fifth song]

1 Wenn still mit seinen letzten Flammen (Geibel)

2 In der Ferne (Kletke)

3 Mein Herz u. deine Stimme (Platen)

4 In der Ferne (Trutz)

5 Ich kannte nur des Lebensschmerzen

Photocopy of the composer's MS, originally made by Richard Divall for ABC Musica Australis project, now in Symphony Australia collection, National Library of Australia, digitised

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/171071780 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-179629656 (DIGITISED)



Sechs deutsche Lieder (songs, voice and piano) [before 1849]

Sechs deutsche Lieder, mit Begleitung des Pianforte in Musik gesetzt und den Fraeulein Eliza und Julie Praetorius zugeeignet von Carl Linger

(Berlin: Groebenschutz u. Seiler, [184-?])

1 Muttertänderlei (von Bürger)

2 Schweizerlied (von Goethe)

3 Amen (von Karoline)

4 Herbstlied (von Ludw. Tieck)

5 Endliche Fahrt (von Karoline)

6 Mailied (von Goethe)

Photocopy of the printed edition, originally made by Richard Divall for ABC Musica Australis project, now in Symphony Australia collection, National Library of Australia, digitised

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/171071779 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-179628425 (DIGITISED)



Vier Motetten (SATB chorus) [1845-46]

Vier Motetten . . . für Sopran, Alt, Tenor, und Bass, componiert von Carl Linger, 1845-46

1 Hymne - Allmächtiger

2 Motette - Deine heilige Geburt (Klopstock)

3 Motette - Kommt zu ihm (Herder)

4 Motette - Wenn Irrtum uns befangen (Spieker)

Photocopy of the composer's MS, formerly in the library of the Tanunda Liedertafel, originally made by Richard Divall for ABC Musica Australis project, now in Symphony Australia collection, National Library of Australia, digitised

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/171071267 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-178630559 (DIGITISED)

Modern edition by Richard Divall (Music archive of Monash University, November 2013), freely downloadable PDF

http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/music-archive/mda005 

No. 4, as "When to our prejudiced errors", performed at the Linger Memorial Concert, 10 September 1863

[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (10 September 1863), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31827812 



Vater unser [Lord's prayer] (SATBB chorus and organ) [before 1849]

Vater unser für Sopran, Alt, Tenor, und 2 Bässe mit begleitung der Orgel (ad libitum) composiert von Carl Linger

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/156931133 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-178625103 (DIGITISED)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-178627218 (DIGITISED)

Modern edition by Richard Divall (Music archive of Monash University, November 2013), freely downloadable PDF

http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/music-archive/mda004 



Sechs Zwischenspiele [6 interludes/entractes] (small orchestra) [before 1849]

Sechs Zwischenspiele für ein kleines Orchester zum Gebruach beim Lustspeil & componiert von Carl Linger

1 Menuetto (Allegro)

2 Menuetto (Poco presto)

3 Polonaise

4 Menuetto (Allegro)

5 Andante con moto

4 Menuetto (Allegro di molto)

Composer's MS, ? c. mid 1840s; Berlin, Staatsbibliothek, Preussicher Kulturbesitz, Musikabteilung (D-B/Mus. Ms. 13045)

https://www.vifamusik.de/search?id=rismvifa453500747&View=mus 

https://opac.rism.info/search?id=453500747 (RISM rceord)

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/16422587

Modern edition by Richard Divall (Music archive of Monash University, November 2013), freely downloadable PDF

http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/music-archive/mda003 



Oh Lord who is as thee [O Lord, who is as thee?] (hymn, SATB chorus and orchrestra) [1851]

Hymne, "Oh Lord who is as thee", for Soprano, Alto, Tenor & Basso and Orchester composed by Carles Linger, 1851 [sic]

Photocopy of the composer's MS, formerly in the library of the Tanunda Liedertafel, originally made by Richard Divall for ABC Musica Australis project, now in Symphony Australia collection, National Library of Australia, digitised

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/171071786 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-179636596 (DIGITISED)

Modern edition by Richard Divall (Music archive of Monash University, November 2013), freely downloadable PDF

http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/music-archive/mda001 



The song of Australia (voice and piano) [1859]

