THIS PAGE FIRST POSTED 24 JUNE 2016

LAST MODIFIED Tuesday 25 June 2019 13:06

Marian Maria Chester

Dr GRAEME SKINNER (University of Sydney)


THIS PAGE IS CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION


To cite this:

Graeme Skinner (University of Sydney), "Marian Maria Chester", Australharmony (an online resource toward the history of music and musicians in colonial and early Federation Australia): https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/chester-marian-maria.php; accessed 21 September 2019


Thanks:

To John Bishop, September 2016, for finally establishing the details of Mrs. Chester's second marriage and death.





CHESTER, Marian Maria (Miss CRAWFORD; Mrs. CHESTER; Mrs. ROLLAND)

Soprano vocalist, actor

Born ? Dublin, Ireland, c.1810-12
Moved to England, by November 1829
Married William CHESTER (1812-1859), St. Pancras Old Church, London, 16 March 1830
Arrived (1) Hobart Town VDL (TAS), 22 July 1835 (free per Medway from London, 16 March)
Departed (1) Sydney, NSW, 11 October 1836 (per Pegasus for Calcutta, India)
Arrived (2) Hobart Town, VDL (TAS), 23 November 1841 (per British Sovereign, from Calcutta and Madras)
Departed (2) Sydney, 20 December 1859 (for England, per Blackwall)
Arrived (3) ? Australia, 1860
Married Robert ROLLAND, VIC, 1861 (BDM VIC 1861/3140)
Died Newcastle, NSW, 18 August 1867, "aged 51 years"

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Marian+Maria+Chester (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.party-1585341 (NLA persistent identifier)


CHESTER, William

Born Bray, Berkshire, England, 30 January 1812 (son of Edward Yates CHESTER and Caroline STEVENS)
Married Marian Maria CHESTER, St. Pancras Old Church, London, 16 March 1830
Arrived (1) Hobart Town VDL (TAS), 22 July 1835 (free per Medway from London, 16 March)
Departed (1) Sydney, NSW, 11 October 1836 (per Pegasus for Calcutta, India)
Arrived (2) Hobart Town, VDL (TAS), 23 November 1841 (per British Sovereign, from Calcutta and Madras)
Died Newcastle, NSW, 15 June 1859

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=William+Chester+d1859 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)


CHESTER, Sydney Yates

Born Madras, India, 21 November 1837 (?)
Arrived Hobart Town, VDL (TAS), 23 November 1841 (per Britith Sovereign, from Calcutta and Madras)
Married Amelia Louisa Francesa DEHN, 1859
Died Sydney, NSW, 26 October 1861

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Sydney+Yates+Chester+1837-1861 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)


CHESTER, Herman Granado (1843-1843)


CHESTER, Ernest Stevens

Born Hobart, VDL (TAS), 14 Septenber 1844
Died Ryde, NSW, 1912




Summary

Dublin, Ireland (? c.1810-19)

According to a January 1830 report of her first English season, Miss Crawford was a native of Dublin. At her death in 1867, her age was recorded as 51, and her birth year therefore c.1815/16; however since she can hardly have been only 3 on her first advertised appearance as a child dancer at Dublin's Theatre Royal late in 1818, a birth year of c.1810-12 is perhaps more likely. The indexer of the Currency companion to music and dance in Australia bravely hazarded a birth date of "c.1799", but this must almost certainly be at least a decade too early.

Nothing certain is known about her family, though at one Australian source claimed that she was related to the Wallaces and Ellards, plausibly given that she, Maria Logan (Ellard), and William Vincent Wallace all arrived in Hobart from Dublin in 1835. Mention in a notice of her subsequent arrival in Sydney that "Several other professionals we hear, may shortly be expected in Sydney" may plausibly be a reference to the impending arrival there of the Wallaces. Considering a possible Wallace-Ellard family connection, and that she was later organist of a Presbyterian church, it is worth noting that two protestant Mary Crawfords were baptised in Dublin (on 22 April 1806 and 1 June 1809), and a Mary Ann Crawford (19 November 1812).

On the occasion of her benefit in June 1824, she advertised that tickets could be had from her at her address, 62 Exchequer Street, near Grafton Street, Dublin; perhaps unrelated, a W. H. Crawford, agent, had an office at 60 Exchequer-street in 1819 ([Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (15 January 1819), 4).

Her first advertised appearances, from December 1818 and through the 1819 season, were as part of a troupe of child dancers under the tutelage of the dancing masters Mons. Simon and Mons. St. Pierre; and at her first benefit, in June 1819, she was billed as a pupil of St. Pierre.

St. Pierre, otherwise unidentified, first appeared in London bills in 1798. According to Charles Dibdin (Memoirs, ed. Speaight, 42) he "was one of the best Dancers off the Opera Stage; he went to Dublin subsequently, married and settled there, and was for some seasons principal dancer and Maitre du Ballet at the Theatre Royal, Crow Street". He is perhaps the Paul Pierre who married Catherine Fowler at St. James's (CoI), Dublin, on 3 October 1814. A Miss St. Pierre was advertised as dancing with our Miss Crawford at he first appearance in December 1818. A Master T. St. Pierre was later another one of her dancing partners.

Miss Crawford continued to dance with the St. Pierres until April 1820 or later, but then disappears from Theatre Royal bills for 1821.

Meanwhile, in November 1820, a Miss Crawford advertised her school for young ladies, in which a Miss E. Crawford, a trained Logerian, taught music. What, if any family connection these two had with the theatrical Miss Crawford is unclear. Some further problem is introduced by the description of another Miss E. Crawford, in her September 1819 marriage notice, of being "of the Theatre Royal, Dublin". Was this a younger sister of Marian Crawford, or was there some confusion between the newlywed and her theatrical sister, who was in the same month making her first appearances in England.

Marian Crawford next appeared in the Dublin bills in January 1823, from which time onward she featured chiefly as a vocalist. Announcing her benefit in June 1823, a Dublin paper recommended her as "A clever and interesting little candidate for popular favour". Later notices in Australia mention that she had studied singing in London for two years with the song composer Alexander Lee (1802-1851). However, it was in Dublin around this time that she first came into professional contact with Lee.

By late in 1827 a Miss A. Crawford also begins to appear in the bills as a singer and occasional actor; since she is always listed with her forename initial, she was (according to convention) probably Marian Crawford's younger sister. She continued to appear on Dublin stage during 1830, but by November 1831, she was reportedly taking London by storm. Two newspaper reports give her full name as Amelia Crawford. According to her marriage record, her full name was Amelia Eliza Mary Crawford; she married Thomas Snelson, at St. Martin in the Fields, London, on 9 February 1834, at which ceremony Marian was listed as a witness.

Thus, it would appear that Amelia cannot necessarily be confused with the Miss E. Crawford, "of the theatre Royal, Dublin" who married Thomas Hanlon in Liverpool, England, in September 1829. This "Miss E. Crawford" may well have been another sister, and perhaps not an actress at all, if, as seems possible, the report partly confused her with her elder sister Marian, who that same month has started touring the English provinces. Another possibility is that it was Amelia Eliza who married in 1829, and that her first husband died shortly afterwards.

London, and the provinces, England (1829 35)

Marian Crawford was last billed performing in Dublin in mid August 1829, and may well have arrived in England in time to attend Miss E. Crawford's wedding in Liverpool on 9 September, before reportedly appearing on stage at Cambridge later that month. Even, if as a report seems to suggest, she was back in Ireland performing at Tipperary in October, she certainly made her debut at Norwich Theatre in December, as was reported in the Dublin press in January.

Back in London, Marian Maria Crawford and William Chester, both described as "of this parish", were married at St. Pancras Old Church, Camden Town, London, on 16 March 1830.

According to the Sydney Empire in 1859, the late William Chester's sister was the once very popular actress "Miss Chester" ("reputed mistress of the duke of Buckingham"). Whether they were in fact siblings, or perhaps more likely not, their shared surname may explain why Marian continued to use her maiden name professionally, as "Miss Crawford", until mid-1832.

Confirmation that the Dublin and London actors were one and the same came in a report in the Dublin press in September, noting that "Miss Crawford, alias Mrs. Chester, who has been singing at Sadler's Wells, is engaged at Drury-lane in the operatic department."

Thereafter, apart from an intervening season at Oxford in Autumn 1831, she remained at Drury Lane for the remainder of her time in England. She performed there for the last time in mid February 1835, and a month later she and William embarked from London on the Medway, bound for Australia. Given that she reportedly died of an asthma attack, her decision to leave London may have been at least partly for reasons of health.


Notes: On the famous Eliza Chester (1799-1859), see profiles in The daughters of Thespis, 1841, 140

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=rc5UKr-LsdUC&pg=PA147

and Our actresses, 1844, 267

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=sFwzAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA297

The relationship with the duke of Buckingham, Richard Grenville (1776-1839), mentioned above, is not elsewhere attested; she was, rather, for over 10 years the mistress of the politician John Calcraft (1765-1831), until rumour had it that had become a regular "visitor" to George IV at Windsor.

Hobart Town and Sydney, Australia (1835-36)

The Chesters arrived in Hobart in July 1835, where, if she was indeed related to the Ellards, Marian would have found a cousin Maria Logan (Ellard) also recently arrived. They salied on, in September, to Sydney, where Francis Ellard had been was established as a music dealer for three years. Chester made her Sydney debut in the title role of Clari, the maid of Milan on 1 October, singing Bishop's "Home Sweet Home", and then she and her husband returned to Hobart in November, plausibly to meet William Vincent Wallace on his arrival there.

Calcutta, India (1836-41)

Towards the end of 1836, after a little over a year in Australia, though reportedly intending to return, the Chesters departed for India, where they took over the Chowingee Theatre at Calcutta. Mrs. Chester appeared in many notices there before the theatre was destroyed in a fire.

Australia (1841-67)

Chester and her husband returned to Tasmania in 1841, with their first son, Sydney.

She came out of several years' "retirement", the last part spent as a schoolmistress at Bothwell, Tasmania, in 1848.

Thereafter she gave several concerts on the island before she and her husband sailed for Melbourne.

She returned to the Sydney stage briefly in 1849, whereafter the Chesters then spent several years at Newcastle-Maitland, appearing in and presenting several concerts in Maitland in 1849-50.

Mrs. Chester returned again to Sydney to work in Frank Howson's company for a season running from August 1854 until February 1855, in which time she also appeared with Catherine Hayes, and in Melbourne early in 1856.

After two years of serious illness (paralysis), and the death of her husband William, she left Sydney to return to England in December 1859.

However, she was back in Melbourne two years later, where in August 1861 she made her last advertised stage appearance.

Having remarried late in 1861 (nothing more is known so far about her second husband Robert Rolland), she died in Newcastle in August 1867.




Documentation

Dublin, Ireland (?- until 1829)
1812

? Baptism, Dublin, St. Mary, 1812; Irish Church Records, DU-CI-BA-136604; d-277-1-4-091

https://churchrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/details/39b0780136603 

https://churchrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/display-pdf.jsp?pdfName=d-277-1-4-091 

19th [Nov 1812] Mary Ann Dr. of John & Anna Crawford

Compare ? Mary Crawford 1 (1806)

http://churchrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/details/4f2b900115695

Mary Crawford 2 (1809)

http://churchrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/details/3c28470174048

1818

[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (23 December 1818), 3

THEATRE ROYAL. FIRST CHARITY BENEFIT . . . THIS Evening . . . A new set of Quadrilles, composed by Mons. Simon sen. will danced Mons. Simon, sen. will be danced by Mons Simon, sen., St. Pierre, Mr. St. Albin, Mons. Simon, jun., Miss Rock, Miss Treby, Miss St. Pierre and Miss Crawford. The Ballet and Music composed by Mon. Simon, sen. . . .

1819

[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (13 January 1819), 3

THEATRE ROYAL . . . On THURSDAY EVENING . . . a favourite Ballet, entitled L'AMOUR ET LE POISON Will be danced by Messrs. Simon, Mr. St. Albin, Master St, Pierre, Messrs. Reid and Good, Miss Rock, Miss Aylet, Miss Crawford, &c. &c. . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (3 June 1819), 3

THEATRE ROYAL . . . THIS EVENING . . . After which, (composed by Mr. St. Pierre,) a set of NEW QUADRILLES, By Master and Miss St. Pierre, Master and Miss St. Clair, Master and Miss Cassidy, Master T. St. Pierre, and Miss Crawford . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (23 June 1819), 3

THEATRE ROYAL . . . This Evening . . . THE DUENNA . . . After which . . . A favourite Hornpipe by Miss Crawford . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (24 June 1819), 3

THEATRE ROYAL . . . MISS CRAWFORD (Pupil of Mons. St. Pierre,) BEGS leave, most respectfully, to announce to the Nobility, Gentry, her Friends and the Public, that her BENEFIT is fixed for FRIDAY, JUNE 25 . . . the admired Opera of ROB ROY MAC GREGOR, Or, Auld Lang Syne . . . End of the Play, The Minuet de la Cour and Gavotte, By Master St. Pierre and Miss Crawford . . . After which, New Ballet, (composed for the occasion by Mons. St Pierre), called, ERIN'S ISLE; OR, Paddy's love. Jemmy, (Father to Paddy), Mons St. Pierre; Paddy, Master St. Pierre; Dolly (Mother to Norah,) Monsieur Simon; Norah, Miss Crawford. in the course the Ballet will be introduced A PAS DE DEUX, By Master St. Pierre and Miss Crawford. A PAS-DE-QUATRE, By Miss Cassidy, Miss St. Pierre, Miss St. Clair, and Miss Crawford. . . . A Reel, by Eight Children; Who will dance a new Set of Quadrilles (compoacd by Mons. St. Pierre, expressly for this Night) . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (18 December 1819), 2

THEATRE ROYAL . . . THIS EVENING . . . the Opera of GUY MANNERING . . . in Act II . . . A Pas de Trois, by Miss St. Pierre, Miss Crawford, and Master T. St. Pierre . . .

1820

[Advertisement], Freeman's Journal (21 January 1820), 1

ROTUNDA. GRAND FANCY BALL. MISS CRAWFORD, (Pupil of Monsieur St. Pierre,) Has the honour of announcing to her Friends and the Public, that her GRAND FANCY BALL WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE ROTUNDA, On THURSDAY, the 27th instant, Under the Patronage of several persons of distinction . . . [Tickets] To be had of Miss Crawford, 11, Crow-street; at all the Principal Music Warehouses; . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (27 January 1820), 3

MISS CRAWFORD RESPECTFULLY informs her Friends and the Public, that in consequence of the lamented death of his Royal Highness the Duke of Kent, her Fancy Ball, which was to hare taken place this Evening, is unavoidably postponed until further notice. No. 11, Crow-street, Jan. 27, 1829.


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (24 February 1820), 3

GRAND FANCY BALL. ROTUNDA. MISS CRAWFORD . . . This Evening, the 24th inst . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (14 April 1820), 3

THEATRE ROYAL . . . On Tuesday Next, April 18, 1820 . . . End of the Comedy, a variety of Dancing by Master T. and Miss St. Pierre, Miss Crawford, and Master and Miss St. Clair . . .


? [Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (18 November 1820), 3

ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND MUSICAL SEMINARY, No. 72, NEW-STREET. MISS CRAWFORD apprises her Friends, that having enlarged her Day School, she is enabled to accommodate a greater number of Pupils than heretofore. She flatters herself with the hope of giving perfect satisfaction to the Parents and Friends of such young Ladies may be placed under her care, to be educated in useful and Polite Literature, necessary and Ornamental Needle Work. The Musical Department conducted by Miss E. CRAWFORD, who has studied under the most celebrated Master of the Logerian System, and attends Ladies at their own Houses. - Terms will be found moderate.

1821

? [Advertisement], Freeman's Journal (10 September 1821), 2

NEW MUSIC. This Day is Published, BY I. WILLIS, At the Harmonic Saloon and Musical Circulating Library, NO. 7, WESTMORLAND STREET . . . THE CORONATION QUADRILLES, with new Figures, and composed by Miss Crawford. Price 3s. . . .


Compare the following advertisement for the Coronation guadrilles (? as arranged) by Thomas Leggatt, ? a cousin of Marian; [Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter [Dublin] (27 August 1821), 2

NEW QUADRILLES. Just Published, BY I. WILLIS, At the Harmonic Saloon, and Musical Circulating Library, 7, WESTMORLAND-STREET . . . THE CORONATION QUADRILLES, with an entire New Set of Figures; to which is added, King George the IV. Grand Waltz, and the Circular Road Waltz; the Music arranged for the Harp, or Piano-Forte, by Mr. LEGGATT, Master of the 7th Hussar Band, and Dedicated, by permission, to the Lady Mayoress.- Price 3s . . .

1823

[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (28 January 1823), 3

NEW THEATRE-ROYAL. BENEFIT OF MISS STEPHENS . . . THIS EVENING . . . End of the Opera, the Song of "The Cabin Boy," Miss Crawford . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (22 May 1823), 3

NEW THEATRE-ROYAL . . . This Evening . . . the Musical Play of HENRI QUATRE . . . Page to Florence, Miss Crawford . . . Miss Bedford and Miss Crawford will sing the Duet "My Pretty Page Look out afar." . . .


"THE THEATRE", Saunders's News-Letter (6 June 1823), 2

To-morrow night will the last performance until Mr. Braham's arrival. A clever and interesting little candidate for popular favour - Miss Crawford - makes her appeal; it being a fashionable night, she will doubtless receive the reward of merit.

1824

[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (2 June 1824), 3

A CARD. THE Vintnrers of the City of Dublin are respectfully informed, that Tieckets for Miss Crawford's Benefit (which takes place on Friday Evening, the 4th June, instant,) are ready for delivery at the Houses of Mr. Alleb and Mr. Thornton, Lower Liffey-street, Mr. Brereton's, No. 1, Great Britain-street, and of Mr. Peter Kelly, Wood-quay.


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (3 June 1824), 2

THEATRE ROYAL. MASTER AND MISS ST. CLAIR (PUPILS OF MR. MONTAGUE,) Have the honor to announce . . . that their BENEFIT is fixed for THIS EVENING . . . END OF THE PLAY, THE MINUET DE LA COUR, and GAVOTTE, OF VESTRIS, by Master and Miss St. Clair. SONG - "LO HEAR THE GENTLE LARK," [sic] by Mrs. H. Corri - "WHERE HAS MY LOVER STRAYED," by Miss Crawford - and a COMIC SONG, by Mr. Smollet. After which, a NEW BALLET, Composed by Mr. Montague, called LE TONNELIER. Martin, Master St. Clair . . . Henri, Master St. Pierre; Fanchette, Miss St. Clair; Nannette, Miss St. Pierre; Ninna, Miss Crawford . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (4 June 1824), 3

THEATRE ROYAL . . . MISS CRAWFORD, with deep regret, informs the numerous friends of her Father, that he has been seriously indisposed several weeks, in consequence of which domestic calamity, all assistance on his part is ENTIRELY LOST on this occasion. Miss Crawford, therefore, respectfully solicits their kind support on this Night. BENEFIT OF MISS CRAWFORD. ON THIS EVENING, June 4, 1824, will be performed, the Opera of THE SIEGE OF BELGRADE . . . To conclude with THE LIBERTINE. Zerlina, Miss Crawford (her first appearance in that character.) Tickets to be had of Miss Crawford, 62, Exchequer-street, near Grafton-street; of Mr. Lowther, at the Theatre, and at all the Music Shops.

1825

"THE THEATRE", Dublin Morning Register (2 September 1825), 3

. . . The duet "Together let us range the fields," by Mr. Sapio and Miss Forde, received deserved applause. A young Lady, whose name we understood to be Miss Crawford, acquitted herself, prettily of a little air that was assigned to her . . .


[Advertisement], Dublin Morning Register (12 December 1825), 1

THEATRE-ROYAL . . . THIS Evening . . . (2d time) the Grand Opera (which has long been in preparation) called TARRARE, The Tartar Chief, The Music by the celebrated Salieri, with the exception of the introduced songs . . . Director of the Music, Mr. A. Lee . . . Tartar Chief . . . Mr. Braham; . . . Elamir, one of the Children of the Oracle, Miss Crawford . . .

1826

"THE THEATRE", Dublin Morning Register (28 March 1826), 3

. . . As we are speaking of the Ladies, may as well here, good naturedly, recommend Miss Crawford, who has, we are sure, capabilities to lead her to cleverness, to play any character she may in future sustain, with originality. This young Lady has chosen a model whom we need not describe by name, but whose forte is not certainly in acting, although in other respects she would be a very excellent prototype.


[Advertisement], Dublin Morning Register (28 November 1826), 1

THEATRE-ROYAL. THIS Present Evening . . . the Opera of ROB ROY MACGREGOR . . . Dianna Vernon, Mrs. Waylett . . . Helen Macgregor, Mrs. Vaughan; Kattie, Miss Crawford . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (29 December 1826), 3

THEATRE-ROYAL. ON This Evening . . . the Romantic Drama of THE CASTLE SPECTRE . . . The Vocal Parts by Messrs. McKeon, Plumer, Brough, Smollett; Mesdames Hallande, Brwone, A. Jones, Crawford, Stanfield. &c . . .

1827

[Advertisement], Dublin Morning Register (3 April 1827), 1

THEATRE-ROYAL. REVIVAL OF THE GRAND OPERA OF OBERON. THIS EVENING . . . OBERON; Or, the Charmed Horn. The Music by CARL MARIA VON WEBER. Fairies: Oberon, Miss Cramer; Puck, Mrs. Browne; Fairy, Miss Crawford; Titania, Miss A. Crawford; Sea Nymph, Miss Halland . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (2 August 1827), 3

THEATRE-ROYAL. Last week but one of the Engagement of Mr. Braham . . . THIS present Evening . . . the Grand Romantic and Fairy Opera, entitled OBERON; OR, THE CHARMED HORN. Oberon, Mr. McKeon; Puck, Miss Crawford; Sir Huon of Bordeaux, Mr. Braham, as originally performed by him . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (30 October 1827), 3

THEATRE ROYAL. MR. BUNN, HAVING become Lessee of this Establishment, begs respectfully to announce that the Season will commence On SATURDAY NEXT, NOV. 3. 1827 . . . The following is a list of the company engaged for the Season: - . . . Mrs. Vaughan, Mrs. H. Com, Miss Garbois. Miss A. Crawford, Mrs. Johnson, Miss Yates, Miss Debarr . . .


[Advertisement], Dublin Morning Register (14 November 1827), 1

THEATRE-ROYAL. THIS EVENING . . . will be repeated (With considerable alterations and additions,) Rossini's celebrated Opera of the BARBER OF SEVILLE . . . Marcellina, Miss Crawford. In order to give every possible effect to the performance of the Opera, an arrangement has been made with Signor Castelli, who will preside at the Piano-Forte on this occasion . . .

1828

[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (30 May 1828), 3

THEATRE-ROYAL. THIS Evening, May 30, 1828, will be performed the Grand Serious Opera of ARTAXERXES. Artaxerxes, Mrs. H. Corri; Artabanes, Mr. Philipps; Arbaces, Mr. Melrose; Rimenes, Mr. Smollett; Samira, Miss Crawford; Mandane, Madame Feron . . .


[Advertisement], Dublin Mercantile Advertiser, and Weekly Price Current (17 December 1827), 1

THEATRE-ROYAL. THIS present EVENING . . . Shakspeare's Historical Tragedy of JULIUS CAESAR . . . Lucius, Miss Crawford . . . Virgin Mesdames Mahon, Sullivan, A. Crawford, Debar, Johnston, &c . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (7 April 1828), 3

THEATRE-ROYAL. First Night of a New popular Comic Piece . . . This Evening . . . DAMON AND PYTHIAS; Or, the Force of Friendship . . . In Act 3d, an Epithalamium will be sung by Mesdames Hamilton, H. Corri, Crawford, Norman, Johnson, Mahon, Sullivan, De Barr, A. Crawford - Messr. McKeon . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (15 July 1828), 3

THEATRE ROYAL. Third appearance of the celebrated Madame Vestris . . . THIS Evening . . . the Comedy of PAUL PRY . . .. Marion, Miss Crawford; Phoebe, Madame Vestris . . . in which character she will introduce "The Lover's Mistake," "Cherry Ripe," and "I've been Roaming" . . .


[Advertisement], Dublin Morning Register (26 July 1828), 1

THEATRE-ROYAL. MADAME VESTRIS has the honour of announcing . . . that her BENEFIT takes place THIS EVENING . . . The Entertainments will conclude . . . with THE INVINCIBLES . . . Desire, Miss Crawford; Eliza, Miss A. Crawford . . .


[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (26 December 1828), 3

THEATRE ROYAL. First nght of the New Grand Spectacle. ON This Evening . . . the Play of THE CASTLE SPECTRE . . . The Vocal parts by Miss Hamilton, Mrs. H. Corri, Miss Chalmers, Miss Crawford, Miss A. Crawford . . .

1829

[Advertisement], Saunders's News-Letter (27 June 1829), 3

THEATRE ROYAL . . . ON This Evening . . . Sheridan's Opera of THE DUENNA. Don Carlos, Madame Vestris . . . Agnes, Miss A. Crawford . . .


[Advertisement], Dublin Morning Register (14 August 1829), 1

THEATRE ROYAL. MOST POSITIVELY THE LAST WEEK OF THE PRESENT SEASON . . . ON THIS EVENING, August the 14th . . . To conclude with the Farce of MORE BLUNDERS THAN ONE; OR, THE IRISH VALET . . . Susan, Miss Crawford . . .




London, and English provincial tours (by early 1830 to February 1835)


? [News], Cambridge Chronicle and Journal (11 September 1829), 3

Our theatre will open on Monday next, when the fascinating and elegant actress, Miss Foote, will appear for the first time before a Cambridge audience . . . A Miss Crawford takes the lead in the vocal department . . .


? "MARRIED", Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser (17 September 1829), 3

On Wednesday the 9th inst. at St. George's Church, Everton, Mr. Thomas Hanlon, of this town, to Miss E. Crawford, of the Theatre Royal, Dublin.


"FASHION AND TABLE TALK", The Pilot [Dublin] (6 November 1829), 2

The officers of the 70th, quartered in Tipperary, assisted by several the resident gentlemen, have set on foot amateur plays during the winter . . . Mrs. McCullogh, and Miss Crawford, from the Theatre Royal, Dublin, are performing. - Tipperary Free Press.


"THE THEATRE", Dublin Morning Register (12 November 1829), 3

Yesterday evening, the Theatre opened for the regular winter season . . . Miss M. Glover was another debutante. As an actress and singer, her pretensions are third-rate. She is, we suppose, engaged to fill the characters of Miss Crawford . . .


"THEATRE", Norfolk Chronicle (19 December 1829), 2

This evening (Saturday) our Theatre opens for the season with (among other pieces) the nautical drama of BLACK EYED SUSAN, which has proved so remarkably attractive in the metropolis . . . the same evening the vocal character of Rosina will be undertaken by Miss Crawford, a debutante . . .


"THEATRE", Norfolk Chronicle (26 December 1829), 2

Our Dramatic season has commenced earlier than for several years past, and so in fact has the winter. The result of this coincidence on Saturday evening was, that the curtain drew before an audience of very scanty numbers . . . The performers as they respectively appeared, although the night was cold, received a very warm reception. After a Pas de Deux, very gracefully danced by Mr. Hayes and Miss Purton, the opera of "Rosina" (by the late Mrs. Brookes, with Shield's ever-delightful music), introduced two new performers to this stage - a Miss Crawford, as Rosina, and a Mr. M'Keon, as Mr. Belville. The lady possesses a powerful and well-cultivated voice, of great compass; and her opening of the trio - "When the rosy morn appearing," with her two following songs, were loudly applauded by the audience, whose numbers then had considerably increased . . .

1830

[News], Dublin Morning Register (16 January 1830)

Miss Crawford, a native of Dublin, and who was lately a promising actress at Hawkins's-street, had made her debut at the Norwich Theatre. The Norwich Mercury has the following notice of her first appearance there: - "She is a valuable acquisition to provincial theatre, and when time has bettered her experience, she will make, we little doubt, considerable advances in her profession. What we have heard her do has the recommendation of modesty and propriety, with sufficient display of natural endowment and skill.


16 March 1830, marriage of Willaim Chester and Marian Maria Crawford, St. Pancras Old Church, Camden

Marriages solemnized in the parish of St. Pancras; Camden, St. Pancras, Old Church, marriage register

https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/1623/31280_195012-00252 (PAYWALL)

No. 143 / William Chester, of this Parish and Marian Maria Crawford, of this Parish, were married in this Church by Banns . . . this sixteenth Day of March in the year [1830] . . .


7 June 1830, as "Miss Crawford", her London stage debut

"SADLER'S WELLS," The Times (7 June 1830), 2

First Appearance of Miss Crawford (from the Theatre Royal, Dublin) as Apollo. SADLER'S WELLS . . . THIS EVENING, and during the week, to commence with the amusing burlesque operatic drama, entitled MIDAS. Apollo by Miss Craword ((from the Theatre Royal, Dublin), in which character (in addition to the songs of the piece) she will introduce the beautiful airs of "Hasten by the starlight," "My own blue bell," and "Alice Gray;" Pan, Mr. Andrews; Midas, Mr. W. H. Williams; Nysa, Miss Holme; Daphne, Miss Adami . . .


"SADDLER'S WELLS", Dublin Evening Packet and Correspondent (15 June 1830), 3

Midas was brought out here on Monday last, (and has been repeated throughout the week,) for the purpose introducing as Apollo Miss Crawford, from the Theatre Royal, Dublin. She assumed the character with much ease and grace, and sang the music with power and great musical precision, as well as the introductory airs - "Hasten by the Starlight" - "My own Blue Bell" - and "Alice Gray" - all of which were called for a second time. She most valuable acquisition. - Sunday Times.


"THEATRICAL CHIT CHAT", The Pilot [Dublin] (22 September 1830), 1

. . . Miss Crawford, alias Mrs. Chester, who has been singing at Sadler's Wells, is engaged at Drury-lane in the operatic department . . .