The song of Australia, to which the prize of twenty guineas was awarded by the Gawler Institute on the occasion of its Second Anniversary 1859; words by Mrs. C. J. Carleton, music by Herr Carl Linger

(Adelaide: Penman & Galbraith, Lith., 1859)

[title on first page of music: "Australia"]

Original edition; copy at National Library of Australia, digitised

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/22569242 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-165711495 (DIGITISED)

Second colonial edition:

The song of Australia, to which the prize of twenty guineas was awarded by the Gawler Institute, words by C.J. Carleton; music by Carl Linger

(Adelaide: S. Marshall & Sons, [1878])

Copy at National Library of Australia, digitised

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/19529440 

Also ? original MS (? Gawler Library), and many later editions

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/5229425 

"GAWLER MUSIC PRIZE", South Australian Register (5 November 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49825647 

The Judges who had undertaken to decide upon the music set to the "Song of Australia" met yesterday, and, after due examination, agreed to the following report: -

"The Judges appointed to award the prize for the best musical composition set to the words of the prize song, entitled "The Song of Australia," met on Friday, the 4th November - present, Messrs. Dutton, Ewing, Chinner, and Holden. Twenty-three compositions were examined, and the prize was unanimously awarded to the composition bearing the motto "One of the Quantity." Those bearing the mottoes "Long Live our Gracious Queen," "Garibaldi," and "Con Amore" so nearly equalled the prize composition in merit that the Judges had great difficulty in coming to a decision.

"Francis S. Dutton.

"A. Ewing.

"Geo. W. Chinner.

"Wm. Holden."

Immediately upon receiving this report we telegraphed to the Secretary of the Gawler Institute to ascertain the name of the successful competitor, and we find from his reply that the composer who has thus distinguished himself is Mr. Carl Linger.

ASSOCIATIONS: Francis Dutton (judge); Alexander Ewing (judge); George Chinner (judge); William Holden (judge)

"THE PRIZE SONG", The South Australian Advertiser (5 November 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1198928

"THE SONG OF AUSTRALIA", The South Australian Advertiser (15 December 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200228 

We have received a copy of the words and music of this song. Of the former nothing need be said, as Mrs. Carleton's fame is South Australian, and it is not necessary to say more, whether of praise or dispraise, than has already been said. Herr Linger has produced a very beautiful air, of the merits of which we hope he will soon give the Adelaide public an opportunity of judging. We must not, however, forget Messrs. Penman and Galbraith who appear to have lavished extraordinary pains upon the "getting up " of the double composition, and certainly they deserve to be complimented for their success. Take the piece as a whole, - words, music, and engraving, - and South Australia need not be ashamed of the achievement.

[Advertisement]: "THE PRIZE SONG OF AUSTRALIA", South Australian Register (16 December 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49830430

"GRAND CONCERT AT THE GAWLER INSTITUTE", The South Australian Advertiser (20 December 1859), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200383

"SOCIETY", The Bulletin (13 December 1939), 52

https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-578562903/view?sectionId=nla.obj-578576295&partId=nla.obj-578576295#page/n13/mode/1up 

"S.T.S.": The archives department of the Public Library of Adelaide has been given the original MS. music, by Carl Linger, which won a "Song of Australia" competition just 80 years back, to the words of Mrs. Carleton. This was a local literary venture by Gawler, a brainy town a few miles north of Adelaide. But it is a tuneful song, easily picked up, and with a great "Australi-a!" three times at the end of each verse for an audience to join in. The whole State took kindly to the new anthem, and has never dropped it, and in S.A. it is as well known as "Advance, Australia Fair."

See also earliest international edition:

National, patriotic and typical airs of all lands; with copious notes by John Philip Sousa (Philadelphia: H. Coleman, [1890]), 33

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.l0070184577;view=1up;seq=39 




Musical works (presumed lost)


Quartet (instrumental)

Performance: 21 January 1851

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (21 January 1851), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38448111 

. . . Instrumental quartette (C. Linger) - Messrs. Wallace, Osborne, Heinerbein [sic], and Mater . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Spencer Wellington Wallace (? violin or flute); Ferdinand Osborne (? violin); August Huenerbein (? clarinet, piano); Charles Mater (? violin, clarinet)



God save the queen (arr.) [1853]

Performance: 14 April 1853

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (14 April 1853), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38458626 

. . . God Save the Queen Solo, Quartette, and Chorus, written expressly for this Concert, Carey and C. Linger . . .

"MADAME CRANZ'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (15 April 1853), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38455697

ASSOCIATIONS: Mathilde Cranz



Die Nelken und die Rosen (vocal quartet)

Vocal Quartette Die Nelken und die Rosen

Performances: 14 April 1853

[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (13 April 1853), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207011657 

. . . PART II . . . 6. Two Vocal Quartetts, a. Die Nelken und die Rosen; b, Die Nachbarin - Linger and Bank - Mad. Cranz and Amateurs . . .



Overture to The combat with the dragon [Der Kampf mit dem Drachen] (2 pianos; or piano duet)

Performances: 18 July 1854; 14 February 1855, 30 September 1857

[Text] Theodor Körner, Der Kampf mid dem Drachen, ein Sinspiel in einem Aufzuge, 1811 (Berlin: Nicolai, 1847)

https://bildsuche.digitale-sammlungen.de/index.html?c=viewer&bandnummer=bsb00057346&pimage=7

http://libretti.digitale-sammlungen.de/de/fsl/object/display/bsb00057346_00011.html 

[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (18 July 1854), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207016711 

. . . Part II. Overture, "The Combat with the Dragon" - Mrs. Young and Mr. Linger - Linger . . .

"MRS. YOUNG'S CONCERT", Adelaide Times (20 July 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207016744 

. . . The novelties of the evening were the selections from a piece entitled "Der Kampf mit dem Drachen," a dramatic poem of Korner, which Mr. Linger has set to exquisite music. Mr. Linger is a zealous disciple of Mozart, and having said that his melodies lost nothing by following two of the favourite productions of his great master, it is unnecessary to add more to their commendation. The overture, brilliant and rich in harmony, was beautifully played by himself and Mrs Young . . .

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (14 February 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49308713 

. . . 7. Overture - "The combat with the dragon" - Miss Rowe and Mr. Linger . . .

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (30 September 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49209042

. . . 8. Overture to the Opera, "The Combat with the Dragon," - C. Linger.



Duetto (soprano and tenor, piano) [performed 18 July 1854]

Performances: 18 July 1854 [? 14 August 1855]

[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (18 July 1854), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207016711 

. . . Duetto - Madame Cranz and Mr. Daniels [sic] - Linger . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Josiah Wyke Daniel (tenor)



Scena and aria, Through long dull years of sorrow (from an MS opera) [before 1854]

Performances: 11 July 1854; 3 August 1854; 6 July 1855; 24 September 1863

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (11 July 1854), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49197979

. . . Scena and aria, Madame Cranz - Linger . . .

[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (3 August 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207017031 

. . . Scena and Aria, "Through long dull Years, Madame Cranz, by desire (Linger) . . .

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (6 July 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49299634 

. . . Aria, "Through long dull years," with Orchestra - Linger . . .

"CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (7 July 1855), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49301225 

. . . Another very successful piece was a composition by Mr. Linger, consisting of soprano solo, with orchestral accompaniments, entitled "Through long dull years," and performed by Miss Petman and the band. The plaintive strains with which the piece commences were strikingly contrasted by the vigorous and elaborate construction of that part of the composition which follows the opening movement. Miss Petman performed even the most difficult passages of the song with marked precision; but her voice was at times scarcely audible above the united tones of about 30 instruments. At the conclusion she was loudly applauded, and greeted with a general encore . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Mary Ann Petman (Mrs. Smart)

"The Linger Memorial Concert . . . ", The South Australian Advertiser (26 September 1863), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31828429 

. . . Mrs. Smart sang the song, from a manuscript opera, by Linger, "Through long dull years of sorrow," which was produced some years ago at one of the Choral Society's concerts.



Duetto, O give faith and in the heart (soprano and ?, piano) [1855; perhaps same as 1854 Duetto above]

Performances: [? 18 July 1854] 14 August 1855

[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (14 August 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207072675 

CONCERT FOR THE BENEFIT OF MADAME CRANZ. . .
On TUESDAY EVENING, August 14 . . .
PROGRAMME. PART I . . . 6. Duetto - "O give Faith and in the heart," Madame CRANZ and an Amateur - Linger . . .