[Theatre Royal, Drury Lane], The Theatrical Observer (September to December), various

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183002lond#page/n303/mode/2up/search/crawford 


"Theatre Royal. Drury Lane", The Theatrical Observer (27 September 1830), 3

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183002lond#page/n303/mode/2up/search/crawford 

This Theatre, during the recess, has been Superbly Decorated under the Superintendance of Mr. Grace, and will be opened on Friday next, October 1, under the Management of Mr. Alexander Lee . . . The following Ladies and Gentlemen are Engaged . . . Miss Phillips, Miss Huddart, from the Dublin Theatre, Mrs. Waylett, Miss Chester . . . Miss Crawford . . .


26 October 1830, "Miss Crawford" (Mrs. Chester) as Cherubino, in The marriage of Figaro, Drury Lane

[Advertisement], The Tatler (26 October 1830), 180

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=YioTAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA180

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE. This evening . . . the Comic Opera of MARRIAGE OF FIGARO. Countess Almaviva, Miss S. PHILLIPS; Susanna, Mrs. WAYLETT; Barbarina, Mrs. NEWCOMBE, Marcellina; Miss BUTLINE; Cherubino, Miss CRAWFORD. Count Almaviva, Mr. VINING; Fiorello, Mr. BLAND; Basil, Mr. BEDFORD; Antonio, Mr. HARLEY: Figaro, Mr. LATHAM, Sebastian, Mr. DOWSING.

[Advertisement], The Theatrical Observer (26 October 1830), 4

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183002lond#page/n403/mode/2up 

"Drury Lane Theatre", The Theatrical Observer (27 October 1830), 1-2

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183002lond#page/n403/mode/2up/search/crawford 

The great strength of cast with which Sheridan's Comedy of The School for Scandal was announced at this Theatre, drew an exceedingly full house last night . . . The Marriage of Figaro followed, Mrs. Waylett was the Susanna; her voice though sweet and beautiful in kallads, is unequal to give effect to the music of Mozart, she sang in tune, but did not give the expression such music deserves; her singing gave us the idea of hearing Susanna at a distance. Miss S. Phillips was the Countess, and got through it respectably, but she sings Rossini's music, better than Mozart's. A Miss Crawford made her first appearance as Cherubino, which she played with much life and spirit; her song too, was very pleasantly given; she is a slight figure, and appears perfectly accustomed to the stage; she evinced complete self-possession, in fact an [2] actress who selects a character for a first appearance, in which she shews her legs, would certainly throw away any attempt at trepidation . . .

Marian Maria Chester's first appearance at Drury Lane, as Miss Crawford, in Figaro; on the same evening "Miss (Eliza) Chester" as Lady Teazle in School for scandal.


"Drury Lane Theatre", The Theatrical Observer (15 November 1830), 1

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183002lond#page/n467/mode/2up/search/crawford 

The Comedy of The Hypocrite, was performed at this Theatre on Saturday evening [13 November], followed by the comic Opera of The National Guard. It is only nine months since this Opera was first produced upon these boards, in that short space of time, it has undergone so material a change in the representation, that even in spite of the oft quoted saying that "comparisons are odious" we feel inclined to compare its original cast with its present one . . . Miss Crawford is better than Miss Bartolozzi as Cecile, because she has plenty of animation, while Miss Bartolozzi was unfortunately so like her sister in person, yet so unlike her in every thing else, that she always reminded us of a beautiful automaton, going about, and doing certain tasks allotted her, without the aid of a soul . . .

[Advertisement], The Tatler (18 November 1830), 260

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=YioTAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA260

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE. This evening . . . (2nd time this Season) a Comic Opera, in two Acts, called THE NATIONAL GUARD [By MR. PLANCHE] Pauline, Mrs. WAYLETT; Cecile, Miss CRAWFORD; Nina, Miss S. PHILLIPS . . .


[Advertisement], The Tatler (26 November 1830), 288

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=YioTAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA288

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE. This evening . . . GIOVANNI IN LONDON . . . Squalling Fan, Miss CRAWFORD . . .


"THE LONDON DRAMA", The Edinburgh literary journal (6 November 1830), 297

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=IfdPAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA297

. . . A Miss Crawford, from a place not mentioned, has made a very promising debut as the Page Cherubino, in "Figaro," at Drury Lane . . .


"Drury Lane Theatre", The Theatrical Observer (7 December 1830), 1

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183002lond#page/n543/mode/2up 

[Last evening] . . . and John of Paris concluded; an apology was made for Mrs. Waylett, who was prevented by indisposition from taking the part of Olivia, which caused great disappointment, particularly as she was to have introduced some favorite songs. Miss Crawford was the substitute; she was good humouredly accepted by the audience, and received with applause . . .

1831

The Theatrical Observer (January-June 1831), various

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183101lond#page/n99/mode/2up/search/Crawford


"Drury Lane Theatre", The Theatrical Observer (29 January 1831), 1

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183101lond#page/n9/mode/2up/search/Crawford

Werner, The Lady and the Devil, and the Pantomime, were the performances, at this Theatre, last night; in the second piece, which went off remarkably well, Mr. Vining, Mr. Harley, Mrs. Waylett, and Miss Crawford, kept the audience in a continued laugh throughout. The house was crowded.


"THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE", The Tatler (9 February 1831), 544

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=k4E3AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA544 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . NO SONG NO SUPPER! . . . Louisa, Miss Crawford . . .


"Drury Lane Theatre", The Theatrical Observer (26 March 1831), 1

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183101lond#page/n291/mode/2up/search/Crawford 

The concluding Oratorio, for the Lent season, took place last night at this Theatre, which was in every part crowded to excess. In noticing these performances it has been impossible to do more than record the prominent songs, and we now take the opportunity of thanking some of those who have not obtruded themselves upon the house, but who have nevertheless been heard with pleasure, we mean Miss Hughes, Miss Bruce, Miss S. Phillips, Miss Russell, Miss Byfeld, and Miss Crawford; these ladies have had but little prominent music allotted them, such as popular airs, which attract the multitude, but they all sung scientifically and with taste, and we take our leave of them with a feeling of obligation for being gratified with some charming music from each. There was nothing io the Oratorio of last night differing from its predecessors.


"THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE", The Tatler (4 April 1831), 728

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=k4E3AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA728 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . a new splendid Tale of Enchantment, called THE ICE WITCH; OR, THE FROZEN HAND. Ulla, Miss Crawford. Minna, Mrs. WAYLETT . . .


"DRURY-LANE", Evening Mail (6 April 1831), 2

After the tragic play of Pizarro, a new and very successful Easter piece was last night produced. It is entitled The Ice Witch; or, the Frozen Hand . . . Druda, by her magic power, transforms the bleak and steril coast into scene of surpassing beauty and splendour, and endeavours, by her enchanting blandishments, to win the affections of Harold, and drive from his recollection Ulla (Miss Crawford), the daughter of Sweno, a Norwegian chief, to whom he was betrothed . . .

"DRURY LANE", The literary gazette (9 April 1831), 235

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=lDZDUdPLPWQC&pg=PA235 

CHRISTMAS brings its puddings and pantomimes; Easter its buns, cakes, and magicomelodramas . . . At this theatre, the Ice Witch, by Buckstone, claims our wonder, like the hags of yore, from the multitude of her enchantments. Harold (H. Wallack), together with his servant, Magnus Snoro (Harley), are wrecked on an iceberg, whence they are transported by the hand of the Ice Witch (Miss Faucit) to her fairy palace. Here, like master, like man, forgetful of their ladye-loves, they submit to being treated with supernatural hospitality, and are for a time very comfortably bewitched. The spirit of Harold becomes at length roused from its lethargy, and his love for Ulla (Miss Crawford) revives. The Ice Witch dismisses him and his follower in vengeance, and, as might be expected, plays them a very slippery trick. The hand of Harold is death to all whom it touches; and the presence of Magnus Snoro, like that of some other great men, chills all who approach him. The ice and the plot thicken; Gruthioff, the rival of Harold, scales the castle of Sweno, Ulla's father, and forcibly abducts both Ulla and Minna, her maid (Mrs. Waylett) . . .


"THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE", The Tatler (9 April 1831), 748

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=k4E3AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA748 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . The Opera of ROB ROY MACGREGOR (Adapted by Mr. POCOCK) . . . Mattie, Miss Crawford . . . To conclude with . . . THE ICE WITCH . . . [By Mr. BUCKSTONE] Ulla, Miss Crawford . . .

From later advertisement: "THE ICE WITCH . . . The Overture (MS.) composed by H. Marschner. The rest of the Music composed ans selected by Mr. T. Cooke.]


"THEATRE ROYAL, COVENT GARDEN", The Times (21 May 1831), 2

Whitsun-Eve, Under the immediate direction of Mr. Alexander Lee. THIS EVENING, a Grand, Miscellaneous, and Popular SELECTION of VOCAL and INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. Conductor, Mr. H. R. Bishop. Principal vocal performers:- Miss Inverarity . . ., Miss Hughes, Miss Pearson, Miss Riviere (her first appearance at these performances), Miss Bruce, Miss S. Phillips, Miss Byfeld, Miss Russell, Mrs Bedford, Miss Harrington, Miss Crawford, Miss Levol, Mrs. Mapleson, and Mrs. Waylett; Mr. Braham, Mr. Sinclair, Mr. T. Cooke, Mr. Horn, Mr. Bedford, Mr. Robinson, Mr. G. Smith, and Mr. Phillips.


"THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE", The Tatler (3 June 1831), 936

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=k4E3AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA936 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . a petite Historical Drama, called THE LITTLE CORPORAL, OR THE SCHOOL OF BRIENNE. Josephine, Miss Crawford . . .


"THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE", The Times (6 June 1831), 2

. . . THIS EVENING, THE EXILE . . . After which THE WATERMAN. Tom Tug, Mr. Braham; Bundle, Mr. W. Bennett; Robin, Mr. Hayley; Mrs. Bundle, Mrs. C. Jones; Wilhelmina, Miss Crawford . . .


The Theatrical Observer (July-December 1831), many, from 319 onward, for both "Miss Crawford" and "Miss A. Crawford"

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183102lond#page/n319/mode/2up/search/crawford 

[24 September] . . . Madame Vestris's list of performers looks quite formidable. The names of Liston, James Vining, Horn, J. Cooper, Mrs. Glover, Miss Sydney, and Miss Crawford, are among the old established favorites . . .

Recte not "Miss Crawford", but her sister, the newcomer "Miss A. Crawford"


"THE THEATRE", Oxford Journal (30 July 1831), 3

. . . And on Tuesday evening was performed (for the first time) the interesting burletta, called The Wreck Ashore . . . Mrs. Barnett, as Alice, was very effective, and played with considerable truth and feeling; while Miss Crawford, as Bella, and Mrs. Renaud, as Dame Barnard, contributed much to the success of the piece . . .


"THE THEATRE", Oxford Journal (27 August 1831), 3

. . . The most attractive piece of the week, however, has been Miss Mitford's beautiful tragedy of Rienzi. In the banquet scene Miss Phillips and Miss Crawford introduced the pleasing duet "As it fell upon a day," which they sang in so sweet and correct a style that it was loudly and rapturously encored by the whole house . . .


"Theatre", Oxford University and City Herald (27 August 1831), 3

. . . The duett, brought in with great propriety the nuptial banquet, and sung by Miss Crawford and Miss Phillips, delighted the audience. They are both them very much improved . . .


[News], Oxford University and City Herald (3 September 1831), 3

Since our last account of Mr. Barnett's theatricals, this gentleman has treated us with a continued series of novelties, in Play and Afterpiece. We have so often spoken of the merits of the different performers, that eulogy would be repetition, and censure is uncalled for. How the performers can learn many parts, changing every evening, we cannot conjecture; and occasional incorrectness should neither excite surprise nor disapprobation. We cannot refrain, however, from mentioning the admirable acting of Mr. Cathcart, in King Lear, and the irresistible risibility of Mr. Barnett's Dozey, in "Past Ten o'Clock." On Thursday evening, both Miss Crawford and Miss Phillips sang delightfully . . .


"POETICAL EPISTLE TO MRS. BARNETT", Oxford University and City Herald (10 September 1831), 4

. . .

Miss Crawford's heavenly Goddess,
Too bright for these regions below
I think ev'ry night of her boddice,
And dream of her bosom of snow:
Kind Nature's indulgence has blest her
With beauty surpassingly fair;
Alas! she is going to Chester,
To act in the Honey Moon there.

. . .


"THEATRE", Oxford Journal (24 September 1831), 3

. . . The musical entertaininent of "Paul and Virginia" was performed on Tuesday evening; and as Yarnold and Miss Crawford but seldom appear on the stage, we must not neglect to notice their admirable singing and acting in this interesting piece.


"THEATRE", Oxford Journal (1 October 1831), 3

During the past week the celebrated play called Clari, has been performed: Mrs. Barnett as Clari, and Cathcart, (her father), made a poweful impression . . . In the admired comedy of Charles the Seconed we know not which to admire most, the gay intriguing of the merry Monarch, Cathcart, and Rochester, (Courtney), the bluntness of Capt. Copp, (Renaud), or the artless simplicity of his daughter, Mary, Miss Crawford - all were so well sustained, that we know not which to select for especial commendation . . .


[Advertisement], Morning Post (5 November 1831), 2

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE. THIS EVENING the Comic Opera, in two Acts, called THE LOVE CHARM; or, The Village Cocquette. Signor Furbaroso, Mr. Seguin (his 2d appearance on this Stage,) . . . Louise, Miss Crawford.

1832

[Advertisement], Morning Post (12 January 1832), 2

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE. THIS EVENING . . . the Opera of LOVE IN A VILLAGE . . . Madge, Miss Crawford.


"MISS A. CRAWFORD", Dublin Evening Packet and Correspondent (29 November 1831), 3

The beauty of this young Lady (late of the Dublin stage) seems to have attracted the admiration of the Londoners. We extract the following from the Age: "Who is the beautiful Amelia Crawfbrd, about whom half a dozen lovers pester us with stanzas? We must positively be compelled to Advise Andrews of our gracious intention to occupy a private box some night next week, for the gratification of looking at this divinity."


"MADAME VESTRIS'S OLYMPIC THEATRE", Dublin Evening Packet and Correspondent (6 December 1831), 3

. . . the talented widow has no greater admirers than ourselves. She has also among her corps dramatique others that greatly attract the attention of the town; and if we were to tell the handsome Amelia Crawford all we receive about her in the course of a week, we should set her brains "pretty particularly" on the alert. - Age.


The Theatrical Observer (January-April 1832), many, from 28 January onwards

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183201lond#page/n97/mode/2up/search/crawford 


The Theatrical Observer (May-September 1832), for "Miss Crawford", until 1 June

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183202lond#page/n111/mode/2up/search/crawford 


[Advertisement], Morning Advertiser (9 May 1832), 2

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE. THIS EVENING . . . THE MAGIC CAR; or, Three Days' Trial . . . Bedia, Miss Crawford.


The Theatrical Observer (September-December 1832), for "Mrs. Chester", from 22 September

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183203lond#page/n9/mode/2up/search/Mrs+Chester 


[Advertisement], Morning Post (18 September 1832), 2

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE. The Public is most respectfully informed that this Theatre will OPEN for the SEASON on SATURDAY next, Sept. 22, when will be performed the Comedy of THE SOLDIER'S DAUGHTER . . . To which will be added the Interlude of THE IRISH TUTOR . . . Mary, Mrs. Chester . . .


[Advertisement], Morning Advertiser (5 November 1832), 2

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE. THIS EVENING . . . To conclude with, GIOVANNI IN LONDON. Don Giovanni, Miss Ferguson; Leporello, Mr. Harley; Proserpine, Mrs. Brudenel; Miss Constantia Quixote, Miss Cawse; and Mrs. Leporello, Mrs. Chester . . .

1833

The Theatrical Observer (January-June 1833), many, from 4 January, until 26 June (687, pictured above)

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183301lond#page/n23/mode/2up/search/Mrs+Chester 


Playbill, Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London, 19 October 1833

http://libcdm1.uncg.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/Hansen/id/49

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE. This Evening . . . the Play of The STRANGER. The Stranger, Mr. MACREADY; Charlotte, Mrs. GIBBS; Annette, Miss H. CAWSE; Claudine, Mrs. CHESTER . . .


"Theatre Royal, Covent Garden", The Theatrical Observer (July-December 1833), many, from 5 October, including 11 November (pictured above)

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183302lond#page/n359/mode/2up/search/Mrs+Chester 

PIECES: Artaxerxes (Arne)


Playbill, Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London, 31 October 1833

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-52721489 

Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.
This evening, Thursday, Oct. 31 1833, Their Majesties' servants will perform Colman's comedy of the Poor Gentleman . . .
After which will be performed (Second Time) a Grand Melo-Dramatic Romance, called
PRINCE LEE BOO.
(Founded on the principal Events in the popular tale of that name)
THE NEW MUSIC BY MR. R. HUGHES . . .
. . . Betty, (her Maid) Mrs. CHESTER . . .

1834

The Theatrical Observer (January-April 1834), several, from 11 March

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183401lond#page/n245/mode/2up/search/Mrs+Chester 


Marriages solemnized in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields in the county of Middlesex in the year 1834 (9 February 1834), 113

No. 58 / Samuel Snelson, a Bachelor / and Amelia Eliza Mary Crawford, a spinster of this Parish / were married in this Church by Licence this Ninth day of February [1834] . . . In the presence of Charles Perks [and] Marian Maria Chester.


The Theatrical Observer (May-August 1834), several, from 30 May (on which night she was billed to appear miraculously at both Drury Lane and Covent Garden) until 26 June

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183402lond#page/n107/mode/2up/search/Mrs+Chester 


[Advertisement], Morning Advertiser (30 May 1834), 2

THEATRE ROYAL, COVENT-GARDEN. THIS EVENING . . . THE BARBER OF SEVILLE. Count Almaviva, Mr. Templeton ;Doctor Bartolo, Mr. Seguin; Figaro, Mr. H. Phillips; Rosina, Miss Inverarity; Marcellina, Mrs. Chester.


Playbill, Theatre Royal, Covent Garden, 16 June 1834

http://apollo.ram.ac.uk/emuweb/pages/ram/display.php?irn=4412


The Theatrical Observer (September-December 1834), many, from 11 October

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183403lond#page/n149/mode/2up/search/Mrs+Chester 


The regent, a comedy in two acts by J. R. Planché, first performed at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, Saturday, October 18th, 1834 (London: John Miller, 1834)

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=JVQLAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA60 


"DRAMA. DRURY LAND and COVENT GARDEN", The Literary Gazette (22 November 1834), 788

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=NExRAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA788 

. . . We now turn to the Red Mask, a grand three act opera, the adaptation by Mr. Planché, and the music of Marliani (called "the celebrated Marliani"), under the supervision of Mr. T. Cooke. What related to bringing the Red Mask before an English audience could not, therefore, have been in abler hands . . . and the music of "the celebrated Marliani," - who is known for having produced this single opera, to exhibit the talents of his friend Mdlle. Grisi. With all these advantages, we cannot speak highly of this opera: and when repeated on Monday night, with Massaniello as an afterpiece, it really sunk by the comparison into a heavier and duller Massaniello . . . Miss Shirreff sang admirably in every thing allotted to her, and Seguin, Templeton, Bedford, and Yarnold, sustained their parts with much ability; while in the acting, Cooper, Warde, Younge, Diddear, Mathews, Mrs. Chester, &c. were all that their characters required. Of Miss E. Tree we have already spoken, - nothing could surpass her effective scene with the Doge . . .


The Theatrical Observer (January-June 1834), January only

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183501lond#page/n7/mode/2up/search/Mrs+Chester 

1835

[Advertisement], Morning Post (11 February 1835), 2

THEATRE ROYAL, COVENT-GARDEN. THIS EVENING will be performed the Dramatic Poem of MANFRED. Count Manfred, Mr. Denvil; . . . Atropos, Mrs. Chester; The Phantom of Astarte, Miss Clifton; The Witch of the Alps, Miss E. Tree.






To call up all the TROVE newspaper items tagged Marian Maria Chester for 1835:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Marian+Maria+Chester&q&l-decade=183&l-year=1835 

Hobart Town, VDL (TAS) (22 July to 12 September 1835)

22 July 1835, the Chesters arrived Hobart Town

"TRADE AND SHIPPING", The Hobart Town Courier (24 July 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4179697

Arrived on Wednesday, the ship Medway, 450 tons, Captain Wight, from London, 16 March, with goods. Passengers, Capt., Mrs, and Miss Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Chester, Mr. and Mrs. Williamson, Mr. Kimbolton, Mr. Grant, Mr. Horrolls, and Miss Burdett.


27 July 1835, Theatre, Argyle Rooms, Chester in Charles the second

Theatrical performances had resumed at the Argyle Rooms on 8 July, under the management of George Peck, with Anne Clarke as the leading vocalist

[Advertisement], The Hobart Town Courier (24 July 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4179709

THEATRE, ARGYLE ROOMS. Mrs. Chester from the Theatres Royal Drury lane, and Covent Garden.
THE Public are respectfully Informed that
Mrs. W. Chester from the Theatres Royal Drury-lane and Covent Garden, on her way to Sydney, has been engaged for three nights only
and will make her appearance in three of her favorite characters on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday evenings.
On Monday Evening will be performed, the favourite petite Comedy, called
CHARLES THE SECOND, Or the Merry Monarch.
Mary Copp - Mrs. W. Chester
As performed by her at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, in which she will introduce -
"My own Blue Bell" - "Do you ever think of me" - "Come where the aspens," - and "Meet me in the Willow Glen;" as sung by her in London.
July 23.

"Domestic intelligence", Colonial Times (28 July 1835), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8648358 

The great star, Mrs. Chester, performed last evening at the Argyle Theatre, and the most sanguine were not disappointed. We have never before heard a first rate singer in Van Diemen's Land. Mrs. Chester evidently laboured under considerable disadvantage, she was rather hoarse from the effects of a cold, and not accustomed to the company or the Theatre. On Wednesday, she will perform in a piece more suited to her than "Mary Copps." . . . Mrs. Chester's "Come where the aspens quiver," was a delicious treat, and worth double the entrance money. We shall offer a few observations on this lady's singing in our next, till then the public must judge for themselves. The Theatre was crowded to excess, and respectably attended. The ladies will do well to go very early on Wednesday, or they will not obtain seats.

PIECE: Charles the second (Payne)

SONGS: My own blue bell (Alexander Lee); Do you ever think of me, love (Sporle); Come where the aspens quiver (Lee); Meet me in the willow glen (Lee)


29 July 1835, Chester in Abon Hassan

[Advertisement], Colonial Times (28 July 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8648353 

Theatre, Argyle Rooms. MRS. CHESTER'S Second Appearance.
ON WEDNESDAY EVENING will be produced (for the first time here) the celebrated comic Drama, called
ABON HASSAN; OR, DEAD ALIVE, Founded on one of the Tales of the "Arabian Nights' Entertainments," with new Scenery, Dresses, and Decorations.
Zulima - Mrs. Chester, From the Theatres Royal Drury Lane and Covent Garden, in which she will introduce several Songs, as sung by her with unbounded applause at the London Theatres . . .

PIECE: Abon Hassan (Dimond; music by Carl Maria von Weber from Abu Hassan, including a air for Zulima, The bird whose song of gladness

"The Theatre", The True Colonist Van Diemen's Land Political Despatch (31 July 1835), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article200329212 

During the past week the Theatre has been crowded, in consequence of the engagement of Mrs. Chester, (formerly Miss Crawford) from the Theatres Royal, Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Mrs. Chester's singing is a combination of richness, compass and extraordinary execution; and she articulates with great taste and feeling. The Theatre has undergone some improvement in the scenery and dresses, which heretofore were very carelessly looked after, and the performers are generally more perfect and correct in their delineations, and consequently obtain favour with the Public. This evening Mrs. Chester plays Maggy, in the "Highland Reel," and will sing some of her choicest songs.


31 July 1835, Theatre, Argyle Rooms, Chester in The highland reel and Rosina

[Advertisement], The Tasmanian (31 July 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232800887 

Theatre, Argyle Rooms. Last Night of Mrs. Chester's Engagement.
THIS EVENING, (Friday,) will be performed (for the first time here) the favourite musical piece called
THE HIGHLAND REEL
Moggy McGilpin - Mrs. Chester,
In which she will introduce the following Favourite Songs:-
"What though I'm but a very little lad."
"The Dashing White Sergeant"
And by particular desire, "Come where the Aspens quiver"
After which, Mrs. CLARKE will sing "Rise gentle Moon."
To conclude with the favourite Opera of
ROSINA, With the Original Music, composed by Shield.
*** For particulars, see the Hand Bills. Boxes, 4s.; Pit 2s. 6d.; Gallery 2s.
July 31, 1835.

FIRST PIECE: The highland reel (O'Keefe)

SECOND PIECE: Rosina (Shield)

SONG: The dashing white sergeant (Bishop, from The lord of the manor)

SONG: Though I am now a very little lad (words: O'Keefe; tune: The white cockade)


3 August 1835, Chester's benefit

"Domestic Intelligence", Colonial Times (4 August 1835), 6-7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8648380 

The Theatre has been remarkably well attended since the arrival of Mrs. Chester, and, we may say, more respectable assemblages were never witnessed in Hobart Town, either at the Argyle or the Freemasons Theatre. The performances for the most part have been excellent, but got up in too hurried a manner - many of the actors being exceedingly imperfect in their parts. Last evening, the Green Eyed Monster was performed for the benefit of Mrs. Chester, and was very much applauded . . . [7] . . . Mrs. Chester's, and Mrs. Clarke's duett, "As it fell upon a Day," was excellent, and was rapturously encored. Mrs. Clarke is an old favorite, therefore on her singing, we need offer no remarks. Mrs. Chester's voice is remarkably round, and melodiously soft, she has a vast range, and her decending cadences are extremely neat and elegant; she excels most in the softer passages, and her pianissimo cadences, cannot be equalled by any singer in this Colony. As an actress, Mrs. Chester is not nearly equal to Mrs. Cameron, but then her voice preponderates so greatly in her favor, that if she remains here, she will be sure to become quite as great a favorite. With regard to her person, Mrs. Chester is rather too "embonpoint" for a showy figure, and this is a great draw back - but then the gentlemen say, she has the prettiest foot and ancle in the Colony.

PIECE: The green-eyed monster (Planche)

MUSIC: As it fell upon a day (Bishop)


5 August 1835, Theatre, Argyle Rooms

[Advertisement], Colonial Times (4 August 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8648403 

Theatre, Argyle Rooms. THE Public are respectfully informed, that in consequence of the overflowing houses, and continued attraction of MRS. CHESTER, the Proprietor has prevailed on that Lady to accept a re-engagement for a few Evenings more, previous to the vessel's sailing; and will make her fifth appearance on WEDNESDAY EVENING, the 5th of August . . . when will be performed the comic drama, called ABON HASSAN . . . Zulima - MRS. CHESTER, in which she will introduce several new and popular Songs . . .


[Advertisement], Colonial Times (4 August 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8648398 

Vocal Music. MRS. CHESTER begs to inform the Ladies of Hobart Town, that she has a small selection of the most modern Vocal Music to dispose of - consisting of songs, ballads, and sacred melodies. Also, a cottage piano-forte for sale. Freemason's-hotel, August 4, 1835.


12 August 1835, Theatre, Argyle Rooms

[Advertisement], Colonial Times (11 August 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8648422 

Theatre, Argyle Rooms.
ON WEDNESDAY EVENING, the 12th of August, will be Performed the favorite musical piece, called
NO SONG NO SUPPER
Margaretta (with Songs), Mrs. Chester.
After which, a musical Entertainment, called
THE FESTIVAL OF APOLLO.
Quartette, Violin Obligato, MR. PECK.
Song, "Tyrant soon I'll burst thy chains" MRS. CHESTER.
Song, "If a body meet a body" MRS. CLARKE.
Ballad, "The Soldier's tear," MRS. CHESTER.
Solo, Piano forte, "Variations on Weber's last Waltz," MISS DEANE.
Glee "The chough and crow."
Song, "Meet me by moonlight," MRS. CLARKE. Song, "By the margin of fair Turick's waters," MRS. CHESTER.
Duett, "My pretty page," MRS. CHESTER and MASTER E. DEANE.
Song, "The old maid" (in character), MRS. CLARKE.
Finale, verse and chorus, "Rule Britannia," by the whole vocal strength of the Company.
To conclude with a new piece (first time here), called RETURNED KILLED. Boxes, 4s.; Pit 2s. 6d.; Gallery 2s. Children, under 12 years of age, half-price. Doors to be opened at 7 o'clock, and the Performance to commence at half-past 7.
August 11, 1835.

ASSOCIATIONS: Rosalie Deane (pianist); Edward Deane (vocalist); children of John Philip Deane (violinist, and proprietor of the Argyle Rooms)

PIECES: No song no supper (Hoare-Storace)

SONGS: Tyrant soon I'll burst thy chains (Rossini); The soldier's tear (Lee); By the margin of fair Zurich's waters (Dance);

DUET: My pretty page (Bishop); GLEE: The chough and the crow (Bishop)


[Editorial], Colonial Times (18 August 1835), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8648454 

In the last number of the Courier there appeared a letter fiom one of the "gentlemen composing the corps of amateurs" . . . Are not these young amateurs, for the greater part, clerks in Government employ, whose salaries vary from £60 to £100 per annum? Have not many young amateurs ruined their prospects in life, by running into debt, in consequence of being connected with these amateur performers? . . . Now, it comes to our knowledge that these young gentlemen offered a very considerable sum (£40) to Mrs. Chester for her services - for three night's performance; and, as there must be a band of music - scene shifters - ticket-takers - candle snuffers, and such like, the duties of which departments, of course, the gentlemen amateurs cannot undertake - the "nominal expense" incurred must amount to somewhat considerable . . .


[Advertisement], Colonial Times (18 August 1835), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8648447 

New Music. MRS. CHESTER respectfully informs the Ladies and Families of Hobart Town and its vicinity, that she has still a small quantity of Songs and Ballads remaining, which will be disposed of at the published prices. Also an organ-toned Accordian and a Flagelet for sale. Freemasons' Hotel, August l8, 1835.


[Advertisement], The Hobart Town Courier (28 August 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4179328 

ARGYLE ROOMS. For the Benefit of the Family of Mr. J.P. Deane. THE public are respectfully informed that a Concert of Vocal and Instrumental Music, will take place at the Arglye Rooms, on Friday Aug. 28, previous to Mrs. Chester's departure from the colony, per Medway, to Sydney, who has, with the rest of the profession, ottered her services gratuitously for the benefit of the family of Mr. Deane. Tickets to be had of Mrs. Deane, at the Argyle Rooms, 5s. each, not transferable.


A report in the Hobart press after Chester had departed for Sydney:

"THE THEATRE", The Tasmanian (9 October 1835), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232801054 

Of all the objectionable means of levying contributions upon the struggling occupants of a new country, none can be more than these commonly called "the Theatrical." We supported Mr. Deane, and we supported Mr. Cameron in their attempts, not but that we were convinced that in both cases the attempts would end as they have done, but, because the former was an industrious and deserving man, with a large and increasing family, and that the other had been forced, almost against his will, into an undertaking for which he was anything but suited, and that Mrs. Cameron had obtained universal good will, both by her public and private demeanour. When the bubble was about to burst, another speculator appeared, a Mrs. Chester, whose pretensions were of so high a cast, that we have been told, she expected ten guineas a night for her performance; and, that finding the people here not sufficiently sensible of her merits, she departed to Sydney, in the expectation of being more appropriately valued. She has been refused an engagement and has dwindled down to the proper standard, as a teacher of music. It is now said, that this lady is to unite with Mrs. Cameron, in another attempt at the original theatre - Mr. Whitaker's, the Freemason's Tavern. If theatricals can succeed at all, the limited scale of that very pretty room, affords the chance of commonly ordinary remuneration. But Mrs. Chester must diminish her "nobles to ninepence."

ASSOCIATIONS: Samson Cameron (actor); Cordelia Cameron (actor, vocalist)




Sydney, NSW (16 September to 12 November 1835)

16 September 1835, the Chesters arrived Sydney

"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. ARRIVALS", The Sydney Gazette (19 September 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200293

From Hobart Town, on Wednesday last, whence she sailed the 12th instant, the schooner Maria, Captain Milne, with sundries. Passengers, Mr. D. Egan, Mr. W. Chester, Mrs. M. Chester, Mrs. Mary Becket, Lawrence Kelly, John Kelly, Edward Elliott, John Doran, John Williams, Henry Bell, and William Young.


[News], The Sydney Herald (17 September 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12853056

Mrs. Chester, the vocalist, who has for some time past appeared with much success at Hobart town, arrived yesterday in the Maria. Several other professionals we hear, may shortly be expected in Sydney.


1 October 1835, Chester's Sydney debut, in Clari; or, The maid of Milan

[Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (1 October 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12853159 

First Night of Mrs. CHESTER'S Engagement.
Theatre Royal, Sydney
THIS Evening, (Thursday), October the 1st,
CLARI; OR, THE MAID OF MILAN.
The Duke Vivaldi (first time), Mr. Mackay.
Rolamo (father to Clari), Mr. Knowles.
Jocoso (valet to the Duke), Mr. Simmons, his first appearance in that character.
CLARI - by - MRS CHESTER
From the Theatres Royal, Drury Lane and Covwnt Garden, in which she will sing
"HOME, SWEET HOME,"
"TYRANT SOON I'LL BURST THY CHAINS."
"Come where the Aspins Quiver," AND
"O say not Woman's love is bought."
Fidalma (her mother) - Mrs. Larra.
Vespina (her maid) Mrs. Taylor - in which she will sing
O! Love is a mischievous Boy,
and introduce with Mr. Simmons the Duet of
When a little Farm we keep . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Angus Mackay (actor); Conrad Knowles (actor); Joseph Simmons (actor, vocalist); Mary Ann Larra (actor); Maria Taylor (vocalist, actor); Theatre Royal, Sydney

SONGS: O say not woman's love is bought

"THEATRICALS", The Australian (2 October 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42004690 

We have not now time to descant upon the rich Theatrical treat afforded last evening. Mrs. Chester made her first appearance to an elegant and crowded audience, and which, perhaps, had seldom experienced so great a gratification. Mrs. C.'s execution, style, and feeling, was beyond what our most sanguine expectation induced us to hope.

"THE THEATRE", The Sydney Gazette (3 October 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200475

On Thursday evening last, agreeably to previous announcement, Mrs. Chester, formerly of the Theatres Royal Drury Lane and Covent Garden, made her first appearance on the Sydney boards in the character of Clari, in the operatic piece called the Maid of Milan. As a vocalist of superior ability, power, and taste, Mrs. Chester confessedly ranks first here in her profession; it is very evident that with a powerful natural voice, Mrs. C. has had the opportunity afforded her of superior instruction, combined with considerable musical skill, and much persevering application. This lady sang Home, sweet home, with a chasteness of expression and style we have seldom heard equalled, and never surpassed. In Rossini's difficult song of Tyrant soon I'll burst thy chains, she shewed the powerful addition which highly cultivated art had given her as a vocalist of natural ability. Her cadences evinced much command and taste, and her execution of them was very effective. Mrs. Chester was encored in this song, as she was likewise in that beautiful ballad, O say not woman's heart is bought. But we confess that the song which we most admired, was, Come where the aspen's quiver, which Mrs. Chester sang with the most delightful softness and expression of tone.

As an actress, it would be scarcely fair to pronounce judgment on Mrs. Chester at first sight. Her intonation is deeply sonorous, her delivery precise, but her articulation appears slightly defective, betraying a sort of thickness of expression, which being perhaps a natural imperfection, will imperceptibly wear off after her auditors have become more accustomed to hear her. Her performance of Clari was more studious than natural-rather labored than easy: yet notwithstanding it proved she had both observed and profited by all those requisites to constitute a successful performer, more commonly known as "stage tact." Mrs. Chester was well received by a tolerably numerous and respectable audience, and both her singing and acting met will much justly bestowed applause.

But while we record the public approbation of a new candidate for theatrical fame, we have also the pleasing duty to perform of bearing testimony to the strong manifestation of popular remembrance of an old, an often approved, an useful, and a deserving favorite in the person of Mrs. Taylor. This lady's song of, O Love was a mischievous boy, and her comic duett with Mr. Simmons of When a little farm we kept were loudly applauded, as was likewise the whole performance of both them, and the rest of the company, who appeared on this occasion to exert themselves to the uttermost in order to compete with a powerful rival for theatrical honors.

It would perhaps be esteemed unjust to draw a full length comparison between the two first rate female performers on the Sydney stage, but we cannot avoid saying, that if, on the present occasion, we yield the preference to Mrs. Chester as a vocalist, indebted more to art than to nature for her superiority over Mrs. Taylor; yet, as an actress of prepossessing appearance, and fascinating manner, we should unquestionably acknowledge the superiority of the latter over the former lady. Whatever opinion we may have heretofore entertained and expressed, and may still perhaps do so, as to the effects which Mrs. Chester's partial engagement at the Theatre during the season of benefits, may produce over the interests of those more particularly concerned in the question, we cannot help awarding the meed of praise towards those to whom it is eminently due, as connected with this subject.

We allude to the gentlemen composing the lessees of the establishment, who are entitled, not merely to the dry thanks, but to the liberal patronage of the public, for having secured, doubtless at a great additional expense to themselves, a person of Mrs. Chester's superior vocal talent, and general ability. We repeat what we have before asserted, that "we know the lessees are considerably out of pocket by their bargain," and it reflects no little censure on the slate of public spirit, that they should be suffered to be so. When a few gentlemen are joined together for the laudable purpose of promoting a patriotic view, in the adequate equipment of one of the first places of popular amusement, it is a shame to the community that their patriotism should be rewarded by a heavy pecuniary loss. It is, therefore, to be hoped, that the public may, by their liberal support of this infant institution during the remainder of the present season, not only reimburse the lessees of the Theatre for their outlay, but give them something more than bank interest for the investment of their capital.

By the bye, before we quit this theatrical topic, a word or two with those sluggish gentlemen, the members of the orchestra. We have before told them of their merits, and of their exertions, but they appear to have quite forgotten our lecture. They are, we know, most liberally-liberally to a fault, paid for their services; and it is but reasonable to expect a suitable return from them. This is, however, any thing but the case, and the fault appears rather to be gaining ground, than diminishing. We were taught to expect very great things from the highly talented gentlemen who were to compose the orchestra upon its present formation, but we rather surmise that both the proprietors and the public have been most miserably disappointed in this particular. We need only advert to the worse than wretched accompaniament to Mrs. Chester on Thursday evening, and our strictures on the inefficiency of the present instrumental company, will then be acknowledged to be well founded.

Mrs. Chester was, in point of fact, the leader of the band; and in being so, it was pretty generally acknowledged that she displayed more musical judgment than the united phalanx of the orchestral body. We invite all those who are fond of any thing like rational amusement to visit the Theatre this evening, where they cannot fail of being highly gratified by Mrs. Chester's Page, Mrs. Taylor's Rosa, (she having in a most lady-like manner resigned the other character to Mrs. Chester, at the request of the latter) and Mr. Simmons's Pedrigo Potts, in the operatic piece of John of Paris. Such pieces in the hands of such performers ought to attract full houses, or public taste is vitiated, and public spirit is dead!

"THEATRE", The Sydney Monitor (3 October 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32149843 

Mrs. Chester made her debut on Thursday evening, in the character of "CLARI." There was a highly respectable audience, and Mrs. C. was cordially greeted upon making her appearance. The part of "CLARI" is not a very arduous one, but it appears to be quite out of Mrs. C's. line, and it is evident that whatever she may have been in the habit of playing in London, plaintive characters are not her forte. Mrs. Chester's singing is pleasing, her voice is not powerful; this was apparent when she sung "Tyrant soon I'll burst thy chain," the lower part of which she gave with much sweetness, but her voice was not pleasant when she reached the higher notes. Mrs C. was encored in this song, and improved much the second time. In the ballad of "Oh say not woman's love is bought," Mrs. C. was more successful, and was rapturously encored. On the whole Mrs C. played respectably, but nothing more. The public had been wrought up to a great pitch of anxiety, to hear a lady recently from the London Theatres, and one who had been in the habit of playing with the first English performers of the day, and that may is some measure account for Mrs C. performance not equalling their expectations, when they found that as a singer she was equalled, and as an actress surpassed by some of the performers who were on the stage before. Mrs. Chester we should think would appear to more advantage in the concert room than on the stage.


3 October 1835, Chester's second night, in John of Paris

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (3 October 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32149829 

THEATRE ROYAL, SYDNEY,
SECOND NIGHT OF MRS. CHESTER'S, ENGAGEMENT.
THIS Evening, SATURDAY, October 3rd will be performed for the second time here (with a new cast) the favourite Opera of
JOHN OF PARIS
John of Paris - Mr. Knowles
Grand Chamberlain - Mr. Buckingham
Pedrigo Potts - Mr. Simmons
OLIVIA (disgised as Page Vincent) MRS. CHESTER
In which she will sing "My Own Blue Bell"
(as sung by her at the London Theatres), "Had I a Heart for Falsehood framed," "Should he upbraid," and "The Traboudor."
Theodore - Mr. Mackay
Gregory - Mr. Simes
Princess ot Navarre (1st time) - Mrs. Mackay
Rosa (for this night only) - MRS. TAYLOR (Her first appearance in that character)
IN WHICH SHE WILL INTRODUCE "O What a Joyous Day" . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: George Buckingham (actor); Frances Mackay (actor); Thomas Simes (actor)

PIECE: John of Paris (Boieldieu-Pocock)

SONGS: Had I a heart for falsehood framed; Should he upbraid (Bishop); The traboudor (? unidentified, perhaps Gaily the troubadour touch'd his guitar)

"THE THEATRE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (6 October 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200517 

The performance on Saturday evening was John of Paris and High ways and bye ways. Mrs. Chester as the the Page Vincent, sang "My own blue bell," and "Should he upbraid" in both of which, she was rapturously encored. She also sang "Had I a heart for falsehood framed," and "The Troubadour." Mrs. Taylor was loudly encored in "O! what a joyous day." It is very evident however, that the latter lady is very indisposed. We think that the manager does not use her fairly to harrass her so much. We recommend him to give her a week's leave of absence at last, and then Mrs. Chester and her will be able to divide the more arduous duties of the Theatre between them.


6 October 1835, Chester's third night, in Clari and John of Paris

[Advertisement], The Australian (6 October 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42007460 

THE LAST NIGHT OF
MRS. CHESTER'S Engagement, on which occasion Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor will both play in both pieces.
Theatre Royal, SYDNEY.
IN consequence of the numerous applications for a repetition of the Opera of Clari, the Manager begs leave to announce it for this Evening, TUESDAY, October 6th, 1835, when the performance will commence with the celebrated Opera of
CLARI; OR, THE MAID OF MILAN . . .
To conclude with the Comic Opera of
JOHN OF PARIS . . .

"MRS. CHESTER", The Sydney Herald (8 October 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12853204

It is with some degree of gratification that we witness persons of respectability and science joining our infantile corps dramatique, and lending their talents for the rational entertainment of the community - for by such means alone will the drama flourish and eventually arrive at maturity, or the speculators in theatricals find their undertaking to be advantageous. These remarks are elicited by the recent engagement at the Sydney Theatre of Mrs. Chester, who, having received a theatrical education in Europe, has emigrated to this Colony for the purpose of following her profession. The Lessees of the Theatre - who certainly deserve every credit for their exertions in the public service - at once made the necessary arrangements with Mrs. Chester, for her appearance, and on Thursday last she made her debut in the Opera of Clari.

In a strange land, and before such an audience of strangers, we considered that Mrs. Chester laboured under many disadvantages on Thursday night, and calculating the embarrassment under which Mrs. C. must have laboured on her first interview with the public, we considered that her performance on this occasion was not a fair criterion for judging of the merits of this actress; we therefore resolved to see her when she had become more "at home" with the audience. Many a bright genius in theatricals has been consigned to the shades (or, as the London writers would say, "damned") by the false judgment of superficial critics, who allow their senses to be carried away, and former erroneous conceptions from first impressions. Mrs. Chester appeared on Saturday, and again on Tuesday last, when we had the pleasure of beholding her performances in the Opera of Clari; and, as the Page in John of Paris, (very opposite lines of character) in both of which she strengthened the opinions we had formed of her talents. Mrs. Chester's acting is natural, and unaffected, without any violent exertion to give effect, unlike some of our performers, who are all rant and noise, and therefore unnatural; her emphasis and precision in the relation of the author were remarkably beautiful. We thought her rather too sombre in both characters, in the Page she wanted much more vivacity.

As a vocalist Mrs. Chester is superior to any on the boards. Her voice is a full round-toned Soprano, not so powerful as Mrs. Taylor's, but of a more, pleasing mellow quality. Mrs. Chester's upper notes, - say above, G in Alt, appeared laboured, but this might have originated from a slight affection of the lungs at this particular season of the year. Her runs, cadences, and shakes, were executed with neatness and taste, although the latter we thought, in some of her songs, were used too frequently, but perhaps Mrs. Chester merely wished to let us know what she could perform, rather than exhibit the real beauty of the composition in question. As a ballad singer, we have no doubt Mrs. Chester will be unrivalled on the Sydney boards for some time to come; and as an actress, in a general line of business, (although we would say light Comedy is her forte) her services will be invaluable.

We intended to have done justice to the exertions of some of the performers in Clari and John of Paris, but our "sand has neatly run out" for this publication; we must not, however, close without deprecating the miserable attempt that was made in the Orchestra to accompany Mrs. Chester. Had there been no rehearsals? if the orchestra is weak, it is no excuse for being imperfect. In the plaintive song of "Home, Sweet Home," we never heard such timeless, unfeeling, discordant, strumming, the musicians, we perceived, played "from ear," and a fertile imagination they displayed! We hope better things of the Orchestra for the future.


10 October 1835, Chester in Abon Hassan

[Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (8 October 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12853201 

Theatre Royal, Sydney.
THE Manager respectfully informs his Friends, and the Public in general, that in consequence of the great approbation that has been bestowed, and the rapturous Applause that MRS CHESTER'S Performance and Singing has excited, during the three Nights of her engagement, by crowded and fashionable audiences, induced him to RE-ENGAGE that Lady for SIX NIGHTS more, during which period she will appear in some of her most favourite characters.
On Saturday Evening, October 10, 1835,
ABON HASSAN; OR, THE LIVING DEAD.
Abon Hassan - Mr. Mackay
The Caliph - Mr. Grove
Zabone (slave to Abon Hassan) - Mr. Simmons
Zulima (wife of Abon Hassan), by Mrs Chester,
in which she will sing
"Meet me in the Willow Glen" - A. LEE,
entirely new, written expressly for and sung by her at the London Theatres;
"Bid me Discourse" - BISHOP;
"Each Bower has Beauty for me" - A. LEE;
Nouramoul - Mrs. Larra . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Daniel Grove (actor)

SONGS: Bid me discourse (Bishop); Each bower has beauty for me (Lee)

"THE THEATRE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (10 October 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200611 

We are highly gratified in perceiving that Mrs. Chester's superior vocal talent, attracted a numerous audience on Tuesday evening, especially in the dress circle of boxes which was chiefly engrossed by the ladies. The performances were Clari and John of Paris, of both of which we have before spoken. Mrs. Chester sang in each piece with renewed effect, and with renovated voice; she having quite recovered from a slight cold, the effects of which were observable on the night of her second appearance. The songs which were most admired, and in which she was loudly encored, were "Home, sweet Home;" "Tyrant soon I'll burst thy chains;" "My own blue bell;" and "Should he upbraid." This lady has, we perceive been re-engaged for six nights, and will this evening perform in Abon Hassan or the Living Dead; to hear her in which, we invite all those who are really fond of good singing, as the songs which have been selected for introduction in the piece cannot fail, when confided to such superior ability, of gratifying their taste. Mrs. Taylor, we regret to hear, continues seriously indisposed; the arduous nature of her duties of late, have evidently very materially injured a constitution naturally delicate. We hope, however, that a little necessary rest may restore this lady to the enjoyment of perfect health; and that she may soon re-appear before that public with whom she is so deserving a favorite. Mr. Simes, and Mrs. Mackay take their joint benefit on Monday evening . . .

"THE THEATRE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (13 October 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200631 

A new piece, called Abon Hassan or the Living Dead, was performed for the first time on Saturday evening. The principle characters are Abon Hassan (Mr. Mackay), Zabouc (Mr. Simmons), and Zulima (Mrs. Chester), and the piece itself is replete with comic incident and humour. Mrs. Chester sang a new song, entitled Meet me in the willow glen, written expressly for, and sang by her at the London Theatres. It is a pleasing air, and being well executed, it appeared to give much satisfaction. This lady also introduced Bid me discourse; and Each bower has beauty for me, in both of which she was loudly encored. Zabouc is a lively comic character, and Mr. Simmons, in playing it, kept the house in continued roars of laughter. Mrs. Chester's Zulima was also respectable. The rest had but little to do, yet they got through that little tolerably, which caused the piece to be well received. The house, although but thinly, was respectably attended - a circumstance we should say, that it is strongly indicative of the times. The evening's amusement concluded with Tekeli, which altogether, was but a very so so piece of performance.

"THEATRE", The Sydney Monitor (14 October 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32149909 

An Operatic Drama called Abon Hassan was brought out on Saturday evening. The principal characters were supported by Mesdames Chester, Mackay and Larra, and Messrs. Simmons and Mackay; they played tolerably, but with the exception of Mrs. Chester, there appeared to be a great deficiency in the knowledge of the words of their respective characters. Mrs. Chester introdaced three songs, which she executed in her usual style; she went through Meet Me in the Willow Glen with taste and was honoured with an encore. The Drama of Tekeli was the afterpiece, in which the last act was most miserably murdered.


13 October 1835, Chester in Abon Hassan, and Clari

[Advertisement], The Australian (13 October 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42008579 

Theatre Royal, SYDNEY.
THE Comic Opera of ABON HASSAN having been hailed from all parts of the house with abundant applause, and the unanimous approbation that MRS. CHESTER received in the character Zulima, the Manager is authorised to announce its repitition this Evening; in which will be added (positively for the last time) the Opera of the MAID of MILAN, in which MRS. CHESTER will appear in the Character of CLARI, when it must be withdrawn, owing to forthcoming Novelties, which are in active preparation.
Tuesday, October 13, 1835.
The Evening's entertainments will commence with (for the second time here,) the celebtated Comic Operatic Drama, with appropriate Scenery, Dresses, Processions and Music, called
ABON HASSAN; OR, THE LIVING DEAD.
The Caliph - Mr. Grove
Abon Hassan - Mr. Mackay
Mosrour (chamberlain) - Mr. Simes
Omar (a usurer) - Mr. Buckingham
Zabouc - Mr. Simmons
Mustapha (a baker) - Mr. Dyball
Solyman (a butcher) - Mr. Lane
Sadi (a tailor) - Mr. Winters
Page - Master Jones
Zobeide (the Sultana) - Mrs. Mackay
Nousamoul (her nurse) - Mrs. Larra
Zulima - Mrs. Chester
In which she will sing
"Meet me in the Willow Glen" A. Lee. Entirely new - written expressly for, and sung by her at the London Theatres.
"Bid me Discourse" - Bishop.
AND
"Each bower has beauty for me" - A. Lee
Lesbia - Mrs. Downs
Delia - Mrs. Jones
Chiefs. Eunuchs, Slaves, Guards, &c. &c. &c.
To conclude with for the first time at Half Price, and positively the last time this season, the Opera of
CLARI; OR, THE MAID OF MILAN.
The Duke Vivaldi, Mr. Mackay
Geronio, Mr. Buckingham
Claudio, Mr. Dyball - Rolamo, Mr. Knowles
Nicolo, Mr. Winters - Nimpedo, Mr. Simes
Jocose, Valet to the Duke, Mr. Simmons
Clari, MRS. CHESTER.
From the Thentres Royal, Drury Lane and Covent Garden, in which she will sing for the last time, the Original Song of
"Home, sweet Home."
And imroduce for the first time here,
"Tell me my Heart."
O say not Woman's Love is Bought - Whitaker.
Fidelma, her Mother, Mrs. Larra
Ninetta, Mrs. Jones
Vespina, Clari's Maid, Mrs. Mackay.

SONGS: Tell me my heart (Bishop)


17 and/or 20, and 22 October 1835, Chester in The slave

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (17 October 1845), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32149938 

Theatre Royal, Sydney.
MRS. CHESTER, AS ZELINDA.
SATURDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 17th, 1835, the Performance will commence with the favourite Opera, (with New Scenery, Dresses and Decorations,) in three Acts, of
THE SLAVE . . .
Zelinda, a quadroon slave - Mrs Chester.
IN WHICH SHE WILL SING
"THE MOCKING BIRD."
"TELL ME MY HEART."
AND "Come where the Aspens Quiver" . . .

SONGS: The mocking bird (?)

[Advertisement], The Australian (20 October 1845), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42009476 

. . . MRS. CHESTER being recovered from her indisposition, will resume her engagement, and will positively appear in the character of ZELINDA ON THIS EVENING, TUESDAY, October 20, 1835, When the Performance will commence with the Opera of THE SLAVE . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (22 October 1845), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200772 

The SLAVE, having been loudly applauded, and the unanimous approbation and unbounded applause that Mrs. CHESTER elicited in the character of ZELINDA, induces the Manager to announce its repetition for THIS EVENING . . .

"THE THEATRE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (24 October 1845), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200825 

On Thursday evening the Slave was repeated to a rather thin audience. The performance was an amendment to that of the previous evening, and Mrs. Chester's songs seemed to give much satisfaction. The afterpiece was the Irish Tutor, in which Mr. Simmons as Dr. O'Toole alias Terry O'Rourke as usual cured all his low spirited hearers of that ailment. His St. Patrick was a Gentleman was vociferously encored. This evening Mrs. Chester plays Don Giovanni, in which she will introduce all the original songs - so that the lovers of scientific singing may expect a rich treat . . .

PIECE: The slave


24 October 1835, Chester in Giovanni in London

[Advertisement], The Australian (23 October 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42005326 

Theatre Royal, SYDNEY.
MRS. CHESTER In the Character of DON GIOVANNI.
ON THIS EVENING, SATURDAY, Oct. 24, 1835,
When the Performance will commence with the Admired Extravaganza, called
GIOVANNI IN LONDON.
The part of Don Giovanni, - MRS. CHESTER.
In which she will Sing all the original Songs.
Liperello, his Valet of all work, MR. SIMMONS.
Firedrake, MR. KNOWLES . . .

PIECE: Giovanni in London


27 October 1835, Chester in Charles the Second and Abon Hassan

[Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (26 October 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12853350 

Last Night but Three of Mrs. Chester's Engagement.
TUESDAY Evening, October 27, 1835, will be Performed
CHARLES THE SECOND;
Mary Copp. MRS CHESTER,
In which she will Sing
"Alice Gray," AND "THE SOLDIER'S TEAR."
Between the Pieces, MR. ASTLEY will exhibit some wonderful and extraordinary GYMNASTIC FEATS; To conclude with
ABON HASSAN;
Zulima, MRS. CHESTER,
In which she will Sing
"BID ME DISCOURSE," "My own Blue Bell,"
AND "EACH BOWER HAS BEAUTY FOR ME."

[Advertisement], The Australian (27 October 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42006284 

SONG: Alice Gray (Millard)

"THE THEATRE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (29 October 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200915 

On Monday evening Messrs. Dyball and Knight's benefit took place . . . On Tuesday the performance was Charles the Second and Abon Hassan, which were both above par, especially the former. Mrs. Chester's five songs were all well approved of - that of My own Blue Bell was loudly encored. Mr. Astley has been re-engaged, and he performed some very surprising gymnastic feats with apparent ease. A new clown to the rope (a Mr. Hughes) also made his first appearance, and went through some tumbling and somerset agilities with great activity. Mrs. Chester's benefit takes place this evening, and we feel persuaded that her eminent vocal ability, seconded by the novelties she has selected, will insure her a crowded house. Paul Pry "Hopes he wont intrude," and Mrs. Taylor has tendered her services in the part of Laura, Mrs. Chester playing Crimp, with songs. The performance will conclude with several entertainments, and Giovanni in London.


29 October 1835, Chester's benefit . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (29 October 1835), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200920 

THEATRE ROYAL, SYDNEY.
Under Distinguished Patronage.
Mrs. Chester
MOST Respectfully informs her Friends and the Public generally that her
BENEFIT Is fixed for Thursday, October 29, 1835.
On which occasion she trusts the very flattering reception she has met with, since her first appearance, before an Australian audience, and the popular pieces she has selected for the Night's Entertainment, will insure her that support and patronage, which it will be her proudest hope to merit and study to secure.
WHEN WILL BE PERFORMED, FOR THE FIRST TIME HERE, The highly popular and truly laughable Petite Comedy, in three acts, of
PAUL PRY.
P.AUL PRY - Mr. SIMMONS.
Billy - Mr. Winters.
Captain Hazleton - Mr. Peat.
Old Button - Mr.Grove.
Sir Spangle Rainbow - Mr Mackay.
Pommade - Mr. Knowles.
Tankard - Mr. Buckingham.
LAURA - MRS. TAYLOR, who has kindly consented lo play on this occasion.
CRIMP (with Songs) - MRS. CHESTER.
AFTER WHICH,
Mr. Simmons and Mrs. Chester, will sing the celebrated Duett, from "Hofer,"
AT CLOSE OF DAY.- Auber.
Highland Fling, - Mr-.
To conclude willi the celebrated Extravaganza of
Giovanni in London.
THE DON (2nd time) MRS. CHESTER,
with the original music.
Tickets to be had of Mr. Ellard, Hunter-street, and of Mrs. Chester, at Mr. Dunsdon's Pastry Cook, George-street, where boxes can only be taken.
The last night of her appearance this season but two.

"THE THEATRE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (31 October 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200967 

Mrs. Chester's benefit took place on Thursday last; and it produced, as we anticipated it would produce, on account of that lady's eminent talent, and the novelties she had announced for representation - a crowded house. The petite comedy of Paul Pry was most successfully represented. Mr. Simmons's Paul, Mr. Mackay's Sir Spangle Rainbow, Mr. Knowles's Pommade, Mrs. Taylor's Laura, and Mrs. Chester's Crimp, were such as would have reflected no discredit on one of the minor metropolitan Theatres of Old England. The singing of Mrs. C. was managed with her customary success, and the Dashing white Serjeant which she introduced in the piece was an unique in style and execution. The after-piece was Giovanni in London, but it was certainly not the Giovanni of Mrs. Taylor. Mrs. Chester's style of singing proves her to be mistress of her art; but the Don wanted the fascinating powers, and volatile gaiety always thrown into the character by Mrs. Taylor. Mrs. Chester's singing wanted Mrs. Taylor's acting, and then the performance would have been complete.


31 October 1835, Chester in The green-eyed monster and Paul Pry

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (31 October 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150032 

. . . Last Night but Three of this Season.
PAUL PRY just droped in at the Theatre, on Thursday Evening last, and was received with rapturous shouts of laughter by his Friends, intends to make his appearance again this Evening, and "Hopes he won't intrude"
ON SATURDAY OCTOBER 31st, When the Performance will commence with the Petite Comedy in Two Acts, called the
The Green Eyed Monster.
Baron Speyenhausen - Mr Knowles
Marcus - Mr. Peat
Kraut - Mr. Simmons
Colonel Armsdorf - Mr. Grove
Baroness Speyenhausen - Mrs. Mackay
Amelia - Mrs. Downs
LUISE - Mrs. CHESTER.
In which she will sing the Original Song of
"I cannot marry Kraut."
And sing with Mr. Simmons, the comic duet of
"When a Little Farm we Keep" . . .
To conclude with The highly popular and truly laughable Petite Comedy in three Acts of
PAUL PRY . . .
CRIMP - Mrs. CHESTER.
WHO WILL SING THE
"Dashing White Sergeant,"
AND
"Fall not in love dear Girls beware" . . .