Psalm 93 [by 1855]

Der 93rd Psalm: Der Herr ist Koenig: The lord is king

Performances: 25 September 1855

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (20 September 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49298583

"HERR LINGER'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (26 September 1855), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49298377 



Mass in B flat (vocal soloists, chorus, ? organ) [by 1855]

[1] Gloria

Performances: 20 September 1855

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (20 September 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49298583

. . . Lobgesang in der Hoehe. "Gloria" from the Mass in Bb - C. Linger . . .

[2] Sanctus and Benedictus

Performances: 10 September 1863

[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (10 September 1863), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31827812 

. . . Trio - "Sanctus et Benedictus" - Lady Amateur, Mr. Oelmann, and Mr. Bell, Mass in B flat - Linger . . .



Overture Cymbeline (orchestra) [before 1856]

Performances: 18 July 1856; 14 July 1858

[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (17 July 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207093843 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY . . . THE SECOND CONCERT . . . at Neales's Exchange, on FRIDAY EVENINO NEXT, the 18th instant . . . PROGRAMME . . . PART 2. 7. Overture to Shakspeare's "Cymbeline" - C. Linger . . .

[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (13 July 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article781111

"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", The South Australian Advertiser (15 July 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article781182

"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (15 July 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49781322

. . . The instrumental pieces included an overture composed by Herr Linger. It is written in the true orthodox style, commencing with a stately andante movement, followed by an allegro. It contains many fine passages, some of which reminded us of one of Haydn's symphonies. There is, however, on the whole, great originality of conception, and sufficient indications of the great musical talent which Herr Linger is well known to possess . . .



2 preludes (orchestra) [1856]

Sweetly rest in God's own peace (chorus) [1856]

I am the resurrection (anthem, chorus) [1856]

Praise the lord, O my soul (chorus) [1856]

Prelude No. 1 "To the memory of the fallen heroes - Prelude for the Orchestra in G minor

Prelude No. 2 "Praise and thanks to the lord for victory and peace - Prelude for Orchestra in D major

("the two Preludes and Nos. 1, 2, 4 and 11 were expressly composed and arranged for this Concert by Herr Linger")

1 Funeral march on the death of a hero (Beethoven)

2 Chorus Sweetly rest in God's own peace [Linger]

4 Funeral anthem I am the Resurrection [Linger]

11 Chorus Praise the Lord, O my Soul [Linger]

Performances: 18 August 1856

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (11 August 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49753687

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (18 August 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49761314

"The musical event of the season . . .", South Australian Register (23 August 1856), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49756276

The great musical event of the season was a grand concert given in White's Assembly-room on the 18th inst., for the benefit of the widows and orphans of the soldiers who fell in the late war . . . As announced, the concert was conducted by Herr Linger, and Mr. Chapman was the leader. The band of instrumentalists and the choir of vocalists were more numerous and complete than on any former musical festival within our recollection in Adelaide. After the prelude to the memory of the fallen heroes, composed expressly for the occasion by Herr Linger, the Rev. C. W. Evan delivered an appropriate prologue, which was heard with great attention and warmly applauded. Then followed the musical entertainment, which was partly vocal and partly instrumental. The Te Deum was decidedly the grandest musical effort, instrumental and vocal, ever heard in Adelaide. It was, as a performance, worthy of the occasion, of the company, and of the splendid room, in which its effects were heard to the greatest possible advantage.



Divertissement [on themes] from Donizetti's Belisario (2 cornopeans and orchestra) [1856]

Performances: 11 December 1856

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (11 December 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49759956 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY. - The Fourth CONCERT for the Season . . . To-morrow (Thursday) Evening, the 11th inst. . . . PART FIRST . . . 6. Divertissement for two Cornopeans and Orchestra, from Donizetti's Belisario - C. Linger . . .