SONG: Fall not in love dear girls beware = O never fall in love (Lee)


3 November 1835, last night of the season, Chester in Charles the second

[Advertisement], The Australian (3 November 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42004965 

THE LAST NIGHT OF THE COMPANY'S PERFORMING THIS SEASON.
Theatre Royal, SYDNEY.
THIS EVENING, (TUESDAY,) November 3, 1835, the performance will commence with the favourits drama of the
TOWER OF NESLE; OR THE CHAMBER OF DEATH . . . TO CONCLUDE WITH
CHARLES THE 2nd . . . Mary Copp - MRS. CHESTER
IN WHICH SHE WILL SING, "MY OWN BLUE BELL."
"SHOULD HE UPBRAID"
AND, "THE DASHING WHITE SERGEANT."v The whole of the Performance to conclude with "GOD SAVE THE KING,"
By the whole strength of the Company.

"THE THEATRE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (5 November 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2201046 

On Tuesday evening the theatre closed for the season, on which occasion was performed the Tower of Nesle, and King Charles the 2nd, together with some evolutions on the slack rope, by Mr. Hughes, and some gymnastic feats by Mr. Astley . . . The comedy of Charles the 2nd, was a failure; principally because Mr. Grove, who was unexpectedly called upon to take the character of Captain Capp, in lieu of Mr. Mackay, scarcely knew any thing of the part. Mrs. Chester, as Mary Capp, sang, "My own blue bell" - "Should he upbraid" - and "The dashing white serjeant," in the last of which she was encored. At the close of the performance, the whole strength of the company sang the national anthem . . .

In taking leave of theatricals in Sydney for a season, we have a few remarks to offer respecting the present corps dramatique, and on the manner that body and the theatre might be more successfully managed for the future . . . But the orchestra, the miserable orchestra, has been the chief griavance during the past season, and that must be remedied for the future. With respect to the performers . . . Messrs. Simmons, Knowles, Mackay, Buckingham, Groves and Winters, may be considered, in their respective lines of character, as ranking in succession for ability and usefulness . . . Of the female performers, there is likewise a sufficient phalanx of ability, if industry be combined with it. Mrs. Taylor is here quite unrivalled as an actress, as the versatility of her genius in such opposite characters as Don Giovanni and Mrs. Haller; in Mannette and Ernestine; and many other characters of an equally opposite nature, can fully testify. Her vocal ability, although not of that finished and talented order of Mrs. Chester's, is nevertheless, equally pleasing; and it will, we doubt not, on account of its sweet cadence, and strong natural power, command the favour of the public generally, to an equal, if not superior extent. Between Mrs. Taylor and Mrs. Chester the more arduous duties of the female performances might undergo a division, though the preponderance wou'd be in favour of the former lady. Among the rest, namely, Miss Douglass, Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Mackay, and Mrs. Downes, there is also a ray of talent, which should be called into exercise, as occasion might require . . .

"THEATRE", The Sydney Monitor (7 November 1835), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150080 

Tuesday way the last night of the season, and the pieces were "THE TOWER OF NESLE" and "KING CHARLES THE SECOND," which were very badly played; this was chiefly owing to the performers not being perfect in their parts . . . The amusing Farce of "KING CHARLES THE SECOND" was wretchedly performed through the deficiency of Knowles and Peat. Mrs. Jones was good as usual, she sang as she always sings, sweetly and naturally, indeed as a general actress, Mrs. J., for industry and talent decidedly ranks first on the boards. Mrs. Chester's singing in Mary Copp we admired, she has a strong voice and easy execution, and is decidedly a great accession to the Theatre . . . At the close of the performance, Mr. Simmons briefly thanked the audience for their patronage during the season, and the performers sang God save the King. The Theatre is is said will not remain closed longer than a fortnight, as it is only cIosed in order to break the agreement of two or three parties who were engaged for the season. Since writing she above, we have been informed that Mr. Joseph Simmons has taken the lease off the hands of the late lessees, and that the Theatre will open under his sole Direction as soon as the scenery can be fresh painted, and some new dresses be provided, which will not require more than a fortnight.


[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (5 November 1835), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2201045 

We understand Mrs. Chester proceeds to Hobart Town to fulfil an engagement, After which she returns for a permanency to our Theatre.


"THE THEATRE", The Tasmanian (6 November 1835), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232801116 

We extremely regret to state that Mrs. Taylor, the celebrated vocalist, a favourite equally here as at Sydney, to have been compelled to withdraw from the stage, her exertions upon which have so exhausted her constitution, as to render her unequal to their continuance. Mrs. Chester, has in consequence, received an engagement at a salary of £3 a week. Even the Sydney Theatre cannot afford high salaries.


12/13 November 1835, the Chesters depart Sydney

"PROJECTED DEPARTURES", The Colonist (12 November 1835), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31717200 

The schooner Maria, Captain Robertson, will sail this day for Hobart Town, she is full of passengers both cabin and steerage, amongst the former we observe the following: Major Ryan and family H. M. 50th Regiment, Mr. and Mrs. Chester (the vocalist), Mr. Ross, Miss Banks, and, also those most indefatigable and truly amiable men, Messrs. Backhouse and Walker.

ASSOCIATIONS: James Backhouse (Quaker missionary); George Washington Walker (Quaker missionary)




Hobart Town, VDL (20 November 1835 to 4 January 1836)


20 November 1835, the Chesters arrive Hobart Town

Arrivals by ship; Tasmanian names index; NAME_INDEXES:412864; MB2/39/1/2 P401

https://linctas.ent.sirsidynix.net.au/client/en_AU/names/search/detailnonmodal/ent:$002f$002fNAME_INDEXES$002f0$002fNAME_INDEXES:412864/one 

Mrs. Chester / to Hobart Town, 20 November / on the Champion [sic] from Sydney


4 December 1835, William Vincent Wallace's concert

[Advertisement], The Tasmanian (4 December 1835), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232801175 

MR. WALLACE having been requested to give a CONCERT before his departure for Sydney, begs leave to announce that a Performance of VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE ARGYLE ROOMS, THIS EVENING, DECEMBER 4, 1835; On which occasion he will be aided by the talents of Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Logan, and also of some Gentlemen Amateurs.
PART I.
Overture -
Glee -
Song - "The Misletoe Bough," Mrs. Logan
"Rondo characteristique pour le Piano-forte" (Herz) - Mr. Wallace
Song - "Come where the Aspens quiver" - Mrs. Chester
Glee -
Concerto - Violin - (Mayseder) - Mr. Wallace.
Song - "Tyrant soon I'll burst thy Chains," - Mrs. Chester.
PART II.
Overture
Glee -
Duet - Piano-forte (Hertz) - Mrs. Logan & Mr. Wallace
Song - "Farewell to the Mountain" - Mrs. Chester
"Fantasia di Bravura" (Herz) - Mr. Wallace
Song - "Bid me discourse" - Mrs. Chester
Concerto - Violin (Spohr) - Mr. Wallace
[The Officers of the 21st Regiment have kindly allowed Mr. Wallace the valuable assistance of their Band on this occasion.] Tickets, 7s. 6d. each, to be had of Mr. Wallace, 20, Macquarie-street; at Dr. Ross's Reading Rooms; Mr. Carter, Derwent House; Mrs. Davis, Music Warehouse, and Mrs. Hedger's, Elizabeth-street. N.B. - Concert to commence at 8 o'clock. Dec. 4, 1835.

ASSOCIATIONS: Maria Logan (pianist and vocalist, Wallace's cousin); Band of the 21st Regiment


[Advertisement], The Tasmanian (11 December 1835), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232801189

MRS. CHESTER, BEGS to announce to her friends and the public generally, that her CONCERT OF VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC WILL BE GIVEN ON FRIDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 11, 1835; on which occasion MR. WALLACE, whose Performances were received with the greatest approbation, will afford his valuable assistance, and play Several celebrated pieces on the Piano-forte and Violin, ASSISTED BY THE TALENTS OF MRS. LOGAN, Who will kindly afford her gratuitous services on this occasion, and several Amateurs.
PART I.
Overture -
Glee, "Should auld acquaintance be forgot"
Song, "Arise Zariffa" - Mrs. Logan
"Fantasia di Bravura" - Mr. Wallace
Song, "Alpine Maid," - Mrs. Chester
Glee, "See our Boat scuds o'er the main,"
Concerto, Violin - Mr. Wallace
Song, "Oh 'tis sweet when the moon is beaming," - Mrs. Chester
PART II.
Overture
Glee, "Ye banks and braes,"
Song, "Savourneen deelish," - Mrs. Chester
Duett, piano-forte, by desire, (Hertz) - Mrs. Logan and Mr. Wallace
Song, "Say not woman's heart is bought," - Mrs. Chester
Concerto, Violin, by desire, in which will be introduced, the admired melody, "'Tis the last rose of summer," - Mr. Wallace
Song, "Tell me my heart," - Mrs. Chester
By the kind permission of the Officers of the 21st Regiment, Mrs. Chester is allowed the assistance of the Military Band. Tickets, 7s. 6d., children 5s , to.be obtained of Mrs. Chester, Freemason's Hotel. Mr. Swan, Elizabeth-st., Mr. Davis, Music Warehouse, Mr. Carter, Derwent House. N.B. - Concert to commence at 8 o'clock. Dec. 8, 1835

1836

To call up all the TROVE newspaper items tagged Marian Maria Chester for 1836:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Marian+Maria+Chester&q&l-decade=183&l-year=1836 


4 January 1836, the Chesters sail for Sydney

"TRADE AND SHIPPING", The Hobart Town Courier (8 January 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4177805 

The Layton, Capt. Wade, proceeded on her voyage to Sydney in ballast on Saturday - [2 January] - passenger Mr. Wallace.

The Siren, Capt. Marten, sailed on Monday with goods and colonial produce for Sydney passengers - Mr. H. C. Bates, and Mr. and Mrs. Chester - . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Note also the departure of William Vincent Wallace for Sydney




Sydney, NSW (11 January to 11 October 1836)

"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. ARRIVALS", The Sydney Herald (14 January 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12853744 

From Hobart Town, on Monday last [11 January], having sailed from thence the 4th instant, the brig Siren, Captain Hayle, with sundries. Passengers, Mr. Chester, Mrs. Chester, . . .


"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (14 January 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202242 

. . . It is said that Mrs. Cameron has made overtures to the managers of the Sydney theatre to join the Sydney corps dramatique . . .

Mr. and Mrs. Chester have returned to Sydney by the Syren. It is expected she will re-engage with Mr. Simmons, and favour the public with a treat of her very superior vocal powers . . .


[Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (18 January 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28654619 

MRS. CHESTER,
HAVING returned to reside in Sydney, requests to inform those Ladies who honoured her with their Patronage, and the Public generally, that she intends to resume giving instruction in Singing.
Mrs. C. trusts, from the opportunities she has had of practising under the best Masters in London, upon the most approved method of forming a pure nnd correct style of articulation, that she is enabled to instruct Pupils in the same, to the satisfaction of thosa Families who may honour her with their Patronage.
Terms, &c, at Mr. Ellard's, Hunter-street.
Sydney, January 16, 1836.


23 January 1836, Chester appears for the first time this season, in No song no supper, Theatre Royal, Sydney

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (23 January 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202382 

We see by the bills that Mrs. Chester makes her appearance on the boards this evening, in "No Song No Supper," from which play-goers anticipate a treat, and the managers a bumper house - Mrs.C., having to sing several favorite airs. We are far from desiring to draw invidious comparisons between Mrs. C. and our old favorite Syren Mrs. Taylor, who has charmed so many, and we hope will long charm many still. With the accession of Mrs. Chester, no doubt the managers will get out some pretty simple Operas, which they can well do now.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (23 January 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150566 

FIRST NIGHT OF MRS. CHESTER'S ENGAGEMENT.
Theatre Royal, Sydney.
THE PUBLIC are most respectfully informed that
THIS EVENING, The Entertainment will commence with (for the first time at this Theatre,) the celebrated operatic piece of
No Song, No Supper.
Robin - Mr. Mackay
Frederick - Mr. Peat
Endless - Mr. Simmons
Crop - Mr. Knowles
William - Mr. Simes
Thomas - Mr. Lane
Sailors, &c.
Marguerette - Mrs. Chester
In which she will sing
"With lonely suit and plaintive ditty."
"Across the Downs this Morning."
AND
"Come where the Aspens Quiver."
Louisa - Miss Winstanley
Dorothy - Mrs. Downes
Nelly - Mrs. Jones
Between the pieces,
The Celebrated Matrimonial Duett
MR SiIMMONS and MRS TAYLOR.
The whole to conclude with the grand romantic spectacle, called
WILD MAN OF THE WOODS . . .
The Acting and Stage management under the entire direction of JOSEPH SIMMONS.

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (26 January 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202413 

On Saturday night last "Hoare's" pretty musical entertainment of "No Song no Supper," and Dibdin's "Valentine and Orson," were represented to a very full house. Mrs. Chester made her debut in the former piece as Margaretta, and sung "with lowly suit and plaintive ditty," "Come whore the aspens quiver," and "The Minstrel Boy." In none of those was her melodious voice well seconded by the orchestra. Her disclosure song, without accompaniment, passed off best. We cannot compliment her upon her general acting in Margarette. Her vocal powers, no doubt, are good; and we would suggest to her, in future, to sing either without accompaniment, or with a select few who will do her justice. Without some such preomition her vocal labor will be in a great degree thrown away upon the audience; even now playgoers complain, and with some reason, that "the same tunes, few in number, have been played and repeated from night to night since the opening of the Theatre, until patience has grown exhausted, and the ear become quite surfeited. Whoever has the superintendence of the musical department will do well to heed those hints, which we offer thus frankly, and with every feeling of goodwill. We understand the proprietors of the Theatre pay very decent salaries to their musicians, and they therefore may well do something for their money.

"No Song no Supper" went off heavily - the actors were generally imperfect, and it seemed as though it had been got up hastily, and performed without rehearsal - some of the original songs, which are very simple, were cut out, and others substituted, not by any means well-timed. Mr. Simmons played Endless well, though unequal to Liston; Mrs. Downes as Dorothy, Mrs. Chester as Margaretta, and Mrs. Jones as Nelly, were passable; but even with them, there was an evident confusion, resulting from non-rehearsal, which destroyed the effect of the piece. Mrs. Taylor was much missed. Mr. Mackie, in Robin, appeared to have studied one line . . .

"THEATRE", The Sydney Monitor (27 January 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150589 

Mrs. Chester has been been engaged; she has appeared twice in the character of Margaretta, in the Musical Farce of No Song no Supper, the characters in which were well conceived, although, from want of study the performers were not up in their parts. The best played character throughout was Mrs. Downs', who in Dorothy evinced much humour, and never apppeared to more advantage. The songs belonging to the piece were omitted, and The Minstrel Boy and Come where the Aspens quiver, were introduced by Mrs. Chester, in both of which she gained applause.

On Monday night the Hypocrite was played . . . The performance concluded with No Song no Supper.


25, 26, and 28 January 1836, Chester in No song no supper, in Clari, and in Black-eyed Susan

[Advertisement], The Australian (26 January 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36853246 

Theatre Royal, SYDNEY.
THE PUBLIC are most respectfully in formed that
THIS EVENING, TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 1836,
The performance will commence with the admired and favourite drama called
CLARI; OR, THE MAID OF MILAN.
Clari - MRS. CHESTER,
With the Original Song of
"HOME SWEET HOME."
Vespina - Mrs. Taylor
Who will Sing the admired song of
"Love was a Mischievous Boy."
(For Characters see small bills.)
In the course of the piece, MRS. CHESTER will
Sing the admired Song of
"Tell me my Heart,"
AND
"Say not Woman's Love is Bought"
THE CELEBRATED DUET OF
"When a Little Farm we Keep,"
BY MRS. TAYLOR & MR. SIMMONS,
A HIGHLAND FLING BY MR. FITZGERALD.
The whole to conclude with the Grand Eastern Spectacle of
TIMOUR THE TARTAR.
(For characters see small Bills.)

"SYDNEY THEATRICAL INTELLIGENCE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (28 January 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202462 

Bickerstaff's excellent comedy of the Hypocrite was played on Monday evening to a full house . . . No Song No Supper was repeated with marked success; Endless (Mr. Simmons) was super excellent; Frederick (Mr. Peat), and Thomas (Mr. Lane), with Louisa (Miss Winstanley) played their respective parts very characteristically; Robin (Mr Mackay) was at least "two sheets in the wind;" but pretty au fait notwithstanding. Mrs. Chester, in Margaretta, sung charmingly. Her full toned diapasons, however, were not over and above harmoniously seconded by the orchestra. Some excuse must be made for their not having the music of the piece. Deficiencies from non-rehearsal would be unpardonable. "Crop" and "Dorothy" (Mr. Knowles and Mrs. Downes) drew roars of laughter in the "open door" scene. Mr. Simes's conception of his part was as usual, good. On the whole, this piece passed off much better than on the Saturday night previously.

Clari, or the Maid of Milan, a pathetic two act opera by Payne, the talented author of Brutus, the Lancers, Ali Pacha, and others, was played on Tuesday night last, with Timour as an after-piece, to one of the fullest houses of the season. Mrs. Chester's "Home Sweet Home" did not sound to us so sweet and plaintive as her "Minstrel Boy" is rich and martial. Mr. Knowles played "Rolama" with some feeling, and Mr. Simmons "Jocoso" very jocularly. Timour was got through about as well as on former occasions. We have again to complain of the orchestra -- the same old pieces over and over again; a dead silence sometimes between acts, and invariably a long one between the pieces. When the public have generally so much fair cause of satisfaction with the stage arrangements as at present managed, it is a pity there should be any deficiency in so simple a concern as that. Black eyed Susan and John of Paris are announced for performance this evening.

We understand Mrs. Cameron is positively engaged to come from Hobart Town. With Mrs. C., Mrs. Taylor, Mrs. Chester, and Miss Winstanley, the female line of characters will be as ably filled as on any of the British provincial boards. Mr. Spencer, from Van Diemen's Land, has also joined Mr. Simmons's company. He has a very fair tragic turn - but we hope he does not purpose attempting Richard or Othello.

"SYDNEY THEATRICAL INTELLIGENCE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (30 January 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202489 

My anger, my anger will choke me,
If thus they combine to provoke me,
To worry and vex,
Distrust and perplex.
My orders refuse,
My person abuse ;
And all of it's done,
By this plague, "Mr. JOHN."
&c. &c.
John of Paris, Act 2d, sc. 1.

Thursday night's performances were "John of Paris" and "Black Eyed Susan." The former was the afterpiece. The latter passed off admirably. This pretty, simple, national, affecting little piece will bear repetition. "John of Paris," on the whole, was rather a tame performance. Mr. Knowles did not seem so much "At Home" in "John," as we have seen him in other parts. Mrs. Chester played "Vincent," with considerable spirit, and introduced several songs, among others "Sing away, sing away" - and "Away to the mountain's brow," with fine effect, in a clear, free, melodious voice, that rang through the house, "thrilling each heart, and delighting each ear" - but some of the best songs in the piece were omitted such for example as the opening chorus, the grand Chamberlain's (a verse of which we have given above), and "the Troubadour" that should have been sustained between "Rosa," "Vincent," and the "Princesa" . . . The musical accompaniments to Mrs. Chester's songs were better than they had been. They still permit the attention of the audience to flag too long between the acts.

Don Giovanni is announced for performance tonight. Mrs. Chester plays the "Don," Mrs. Taylor "Donna Anna," Miss Winstanley "Contadina;" other characters will be found in the advertisement. This comic, heroic, operatic, tragic, pantomimic-burletta-spectacular-extravaganza, is the production of the facetious Tom Dibdin, author of the Cabinet, Heart of Mid Lothian, Paul Jones, and several other admired melodramas. The Inchcape Bell will be the first piece. We still hear Mr. Spencer means to come out in "Richard!" It is a bold attempt.

We had written thus far when the following was put into our hands, to which we give most ready publicity.

[FROM A CORRESPONDENT.] Douglas Jerrold's drama of Black Eyed Susan, was revived at the theatre, on Thursday evening. This was the first drama ever produced in Austraia. It was greeted with the hearty welcome that an old favorite deserves . . . I am rather surprised at Mrs. Jones being placed in "Dolly," particularly having played "Susan," and more particularly when Mrs. Chester has played the character at the Theatre Royal Covent Garden. It is a character suitable to her powers, it would have strengthened the cast, and it would have introduced very appropriately the Celebrated ballad of Black Eyed Susan . . . The house was well attended, "John of Paris" concluded the performance. Mrs. Chester as the Page, sang three songs with much effect. Yours, &c. Q.

Bickerstaff's Opera of "Love in a Village," we are glad to hear, is about to be produced, Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor are to play Rosetta and Madge; Mr. Knowles and Mr. Simmons, "Justice Woodcock" and "Hodge." - A pretty fair cast.


30 January 1836, Chester as Don Giovanni in Giovanni in London

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (30 January 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202490 

MRS. CHESTER AS DON GIOVANNI, AT HALF PRICE.
Theatre Royal, SYDNEY.
THE PUBLIC are respectfully informed, that
THIS EVENING, SATURDAY, JAN. 30, 1836,
Will be performed the interesting Drama, CALLED
The Inchcape Bell; OR, THE Dumb Sailor Boy . . .
To conclude with (positively for the last time this Season), the celebrated Extravaganza of
DON GIOVANNI.
The part of Don Giovanni by MRS. CHESTER
In which she will sing all the admired Parodies.
Leporello - MR. SIMMONS.
(For other characters see small bills.) . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICAL INTELLIGENCE . . . FROM A CORRESPONDENT", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (2 February 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202578 

That those who cater for the public should provide as fully as possible for their entertainment, and afford them every variety and novelty, must of course be admitted, and no doubt that was the sole reason why Mrs. Chester played the Don in Moncrieff's Giovanni on Saturday evening last; the house was well filled, but it does not necessarily follow, that what has pleased shall always please, though the presumption is that it may; and it is now evident the piece was not received with the continual applause it had on former occasions. The success of the piece itself depends on the lady who personates the Don, and Mrs. C. acquitted herself very respectably, and sung the parodies with taste and execution, but rather indulged herself into too many cadences, yet was well supported by Simmons as Leporello . . .


1 and 2 February 1836, Chester in Black-eyed Susan, in The Irish Tutor, and in No song no supper

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (2 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202575 

Theatre Royal, SYDNEY.
THIS EVENING, TUESDAY, FEB. 2, 1836, WILL be Performed for the second time this Season, the admired favorite and nautical Drama, called
Black Eyed Susan; OR, ALL IN THE DOWNS . . .
The whole to conclude with the celebrated operatic Piece of
No Song, No Supper
Robin - Mr. Mackay
Frederick - Mr. Peat
Endless - Mr. Simmons
Crop - Mr. Knowles
William - Mr. Simes
Thomas - Mr. Lane
Sailors, &c.
Marguerette - Mrs. CHESTER,
In which she will sing
"With lowly suit and plaintive ditty."
"Away, away to the Mountain Brow."
AND
"Across the Downs this Morning."
Louisa - Miss Winstanley
Dorothy - Mrs. Downes
Nelly - Mrs. Jones.

"SYDNEY THEATRICAL INTELLIGENCE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 February 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202611 

Mr. Spencer, from the Hobart Town theatre, made his first bow before a Sydney audience on Monday evening last, as the "Duke of Gloster," in Richard the Third . . . The "Irish Tutor" closed the performance, and Mr. Simmons "tipped the blarney with a bit of the brogue in the true mothers style," as Teddy O'Rourke, and kept the audience in continual laughter; Buckingham as Tillwell was excellent; he was well seconded by Mrs. Chester, as Mary, who sang the beautiful ballad of "Savourneen Deelish," with exquisite pathos and effect, and was most rapturously applauded and encored. The house was crowded to the ceiling.

That sweet little melo-drama "Black-eyed Susan" was re-enacted on Tuesday night last, and with perfect success . . . "No Song no Supper" followed as the afterpiece. On this we have nothing new to say, except that Margaretta (Mrs. Chester) was in fine voice . . . The house was not crowded, but at half price filled just pleasantly . . .


4 February 1836, Chester in Charles the Second

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202599 

. . . THIS EVENING, THURSDAY, FEB. 4, 1836, The admired Tragedy called OTHELL, OR, The Moor of Venice . . .
The Evening's Entertainment will conclude with
Charles the Second; OR THE MERRY MONARCH.
King Charles - Mr. Knowles
Rochester - Mr. Peat
Captain Copp - Mr. Mackay
Edward, (the Page) - Mrs. Jones
Lady Clara - Mrs. Downes
Mary Copp - Mrs. CHESTER,
In which she will sing
"My own Blue Bell."
"Should he upbraid."
AND
"Alice Gray."


6 February 1836, Chester in A day after the wedding

[Advertisement], The Australian (5 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36854768 

CAPTAIN PIPER, Has signified his intention of patronizing the Theatre and honouring it with his presence,
on SATURDAY EVENING NEXT, February 6th, 1836, when will be performed the affecting, and highly interesting domestic drama, taken from Mrs. Opie's tale of the same name, CALLED
The Lear of private life, OR FATHER & DAUGHTER . . .
The Evening's entertaimnonts will conclude with (for the first time at this Theatre,) the Petite Comedy called,
A day after the wedding.
Colonel Freelove - Mr. Mackay
Lord Rivers (his friend) - Mr. Grove
Old Davis - Mr. Simes
Mrs. Davis - Mrs. Downes
Lady Elizabeth Freelove - MRS. CHESTER.
IN WHICH SHE WILL SING
"Should he Upbraid."
"The Alpine Maid."
AND
"Oh 'tis sweet when the moon is beaming."
(Accompanied by herself on the Piano Forte.) . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICAL INTELLIGENCE [FROM A CORRESPONDENT]", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202685 

On Saturday evening last, Capt. Piper and many of his friends visited the Theatre. The "haut ton" mustered pretty strong in the Dress Circle . . . A "Day after Wedding" closed the performance. There are so many ludicrous points about this little piece, that it can not but excite laughter, and it did so abundantly, but did it give general satisfaction? we will pass over it in silence - it was wrong cast. Mrs. Chester introduced three songs and was very happy in "Should he upbraid" . . .


8, 9, and 11 February 1836, Chester in Father and Son, in A day after the wedding, and in an olio

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202681 

. . . THIS EVENING TUESDAY, FEB. 9, 1836,
Will be Performed (second time), the beautiful and Romantic Drama, called
Father and Son; OR, THE Rock of Charbonniere . . .
Amy Cassonette - Mrs. Chester
In the course of the Piece Mrs. CHESTER will sing
"Oh 'tis sweet when the Moon is Beaming" . . .
AFTER WHICH, The laughable Interlude of the
Day after the Wedding . . .
Lady Elizabeth Freelove - Mrs. CHESTER
"Tell me my Heart."
"O they Marched through the Town."
The whole to conclude with (first time this Season) the admired and favourite Piece, called
THE INTRIGUE; OR, THE BATH ROAD . . .
In which will be sung by Mr. SIMMONS and Mrs. TAYLOR, the Duet of
"When a Little Farm we Keep."

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (10 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150694 

. . . TOMORROW Evening, February 11th, the Performance will commence with (by desire) Shakespeare's Tragedy in 5 Acts
Richard the Third . . .
At the conclusion of the Tragedy the curtain will rise for a THEATRICAL OLIO!!
In which will be introduced
he Huntsman's Chorus, From Der Freischutz, by the whole Male Vocal strength of the Company.
Duet - Dear Maid I love thee, BY MR. SIMMONS AND MRS. TAYLOR.
SONG - Bid me Discourse - MRS. CHESTER.
SONG - Draw the sword Scotland - Mr. GROVE.
SONG - Come Cheer up my Lad - Mrs. JONES.
SONG - When will you meet me Love - Mrs. TAYLOR.
MEDLY - Parodys, Mr. SIMMONS.
COMIC SONG - Tippetywitchet in Character - MR. LEE.
SONG - I've been Roaming - Mrs. CHESTER.
DUETT - Minute Gun at Sea, Messrs GROVES and KNOWLES.
RULE BRITANNIA, By the whole of the Company.
The Evening's Entertainment will conclude with the very Laughable Farce called
The Rendezvous; OR, THREE PAIR OF LOVERS . . .

"THEATRE", The Australian (12 February 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855515 

On Monday last was performed, the drama of "Father and Son," which was repeated on Tuesday last. This is a highly interesting and spirit-stirring piece, and reflects great credit on the performers generally, for the effective manner in which it was acted . . . The other entertainments on Tuesday were the very laughable interlude of the "Day after the Wedding," concluding with "The Intrigue, or the Bath Road," - both of which kept the audience in very good humour throughout the whole of the performances. Mackay was very good as Colonel Freelove, as was Mrs. Chester in Lady Freelove - but entre nous (as we now speak of a lady) who looked any thing but a young and spoiled girl - her song of "Tell me my Heart," was worth a pilgrimage farther than the "Theatre Royal." Mrs. Taylor's "Ellen" in the "Bath Road" was certainly beautiful, and Simmons as "Tom" was as usual, excellent, their duet of "When a little farm we Keep," was rapturously and deserved encored. - Correspondent.

"SYDNEY THEATRICAL INTELLIGENCE [FROM A CORRESPONDENT]" and [News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (11 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202711 

. . . On Tuesday night, "Father and Son" was repeated with a "Day after the Wedding", with some little little improvement; Mrs. Chester introfuced "O they march'd thro' the town" which was rapturously received; Mr. Mackay was very good as the Colonel . . .

The Concert, under the management of Mr. Wallace, fixed for to-morrow night, is likely to be attended by many of the elite of Sydney, and the interior. His Excellency Sir Richard Bourke has promised to attend. Mrs. Chester will be the principal vocalist . . .


12 February 1836, Chester at William Vincent Wallace's first Sydney concert

[Advertisement], The Australian (12 February 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855510 

UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF
HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR WHO HAS SIGNIFIED HIS INTENTION OF BEING PRESENT.
MR. W. WALLACE,
LEADER OF THE ANACREONTIC SOCIETY, AND PROFESSOR OF COMPOSITION, ROYAL ACADEMY,
BEGS TO ANNOUNCE, that his
CONCERT OF VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC,
WILL TAKE PLACE IN THE SALOON OF THE ROYAL HOTEL,
On THIS EVENING, the 12th of February, 1836.
PART I.
Overture - Guilluame Tell
Glee - Forrester
Variations, Brilliantes (Piano-Forte sur le trio Favori di Pre aux Clercs, with Orchestral Accompaniment - Mr. Wallace
Song - "Should he Upbraid," Bishop - Mrs. Chester
Potpouri - Flute, Nicholson - Mr. Josephson
Glee - "Merrily goes the Bark,"
Song - "Savourneen deelish," - Mrs. Chester
Concerto- Violin, Mayseder - Mr. Wallace
PART II.
Overture - Gustavus, Auber
Glee - "Who is Sylvia"
Solo - Clarionet, Gambaro - Mr. Lewis
Song - "Glory from the Battle Plain", Rossini - Mrs. Chester
Grand Duett - Piano Forte, Herz, on the favourite March in William Tell - - Mr. Wallace & Mr. Jospehson
Song - "Come where the Aspens quiver" - Mrs. Chester
Fantasia di Bravura - Violin - dedicated to Paganini, in which will be introduced "'Tis the last Rose of Summer," - Mr. Wallace
By the Kind Permission of Colonel Despard, MR. WALLACE will be allowed the assistance of
THE ADMIRED BAND OF THE 17TH REGIMENT.
Tickets 7s. 6d. each, to be had at Mr. Ellard's Music Warehouse, Hunter-street, and at the Royal Hotel.
N. B.- Concert to commence at Eight o'Clock.

ASSOCIATIONS: Joshua Frey Josephson (flute, piano); Thomas Lewis (clarinet, master of the band of the 17th regiment)
Francis Ellard (music seller, Wallace's maternal first cousin, son of Andrew Ellard of Dublin, and brother of Maria Logan of Hobart)

"MR. WALLACE'S CONCERT", The Sydney Monitor (13 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150722

FROM the lateness of the hour at which the Concert closed last night, we are prevented from giving a detailed account of the performances, but we feel called upon the allude to the splendid performance of Mr. Wallace . . . Notwithstanding the state of the weather, there were upwards of three hundred persons present; among whom we noticed His Excellency the Governor and Staff, Mr. and Mrs. McLeay, the Chief Justice, Sir John Jamison, Colonel Snodgrass, Mr. Potter Macqueen, Mr. Plunkett and Lady, Mr. R. Therry and Lady, Mr. Wentworth and Family, Mr. Manning, Colonel Breton, Mr. Blaxland and Family, the Officers of the 17th Regt., &c, &c.

ASSOCIATIONS: Alexander Macleay and wife; the Chief Justice of New South Wales Francis Forbes; prominent landowner and developer John Jamison; solicitor general of New South Wales, John Hubert Plunkett; barrister Roger Therry; barrister and politician William Charles Wentworth

"MR.WALLACE'S CONCERT", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (16 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202786 

. . . Mrs. Chester sang exquisitely, but we think excelled in "Come where the Aspens quiver" . . .

"CONCERT", The Australian (16 February 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36854544 

. . . Mrs. Chester then sang the beautiful air "Savourneen Deelish" - very sweetly. She has considerable execution and flexibility of voice; her shake is very good, and in the song of "di piacer," she gave us an opportunity of judging of her full powers as a vocalist . . .


15 and 16 February 1836, Chester in No song no supper, and in Paul Pry

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (16 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202785 

. . . THIS EVENING, TUESDAY, FEB. 16, 1836,
THE Performance will commence with the Petite Comedy in 3 Acts, called PAUL PRY.
Old Button - Mr. Grove
Sir Spangle Rainbow - Mr. Simes
Captain Haseldon - Mr. Peat
Pommade - Mr. Knowles
Tankard - Mr. Buckingham
Billy - Mr Lee
PAUL PRY - Mr. Simmons
In which he will introduce the admired Comic Song
"I never says nothing to nobody."
CRUMP - Mrs. CHESTER
In which she will sing
"The Dashing While Sergeant,"
AND
"Sing away, Sing Away."
Laura - Mrs. Downes.
After which, the Comic Duet,
"One Day while Working at my Plough"
By Mrs. Taylor and Mr. Simmons.
The whole to conclude with the celebrated Melo-Drama in two Acts, called the
Miller & his Men.
(With all the original Glees & Choruses.)
Grindoff (the Miller) - Mr. Grove
Count Friburg - Mr. Simes
Lothair - Mr. Knowles
Kelmar - Mr. Peat
Karl - Mr. Buckingham
Riber - Mr. Lee
Golotz - Mr. Lane
Zengra - Mr. Johnson
Ravena - Mrs. Downes
Claudine - Mrs. Jones
The Piece ends with the Conflagration of the Mill
and Destruction of the Haunt of the Banditti.

"SYDNEY THEATRICAL INTELLIGENCE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (18 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202823 

On Monday last, the comedy of the "Hypocrite" was played to a full house . . . "No Song No Supper" concluded the evening's performance.

On Tuesday evening "Paul Pry" was enacted. Mr. Simes as "Sir Spangle," and Mrs. Chester as "Crimp," were far from superior to Mr. Mackay's and Mrs. Taylor's personifications of those characters; but "Crimp" being Mrs. Chester's original character, she was excusable in having assumed it. The piece excited much about the usual quantum of laughter. Between the pieces, a duet was sung between Mrs. Taylor and Mr. Simmons; it might some thought as well have been omitted. The performance concluded with the "Miller and his Men," with all the original glees and choruses, in manager's phrase, by the male-vocal strength of the Company. Certainly "music's all the rage." Then pray reform your musical arrangements somewhat. "Hamlet" is announced for this evening; we are sorry to perceive it so ill cast, but forbear remarks till after the performance. Some pretty operas - "Love in a Village;" the "Maid of the Mill; and "sic like," we are glad to hear will shortly be brought out, and very probably to good houses.


20, 22, and 25 February 1836, Chester in an olio, in A day after the wedding, and in Love in a village

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (20 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202849 

. . . THIS EVENING, SATURDAY, FEB. 20, 1836,
The Performance will commence with, for the first time these two Seasons, Shakespeare's admired Comedy in 3 Acts, as altered by Garrick, entitled
Catherine & Petrucio; OR, Taming of the Shrew . . .
AFTER WHICH,
Owing to the very favourable manner in which a numerous and highly respectable audience were pleased to receive the first attempt at a
Theatrical Olio,
The Manager is induced to announce it for repetition THIS EVENING, in the following order:
The National Air - "Rule Britannia," By the whole strength of the Company.
Duet - "All's Well," BY MESSRS. KNOWLES AND GROVE.
Song - "I've been roaming" BY MRS. CHESTER.
Duet - "Stay a Moment if you please Miss," BY MRS. TAYLOR AND MR. SIMMONS.
Song - "The Soldier's Tear," MR. GROVE.
Duet - "Now Hope, now Fear," BY MRS. CHESTER AND MR. SIMMONS.
Song - BY MRS. TAYLOR.
Song - "I'm a brisk and sprightly Lad," BY MRS. JONES.
Comic Irish Song, BY MR. SIMMONS.
Huntsman's Chorus from Der Freischutz, By the whole male vocal strength of the Company.
The whole to conolude with, a Day after the Wedding.
Colonel Freelove - Mr. Mackay
John Rivers (his friend) - Mr. Grove
Old Davis - Mr. Simes
Mrs. Davis - Mrs. Downes
Lady Elizabeth Freelove - Mrs. Chester,
In which she will sing
"Oh they marched through the Town."

"SYDNEY THEATRICAL INTELLIGENCE [FROM A CORRESPONDENT]", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (23 February 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202892 

On Saturday evening was played the comedy of "Taming of the Shrew" . . . Mrs. Taylor for the first time enacted the Shrew, "Katherine." It was a performance of considerable merit . . . Prior to the commencement of the olio, Mr. Grove stepped forward by order of the Manager to apologize for Mrs Taylor not singing in the Olio, in consequence of the fatigue and exertion of the character of "Katherine." The apology was received with regret for the absence of a decided favourite, but it was matter of surprise to have seen her name announced at all in an Olio, alter the performance of so ardous a character as "Katherine." The Olio commenced with "Rule Britannia," and Mrs. Chester delighted her hearers with her powerful singing of the principal parts - the lower notes were extraordinarily rich, and her exertion, fully compensated for the miserable failure the Male vocal strength of the company made in the Huntsman's Chorus. One might almost fancy he saw Weber's Shade! Mrs. C. also sang "I've been roaming" very pleasingly, as well as the comic duet of "When a little farm we keep" with Mr. Simmons, which received the same full quantum of applause that is always bestowed upon it. Simmoris's Irish song convulsed the house with laughter - the other songs were sung in the respective singers best style. A "Day after the Wedding" concluded the performance. Grove, Mackay, and Mrs. Chester have much improved in their respective characters and kept the house in excellent good humour.

That sweet little Opera "Love in a village" was played to a full house last night. We have not space or time (12 o'clock) to say more, but will probably make amends in our next. We perceive by advertisement that Mr. Wallace's next concert takes place on Friday next. It is highly pleasing and creditable to the "profession" to find so much unanimity and good feeling, as is now evinced among ita many clever members who purpose coming forward to aid Mr. W., who we are pleased to see has also secured the united talents of Mrs. Taylor and Mrs. Chester for Friday next.

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (25 February 1836), 2-3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202925 

. . . To "Catherine and Petrucbio" succeeded that hodge-podge concern, y'clept - a "Theatrical Olio," of which we can only say that "Olio," or Omelet, or "Olia Podrida," or whatever they may choose to call it, it was most truly malapropos. We'd as soon sit down and rise delighted - stored with the fumes of a Scotch haggis! An Olio of ten songs, after "Catherine and Petruchio," with a farce to come, the mercury in the thermometer mounting above 80o, and pit and gallery in the clouds - are too many good things all at once - "pray you avoid them." "All's Well," by Mr. Knowles and Mr. Grove; "Now hope, now fear," by Mrs. Chester; and the "Huntsman's Chorus," from Der Freischutz, by the whole company, were much applauded, although we do not think they all deserved to be so. "A day alter the Wedding" terminated the evening's long diversements. That little bagatelle was done ample justice to, especially by Mrs. Chester, and Mr. Mackay who has returned to the boards. Let him but get his part well by heart (he bas a good conception, and pleasing style of action) and he will shine.

Love in a Village" was played on Monday night last to a we'll filled house . . . [3] . . . The characters are such as may be found everywhere . . . a giddy young Miss (Lucinda, sweetly sung to, by Mrs. Chester); her companion, (Rosetta, personated by Mrs. Jones) . . . The "Irish Tutor" concluded tho entertainment, in which Mr. Simmons "tipped" St. Patrick was a Gentleman in a rich Munster brogue, that produced repeated bursts of laughter from the whole audience. Mrs. Chester improves in her acting; as a singer she must be ever popular, especially when she sings with feeling.

"THEATRE", The Sydney Monitor (24 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150809 

The entertaining opera of Love in a Village was played on Monday night to a numerous audience; the characters were sustained with spirit, and it will doubtless be a standing favourite; Knowles as Woodcock was extremely happy; his personation of the amorous gouty old justice received deserved applause; Simmons' Meadows was a fair performance, and his singing greatly enhanced his acting; he sang She lives by the mill, with taste and feeling; Groves made a gentlemanly Hawthorn; Mackay's Hodge was, as his representations of countrymen generally are, very good; Lane made a respectable Sir Wm. Meadows, he appears to be improving in his acting; there was a stiffness about Mr. Spencer's Eustace that spoiled it. Mrs. Chester played Rosetta naturally and with much humour, several of her songs were much admired - it is the best sustained character Mrs. Chester has appeared in - the duet of Now hope, now fear, sung by Mrs. Chester and Mr. Simmons was very pleasing. Mrs. Jones' Lucinda was spoilt by all the singing being omitted, - Mrs. Downes played Deborah Woodcock with spirit, but she cannot properly support the character of an old woman, - Mrs. Taylor's Madge was not equal to her usual acting - indeed, both her and Mrs. Jones were out of their respective lines; - Mrs. Jones would have entered more into the spirit of Madge than Mrs. Taylor did, while Mrs. Taylor would certainly have made a more lady like Lucinda than Mrs. Jones, - it is to be repeated to-morrow evening.

"THEATRE", The Australian (26 February 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855588 

On Tuesday evening last, the Tragedy of Hamlet was again performed to a house respectably filled . . . The farce of the "Irish Tutor" followed, which was well received, as it well deserved. Simmons's Dr. O'Toole and Terry O'Rourke was an excellent specimen of genuine humour, and his "St. Patrick was a Gentle man" would make sickness and pain forgot sorrow for a time. Mackay played (Charles) remarkably well, as he always does when he takes pains; and Mrs. Chester as Mary sang the beautiful melody of "Savourneen Deelish" in her own superior style. We must not pass over Mrs. Jones's Rosa, which was a very clever performance . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (25 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202919 

. . . By the desire of several respectable Families.
THE Manager feels great pleasure in having it in his power to state, that owing to the very favourable reception the beautiful Opera of "LOVE IN A VILLAGE" met with on Monday Evening, from a Crowded and Fashionable Audience,
and by the desire of many respectable Families and Patrons of the Theatre, who were unable to attend on that Evening, in consequence of the inclement state of the weather, the Manager is happy in announcing it for repetition,
THIS EVENING, THURSDAY, FEB. 25, 1836,
WHEN WILL BE PERFORMED FOR THE SECOND TIME, BICKERSTAFF'S CELEBRATED OPERA IN 3 ACTS CALLED
Love in a Village.
Sir William Meadows - Mr. Lane
Justice Woodcock - Mr Knowles
Hawthorn - Mr. Grove
Young Meadows - Mr. Spencer
Eustace - Mr. Simmons
Hodge - Mr. Mackay
Lucinda - Mrs. Jones
Rosetta - Mrs. Chester,
Who will introduce among other Songs,
"Tell me my Heart,"
And with Mr. Simmons will sing the Duet of
"Now Hope, now Fear,"
Mrs. Deborah Woodcock - Mrs. Downes
Mudge - Mrs. Taylor.
The whole to conclude with the admired Drama of
The Cedar Chest; OR, THE LORD MAYOR'S DAUGHTER . . .


26 February 1836, Chester at Wallace's second concert

[Advertisement], The Australian (26 February 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855595 

MR. W. WALLACE. . . BEGS TO ANNOUNCE, that his SECOND CONCERT OF VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, WILL TAKE PLACE IN THE SALOON OF THE ROYAL HOTEL THIS EVENING, FEBRUARY 26, 1836,
On this occasion, MR. WALLACE will be assisted by MRS. CHESTER, MRS. TAYLOR, MR. JOSEPHSON, MR. WILSON, and MR. SIPPE.
PROGRAMME OF THE CONCERT
PART 1st.
1 - Overture; Gazza Ladra - Rossini
2 - Song, Kate Kearney, Irish melody - Mrs. Taylor
3 - Concerto, Piano-forte - Mr. Wallace
4 - Song, (by desire), Glory from the Battle Plain, Rossini - Mrs. Chester
5 - Grand Fantasia (flute) Drouet - Mr. Josephson
6 - Duet, My Pretty Page, Bishop - Mrs. Chester, and Mrs. Taylor
7 - Paganini's Grand Concerto, on one string, for the violin - Mr. Wallace
PART 2nd.
8 - Overture - Semiramide - Rossini
9- Song, Cathleen O'More, (Irish melody) - Mrs. Chester
10 - Extemporaneous Performance on the Piano forte, on any subject or subjects which may be presented, (written) - Mr. Wallace
11 - Song, Cans't Thou Ask Me to Forget - A. Lee - Mrs. Taylor
13 - Song, She Sat Within the Abbey Halls - Barnett - Mrs. Chester
13 - Fantasia di Bravura - Violin - dedicated to Paganini, in which will be introduced (by particular desire) The last Rose of Summer - Mr. Wallace
By the kind permission of COLONEL FRENCH, MR. WALLACE
will be allowed the valuable assistance of the Band of the 28th Regiment . . . CONCERT TO COMMENCE AT EIGHT O'CLOCK

ASSOCIATIONS: From the orchestra of the Theatre Royal, George Sippe, cellist and pianist, and Mr. Wilson, violinist; the 17th Regiment being about tp sail for India, Wallace instead had the services of the newly-arrived Band of the 28th Regiment (master, Vincenzo Chiodetti

"MR WALLACE'S CONCERT", The Sydney Monitor (27 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150833 

. . . Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor were in good voice and sang well, and received much applause . . . The room was crowded to excess with respectable persons, and the only drawback was the deficiency of seats, many gentlemen being obliged to stand the whole evening.

"LAST FRIDAY EVENING'S CONCERT (From a Correspondent)", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (1 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203019

. . . Mrs. Chester sang "Di Piacer". It abounds with brilliant passages, and was most beautifully executed[;] then followed Mr. Josephson on the flute . . . after which Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor, sang the celebrated duet of "My Pretty Page" from Bishop's opera of "Henri Quatre", with fine effect. Their voices blended together so harmoniously that it was pronounced the best musical treat ever yet heard in the colony. It made a decided impression, and both ladies evinced great musical knowledge; it was rapturously applauded, and was honored with an unanimous encore . . .

The second part commenced with the overture to "Zampa". Mrs. Chester sang an Irish ballad "Kathleen O'More" rather pleasingly . . . New Song by "Lee" "Cans't thou ask me to forget" was sung by Mrs. Taylor . . . Mrs. Chester also sung a new song by "Barrett" [Barnett], "She sat within the Abbey Walls". This song caused a great sensation at home, and was sang in that lady's best style. Both ladies were rapturously applauded in their respective songs . . .

. . . Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor, as singers, are more at home in the Concert Room, than in the Theatre, and heard to greater advantage - The generality of persons who attend Concerts, do not always patronise the theatre . . . We hope Mr. W. in return for the public patronage will exert himself to raise musical talent in the colony, especially, understanding that Mrs. Wallace, Miss Wallace, as also his brother and father are all in the colony; they are excellent musicians, and in conjunction with Mrs. Taylor, and Mrs. Chester, could give concerts. Among the visitors on Friday evening last, were the honorable the Chief Justice and Lady, and several families of great respectability.

"Mr. Wallace's Concert", The Australian (1 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36854032 

. . . The Duet of "My Pretty Page" followed by Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor; it was admirably sung, but there wat too much sameness in the two voices to please in the same degree, as is afforded by those of different sexes . . .

. . . Mrs. Chester sang "Kathleen O'Moore" not much to our taste; her style is not the ballad singing, for which Mrs. Taylor is in voice and manner admirably adapted; indeed, though it is impossible not to admire the depth, power, and mellowness of Mrs. Chester's notes, these qualifications do not shew to their full extent in such songs as Mrs. Taylor excels in; a lover of music would walk ten miles to hear the latter in "She sat within the Abbey Walls" and the same distance back, to hear Mrs. Chester in "liquid Italian" . . .

"THE CONCERT", The Colonist (3 March 1836), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31717730 

. . . en passant. We cannot refrain from contrasting the extremely modest and unaffected deportment of Mrs. Chester when before the public, with the affectation displayed by Mrs. Taylor; it may perhaps be necessary in a theatre to produce what is called stage effect, but we conceive it to be bad taste, to say the least of it, at a concert.


[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (27 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202964 

Our fair vocalists, Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor, people of musical taste will no doubt be glad to hear, propose holding a Concert, in concert, shortly, when we hope their united talent will be rewarded by a liberal attendance of the wealth, beauty, and fashion of this metropolis.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (1 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202997 

JOINT CONCERT, Mrs. Chester & Mrs. Taylor BEG to announce to their Friends and the Public generally, their intention of giving a JOINT CONCERT in a few days, on which occasion they will sing a variety of new Songs and Duetts, and will be assisted by the principal Instrumental Talent in the Colony. Programme of Concert in future advertisement.


29 February 1836, Chester in Abon Hassan

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (27 February 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202957 

ON Monday Evening, February 29, 1836, the Performance will commence with the 5th Act of Richard the Third . . .
After which, the curtain will rise for 5th Act of The Gamester . . .
The first part of the Evening's Entertainment to conclude with the 5th Act of Macbeth . . .
The whole to conclude with, for the first time this Season,
ABON HASSAN.
Abon Hassan - Mr. Mackay
Zabouc - Mr. Simmons
Zulima - Mrs. Chester,
In which she will sing
"Bid me Discourse,"
AND
"Each Bower has Beauty for Me,"
Nouzamoul - Mrs. Downes.
Mustapha - Mr. Lee
Omar - Mr. Buckingham
Solyman - Mr. Lane
Sadi - Mr. ---
Caliph - Mr. Grove.

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (3 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203056 

Nothing extenuate, or ought set down in malice." - The performances on Tuesday evening, were "Catherine and Petruchio" and "Don Giovanni" or the libertine reclaimed . . . Mr. Simmons as usual, played well, though in the ranting cue. Petruchio however is a ranter. His performance of of "Zabouc" in "Abon Hassan" the night previously, was a masterpiece of drollerry, although it might better have been much less bewept. Mrs. Chester as "Zulima" sung "Bid me Discourse," and another song, in good voice . . .


3 and 5 March 1836, Chester in Love in a village, and in No song, no supper

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (2 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150852 

. . . ON THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 3 . . . MASSARONI, THE BRIGAND CHIEF . . .
The whole to conclude with, for the first time at HALF PRICE,
The favourite OPERA of
LOVE IN A VILLAGE . . .
Rosetta - Mrs. Chester,
Who will introduce among other Songs, Tell Me My Heart,
and with Mr. Simmons will Sing the Duet, of Now Hope, Now Fear . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (5 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203082 

"Massaroni" the Brigand Chief, and "Love in a Village" were performed on Thur«sday evening to a tolerably well filled house . . . "Love in a Village" has been before noticed, but we cannot resist the opportunity of doing justice to Mr. Simes's Hodge. Low Comedy is decidedly this actor's forte, and out of it he rarely appears to advantage. Knowles' Justice Woodcock was admirable and kept the audience in roars of laughter. Groves played "Hawthorn," with the omission of the songs, tolerably well. Spencer's Eustace was a very eccentric piece of acting. Mrs. Chester's singing was, of course, divine, in every branch but ballad singing. Mrs. Taylor played Madge in her usual agreeable way . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (10 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203164 

The entertainments on Saturday evening were "The Tower of Nesle," and "No Song no Supper" . . . The afterpiece is a lively, rattling, hustling farce, to which due credit was done. Mr. Spencer, as "Robin," was not all a tar. Mr. Knowles represented "Crop," a discontented querulous husband, to the life. "Endless," by Mr. Simmons, caused ed laughter nearly endless. Mrs. Chester made a hit in "Margaretta," and warbled several delightful ditties . . .

. . . Mr. Simmons, at the close of the present theatrical season, it is said, will proceed to Calcutta, to take the lesseeship of the Dum Dum Theatre. We hope not. We should be loath to lose so talented a performer as Mr. S . . .


8 and 10 March 1836, Chester in Love in a village, in Abon Hassan, and in Black-eyed Susan

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (8 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203121 

. . . TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 1836, WILL be performed, by particular desire, Kotzebue's admired Play, in 5 Acts, called The Stranger . . .
The whole to conclude with the much admired afterpiece in 2 Acts, called
ABON HASSAN.
Abon Hassan - Mr. Knowles
Labouc - Mr. Simmons
Zulima - Mrs. Chester,
In which she will sing
"Bid me Discourse," AND "Sing away, Sing away."

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (10 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203163 

. . . IN consequence of Messrs. SIMMONS and KNIGHT having given a PRIZE WHERRY in this day's REGATTA,
to be pulled for by the WATERMEN plying at the King's Wharf, at the end of the first Piece,
the winner will be presented with the Boat on the Stage,
THIS EVENING, THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 1836, Will be performed the admired Nautical Drama, called
Black-eyed Susan; OR, ALL IN THE DOWNS.
Dograss - Mr. Buckingham
Jacob Twigg - Mr. Simes
Captain Crosstree - Mr. Knowles
Admiral - Mr. Peat
Hatchet - Mr. Spencer
Raker - Mr. Grove
Ghatbrain - Mr. Peat
Lieutenant Pike - Mr. Johnson
Blue Peter - Mr. Buck
WlLLIAM - Mr. SIMMONS
Ploughshare - Mr. H. Snell
Officer - Mr. Lane
SUSAN - Mrs. JONES
DOLLY MAYFLOWER (for this Night only) - MRS. CHESTER
In which she will sing the Ballad of
"All in the Downs."
At the fall of the Curtain. the whole of the Company will sing
"Rule Britannia."
The whole to conclude with, tho laughable operatic Entertainment, called
Married and Buried, OR THE ADVENTURES OF Benjamin BowbelL . . .

"THE THEATRE", Commercial Journal and Advertiser (10 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226458915 

Observing the Stranger announced for performance at the Theatre on Tuesday night, we attended in expectation of enjoying a rich treat in witnessing Mrs. Taylor's performance of Mrs. Haller. Conceive our mortification, then, on reaching the Theatre a little before the rise of the curtain to hear it announced that, in consequence of Mrs. Taylor's indisposition the intention of producing the Stranger had been abandoned, and Love in a Village introduced in its stead . . . Rosetta was sustained by Mrs. Chester, as far as the singing went, very well, but her acting was not much to be applauded. We are not aware whose duty it was to allot the characters for this piece, but there ought most decidedly to be a change in the arrangement. Mrs. Taylor ought to have the character of Rosetta, Mrs. Chester that of Lucinda, and Mrs. Jones Madge. Mrs. Taylor in the character of Madge was, as might be expected after such conduct as hers, very coolly received. An English audience would, under similar circumstances, have hissed her off the stage . . .

"THEATRE", The Sydney Monitor (12 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150932 

The play of The Stranger was announced for representation on Tuesday evening, but Mrs. Taylor being indisposed to play the character of Mrs. Haller, it was withdrawn and the opera of Love in a village substituted . . . On Wednesday evening the nautical drama of Black-eyed Susan was played . . . Mrs. Chester played Dolly Mayflower for the purpose of introducing the song of All in the Downs. It does not reflect much credit on the gentlemen of the orchestra, that they could not accompany Mrs. C. in a song like this. After the piece, a boat that had been given by the lessees to the licensed watermen as a prize was given to the winners, Mrs. Jones, on the stage, Mrs. Chester and the whole of the Company singing Rule Britannia. The house was uncomfortably full . . .


12 March 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester in John of Paris

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (12 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150930 

. . . this EVENING, SATURDAY, March 12th . . . CASTLE SPECTRE . . .
The entertainnients to conclude with the favourite operatic farce, called
JOHN OF PARIS.
Pedrigo Potts - Mr. Simmons
Grand Chamberlain - Mr. Simes
John of Paris - Mr. Knowles
Theodore - Mr. Mackay
Gregorie - Mr. Peat
The Page Vincent - Mrs. Chester
IN WHICH SHE WILL SING
"MY OWN BLUE BELL."
"LISTEN DEAR FANNY" . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (15 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203243 

The dramatic romance entitled "The Castle Spectre," and the operatic farce of "John of Paris," were produced on Saturday evening, agreeably to announcement . . . In "John of Paris," which concluded the evening's entainment, Mrs. Chester, as the Page, introduced "The Soldier's Tear," "My own Blue Bell" (in which she was encored), and "Listen, dear Fanny" - all of which were executed with brilliancy and taste.


"DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE", The Sydney Herald (10 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28654714 

Wednesday next, is fixed for the Concert for the joint benefit of Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor, which is under the patronage of Colonel Wilson. Major England has kindly consented to allow the services of the band of the 4th Regiment, which will preside in the orchestra. The whole vocal and instrumental strength of the colony is engaged, and the bill of fare is new and interesting. Mesdames Chester and Taylor have engaged the celebrated violinist, Mr. Wallace, at the sum of twenty-five guineas for the night. Another such sum to a performer would render the concert a losing concern.

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (15 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203246 

We beg to remind the musical world, that Mrs. Chester's and Mrs Taylor's joint concert is fixed for tomorrow night, to take place at the Royal Hotel. From the talent, both vocal and instrumental, engaged upon this occasion, it may be safely anticipated that it will be the most brilliant affair of the whole Season. No expense, we understand, has been spared in retaining the services of all the leading performers in the Colony - Messrs. Josephson, Sippe, Wilson, and Wallace. The latter gentleman, we hear, rates his services so high as £25 for the night, and has declined playing under that ratio. His musical talents doubtless are first rate. Mr. Wallace, however, in this instance, has as certainly put a first rate price upon them. We hope the fair vocalists' expenses will be adequately met as they deserve to be, by a respectable and a flowing [sic] house.

We are given to understand that Mr. Johnson, son of Mr. Johnson, Watch and Clock Maker, George-street, has undertaken to preside at the Pianoforte, on the evening of the joint Concert of Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor.


15 March 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester in Clari

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (15 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203238 

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 1836, WILL be Performed the pathetic and interesting Musical Drama, called
CLARI, OR The Maid of Milan.
Duke Vivaldi - Mr. Mackay
Jocoso - Mr. Simmons
Nimpedo - Mr. Simes
Rolamo - Mr. Knowles
Gerionio - Mr. Lee
Nicolo - Mr. Grove
CLARI - Mrs. CHESTER
With the original Song of "Home Sweet Home."
Vespina - Mrs. Taylor
Fidelma - Mrs. Downes
Ninette - Mrs. Jones
In the Episode.
Nobleman - Mr. Grove
Peligrino - Mr. Lane
Wife to Peligrino - Mrs. Downes
Leoda - Mrs. Jones
In the course of the Piece Mrs. Chester will sing
"Oh say not Woman's Love is Bought."
The whole to conclude for the first time this Season, with the admired and and favorite Drama of
The Somnambulist . . .