Concert overture (orchestra) ["November 1856", for 1857]

Concert Overture, composed for opening the season [1856, for 1857]

Performances: 1 April 1857; 18 November 1857; 10 September 1863; modern revival: 17 October 1936

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Concert+overture+(Linger) (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (1 April 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49767222 

"THE CHORAL SOCIETY'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (2 April 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49767315

[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (18 November 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207125541 

"OVERTURE BY CARL LINGER. Work To Be Produced By Mr. Thomas Grigg", The Advertiser (22 November 1935), 24

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36198443

"CARL LINGER MEMORIAL", The Advertiser (14 February 1936), 25

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74163389 

CARL LINGER'S own score for first violin of Ms concert overture, which will be played at one of the State Centenary concerts by the South Australian Orchestra. This manuscript is 80 years old and was given to Mr. Thos. Grieg by the late Mr. Charles Cawthorne.

"CARL LINGER MEMORIAL", The Advertiser (15 February 1936), 21

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74165934 

. . . Mr. Gus Cawthome has offered to give 100 copies of Carl Lingers "Concert Overture," which it is proposed to publish for the Centenary celebrations, to be sold towards the fund. This would make a handsome addition to the fund, in addition to being recognised as a generous gesture by the firm which handled a number of Carl Linger's manuscripts many years ago . . .

Hooper Brewster-Jones, "MASSED MALE CHOIR CONCERT. Successful Centenary Event", The Advertiser (19 October 1836), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47753381

The massed male voice choral concert given at the Adelaide Town Hall on Saturday night proved a successful Centenary event. Three hundred and fifty male voices, assisted by an orchestra of 60 performers, under the veteran conductor, Thomas Grigg, made a fine display. This concert served the purpose of bringing the members of several male voice choirs together in a happy spirit of co-operation to mark the Centenary.

After a stirring performance of "Song of Australia," Linger, the massed choir sang, with vim, "Border Ballad," Cowen, both numbers being conducted by Mr. A. H. Behrndt. Mr. Grigg is to be congratulated upon the result of his labors in preparing the "Concert Overture for Orchestra," Carl Linger. This work is not easy of performance, but on the whole a very good rendition was given, and the contrapuntal entries were carefully negotiated by the players, even if intonation suffered in the effort. There is some scholarly writing in this overture which did not break any new ground but proved the musicianship of the composer . . .



King Alfred (opera) [before 1857]

[1] Triumphal procession

Performance: 30 September 1857

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (30 September 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49209042

"ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY", South Australian Register (1 October 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49209786

. . . The entertainment concluded with a chorus from the opera of the "Vestal" . . . and indeed this, with the concluding piece of the first part "Triumphal procession from King Alfred," were undoubtedly the masterpieces of the evening, showing, as they did, the perfection at which the Society in their more elaborate performances had arrived . . .

[2] Air de ballet

Performance: 18 February 1859

[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (17 February 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article789171

. . . 9. Air de Ballet, from the Opera "King Alfred" - C. Linger . . .



The song of Australia (setting 2, "Con amore") [1859]

The song of Australia (setting 3, "Long live our gracious queen") [1859]

LOST MSS

"LITERATURE AND ART", South Australian Register (19 November 1859), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49830133 

. . . It has come to our knowledge that the composition bearing the motto "Garibaldi," to which the Judges refer approvingly in their adjudication, is the production of Signor Cutolo; also that the other compositions, with the mottoes "Con amore" and "Long live our gracious Queen," referred to as nearly equal to the prize music in merit, were written by Herr Linger to whom the prize was awarded.


. . . other compositions written expressly for this occasion (? Melange of national airs) [1859]

Performances: 12 December 1859

[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (12 December 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200116 

Unspecified in the review, though most plausibly the "melange" of national airs:

"GRAND CONCERT AT THE GAWLER INSTITUTE", The South Australian Advertiser (20 December 1859), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200383 

. . . The concert concluded with a melange, consisting of the national anthems of different countries performed by the instrumental band, that of England being the first, and the "Song of Australia" the last. The audience exhibited their nationality by rising simultaneously during the "English Anthem," and also when the music of the "Song of Australia" was played . . .