"SYDNEY DRAMATIC INTELLIGENCE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (17 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203280 

On Tuesday evening, the operatic drama of "Clari," was played to a tolerable house. The principal characters were well sustained. Mackay in the gay but yet penitent seducer was inordinately excellent; Knowles, as "Rolamo" would have been much more characteristic, had he put on a milder tone of feeling. "Rolamo's" character is not excess of energy; Simmons made the whole house laugh at his "Jocosi," omitting, however, the duet of "When a little farm we keep," which was to be regretted; Mrs. Chester played "Clari," very effectively, her portraiture of the "Broken-hearted daughter" was affecting and in good taste; "O say not woman's love is bought," was sung, by Mrs. C, melodiously and with appropriate feeling; Mrs. Taylor as the mischievous buisy making "Vespina" kept the audience in good humour, "O love was a mischeivous boy," was applauded. The interesting drama of the "Somnambulist," closed the night's performances . . .

"THEATRE", The Australian (18 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36858060 

On Tuesday evening we had the pleasure of witnessing the performance of Clari, which was gone through in a manner that reflects great credit upon most of the persons engaged in it . . . Mrs. Chester as Clari, played with much feeling, and sung most sweetly, her parting scene with the Duke was capital, and elicited deserved applause . . .


16 March 1836, concert, Marian Maria Chester and Maria Taylor (joint benefit), saloon of the Royal Hotel, George Street, Sydney

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (16 March 1836), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150952 

JOINT CONCERT.
UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF Colonel Wilson, C.P.M.
Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor,
BEG to announce to their Friends and the Public generally, that their CONCERT, Of Vocal and Instrumental Music, will be given at THE ROYAL HOTEL,
On WEDNESDAY Evening, March 16th, 1836,
On which occasion the following eminent talent will render their valuable assistance.
Principal Instrumental Performers,
MR. JOSEPHSON, MR. WILSON, MR. SIPPE, AND
MR. W. WALLACE,
PART I.
1. Overture - Fra Diavolo - AUBER.
2. Song - I know who! - SEVERNE - Mrs. Taylor.
3. Grand Rondo Characterisque [sic] pour le Piano-forte - HERTZ - Mr. Wallace.
4. Song - Tyrant, soon I'll burst thy chains - ROSSINI - Mrs. Chester.
5. Concerto - Flute - NICHOLSON - Mr. Josephson.
6. Duett - Hark o'er the sea - CARL VON WEBER - Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor.
7. Concerto Violin - SPOHR - Mr. Wallace.
PART II.
1. Overture, Italiana an Algeri - ROSSINI
2. Song - Farewell to the Mountain - BARNETT - Mrs. Chester.
3. Concerto, (Piano Forte) - Mr. Wallace.
4. Duet - As it fell upon a day - BISHOP - Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor.
5. Song - Sunshine o'er the brook, my love - A. LEE. - Mrs. Taylor.
6. Fantasia di Bravura (dedicated to Paganini) - Mr. Wallace.
7. Duet - My Pretty Page - BISHOP - Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor.
By the kind permission of Major England, the Band of the 4th Regiment (or King's Own) will attend.
Tickets 7s. 6d.; Children 5s., to he obtained of Mr. Ellard, Hunter-street, Mr. Dunsdon, George-street, and of Mrs. Chester, opposite the Royal Hotel.

"CONCERT", The Australian (18 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36858061 

The unfavorable state of the weather we regret to learn prevented the attendance of numerous families of high respectability who, in addition to those who honored the Concert Room with their presence, had promised their support. However, the performances so far from disappointing the visitors, far exceeded their expectations. The 4th Regiment, or King's Own band upon this occasion had raised them considerably in the estimation of the Australian public. The celebrated bravura, Una Voce, by Rossini, was given with good effect by Mrs. Chester. In the execution of the difficult and flowing passages she was peculiarly happy; in fact, it is in such pieces, (particularly in this composer's style), that she most excells, her voice being a contralto of great compass, depth, and pathos. Burnett's sweet ballad of Farewell to the Mountain, as originally sung by Mr. H. Phillips, was also given with great effect by this lady. I know who, by Mrs. Taylor, was sung with that naivette and sweetness, so truly characteristic of herself. We never saw Mrs. T. appear to more advantage; she was in excellent voice and entered fully into the spirit of the melody which she so sweetly warbled. The duetts by Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor were, as might be expected from ladies possessing musical attainments of so high a caste, deservedly applauded and were adequately appreciated by the audience. We never heard two voices accord more melodiously than did those of our fair vocalists upon this occasion. A. Johnson, who volunteered his gratuitous services, is entitled to the highest praise, his execution was admirable. Of Mr. Wallace it would be superfluous to speak in terms of commendation, he did, as he has hitherto done, his very best, nevertheless, we cannot help thinking that the ladies have paid rather too dear for his whistle.

The Concert concluded at a seasonable hour, and every true lover of harmony retired highly gratified at the Evening's amusements; only regretting the absence of their friends from a participation in so rich a treat.

In the song of Sunshine o'er the brooks, my love, Mrs. Taylor was rapturously and most deservedly encored. In fact we can not speak too highly of this lady's exertions, (ill as she evidently was), we cannot speak in terms adequate to our feelings. The duet of My pretty page was unanimously and with great credit to the taste of the auditors, encored. - Correspondent.

[We shall perhaps be allowed to observe, now that the Concert is over and that our remarks can do no harm, that a worse selection of music could not very easily have been made: - I know who - As it fell upon a day - My pretty page - it was dreadful. - ED.]

ASSOCIATIONS: John Richard Hardy (editor of The Australian); the "A. Johnson" who performed the piano accompaniments, otherwise unmentioned in the pre-concert advertisements, was probably James Johnson, rather than his brother William, both also recent arrivals

"THE CONCERT", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (19 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203328 

Owing to the unfavourable state, not of the weather, but of certain leading streets of which we have so repeatedly complained, the Concert of Wednesday evening last was not so numerously attended as might otherwise have been expected. Between 4 and 6 P. M., rain - delightful rain - poured down in torrents, and the most terrific thunder claps reverberated through the atmosphere, highly charged as it was with electric matter. This was enough to deter many, and did, from venturing from over the threshold of their homes. However, it has not been said that our fair Concertantes sustained any pecuniary loss by their joint exertions, if they have not gained much in pocket by them. How be it, we cannot for our own part say it would be advisable soon to repeat the treat, for whilst play goers can hear tolerable Olios, Melanges, and musical interludes performed at the Theatre, above all may have an opportunity of hearing Mrs. C. and Mrs. T. sing cheaply; it is not the extra expense, of Concert going will be any particular recommendation to that description of pastime. Five and twenty pounds for a night's fiddling (the sum demanded by Mr. Wallace, of his sister Syrens, and received), when people grudge a pound towards securing a House of Assembly, is beyond a joke.

Mr. Wallace (absurdly designated the "Australian Paganini"), clever as he may be, and unquestionably is as a musician, would do well to calculate and ponder upon the story of the "Goose and the golden eggs," before he again incurs the censure of a liberal minded public, by so enormously over-rating his services as he did on Wednesday night last. Mr. W. would do well to learn to conform to circumstances, and meet exigencies consistently. Five and twenty pounds for one night's FIDDLING!!! Che jam satis est!

"CONCERT", The Sydney Monitor (19 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150969 

On Wednesday evening, Mrs. Chester's and Mrs. Taylor's concert took place. Notwithstanding the stormy afternoon about 200 persons assembled. Mrs. Chester did not sing with that taste which usually characterises her; Mrs. Taylor, on the contrary, never appeared to more advantage, her song of Sunshine o'er the Brook was well sung and rapturously encored. Mr. Wallace did not appear to exert himself so much as he did for his own benefit; still his violin playing was of a very superior description. A Mr. Johnson made his first appearance in public as a pianoforte player; from the manner in which he accompanied the different songs, he appeared to be an expert performer. The band of the 4th regiment appear to have had a deal of practice during their absence from Sydney; the manner in which they performed the overtures was highly creditable.

"CONCERT", The Sydney Herald (21 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28654730 

The "Joint Concert" for the benefit of Mesdames Chester and Taylor, took place at the Saloon of the Royal Hotel, on Wednesday last, under the patronage of Colonel Wilson. The weather was extremely unfavourable, and in consequence the room was but half filled - which augurs badly for the taste of the Australian public, who contrasted with the crowded state of the Theatre several nights in the week. The vocal selections were anything but good, seeing that most of the songs have been repeatedly sung by the same parties, either at Concerts or at the Theatre; and, however well a song may be sung, a constant repetition palls the senses, and is an uninteresting and partial renewal of pleasure, which might have been easily avoided. As a guide for the future, and to support of the foregoing remark, the expression of very many of the audience (who were nevertheless well pleased), "We could have heard the songs as well sung by the same parties, at the Theatre, for two shillings," is illustrative. The execution was good - nay, even faultless, and highly creditable to the Colony. Our reporter was unfortunately prevented from attending until after Mr. Josephson's flute solo, by business that could not be neglected, and entered at the duet of Hark o'er the sea, by Mesdames Chester and Taylor, was sung moderately well, but wanted that feeling which characterised the after songs. A concerto for the violin, by Sphor [Spohr], was played by Mr. Wallace with an astonishing facility of execution, and feeling, that justly obtained a corresponding applause.

The second part of the entertainment opened with an overture (Italiana in Algieri) by Rossini, played by the band of the 4th regiment - well performed, but too harsh for so small a room; instead of being in front, the band ought to have been placed at the furthest extremity of the platform, to have produced a good and pleasing effect. Mrs. Chester's Farewell to the mountain was brilliantly executed, and received the applause that Mrs. C's application to her profession and acquired proficiency demanded. Mr. Wallace's Concerto on the piano was a composition that would require a foreign and a peculiar ear to admire, the subject being for the most part lost in a variety of fuges [sic], the real beauties of which could only be relished by an accomplished taste; a simple air with extemporaneous variations would have a much greater impression on our audiences of New South Wales. Mr. W.'s execution is vivid, tasteful, and nervous, which gives a particularly agreeable effect to his playing. The old but beautiful duet "As it fell upon a Day" was delightfully given by Mesdames Chester and Taylor; the harmony was perfect, and the satisfaction appeared general. "Sunshine o'er the brook, my love," Mrs. Taylor, was a talented and beautiful performance; Mrs. T.'s voice was in its best keeping, being full and clear, her emphasis well placed, and her modulations perfect in the first performance; she was unfortunately encored, which was rather unreasonable after the former duet, and had to strain her voice in the second singing, which appeared painful to her. It is a pity that Mrs. Taylor will not dedicate a short space of her leisure time to improve her execution; Nature has done much for her in bestowing a voice that comprehends compass, power, and melody; a little more attention would render her a first rate singer in Australia, and a little more attention to her demeanor on the boards, would make her a universal favorite. As a finale, Mr. Wallace reserved his astonishing performance of a Fantasia di Bravura, dedicated to Paganini, followed by the duet of "My Pretty Page," by Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor. In the former, the brilliancy of the tone, the transition from the lowest bass to the finely drawn natural tone in alt, the perfection in the precisely stopped harmonic, the wonderful mechanical execution, and the feeling displayed by the performer, were a delightful treat. The latter was well sung and encored.

[News], The Colonist (24 March 1836), 6-7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31717811 

The concert given by Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor took place on Wednesday evening, the attendance was neither so numerous nor so respectable as on the two previous occasions, a result which might have been easily foretold, if they had considered, that it was the third performance of a similar kind following each other in rapid succession and at so high a price for admission. The band of the 4th Regiment played the second overture Italiana in Algeri, beautifully, Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor sang pleasingly but were not much assisted by the gentleman who presided at the piano-forte who played most incorrectly. Of Mr. Wallace we can say nothing in his praise, after hearing his performance on two previous occasions, there appeared to be a degree of nonchalance about him during the whole of the evening, and more than that he was in deshabille, thereby offering a mark of disrespect to that public which has so liberally patronised and appreciated his talents. Mr. Josephson's performance on the Flute delighted the audience. That gentleman charged five guineas to his attendance on the occasion, but on finding that it was a losing concert to Mrs. Chester, very hand-[7]-somely enclosed the whole amount and sent it back. I we have not heard that his example has been followed by any other person engaged.


17 March 1836 (St. Patrick's day), Theatre Royal, Chester in The idiot witness, and in a musical melange

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (17 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203278 

St. Patrick's Night. FIRST NIGHT OF The Idiot Witness.
THIS EVENING, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1836,
THE Entertainments will commence with a celebrated Drama, in three Acts, from the pen of J. T. Haines, Esq.,
for the first time at this Theatre, called
The Idiot Witness; OR THE Solitary of the Heath.
Le Sieur Arnaud, the Solitary of the Heath - Mr. Knowles
Robert Arnaud, his son, a libertine - Mr. Mackay
Paul Tugscull, a ferryman - Mr. Grove
Hans Gurthold, a Russian in the pay of Arnaud the Solitary - Mr. Lee
Walter Orlington, Page to the Queen - Mrs. Chester,
In which she will sing "Say, where shall we meet Love."
Earl of Dorset - Mr. Peat
Gilbert, the Idiot Witness - Mr. Simmons
Dame Tugwell - Mrs. Downes
Janet - Mrs. Jones
Nubles, Attendants, &c. by the rest of the Company . . .
AFTER WHICH, In honour of the "Saint," the Curtain will rise to
a MUSICAL MELANGE, in which the following SONGS, &c. will be introduced:
Chorus "Of all the Birds," By the whole strength of the Company.
Song - "The Last Rose of Summer," Mrs. Chester.
Song Comic - by desire - "St. Patrick was a Gentleman," Mr. Simmons.
Song, by desire " Kate Kearney," Mrs. Taylor.
Duet Comic - "Polly Hopkins," Mrs. Jones and Mr. Knowles.
Song - "Savourneen Deelish," Mrs. Chester.
Song Comic - "Murphy Delaney," Mr. Simmons.
Song - "Can'st thou ask me to forget," Mrs. Taylor.
Duet Comic, by desire - "When a Little Farm we Keep," Mrs. Chester and Mr. Simmons.
Song in chaiacter- "Come cheer up my Lads," Mrs. Jones.
TO CONCLUDE WITH "GOD SAVE THE KING." By the whole Vocal Strength of the Company.
The Evening's Entertainments will conclude withe the much admired and highly laughable afterpiece of
Teddy the Tiler
Taddy the Tiler - Mr. Simmons
Flora the Flower Girl - Mrs. Taylor.

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (19 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203330 

Thursday being "St. Patrick's Day," or rather the night of that day, the theatre was crammed to suffocation, to witness the performance of "The Idiot Witness," and "Teddy the Tiler," with an intermediate musical Melange . . . Mrs. Chester appeared as Walter Darlington, the Page. We do not think her forte lies in personating such characters. Mrs. Jones ought to see, without having it pointed out again and again, how supremely ridiculous it is for her to attempt with her shrill feeble pipe, the rough sea song, "Come cheer up my Lads," attired in a blue frock and trousers, which is the dress of any other person, as much as that of a sailor. There is nothing at all particularly characteristic in it however. The opening chorus "Of all the Birds" was very good. "The Last Rose of Summer," by Mrs. Chester, was very melodiously warbled. "Saint Patrick was a Gentleman" in earnest, in Mr. Simmons' hands. He was rapturously applauded, and deservedly encored. Mrs. Taylor, from the fatigues of the preceding night's Concert, probably, we think, did not sing quite as well as usually. The duet of "When a little farm we keep," by Mr. Simmons and Mrs. Chester, was much applauded and encored . . . The orchestra favoured their hearers with a variety of national airs in honour of the "Saint," and the entertainments throughout appeared to give general satisfaction . . .

. . . (From a Correspondent.) . . . Mrs. Chester, in the arch, pert, gay and lively page, Walter Arlington, was all we could desire - indeed this truly popular actress was seen to as great advantage as we have ever witnessed her. Her delivery is clear and distinct, and free from any affectation. Her song of "Say, when shall we meet love," was a good introduction, and assisted the other parts to pass off with greater eclat . . .

A Musical Melange followed, and the night's entertainments finished with "Teddy the Tiler" - all went off well, to a very crowded house, being St. Patrick's night.

A serious accident was likely to have befallen Mrs. Chester during the performance of the first piece. A table, upon which she had to climb and jump through a window, not being secured, gave way, and precipitated her upon a chair on tho opposite side, where there should be a platform for her to alight upon. Had it not been for Mr. Simmons, who happened to stand by, she must have met with a serious accident, there being nothing to save her from falling upon her face, across iron braces. We hope such things in future will be properly attended to previous to the rising of the curtain. - DRAMATICUS.


19 March 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester in Father and son (Fitzball)

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (19 March 1836), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203316 

. . . THIS EVENING, SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 1836 . . . Father and Son:; OR, THE ROCK OF LA CHARBONIER . . .
Amy Cassonette - Mrs. Chester . . .

"THEATRE", The Australian (22 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36858178 

On Saturday evening was performed a drama in two acts, entitled "Father and Son," from the pen of E. Ball . . . Violette, Mrs. Taylor, looked and played exquisite. Amy, Mrs. Chester, gave every satisfaction to the audience. This lady is much improving in her acting, and as she is one of our first rate vocalists, cannot fail to be a great attraction to the house. - We recommend one or two of the male performers to follow her example and study perfectly . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (22 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203372 

. . . Violette" (Mrs. Taylor) and "Amy" (Mrs. Chester) played their respective parts with animation and success; we were sorry, however, to perceive Mrs. C. appear tho' but slightly labouring under lameness occasioned by her fall on the stage the other evening . . .

PIECES: Father and son (Fitzball)


[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (22 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203372 

Mr. Wallace, complains (perhaps not without cause,) that our remarks about the price he charged for his performance at the last concert, was inordinately high. We agree with Mr. W. that one story is all very well, till the other is told; Mr. Wallace says, he had been given to understand that at her [? his] first concert, Mrs. Chester was to sing gratuitously, and that after the bills were printed, he received a communication demanding 10 guineas, as the price of her engagement, that he treated the charge as a matter of business, and submitted to the price at once; and that he (Wallace) actually offered Mr. Chester five guineas, to let him off his bargain, considering it would injure a concert he was about giving shortly after. Mr. Wallace is certainly not to blame, for it was not his fault, that so few attended; he would doubtless have been better pleased to have played to a full house, than to an empty one.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (28 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2204045 

To the Editor of the Sydney Gazette.
SIR, I CONCEIVE I should be wanting in justice to myself, were I to allow the remarks contained in your journal of Tuesday last, respecting Mr. Deane's Concert, to pass by without notice . . .

It was stated Sir, I think, in the Gazette, that I acted illiberally in receiving from Mrs. Chester, at the time of her concert £25 for my services, seeing that she profited little or nothing by it. Now whether Mrs. Chester gained or lost, is not my affair. I paid that lady ten guineas a few weeks before, for singing at a concert given by mvself; and of course I exacted the sum for which I had been engaged at the one given by her. The justice of this every one must see, for it would be unreasonable to imagine, that the non success of her concert would rest with me . . .

. . . I have the honor to be, Sir, your obediant servant,
WM. WALLACE.
Bridge Street, Sydney.
April 27, 1836.


21 March 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester in The idiot witness

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (24 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203411 

On Monday evening the "Idiot Witness" was repeated and (as we anticipated) improved in interest proportionately to the amendment of the performers to their several parts. It was played well; every actor engaged in the piece evidently exerted, him and herself to insure its complete sucess on this occasion. It however, never can become a stock piece. Mrs. Chester sang the sweet little simple ballad, "Say when shall we meet love" delightfully . . .

MORE THEATRICAL ON DITS. - Various rumours are afloat, relative to the Lesseeship of the Theatre, which it is said will undergo a change on the termination of the present season, now fast approaching. Mr. Simmons, it has been said, proceeds to Calcutta, and Mr. Levy succeeds to the management. It is now confidently reported that Mrs. Taylor is likely to become Lessee in conjunction (some say) with Mrs. Chester; others say not. We rather apprehend, as yet, that no definite arrangements can be in contemplation. - After the Benefits, probably more will be known than now is.


24 March 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester in The first of April, and in The idiot witness

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (24 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203401 

THIS EVENING, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1836,
The Performance will commence with, for the first time at this Theatre, the celebrated and highly laughable Piece in Two Acts,
abounding in Practical Jokes, called the
The First of April; OR, THE INN AT DOVER.
Sir Bumkin Pedirgree - Mr. Knowles
General Belford - Mr. Grove
Colonel Airy - Mr. Mackay
Major Belford - Mr. Peat
Captain Heartfree - Mr. Simes
Lieutenant Leslie - Mr. Johnson
Roughead - Mr. Simmons
Servants - Messrs. Fitzgerald, Lee, &c.
Sentinels - Messrs. Lane. &c.
Mrs. Balford - Mrs. Downes
Clara - Mrs. Chester, In which she will sing
"I've been Roaming,"
AND
"Hurrah for the Bonnet of Blue."
The whole to conclude with, for the first time at half price, the very favorite Drama in 3 Acts, called
The Idiot Witness . . .

"THEATRE", The Australian (25 March 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36858290 

On Thursday evening was repeated the interesting drama of the "Idiot Witness" . . . Mrs. Chester pourtrayed the various whims and varieties of the court page with her accustomed good taste and discrimination, the part could not be bettor hit off . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (26 March 1837), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203452 

. . . On Thursday evening was brought out the farcical piece, called the "First of April," or "The Inn at Dover." It abounds in practical jokes, and the laughable interest is well kept up through every scene. There are, however, but two very prominent characters, the others being in general, subservient to thom. Those were "Sir Bumpkin Pedigree," by Knowles, and "Robin Roughhead," Sir Bumpkin's servant, by Mr. Simmons. Mrs. Chester as "Clara," introduced "I've been roaming," and "Huzza for the bonnets of blue," but with less voice and spirit than usual. "Say when shall we meet again love," in the second piece, was belter sung, but not near so melodiously as we have heard her sing it before. The "Idiot Witness" concluded the evening's performances . . .

The theatrical on dit which has been going the round of Sydney, stating that Mrs. Taylor would become the lessee of the Sydney Theatre, at the close of the present season, is, we are told, without foundation. The six lessees are quite agreeable to allow Mrs. Taylor to have the house, but they are bound by their agreement not to under-let it without the sanction of Mr. Levy, which that gentleman will not give. The management therefore flows into the old channel. It could scarcely fall into a more deserving one.

PIECES: The first of April (Boaden)


[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (26 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203446 

We were much gratified in noticing a trait of liberality in our young fellow colonist Mr. Josephson, junr., who on understanding that the concert lately given by Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor, so far from leaving them a profit, on the contrary left them minus some ten or twelve pounds, very politely addressed to Mrs. C. a note, declining the five guineas which, it was agreed he should hare received for his very excellent performance on the flute. What enhances the act in our estimation is that Mr. J., if not quite a native born Australian, is next kin to one. At least he has lived in the Colony from infancy. Mr. J. was a pupil originally of Mr. Sippe's, who rendered his services at the last concert, and as usual in a manner most creditably, without charge.


"POETICAL EFFUSION - ORIGINAL", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (26 March 1836), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203444 

A FROLIC OF THE GODDESS OF SONG.

To Mrs. Chester, Theatre Royal, Sydney.

POLYHYMNIA, once in frolic mood,
A strange eccentric whim pursued,
That there should be of glee no dearth,
Amongst the children of the earth.
'Twas at a meeting in the sky,
When all the potentates were nigh;
In all their regal symbols crown'd,
While airs delicious floated round,
And beams of lustre filled the place,
And kindled every latent grace,
Amidst a pause of deep debate,
While Jove relaxed his brow of state,
The mirthful Goddess turned her head,
And thus to her tuneful sisters said,--

"I'll quick to yonder earth repair,
"Surrounded with dense fogs, and there
"The human character assume,
"And dissipate it's native gloom.
"In various shapes, and various airs,
"The manners, and the characters,
"Of mood, meaning, and intent,
"Of each gay bard I'll represent.
"In different forms and suits appear,
"Even 'from lively to severe.'
"In fair 'Rosetta' I will shew
"What cunning can with dotage do;
"As 'Lady Freelove,' perplex'd with strife,
"Depict the wayward youthful wife;
"Then 'Don Giovanni's' lesson proffer,
"Worth all the gold in Pluto's coffer;
"In 'Copp's' fair run may broil and bluster,
"And 'John of Paris's' troop oft muster:
"Show vice and folly each in measure,
"By holding the 'mirror up to nature.'
"In 'Margaretta', 'Clari,' 'Zelinda,' prove,
"Resistless is the shaft of love.
"These, and a thousand other things,
"To waken rapture's lively springs,
" 'I'll do,' she said, 'with action bland,
" 'And then to Apollo gave her hand.
" 'No toil, no effort, will I spare,
" 'And CHESTER is the name I'll bear !' "

The group o'erheard, the purpose lauded,
And, with cheers, her intent applauded.
Long and loud did they praise the dame
"CHESTER" - Polyhymnia, are now the same.

M. S. S.


26 March 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester in The first of April

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (26 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203441 

. . . THIS EVENING, Will be repeated (by particular desire,) the laughable and favorite Piece, called THE FIRST OF APRIL,
Which was received en its first representation with shouts of laughter and decided approbation.
The success of this amusing Piece stands unrivalled by any hitherto produced at this Theatre . . . SATURDAY, MARCH 26 . . .
Clara - Mrs. Chester,
In which she will sing
"I've been Roaming,"
AND
"Hurrah for the Bonnet so Blue."
The whole to conclude with the Melo Drama, called
TimoUr the Tartar . . .


28 March 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester in Raising the wind

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (31 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203523 

Otway's celebrated tragedy of "Venice Preserved," was performed on Monday evening to a crowded house . . . The farce called "Raising the Wind" concluded the evening's performance. It was admirably performed throughout . . . Mrs. Chester as Peggy sang delightfully, and played prettily. Mrs. C. is daily, or rather nightly, becoming more popular. She possesses, in addition to her many fascinations on the stage, one inestimable advantage, which can never be acquired, and which ever must disarm the severest criticism - namely, good humour. This seldom fails to have a corresponding effect upon the auditory. Then why not on the critic too? . . .

"THEATRE", The Australian (1 April 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36858851 

On Monday evening was performed Otway's Tragedy of Venice Preserved . . . The afterpiece was Raising the Wind . . . Mrs. Chester sustained the part of Peggy, and introduced the Romance, in which she waltzed to the Pollacca, in her own happy style, - it was one of the richest treats we have had this season, and hope to see it repeated shortly . . .


29 and 31 March 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester in Pedlar's acre, and The first of April

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (29 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203489 

. . . THIS EVENING, TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 1836,
The Performance will commence with (for the first time this Season), the much admired and highly interesting Drama, called
PEDLAR'S ACRE; OR The Wife of Seven Husbands.
Warrene De Valance (a Dissipated Noble) - Mr. Knowles
Martyn Lessamore (the Husband of Margaret) - Mr. Simmons
Cyprian Gossamer (Page of Martyn) - Mrs. Chester
In which she will sing
"The Hunter's Signal Horn."
AND
"They marched through the Town."
Robert Laidlaw (the Pedlar in Love with Amy) - Mr. Mackay
Gamiel Bander (a Weaver's 'Prentice, the 1st time) - Mr. Simes
Luke Langten (the Ferryman) - Mr. Lane
THomas Shard (the sheriff) - Mr. Peat
Beggars of the olden time : -
Burly George - Mr. Grove
Longfinger - Mr. Buckingham
Bald Bill - Mr. Lee
Margaret Lessamore (the Wife of 7 Husbands) - Miss Douglass
Patience - Mrs. Jones
Amy - Mrs. Downes
- Daughters of Luke.
The whole to conclude with the Grand Melo Dramatic Spectacle, called
Valentine & Orson, OR THE WILD MAN OF THE WOOD . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (31 March 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203514 

. . . THIS EVENING, THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 1836 . . . PIZARRO.
PIZZARO - Mr. SPENCER (His first appearance in that character.) . . .
The whole to conclude with the favorite Farce (first time at half price), called
The First of April; OR THE INN AT DOVER . . .
Clara - Mrs. Chester.

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (2 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203557 

. . . "Pizarro" was produced on Thursday night last, to a beggarly account of empty boxes, owing to the inclement state of the weather, which kept many dry at home, who, otherwise, would most probably have gladly attended . . . Mrs. Chester sang, "I've been roaming," and "Hurrah for the bonnets of blue," with great success.

PIECES: Pedlar's acre (Almar)


2 April 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester in The day after the wedding

[Advertisement], The Australian (1 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36858844 

. . . THIS EVENING, SATURDAY, April 2, 1836,
Will be performed, for the first time this season, the admired favourite drama, called
THE Children of the Wood . . .
After which the favourite interlude called
THE Day after the Wedding . . .
Lady Elizabeth Freelove (with songs) - Mrs. Chester . . .
The whole to conclude with the Caledonian Melo Drama, called
THE WARLOCK OF THE GLEN OR, THE Fisherman of Glencairn . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (5 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203594 

The performances of Saturday night were "The Children in the Wood," "The Day after the Wedding," and "The Warlock of the Glen." The house was as thinly attended as on the previous night of representation, owing to the continued and incessant rains of the whole week; and the entertainments seemed to partake of the complexion of the weather . . . "A Day after the Wedding" followed, as an interlude . . . "Lady Elizabeth Freelove" (Mrs. Chester), owing, probably, to the inattention of the property man to the wants of the stage, was put out of temper, and played indifferently. Some stupid aspirant in the orchestra, too, mistaking the cue, struck up the symphony for a song (which was afterwards sung by Mrs C.) in the very middle of dialogue . . .

"THEATRE", The Australian (5 April 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36857781 

On Saturday evening was performed the domestic drama of the Children in the Wood, which gave anything but satisfaction. The whole of the performers seemed labouring under a degree of stupor that caused the piece to go off very heavily . . . The Day after the Wedding followed, in which Mrs. Chester introduced "They marched thro' the town" with a great deal of sweetness; but she did not play the part with that energy which has lately characterised her performances; and we cannot avoid noticing the neglect that often occurs in the production of pieces on the part of the property-man, and we would advice [sic] the manager to be a little more particular in that department, for a good point is often spoiled by the neglect which we here complain of, viz. when Lady Elizabeth (Mrs. Chester) asked Mrs. Davis (Mrs. Larra) to bring her gown, the deuce a gown was there on the stage; Mrs. Davis was therefore compelled to make her exit, and we suppose by the length of time the scene was kept waiting, the old lady had a journey to the wardrobe to obtain one . . . From a Correspondent.


4 and 5 April 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester in The devil's elixir, and in The Irish tutor

"THEATRE", The Sydney Monitor (6 April 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151075 

The Devil's Elixir or The Shadowless Man, is the name of the "Grand Romantic Drama," produced at the Theatre on Monday Evening. This is one of those pieces which without the least pretence to sentiment or morality are admired by the frequenters of the Minor Theatres in London merely for the splendour of the scenery and machinery, and the beauties of the music, and therefore in this Colony where the scenery is indifferent, and there is no machinery (worth the name) in the Theatre, a piece of this description can never become a favourite . . . Mrs. Chester's Eurika was a trifling character in which she introduced the song of the Romance which she sang prettily . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (5 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203600 

. . . THIS EVENING, TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 1836,
WILL be Performed for second time at this Theatre, the Grand Romantic Melo-Drama, called
The Devil's Elixir, OR THE SHADOWLESS MAN.
Francisco (a Friar) - Mr. Knowles
Count Hermogen (his Brother) - Mr. Grove
Nicholas (the Bell Toller) - Mr. Simes
Gortzburg (the Demon) - Mr. Simmons
The Shadow King - Mr. Spencer
Demons - Messrs. Lane and Lee
Prior - Mr. Peat
Aurelia - Miss Douglass
Urika - Mrs. Chester.
AFTER WHICH, The favorite interlude, called
Mr. & Mrs. Pringle
The whole to conclude with the admired Farce, called
The Irish Tutor . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (7 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203654 

On Tuesday evening was repeated the second time "The Devil's Elixer, or the Shadowless Man," after which the "Irish Tutor" and "Mr. and Mrs. Pringle." The performances were well conducted throughout with the exception of the sceneshifting department and the blunders of the orchestra. The "Irish Tutor" was received with boundless applause; Simmons was excellent in "Teddy O'Rourke alias Doctor O'Toole," in which he introduced "Saint Patrick" with an accompanying ballet dance, with his usual success. Mr. and Mrs. Pringle was but a so so kind of concern. Mrs. Chester sang with her wonted brilliancy. An infatuated "son of harmony" in the lower regions was so excited by the thrilling melody of Mrs. C's voice in "Savourneen Dheelish" that he could not refrain from joining in concert, to the infinite amusement of the lady herself, as well as the whole of the audience . . .


7 April 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester in Paul Pry

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (7 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203641 

. . . THIS EVENING, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1836,
WILL be Performed the admired and favorite Piece, called
PAUL PRY . . .
PAUL PRY - MR. SIMMONS,
In which he will sing
"I never says nothing to nobody,"
Laura - Mrs Chester [sic]
SUSAN - Mrs. Downs [sic],
In which she will sing
The Dashing White Serjeant,
AND
"Listen Dear Fanny."
The whole to conclude with, the favorite Drama, for the first time this Season, called
TEKELI; OR THE Siege of Montgatz . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203699 

"Pizarro" was repeated, with the "Idiot Witness or the "Solitary of the Heath," on Wednesday night, to a tolerable house . . .

The performances on Thursday night were "Paul Pry" and "Tekeli" . . . Simmons played Paul Pry with infinite humour, and kept the audience in continued roars of laughter at every fresh intrusion. "I says nothing to nobody" was enthusiastically encored. Knowles (Pommade,) we expected would have made a better Frenchman. Mackay, as Sir Spangle, played the frivolous coxcomb to the life. Grove, (Old Button) acquitted himself creditably. Mrs. Downes walked pleasingly through Laura. Mrs. Chester played Crimp, introducing "Listen Dear Fanny" and "the Dashing White Sergeant," which she sang prettily. "Tekeli" followed . . .


[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 April 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203693 

The shop formerly occupied by Mr. Manheim Brown in King-street, will be opened in a few days, by Mr. Chester, as a Cigar Devan. We wish him every success. - Cigars and Coffee by all means.


11 April 1836 (Simmons's benefit), 12 April, and 14 April (Knowles's benefit), Theatre Royal, Chester in theatrical olio, in The day after the fair, in Charles the second, and in No song, no supper

[Advertisement], The Australian (8 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36856041 

. . . MR. SIMMONS' BENEFIT IS FIXED FOR MONDAY, 11th April,
When will be produced for the first time at this Theatre, the celebrated interesting domestic drama, in three acts, called
THE MAID & THE MAGPIE; OR, A TALE OF PALAISEAU . . .
TO BE FOLLOWED BY A
THEATRICAL OLIO,
IN THE FOLLOWING ORDER:-
"Rule Britannia," verse and chorus, by the whole vocal strength of the company.
Duet, "Minute Gun at Sea." Messrs. KNOWLES and GROVE.
Song, "Another Hour." - MRS. CHESTER.
Comic Song in character, "Jack Robinson," By MR. SIMMONS.
Song, "The Ladies, God bless them." - MR. DIGHT.
(Who has kindly proffered his services for this night only.)
Comic Duet. Part the second of "Polly Hopkins, or Mr. Tomkins come from Paris," by MR. KNOWLES and MRS. JONES
Song, By MISS DOUGLASS
Comic Song, "Irish Murphy Delaney," by MR. SIMMONS
Song, "O what a Joyous Day" - MRS. CHESTER
Song, By MR. GROVE.
Comic Song, in character - MASTER JONES
AFTER WHICH, MR. MACKAY WILL DANCE HIS CELEBRATED HIGHLAND FLING.
Duet, "Now Hope, Now Fear." - MR. SIMMONS and MRS. CHESTER.
A COMIC DANCE, BY MR. FITZGERALD.
The whole to conclude with God Save the King, Verse and Chorus, by the whole strength of the Company.
The Evening's Entertainment will conclude with, for the first time here, the highly Laughable Farce, called
A Day after the Fair; OR MY MASTER'S HOUSE . . .
Susan Scrub, a Washer woman, [and]
Mrs. Maypole, a Theatrical Manageress - MRS. CHESTER
In the course of the Piece several Parodies.
Owing to the Length of the Performance, the Doors will open at Six o'Clock, and the Curtain Rise at a Quarter to Seven . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), 12 April, p. 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203749 

. . . THIS EVENING, TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 1836,
WILL be Performed for the second time, the Drama called
THE Maid & the Magpie. (Characters as before.)
The whole to conclude with the Opera Farce, called
Charles the Second.
Charles the Second - Mr. Knowles
Rochester - Mr. Peat
Captain Copp - Mr. Mackay
Edward (the King's Page) - Mrs. Jones
Lady Clara - Mrs Downes.
Mary Copp - Mrs. Chester
In which she will sing
"The Soldier's Tear."
"Sing away, Sing away,"
AND
Alice Gray.

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (14 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203775 

. . . On Tuesday evening were performed the "Maid and the Magpie" or the "Fall of Palaiseau," and "Charles the Second," or the "Merry Monarch" . . . "Charles the Second" followed . . . Mrs. Jones performed the little page "Edward," very prettily. Mrs. Downes played "Lady Clara," in her usual easy manner. Mrs. Chester, as "Mary Copp," introduced "The Soldier's Tear," "Sing away, sing away," and "Alice Gray" - which last was rapturously encored . . .

'THEATRE", The Sydney Herald (14 April 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12854139 

. . . We hope that Mr. Knowles will be liberally patronised; and if one of Shakspeare's finest plays would, of itself, fail to attract, we may add that the band of the 4th regiment will be in attendance, and (we beg pardon of the lady for naming her last) Mrs. Chester will sing some of her sweetest songs.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (14 April 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12854147 

. . . MR. KNOWLES' . . . BENEFIT . . . THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 1836. When will be produced . . .
HENRY THE FOURTH . . .
SIR JOHN FALSTAFF - MR. KNOWLES . . .
Previous to the Play, the Band of His Majesty's 4th, or King's own Regiment, whose attendance is kindly permitted by Major England, will perform the grand
OVERTURE TO "LES PUPILLES."
In the course of the Evening,
With lowly suit and plaintive ditty, Mrs. Chester.
Tell me my heart, Mrs. Chester.
A RECITATION BY MASTER JONES.
My own Blue Bell, Mrs Chester.
London at Six in the Morning, Mr. Simmons.
Across the Downs this Morning, Mrs. Chester.
And a favorite Dance by Mr. Fitzgerald.
Grand Overture to to "Lestoc"
By the Military Band - Leader, Mr. Coleman.
The Evening's Entertainment to conclude with the popular Musical Farce
NO SONG, NO SUPPER . . .
Margaretta - Mrs. Chester,
With several popular Songs . . .


16 April 1836 (Mackay's benefit), Theatre Royal, Chester in The vampire, and in The honest thieves

"Theatrical Benefit", The Australian (15 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855271 

We beg to call the attention of the public to advertisements which appear in our paper, announcing the benefits of two of their favourites, viz. Mr. Mackay's, which takes place to-morrow night, and Mrs. Chester's, on Monday night. We hope that their exertions during the season will not be forgotten by the Sydney public, and that they will be rewarded with "bumpers."

[News], Commercial Journal and Advertiser (16 April 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226460936 

Mr. Mackay's Benefit takes place this evening, and it is to be hoped this indefatigable young actor may have a full house. The bill of fare is very good, and arranged in a manner that cannot fail to please even the most fastidious. The "Vampire," or "The Bride of the Isles," ranks first on the list amongst our Scottish pieces. Mrs. Chester will, for the first time at this Theatre, treat us with some of Burn's choicest ditties. Mr. Simmons will appear as "Teague," - a true Son of the Emerald Isle - and sing "44 I've travelled the wide world all over," which, though last, is not the least attraction.

[News], The Sydney Monitor (16 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151148 

Mrs. Chester takes her benefit at the Theatre on Monday next, when she will produce the lively farce of A Husband at Sight, in which the principal characters will be supported by herself, and Mrs. Jones. Mrs. C. will introduce several of her best songs, and the public will doubtless shew their admiration of Mrs. C, as a Vocalist and comic actress, by liberally patronizing her on Monday.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (16 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151150 

. . . MACKAY'S NIGHT. On SATURDAY April 16, 1836,
When will be performed, for the first time at this Theatre, the grand Caledonian Drama, entitled
THE VAMPIRE; OR THE BRIDE OF THE ISLES . . .
Jeannie, betrothed to Sandie - Mrs. Chester . . .
IN THE COURSE OF THE PIECE,
MRS. CHESTER, WILL SING
John Anderson, my Joe, John,
Ye Banks and Braes of Bonny Doon,
AND
There's nae luck about the House . . .
The Evening's Entertainment will conclude with the highly laughable and amusing Farce
(not performed here for upwards of two years) called
THE Honest Thieves . . .
Teague, a true son of the Emerald Isale - Mr. Simmons
WITH THE SONG OF
I've trevlled the wide world all over . . .
Ruth - Mrs. Chester
WITH AN ADMIRED SONG . . .


18 April 1836, Theatre Royal, Chester's benefit

[Advertisement], The Sydney Herald 18 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12854151 

Theatre Royal, SYDNEY.
MRS. CHESTER'S BENEFIT.
Patronised by the Merchants of Sydney.
MRS. CHESTER
RESPECTFULLY acquaints her Friends, and the Public generally, that her Benefit will take place THIS EVENING, on which occasion will be produced (never acted here) the interesting Comcdetta entitled
A Husband at Sight.
Ferdinand Louisberg - Mr. Mackay
Gustavus Gundershoff - Mr. Simes
Lenord - Mr. Lee
George - Mr. Fitzgerald
Carl - Mr. Lane
Paul Parchwitz - Mr. Simmons
Baroness Louisberg - Mrs. Larra
Catherine (daughter to Paul) - Mrs. Jones
Augusta Polinski, under the assumed name of Michael Von Schnapps - Mrs. CHESTER
In which she will sing a NEW SONG
"Honi soi qui mal y pense."
COMIC DUET,
"When a Little Farm we keep," Mr. Simmons and Mrs. Chester.
To which will be added (first time this Season), the laughable lnterlude of
THE SCAPE GOAT.
Charles Eustace - Mr. Peat
Mr. Eustace - Mr. Grove
Robin . Mr. Simes
Ignatius Polyglot - Mr. Knowles
Molly Maggs - Mrs. Jones
Harriett - Mrs. Downes.
SONG,
"Should he upbraid," Mrs Chester.
The whole to conclude with (never acted here) the highly popular and laughable Operetta, called
THE HIGHLAND REEL; OR, THE SCOTTISH LOVERS.
McGilpin - Mr. Buckingham
Sandy - Mr. Peat
Croudey - Mr. Grove
Shelty - Mr. Mackay
Charley - Mr. Simes
Sergeant Jack - Mr. Lee
Laird of Raassey. - Mr. Lane
Benin - Mr. Fitzgerald
Captain Dash - Mr. Knowles
Moggy M'Gilpin - Mrs. CHESTER
In which she will sing
"Hurrah for the bonnets of blue," -
"March, march, Ettrick and Tiviotdale,"
and "Though I'm now a very little lad"
Jenny - Mrs. Downes
The Piece will terminate with
The Highland Fling,
BY MR. MACKAY AND MRS CHESTER.
** Tickets to be obtained of Mr. Sparkes, Royal Hotel (where a plan of the Boxes can be seen, and places secured); Mr. Tyrer, Fancy Repository, George-street; Mr. Dunsdon's, George-street; and of Mr. Chester, Tobacconist, No. 8, King-street.
*** Doors to be opened at Half-past Six, and the Curtain to rise at Seven, precisely.

ATTRACTION!!
Mrs. Chester's Benefit.
THE Public is respeclfully informed, that Mr. DEANE and Family having arrived from the Sister Colony, per Black Warrior, last evening, it is with great pleasure Mrs. Chester announces to her friends, that Mr. Deane has kindly allowed
MASTER EDWARD DEANE
to sing with Mrs, Chester, in the course of the evening,
The Comic Duet of "My pretty Page."

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (21 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203882 

Mrs. Chester's benefit took place on Monday night last, when were produced three new ; first, "A Husband at Sight," next, "The Scape Goat," and last of all, "The Highland Reel," interspersed throughout with some melodies. The house was well filled, and the dress boxes respectably; but on the whole we cannot say the performances went off surpassingly excellent. The first and last pieces were altogether destitute of interest. Any thing like a connected plot that could be possibly with reason unravelled, did not appear from "The Highland Reel." The interlude of "The Scape Goat," is an amusing enough trifle. Knowles, who sustained the prominent character of the piece, "Ignatius Polyglot," seemed to have mistaken his author quite. "Ignatius" is properly a stiff, starch, old pedant, and not the "Ignatius" of Mr. Knowles. "Honi soi qui mal y pense" was rapturously encored. It is a pleasing melody, and suited Mrs. Chester's voice. The performances terminated with a "Highland Fling," and which was danced by Mr. Mackay and Mrs. C. with much grace and agility, and in exceeding good time. A duett, "My Pretty Page," between Mrs. C. and Master Dean, was greatly applauded and loudly encored. The performances on Tuesday evening were "The Vampire," and "The Maid and the Magpie" . . .

"THE THEATRE", The Australian (22 April 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36858163 

On Monday evening last, Mrs. Chester's Benefit took place, and so respectable a dress circle we have not before witnessed during the season. The performance commenced with A Husband at Sight, of which we cannot speak very highly. During the evening, Master Deane sang with Mrs, Chester the Duet of My Pretty Page, and which was exceeding well executed, making allowance for so juvenile a performer's first appearance; but it is evident from the taste that he evinced, that he is an excellent musician. In the course of the evening Mrs. Chester sang several songs with her well known taste and execution. The peformance concluded with the Highland Reel, and in spite of Mrs. Chester and Mr. Mackay's exertions, the plot and incident of the piece could not be understood, in consequence of the other performers paying very little attention to the author. At the end of the piece, Mrs. C. danced a Highland Fling very gracefully, and above all, it was very lady-like. The house was well attended. Last evening, Miss Douglass' Benefit took place . . .

"To the Editor of . . .", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (3 May 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2204142 


21 April 1836 (Douglass and Larra's benefit), 23 April (Grove's benefit), 25 April (Jones's benefit), Theatre Royal, Chester in various

[Advertisement], Commercial Journal and Advertiser (Sydney, NSW : 1835 - 1840), 20 April, p. 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226459342 

. . . MISS DOUGLASS AND MRS. LARRA'S Benefit,
On THURSDAY, 21 APRIL, 1836.
Will be performed the Romantic Drama, called
THE KING OF THE Beggars, OR BAMFYLDE MOORE CAREW . . .
Bamflyde Moore Carew - MR. SIMMONS . . .
Bridget - MRS. CHESTER
In the course of the evening
THE FOLLOWING SONGS
BY MRS. CHESTER
HONI SOIT QUI MAL Y PENSE,
THE LADY BIRD,
AND
LOVER'S MISTAKE . . .
The whole to conclude with the Farce of
Mmonsieur Tonson . . .
Adolphine de Courcey (for this night only) - MRS. CHESTER . . .

[Advertisement], Commercial Journal and Advertiser (Sydney, NSW : 1835 - 1840), 23 April, p. 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226459534 

. . . GROVE'S BENEFIT . . . THIS EVENING . . .
On which occasions will be produced for the first time at this Theatre, the grand nautical drama, entitled
PAUL JONES THE PIRATE . . .
PAUL JONES - MR. GROVE . . .
Maud Paul - Mrs. Chester . . .
. . . to conclude with, for the first time at this Theatre, the laughable farce in One Act, of
Turning the Tables, OR, THE EXCISEMAN OUTWITTED . . .
Jeremiah Bumps - MR. GROVE . . .
Patty Larkins - Mrs. Chester . . .

. . . MRS. JONES . . . her BENEFIT will take place on MONDAy EVENING, APRIL 25th,
on which occasion will be produced for the first time here, O'Keefe's popular Musical Piece CALLED
PEEPING TOM OF Coventry,
WITH THE AIRS AND MUSIC.
The Earl of Mercia - Mr. Spencer
Count Lewis - Mr. Peat
Mayor of Coventry - Mr. Knowles
Crazy - Mr. Buckingham
Harold - Mr. Grove
Peeping Tom of Coventry - Mr. Simmons
The Lady Godiva - Miss Douglass
The Mayoress - Mrs. Larra
Maud - Mrs. Chester
Emma - Mrs. Downs
Attendants of the Earl, Soldiers &c.,
AFTER WHICH, THE FAVORITE SONG OF ALICE GRAY, BY MRS. JONES in character;
For the first time, MRS. LARRA will sing THE OLD WOMAN OF EIGHTY in in character;
MR. BARNETT LEVEY has with the greatest kindness, consented to appear and sing The Old Commodore in character.
To be succeeded by (also for the first time here) the highly favorite Musical Farce, called the
POOR SOLDIER.
Captain Fitzroy - Mr. Grove
Dermot - Mr. Simes
Father Luke - Mr. Knowles
Darby - Mr. Simmons
Patrick the Poor Soldier - MRS. JONES
Bagatelle - Mr. Peat
Boy - Master Jones
Kathlane - Mrs. Chester
Norah - Mrs. Downs
In the Course of the Piece, the following original Songs.
When I was an infant, Gossips would say, by MRS. JONES.
KATE KEARNEY, for the first time, BY MRS. CHESTER.
IRISH SONG, BY MR. SIMMONS.
A ROSE TREE IN FULL BEARING by MRS. JONES.
You know I'm your Priest, BY MR. KNOWLES.
THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER, by MRS. CHESTER.
My friend and Pitcher, BY MRS. JONES.
Duet - OUT OF MY SIGHT, by MRS. CHESTER & MR. SIMMONS.
HOME SWEET HOME, by MRS. JONES.
The Sun its bright rays, BY MR. GROVE . . .
The Evening's Entertainments will conclude with the popular Farce of the
RENDEZVOUS . . .
Rose, (for the first time) - Mrs. Chester.
FINALE . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (28 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2204048 

. . . We have heard with regret, that Mrs. Chester, who was laboring under so severe a cold and swelling of the throat, as to be unable to sing on the benefit night of Mrs. Jones, was grossiy insulted by the unmeaning clamour of a set of noisy know nothings who had perched themselves in the gallery. The considerate and judicious portion of the house, we understand, applauded Mrs. C. and accepted her apology, notwithstanding she retired in tears from the stage. Now, when it is remembered, upon all occasions, especially benefit nights, how Mrs. C. has invariably exerted herself, it surely could not be suspected that she would feign indisposilion to disoblige either Mrs. Jones, or the public. If such had been the motive, it were far more easy to remain at home and send an excuse, than to come forward in the ingenuous manner in which ehe did, to be so requited.


28 April 1836 (Buckingham's benefit), 30 April (Lee's benefit), and 2 May (Simes's and Peat's benefit), Chester in various

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (28 April 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2204064 

. . . BUCKINGHAM'S NIGHT. ON THURSDAY, APRIL 28 . . . A favorite song by Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], Commercial Journal and Advertiser (30 April 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226459252 

. . . LEE'S NIGHT . . . THIS EVENING, SATURDAY 30TH APRIL . . . When will be performed for the first time, the splendid historical Drama, founded on Sir Walter Scott's celebrated Novel, entitled
IVANHOE; OR THE JEW'S DAUGHTER . . .
Elgiva, Mrs. Chester, with the Song of FLY AWAY, LADYBIRD . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (30 April 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151236 

. . . MESSRS. SIMES' AND PEAT'S NIGHT. Monday May 2nd, 1836,
When will be performed the Popular Drama in three Acts, called
THE EXILE . . .
Catherine (Daughter of the Governor) - Mrs. Chester
In which she will sing
"THE ROMANCE" . . .
The whole to conclude with the laughable FARCE in Two Acts, called
The Rival Valets.
Captain Welford - Mr. Grove
Sophia Fielding - Mrs. Chester
In which she will Sing
"Young Susan had Lovers"
AND
A Highland Lad my Love was born
Other Characters as before . . .

"SYDNEY THEATRICALS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (3 May 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2204148 

On Saturday evening was performed, for the benefit of Mr. Lee, the historical drama founded on Scott's celebrated novel called "Ivanhoe, or the Jew's Daughter" . . . "Rebecca" was personated by Miss Douglass, "Elgiva" by Mrs. Chester who introduced the song "Fly Lady bird" with much effect, though not with all her usual esprit, Mr. Spencer's recitation of the opening canto of Byron's "Corsair", was well received. "I Was the boy for bewitching 'em" by Mr. Simmons, was clamorously encored. Miss Douglass's hornpipe we cannot rank among the happiest of her attempts . . .


"Domestic and Miscellaneous Intelligence", The Australian (3 May 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36854920 

Music - It has been said to be a certain indication of the progress of civilization, and the increase of wealth in a community, when the arts, and sciences flourish: - amongst the foremost of these has been ranked that of music; and if the number of professors in Sydney who gain a livelihood approaching something very like a competency, by the practice of and instruction in music, be any criterion whereby to judge of its progress here, we may safely set New South Wales down as having made such strides towards civilization as may warrant the hope that, one day, and that not very distant, she will be able to hold a distinguished position among the most polished nations of the world. For, in addition to the recent arrivals of Mrs. Chester and Mr. Wallace and family amongst us as instructors in music and singing, we have to draw public attention to the advertisement of Mr. and Miss Deane (from Hobart Town), in another column, announcing their having opened a Music Saloon, where they propose (besides private tuition), giving instruction in the "divine art." Mr. Deane is a member, we understand, of the London Philharmonic Society, and was for many years a teacher of music in the first families in Hobart Town, where he was highly respected. We sincerely wish him and his family success in New South Wales, and have no doubt of his obtaining it.


5 May 1836 (Spencer's benefit) and 7 May (Lane and Stephen Jones's benefit), Chester in The spectre bridgroom, and various

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (5 May 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2204186 

. . . Spencer's Benefit . . . THURSDAY, 5th May . . .
The whole to conclude with, for the first time in four seasons, the popular and laughable Farce called
The SPECTRE BRIDEGROOM
Nicodemus - MR. SPENCER
Squire Aldwinkle - Mr. Buckingham.
Dicory - Mr. Lee.
Paul - Mr. Collins
Vauntington - Mr. Peat
Lavinia - Mrs. Chester, in which character she will sing
"My own Blue Bell,"
AND
"Come where the Aspens quiver."
Georgiana - Mrs. Downes . . .

"THE THEATRE", Commercial Journal and Advertiser (7 May 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226458690 

Several of the corps dramatique must this season have profited little by what is usually designated their benefits. Mr. Spencer's was the other evening, owing to the wetness of the weather, but thinly attended . . . The play was A new way to pay old Debts . . . Spencer in the Spectre Bridegroom, as Nicodemus, was evidently good, and preserved on all occasions inflexibility of countenance and gravity of deportment. Buckingham, Lee, Mackay, and Collins were very successful as Aldwinkle, Dickory, Vauntington and Paul. The female chatacters were represented by Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Downs with much grace and expression. The former sung Come where the Aspens quiver, and My own Blue Bell in excellent taste. - Correspondent.

[Advertisement], Commercial Journal and Advertiser (7 May 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226458698 

. . . For the Benefit of MR. LANE and Master STEPHEN JONES, the Australian Roscius . . .
THIS EVENING, SATURDAY 7TH MAY . . . Sheridan Knowles' Play in 5 Acts called
WILLIAM TELL, OR THE HERO OF SWITZERLAND . . .
Agnes . . . - Mrs. Chester . . .
In the course of the evening, MRS. CHESTER WILL SING
"TELL ME, MY HEART,"
AND
"THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER,"
THE FAVORITE COMIC SONG OF THE TINY BOY BY MR. B. LEVY.
MASTER S. JONES AND MISS JONES WILL SING "POLLY HOPKINS" . . .
. . . conclude with, for the first time this Season,
THE REVIEW, OR THE WAGS OF WINDSOR . . .
Lucy - Mrs. Chester . . .


9 May 1836 (Downes and Levey's benefit), 10 May (joint extra benefit), and 12 May (Knight's benefit, last night of the season), Chester various

[Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (9 May 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12854302 

. . . JOINT BENEFIT. Mrs. Downes & A. Levy, Prompter's Night . . . THIS EVENING, 9th May . . .
SONG - Bid me discourse, my Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (10 May 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2204249 

. . . FOR THE BENEFIT OF Mrs. LARRA, MISS DOUGLASS, MR. SPENCER, MR. GROVE, MR. LANE, AND MASTER S. JONES.
THE Public is respectfully informed, that the Proprietors of the Theatre have given the House, and the Performers and Musicians have kindly consented to play
GRATUITOUSLY,
For the above-mentioned Performers, in consequence of their having been losers through the inclemency of the Weather at their respective Benefits THIS EVENING, MAY 10 . . .
A SONG BY MRS. CHESTER . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (12 May 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2204288 

. . . LAST NIGHT OF THE SEASON. FOR THE BENEFIT OF MR. KNIGHT, THURSDAY MAY 12, 1836, when will be performed, for the first time these three seasons the favorite operatic Extravaganza, with all the Songs, Glees, and Chorusses as before produced, called
TOM & JERRY, OR, Life in London . . .
Sue - Mrs. Chester . . .

NOTE: The theatre re-opened, "for one night only", on Monday 16 May for the benefit of George Sippe, "composer and director of the orchestra"; the advertised pieces were The heir at law and High life below stairs; Chester was not billed separately as appearing:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (14 May 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151339 


18 May 1836, John Philip Deane and family's first Sydney concert, Royal Hotel, George Street

[News], The Sydney Monitor (18 May 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151353 

Mr. Deane from Hobart Town gives his first Concert at the Royal Hotel, this evening. Miss Deane will perform several solos on the Pianoforte, an instrument on which we understand, she plays brilliantly. Mr. D. has secured the assistance of Mrs. Chester, and Messrs. Sippe, Wilton, Cavendish, Stubbs and several amateurs. Major England with his accustomed urbanity has given permission to the band of the 4th Regiment to attend on the occasion.