Fantasia on The song of Australia (piano solo) [1859]

["Fantaisie brilliante on the Gawler prize Song of Australia for pianoforte"]

([Adelaide: Samuel Marshall's Musical Repository, 1860])

NO COPY IDENTIFIED; no reported public performance

"GRAND CONCERT AT THE GAWLER INSTITUTE", The South Australian Advertiser (14 December 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200209

[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (31 December 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200724

Will be published on Tuesday, January 3, A FANTASIA BRILLIANTE for the Pianoforte, on the Gawler Prize Song of Australia, by HERR CARL LINGER.

[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (11 January 1860), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1201020

MARSHALL'S MUSICAL REPOSITORY . . . Where may be had Herr Linger's Fantasia, on the Song of Australia.



The song of Australia with variations (barrel mechanical musical instrument) [before 1862]

"MUSICAL", South Australian Register (5 February 1862), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article40467997 

Mr. James, of the Norfolk Arms, Rundle-street, has just imported from Germany another self-acting musical instrument, at the cost of £200. It has eight separate cylinders, either of which may be used at pleasure. On three of these are arranged the overtures to Massaniello, Die Zauberflote, and the Caliph of Bagdad. The others contain several polkas, waltzes, galops, &c., some favourite English, Irish, and Scotch airs, and the "Song of Australia," with variations, by Herr Linger.



Liebchen Schätse [before 1862]

Drinking song [before 1862]

Performances: 10 September 1863

[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (10 September 1863), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31827812 

"LINGER MEMORIAL CONCERT", South Australian Register (11 September 1863), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50175449



Tagerchor (?) (brass quartet) [before 1862]

[? Jägerchor]

Performances: 26 December 1865, Tanunda, SA

"TANUNDA", South Australian Advertiser (29 December 1865), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31856742

. . . On Boxing-Day, the celebrated Brunswick band gave a grand concert in the large room of the Tanunda Hotel. The room was well filled, although there were so many counter-attractions, such as picnics, &c., and as was to be expected, the audience were highly delighted by the masterly playing of the gentlemen comprising the band, who were assisted on this occasion by Mr. C. W. Draeger, of this place. The first part consisted of . . . the second part . . . quartetto for brass instruments, "Tagerchor," Linger . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Carl Wilhelm Draeger




Related musical sources


Concordia: fantasia for pianoforte on the Song of Australia and God save the queen by W. B. Chinner (Adelaide: S. Marshall & Son, [1878])

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/8699739 (DIGITISED)

ASSOCIATIONS: William Bowen Chinner




Other documentation


A program for a Carl Linger sacred vocal music concert in 1855 in Adelaide (series 65); Two of the works were by Linger, who conducted the orchestra led by Mr. Chapman; Papers of Friedrich Krichauff (1824-1904), State Library of South Australia

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/217097933 




Bibliography and resources


L. A. Triebel (transl., ed.), "A Carl Linger letter", South Australiana 2/1 (1963), 6-13

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/233437044 

See Triebel's translation transcribed in documentation 1852 above


John Horner, "Linger, Carl Ferdinand August (1810-1862)", Australian dictionary of biography 5 (1974)

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/linger-carl-ferdinand-august-4024


Elizabeth Wood, "Linger, Carl", Grove music online (1980; online 2001)

https://doi.org/10.1093/gmo/9781561592630.article.16704 (PAYWALL)


Meike Tiemeyer-Schütte, Das Deutsche Sängerwesen in Südaustralien vor Ausbruch des Ersten Weltkrieges zwischen Bewahrung von Deutschtum und Anglikanisierung (Mänster: LIT Verlag, 2000), especially 185-89

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/43854286 

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=L2HXewmnOfQC&pg=PA185 (PREVIEW)


Skinner 2011, First national music, 385-87

http://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/7264 (DIGITISED)


Jula Szuster, "Talking (and performing) history: Carl Linger's missing legacy", unpublished paper, presented 14 August 2013, for History SA & University of South Australia

http://community.history.sa.gov.au/events/2013/talking-and-performing-history-carl-lingers-missing-legacy 


"Adelaider Liedertafel 1858"; website, last updated 2014; archived, National Library of Australia, Pandora archive

http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/137735/20141231-1704/www.alt1858.org/index.html 


"Carl Linger", Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Linger


"Linger, Carl", Deutsche Biographie

https://www.deutsche-biographie.de/sfz51665.html 





© Graeme Skinner 2014 - 2018