[Advertisement], Commercial Journal and Advertiser (18 May 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226458684 

CONCERT.
MR. JOHN PHILLIP DEANE, Member of the Philharmonic Society, and Professor of Music, BEGS to announce to his Friends and the Public generally of Sydney, and its vicinity, that he will give a CONCERT of Vocal and Instrumental Music, at the Royal Hotel,
THIS EVENING, May 18, 1836, on which occasion the following talent will render their valuable assistance:
PRINCIPAL PERFORMERS - Mr. Cavendish, Mr. Allen, Mr. Stubbs, Mr. Sippe, Mr. Wilson, Masters John & Edward Deane, Miss Deane, several Gentlemen Amateurs, Mr. Aldis, and Mrs. Chester.
PART I.
Overture - Tancredi - Rossini
Glee & Chorus - Bragela, Mrs. Chester, Master Deane, Mr. Aldis, &c - Stevens
Song - If o'er the cruel tyrant love, Mrs. Chester - Dr. Arne
Solo - Pianoforte, Rule Britannia, Miss Deane - Ries
Song - Death of Nelson, Mr. Allen - Bishop [Braham]
Septette - In which will be introduced Haydon's Surprise, Miss Deane, Mr. Cavendish, Mr. Stubbs, Mr. Wilson, Mr. Deane, Masters J. and E. Deane - Haydon
Duet - As it fell upon a day, Miss Deane and Master E. Deane - Bishop
Glee - The Foresters, Amateurs - Bishop
PART II.
Overture - La Villanella Rapita - Mozart
Glee - My sweet Dorabella, Mrs. Chester, Mr. Deane, & Amateurs - Mozart
Fantasia - Flute, Mr. Stubbs - Toulou
Song - Mocking bird, Mrs. Chester, (flute obligato) Mr. Stubbs - Bishop
Solo - Pianoforte, Greek March, with variations, Miss Deane - Hertz
Duetto - Dear Maid , Mrs. Chester and Mr. Aldis - Bishop
Solo - Violincello, Air with variations, Master E. Deane - Dusseck
Glee and Chorus - Away, away, the morning freshly breaking, by all the Vocalists - Auber
By the kind permission of Major England, the Band of the 4th or King's Own will attend.
Tickets 5s. each, to be obtained of Mr. Sparks, Royal Hotel; Mr. Chester, 8, King-street; Mr. Russel, Hatter, George-street; and Mr. Deane, 5, Terry's Buildings, Pitt-street.
* Concert to commence at 8 o'clock.

"MISCELLANEOUS INTELLIGENCE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (19 May 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2204401 

Mr. Dean's concert look place last night, of which we have not room at present to say more, than, that the concert room was well and respectably filled, and the entertainment fully equal to expectation, notwithstanding the absence of the "Australian Paganini."

"CONCERT", The Sydney Herald (19 May 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12854363 

Mr. Deane's Concert took place last night at the Royal Hotel. There were about four hundred persons present . . . The glee and chorus "Bragela," sung by Mrs. Chester, Master Deane, and Amateurs, was well executed, and elicited deserved applause. Mrs. Chester's "If o'er the cruel tyrant, received great and deserved applause, love " was a beautiful performance . . .

The second part commenced by the overture . . . "My Sweet Dorabella," a comic glee, by Mr. Deane, Mrs. Chester, and an Amateur, elicited much laughter and applause . . . Mrs. Chester did ample justice to the " Mocking Bird," and was accompanied by Mr. Stubbs, with much feeling . . . The duetto " Dear Maid" by Mrs. Chester and an Amateur, pleased by its simplicity . . .

"MR. DEANE'S CONCERT", The Australian (20 May 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855030 

. . . We were much gratified by the introduction of numerous stringed instruments, which gave a new feature to the overtures, and was most pleasingly observable in the piano parts of Tancredi . . . Then followed the glee of Bragela, which gave much satisfaction. If o'er the cruel tyrant love, from the opera of Artaxerxes, was sung by Mrs. Chester in her best style . . .

The second part commenced with Morgan's [sic, Mozart's] overture, La Villanella Rapita, by the band of the 4th Regt. which we need not say was well received. My sweet Doraballa followed - we cannot say it succeeded - it was mediocre, but we understand that it is to be accounted for by the circumstance that the gentleman who sang with Mrs. Chester and Mr. Deane, had not practised it with them - as it was intended to have been sung by another - what occasioned the alteration at so late an hour we have not heard. Mr. Stubbs in the flute solo was very happy in the execution of some very difficult passages - and of course met with great applause. In his obligato accompaniment in the song of the Mocking Bird, by Mrs. Chester, he appeared to still greater advantage; the beautiful and flowing passages of this song are well adapted to Mrs. Chester's voice, and her execution of it caused a thrilling sensation throughout the audience . . . The duet Dear Maid, by Mrs. Chester and Mr. Aldis would have been much more effective had the gentleman's voice been strong in proportion to that possessed by Mrs. Chester. It however went off well. Then was given Auber's air from Massaniello, Away, away, the morning freshly breaking, and was the finale; which terminated about eleven o'clock, when the company separated . . .

"MUSIC AND THE DRAMA", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (21 May 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2204431 

Mr. Dean's Concert at The "Royal," on Wednesday night last was the most pleasing entertainment of the kind throughout that has ever before been given in this Colony . . . In Mr. Stubb's hands the flute became indeed "il flunto magico." [il flauto magico] Mrs. Chester seemed to be rather indisposed, yet she warbled in solos and duets with customary sweetness . . . What is highly to be commended in the arrangements of Wednesday evening last, was the exclusion of all known improper female characters - an exclusion for which, of course Mr. D. will appretiate the good policy and propriety of strictly adhering hereafter.

ASSOCIATIONS: William Joseph Cavendish (pianist); Mr. Allen (vocalist); Thomas Stubbs (flute player); George Sippe (cellist); Mr. Wilson (violinist); William Henry Aldis (vocalist); Band of the 4th Regiment; John Sparke (d. 1852; proprietor, Royal Hotel)


"THE DRAMA. REVIEW OF THE SEASON", Tegg's monthly magazine (June 1836), 239

https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-605929052/view?partId=nla.obj-605961402#page/n58/mode/1up 

. . . As our space is almost filled up, we find we must make short work with the actresses who follow Mrs. Taylor, assuring them on the faith of our gallantry, that we shall do them full justice on a future occasion. Mrs. Chester is a sweet singer and a pleasing woman but she has not been very successful as an actress. Miss Winstanley is both a pretty and a clever actress, but she spoils both her beauty and her acting by her insufferable affectation. Mrs. Jones is a very effective actress, always in good humour, always attempting to do her best she is, therefore, deservedly a favourite. Miss Douglass has made many failures, and some few hits; her Catherine, in The Taming of the Shrew was of the latter description. She dresses her hair in excessively bad taste. Mrs. Larra is the very queen of old dames. She is more at home in her appearance on the boards than any actor or actress we have ever seen on this stage. Mrs. Downs is a very indifferent actress; she is a good-looking woman, but she has no soul . . .

NOTE: And see also [Advertisement], The Australian (31 May 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855495 

Theatre Royal Sydney. THE UNDERSIGNED having viewed the management of the Theatre with much regret, and being the Founder of the Drama in this part of the world, is induced to resume the management . . .
B. LEVEY, Sydney, May 21, 1836 . . .


1 June 1836, saloon of the Royal Hotel, Chester at Wallace's concert

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (1 June 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151453 

CONCERT.
UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF His Excellency the Governor,
Who has signified his intention of being present.
MR. W. WALLACE
Leader of the Anacreontic Society, and Professor of Composition, Royal Academy.
BEGS to announce that his Concert of Vocal and Instrumental Music will take place in the Saloon of the Royal Hotel,
THIS EVENING,
The 1st JUNE, 1836, on which occasion he will be assisted by
Mrs. Chester, Miss E. Wallace, Mr. Josephson, Mr. Cavendish, and Amateur, and Mr. S. W. Wallace.
PROGRAMME CONCERT.
PART I.
1. Overture - Lestocq, Auber
2. Duet - Guillaume Tell, Rossini - Miss Wallace and Mrs. Chester
3. Grand Rondo Brilliante (Piano-forte), Hertz - Mr. W. Wallace
4. Song - Tell me my Heart, Bishop - Mrs. Chester
5. Concerto (Flute), Nicholson - Mr S. W. Wallace
6. Song - Una Voce poco Fa, Rossini - Miss E. Wallace
7. De Beriot's Sixth Air, (Violin) in which will be introduced the Double Stop Movement from Paganini's Grand Concert in E - Mr. W. Wallace
PART II. 8. Overture - La Gazza Ladra, Rossini
9. Song - Love's Young Dream, Irish melody - Mrs. Chester
10. Swiss Air - The Spring time is coming - Miss E. Wallace
11. Fantasia - (Flute) Toulou - Mr. Josephson
12. Song - Let us seek the yellow shore, Bishop - Mrs. Chester
13. Extemporaneous performance on the Piano forte, on any subject or subjects which may be presented (written) - Mr. W. Wallace
14. Song - The Minstrel Boy, Irish Melody - Miss E. Wallace
15. (By particular desire,) Fantasia di Bravura, dedicated to Paganini, in which will be introduced 'Tis the last Rose of of Summer - Mr. W. Wallace
By the kind permission of Major England, Mr. Wallace will be allowed the aid of the Band of the 4th Regiment.
Tickets, 7s. 6d, each - to be had at Mr. Ellard's Music Warehouse.
Concert to commence at 8 o'Clock.

"MR. WALLACE'S CONCERT", The Australian (3 June 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36853546 

. . . The songs by Mrs. Chester were all well sung, but she was not fortunate in selecting those best adapted for her voice and style of singing. We have heard many of her songs which pleased us much more. Let us seek the yellow shore is an indifferent imitation of Bid me discourse . . .

"MR. WALLACE'S CONCERT", The Sydney Monitor (4 June 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151492 

. . . To Mrs. Chester were apportioned -

The second part in a Duet from Guillaume Tell (Rossini)
Tell me my Heart - Bishop
Love's Young Dream, an Irish melody
Let us seek the yellow shore - Bishop

Mrs. Chester did not seem to us in spirits - she sang none of these songs with feeling, and consequently could not sing them with any taste, save the habitual mechanical taste of a practised singer. Her first effort, in the duet, appeared to us the best . . .

. . . Miss Wallace has a fine strong voice, similar to Mrs. Chester's, but not so much at her command, being yet so very young . . .

. . . So we say to our Chesters, Wallaces, and Taylors. Do not mind so much about the the compass of your voices; what notes you do sing, let them be clear and soft, and in perfect tune; like the notes of a violincello, with the same powers of swell, and of retention, and of increasing volume. Infuse life and spirit into your common notes, when the words call for life and spirit. Sing not like the notes of a barrel organ. They are loud, and in tune, but they have no soul. A living man or a woman is not an organ, but a being full of judgment, IMAGINATION, and SYMPATHY; and if he or she cannot infuse them into her notes, when the sense of the words call for them, let her have the execution of a Catalani, but she is no singer. We would rather hear "Auld Robin Gray," or "The Soldier's Tear," and such like songs, sung with pathos and judgment by a sweet voice, than all the tweedledums of Rossini. And in the late reviews of the great musical festivals of York, Norwich, &c. the English taste had grown sufficiently cultivated, and the Reviewers (in consequence) sufficiently confident to condemn the ordinary Italian music as unnatural, and without feeling; and as being now sufficiently hackneyed in the ears of the British public, to be deemed COMMON-PLACE, if not vulgar. The duet between Mesdames Chester and Wallace, resembled the music proceeding from two fine-toned organs, turned by a handle. It was good instrumental music, but had not a bit of mind in it.

"WEDNESDAY'S CONCERT", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (7 June 1836), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2204714 

. . . The Concert then began with Bishop's overture in "Guy Mannering" . . . This was followed by a Glee between Mrs. Chester and Miss E. Wallace, which both ladies sang with much science, but we cannot say that to our unrefined ears it sounded at all melodiously . . .

The second part opened with a "Glee," which was succeeded by that sweet Irish Melody of Anacreon Moore's, "Oh! the days are gone when beauty bright my heart's chain wove." It was sung by Mrs. Chester with her usual success; the words "'Twas a light that ne'er may shine again on life's dull stream," Mrs. C. gave with peculiar expression. Mr. [sic, recte Miss] E. Wallace next sang a Swiss air. Mr. Josephson played a fantasia on the flute, which was greatly applauded. "Let us seek the yellow shore," by Mrs. Chester. "Oh! the Minstrel Boy to the War is gone," by Miss E. Wallace . . .


"ORATORIO", The Sydney Herald (30 June 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12854642 

A performance of sacred music, on a grand scale, is shortly to be given at St. Mary's Church Hyde Park, the objects of which, are said to be the advancement of the science of music and musical talent, and to assist in raising funds for an organ. The Oratorio is to be under the direction of Mr. Wallace. Mrs. Rust, Mrs. Chester, Miss Wallace, Mrs. Curtis, Messrs. Cavendish, Clarke, Deane, Stubbs, Spencer, Gordonovitch, Martin, the Choir of the Church, and many Amateurs, have already consented to perform. The two Military Bands are also engaged. The Oratorio is expected to take place on the 26th of next month.

ASSOCIATIONS: Mary Curtis (vocalist); George Gordonovitch (tenor vocalist); Mr. Martin (possibly Conrad Martens, mentioned above)


"The Theatre", The Sydney Monitor (4 June 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151496 

The Theatre, we perceive, re-opens on Monday evening, under a new management. Mr. Knowles has been appointed stage manager, and if the manager is to be a performer, we do not see that the lessees could make a better choice . . . The company is strong this season - the only persons who are not engaged, we understand, are Mrs. Chester, Mr. Simmons, and Mr. Grove . . .


"CONCERT", The Sydney Herald (23 June 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12854592 

We perceive by an advertisement that Mr. Deane announces his second Concert for Wednesday week, which, we hear, will befar more attractive than the first. Mrs. Chester is becoming convalescent, and promises her assistance upon the occasion; most of the professionals will also render their services gratuitously out of respect for Mr. Deane's large and interesting family.


6 July 1836, concert, the Deanes's second concert, Saloon, Royal Hotel, Sydney, NSW

[Advertisement], Commercial Journal and Advertiser (6 July 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226458392 

UNDER THE PATRONAGE of His Excellency the Governor,
WHO HAS SIGNIFIED HIS INTENTION OF BEING PRESENT.
MR. J. P. DEANE, Member of the Philharmonic Society, London, and Professor of Music.
RESPECTFULLY informs his Friends and the Public, that his next CONCERT of Vocal and Instrumental Music will take place
THIS EVENING, July 6th, 1836, in the Saloon of the Royal Hotel, on which occasion he will be supported by
Mrs. Chester, Miss Deane, Messrs. Cavendish, Stubbs, Sippe, Wilson, Masters J. & E. Deane, and Amateurs.
PART I.
Overture - Italiano in Algeri - Rossini.
Glee - The Witches, (by permission) the Band - Calcott.
Solo - Pianoforte, Grand variations on the fall of Paris, Miss Deane - Moscheles.
Song - Lo here the gentle Lark, (by desire) Mrs. Chester, flute obligato, Mr. Stubbs - Bishop.
Quintette - Mr. Deane, Mr. Wilson, Mr. Stubbs, Masters J. aud E. Deane - Hayden.
Duett - I know a bank, &c., Miss Deane and Master E. Deane - Horn.
Chorus - The Chough, and Crow - Bishop.
PART II.
Overture - Caliph of Bagdad - Bishop.
Song - Far, far at sea, Master E. Deane - Arnold.
Solo - Flute, Rule Britannia, with Drouet's celebrated variations in C, Mr. Stubbs - Drouet.
Song - At close of day, Mrs. Chester - Rossini.
Solo - Pianoforte, Variations on the Greek March, (by desire) Miss Deane - Hertz.
Duett - Tell me where is fancy bred, Mrs. Chester and Mr. Aldis - Bishop.
Solo - Violincello, Hope told a flattering tale, Master E. Deane.
Chorus - Of Huntsmen, C. M Von Weber.
* By the kind permission of Major England, Mr. Deane will be allowed the assistance of the Band of the 4th or King's Own.
Tickets 7s 6d; Children,- 5s each, to be obtained at Mr. Tyrer's Fancy Repository; Mr. Chester, King-street; Mr. Ellard, Hunter-street; Mr. Sparke's, Royal Hotel; and Mr. Deane, 5, Terry's Buildings, Pitt-street.
N. B. - Concert to commence at 8 o'clock.

[News], Commercial Journal and Advertiser (9 July 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226461173 

Owing to the inclemency of the weather, Mr. Deane's Concert on Wednesday evening was not well attended. His Excellency the Governor and suit were however present, and the performance elicited the most marked approbation.

"MR. DEANE'S CONCERT", The Sydney Monitor (9 July 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151722 

Owing to the wetness of the morning, and the muddy state of the streets in the evening, the Saloon of the Royal Hotel was only half filled on Wednesday, at Mr. Deane's Concert. His Excellency the Governor was however present.

Having given our opinion on the style of songs and music which appears to us should distinguish our Concerts, in order to please the public at large, and ensure crowded rooms, we shall not repeat it here. Suffice it to say, we did not like the choice of songs generally at this Concert. Nevertheless, as a whole it was a very pleasing entertainment . . . It would be a great improvement to these concerts, if with every ticket sold, a bill, containing the words of the songs in good large print, so as to be read by the dull lights of the lamps were given. Those who give 7s. 6d. for a ticket, would cheerfully give another 6d. or such a bill. Few of the public singers in this colony, articulate their words. Mrs. Jones is the only one we know who does so, and on that very account, we had rather hear her sing than either Mrs. Chester or Mrs. Taylor. We can only catch a word every alternate line; so that we are left to guess at what our performers are singing about.

"MR. DEANE'S CONCERT", The Sydney Herald (11 July 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12854705 

The very unfavourable state of the weather on Wednesday last, was the means of preventing many families from attending the Concert - not more than 100 persons composed the audience. Notwithstanding these discouraging circumstances, the performances generally went off with spirit and approbation . . . Mrs. Chester sung several popular songs; amongst the rest, Bishop's beautiful and difficult composition - Lo here the Gentle Lark, which at the close was applauded. If this lady wishes to become a greater favorite with the public, and will take a piece of friendly advice, let her not sing every thing with the full power of her lungs, and her performances will be a hundred times more pleasing. It is not necessary, in a place like the Saloon, to sing pretty chaste solos as if a person were leading a chorus in "Old Drury;" other of our female vocalists appear to be misled by the same false impression . . . The rest of the entertainment consisted of a glee - The Witches (from "Macbeth"), which appeared to want practice; a song, by Master Deane; a duet between Mrs. Chester and an amateur - Tell me where is Fancy bred, the words by Shakspeare, and Bishop's music; this composition being of a characteristic nature would tell better in the play for which it was written than in a concert room. Mr. Stubbs played a Fantasia upon the Flute, in his usual excellent style, and also accompanied the Overtures and Chorusses. The Chough and Crow, closed the first, and the Huntsman's Chorus the second part, which wound up the Concert. Messrs. Coleman, Wilson, Sippe, and the Band of the 4th Regiment, lent their assistance during the evening. We were gratified to witness so many of the profession rendering their services upon the occasion, it displays a good feeling, which it is hoped will extend to every member of the science.

ASSOCIATIONS: William Henry Tyrer (ticket vendor); Francis Ellard (ticket vendor)


[News], The Sydney Herald (11 July 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12854702 

The public will not want rational amusement for some months to come: - the Theatre is open four nights a week; Mr. Wallace's concert comes off on Wednesday, after which Mrs. Chester gives one, and some other concerts are talked of. Then comes the oratorio, the Theatre is also to be let to a military company for one night; concerts are now "the rage" at Government House, Mrs. Williamson gives a Fancy Ball in a few days; and a Fancy Dress Ball and Concert is talked of at Juniper Hall.

ASSOCIATIONS: Jane Williamson (dancing mistress)


13 July 1836, Wallace's concert

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (13 July 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151738 

Under the Patronage of His Excellency the GOVERNOR,
who has signified his intention of being present.
MR. W. WALLACE,
LEADER OF THE Anacreontic Society; AND PROFESSOR OF COMPOSITION, ROYAL ACADEMY.
BEGS TO ANNOUNCE THAT HIS
CONCERT OF Vocal & Instrumental Music,
will take place on THIS EVENING, the 13th of July, in the THEATRE-ROYAL, on which occasion, he will be assisted by
Mrs. Chester, Miss E. Wallace, Mr. Josephson, Mr. S. Wallace, and Mr. Cavendish.
Programme Concert.
PART I.
1. OVERTURE - Red Mask - Marliani
2. GLEE - Hark, Apollo strikes the Lyre
3. SONG - Di Piacer - Rossini - Miss E. Wallace
4. FANTASIA, Flute, introducing 'Tis the Last Rose of Summer - Nicholson - Mr. Josephson
5. SONG - Trifler Forbear - Bishop - Mrs. Chester
6. QUARTETTE - Violin, Pianoforte, Flute, and Violoncello - Mayseder - Mr. W. Wallace, Mr. Josephson, Mr. S. Wallace, and Mr. Cavendish
7. SONG - Spring time is Coming (by desire) - Miss E. Wallace
8. RONDO BRILLIANTE, Violin, in which will be introduced the "COOLUN," Irish Melody - Mr. W. Wallace
PART II.
9. OVERTURE
10. CHORUS, with Violin obligato accompaniment - Carl Maria Von Weber
11. SONG - Auld Robin Grey - Mrs. Chester
12. CONCERTO, Flute - Mr. S. Wallace
13. SONG - Cease thus to palpitate - Rossini - Miss E. Wallace
14. GRAND DUO CONCERTANTE, for two Piano Fortes - Herz
(as played by Henri Herz and Mr. W. Wallace) - Mr. W. Wallace and Mr. Josephson
15. SONG - The Minstrel Boy - Mrs. Chester
16. CONCERTO, Violin, in which will be introduced by particular desire, Savourneen Deelish, Irish Melody - Mr. W. Wallace.
Dress Circle - 7 6
Upper Boxes - 5 0
Pit - 4 0
Gallery - 3 0
To ensure comfort and respectability, care will be taken to prevent the admission of improper persons and constables will be stationed throughout the upper part of the house.
Tickets to be had at Mr. Ellard's Music Warehouse, Hunter-street; and of Mr. Sparke at the Royal Hotel.
N. B. By the kind permission of Major England Mr. Wallace will be allowed the assistance of the Band of the 4th Regiment.

"MR. WALLACE'S CONCERT", The Australian (15 July 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36857344 

. . . Bishop's Trifler Forbear, was indifferently well sung by Mrs. Chester . . . The second part opened with the Overture to Zauberflote, by the Military Band, which was played in a very spirited manner, though, in rather longer time than it is usually played by a London Orchestra. The Chorus, by Weber, by Miss Wallace, Mrs. Chester, and four of the Band, was in good harmony. Auld Robin Gray was sung with feeling, by Mrs. Chester; but it is not suited to her voice or style . . . Mrs. Chester next sung pleasing enough, The Minstrel Boy . . .

"MR. WALLACE'S CONCERT", The Sydney Monitor (16 July 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151780 

. . . Mrs. Chester did not appear in good spirits in her first song, but in the touching air of Auld Robin Grey, she displayed judgement and taste . . .


17 August 1836, concert, George Coleman (bandmaster, 4th regiment, benefit), saloon of the Royal Hotel, George Street, Sydney

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (17 August 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32151994 

Under the distinguished Patronage of His Excellency the Governor, who has signified his intention of being present.
MR. COLEMAN, Master of the Band 4th, or King's Own Regiment.
BEGS to announce that his CONCERT of Vocal and instrumental Music will take place on
WEDNESDAY EVENING, August 17, 1836, in the Saloon of the Royal Hotel
on which occasion he will be assisted by Mrs. Chester, Mr. Wallace, Mr. Deane and family, Mr. Cavendish, Mr. Sippe, Mr. Wilson, Mr. Stubbs and Mr. Josephson.
Programme concert,
PART I.
1 - OVERTURE - Der Freitchutz, [sic] Weber
2 - CHORUS - Vive le Roi, Balf [sic]
3 - SOLO - My Own Blue Bell, Mrs. Chester
4 - SOLO - Flute, in which will be introduced Auld Robin Gray, &c., Nicholson, Mr. Stubbs
5 - GLEE - See our Oars, Sir John Stephenson
6 - Market Chorus, from the celebrated Opera of Masaniello, Auber
7 - Solo - Violin, Mr. Wallace.
PART II.
1 - OVERTURE - Maniac or Swiss Banditi, Bishop
2 - GLEE - See our Bark, Sir John Stephenson
3 - SOLO - Pianoforte, Miss Deane
4 - FANTASIA - Flute, introducing the Coolun, Drouet, Mr. Josephson
5 - SONG - Bid me Discourse, Bishop, Mrs. Chester
6 - SOLO - Kent Bugle, Mr. Stubbs
7 - CHORUS - Hail, all hail our Patriot King.
Tickets 7s. 6d each, which may be had at Mr. Ellard's Musical Saloon, Hunter-street; Mr. Tyrer's Repository; Mr. Sparkes, Royal Hotel:


"Blue Beard", The Sydney Monitor (27 August 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32152064 

THOSE who have seen certain pieces performed in London, and afterwards see them here, witness the Colonial representation at a disadvantage. Thirty-two years ago we saw "Blue Beard" in the old Theatre of Drury-lane; Palmer in "Blue Beard," Suett in "Ibrahim," Bannister in "Shacabac," Mrs. Bland in "Beda," Kelly in "Selim." The impression this gorgeous spectacle made, is well fixed in our memory. And after saying this, we must admit, that "Blue Beard" has been got up by Knowles admirably . . .

TThe charming duet between Fatima and Selim had to be omitted - for though Miss Winstanley can sing, Peat cannot. The famous duet of "Tink a Tink," which was ground on the hand organs for years afterwards in the streets of London, and then relinquished with regret to give way to novelties, was capitially executed by Mrs. Jones, and got through tolerably by Buckingham, who, like Peat, is no singer, yet sang. Mrs. Bland's style of singing ballads was unique, and has, like Incledin's, never been equalled since. But if she sang "Tink a Tink" better than Mrs. Jones, she did not dance so well, for she was a little dumpling of a cherry-checked milk-maid in appearance. Miss Winstanley "would" have sung "When pensive" well, but for two things - first, she was frightened out of her wits, being a novice in singing in public; and next, she pronounced the words with too homely an accent. But for these faults, both easily remedied, she would have sung this beautiful air well. The dance between Mrs. Jones and Mr. Fitzgerald was well executed. Mrs. Jones's movements were singularly graceful, without any thing to offend; which cannot be said of the Opera at home. Mrs. Downes sang "Love is a mischievous Boy" with great spirit and correctness. With practice, and aided by Mrs. Chester, these three actresses would get through a comic opera with eclat. They have the latent capacity. The dresses of Mrs. Downes, Mrs. Jones, and Miss Winstanley, were superb . . .


31 August 1836, concert, Marian Maria Chester, saloon, Royal Hotel, Sydney

[Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (25 August 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12855020 

Under distinguished Patronage
MRS. CHESTER RESPECTFULLY announces to her Friends, and the public generally, that her
CONCERT OF Vocal and Instrumental Music Will take place on
WEDNESDAY EVENING, August, 31st, 1836, in the Saloon of the Royal Hotel, on which occasion she will be assisted by
MR. W. WALLACE, MR. DEANE AND TWO SONS, MR. JOSEPHSON, MR. CAVENDISH, AND MISS DEANE. ALSO, A Gentleman Amateur has kindly consented to sing a German Song and in an Italian Duett.
Programme Concert.
PART I.
Overture - "Gustavus' - AUBER.
Glee - "Step as soft as Zephyr's dying" - ROSSINI.
Solo - Pianoforte, Air, Variations, and Finale, a la Militaire - HERTZ - MISS DEANE.
Song - "Soldier Tired" - DR. ARNE - MRS. CHESTER.
Market Chorus - From Masaniello - AUBER, (Will be repeated in consequence of the rapturous applause bestowed upon it on its first performance in this Colony,)
Solo - Violin - MR. W. WALLACE.
PART II.
Overture - Der Frietchutz - WEBER.
Song - "Under the Walnut Tree" - LINLEY - MRS. CHESTER.
Quartette - HAYDON.
Duett - "La Ci darem la manon," - MOZART - MRS. CHESTER and AMATEUR.
Chorus - "Hail all Hail!" - AUBER.
Duett - "I know a bank," - HORN - MISS and MASTER DEANE.
The Solos by MRS. CHESTER.
By permission of Major England, Mrs. Chester will be allowed the valuable aid of the Band of the King's Own Regiment.
* TICKETS, 6s. each, to be had of Mr. Ellard, Hunter-street; Mr. Tyrer, George street, and Mrs. Chester, No. 8, King-street.
* Concert to commence at Eight o' Clock.

ASSOCIATIONS: John Philip Deane's two eldest sons, John Deane junior, a violinist, and Edward Smith Deane, cellist and vocalist; the amateur referred to is almost certainly the tenor singer Charles Rodius, better known as a visual artist

[News], The Australian (2 September 1836), 2-3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855247 

Mrs. Chester's Concert took place on Wednesday evening last, and we were sorry to see the room rather thinly attended. We have not time to enter into a detailed critique of the various performances, but must not omit to mention the superior style in which Mrs. Chester executed the song of The Soldier Tired, in which she was rapturously encored. We have so often expressed our admiration of Mr. Wallace's performance on the violin, that [3] it is needless for us to do so now. There was an amateur sung a German song, in which he displayed a most pleasing voice and a great knowledge of music. We must not omit to notice Miss Deane's performance on the piano. This young lady has much improved since we last heard her; her solo was played with a great deal of animation; and we have no doubt that in the course of a few years she will be a first rate pianist. The whole of the arrangements appeared to give much satisfaction; indeed we do not recollect ever being at a concert in this colony where the performances, taken as a whole, elicited so much approbation.

"Mrs. Chester's Concert", The Sydney Monitor (3 September 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32152108 

MRS. CHESTER'S Concert took place on Wednesday Evening, in the Saloon of the Royal Hotel, and notwithstanding the damp and chillness of the evening, the room was nearly full. Miss Deane displayed her usual skill and taste at the Piano. Mrs. Chester's The Soldier Tired, &c., received great applause and was loudly encored. This song requiring great exertion, it was rather inconsiderate we think, to call for it a second time. The trio which followed was performed by Mr. Deane, Mr. Josephson, and Master Deane, and was well executed. We cannot speak in too favorable terms of the taste with which the German song was executed by an amateur. His voice is manly, and at the same time very mellow, and he modulated well. This was loudly encored. The Market Chorus, from Masaniello, by eight Bandmen and Mrs. Chester, created universal applause, and was also loudly encored. The first part was concluded by Mr. Wallace's brilliant performance on the Violin, which was contrasted with the touching air, Hope told a Flattering Tale, and which Mr. W. introduced with variations. The audience was wrapt in silence during this piece, except at every pause, when the clapping was general. On the conclusion, Mr. W. was so loudly applauded that he returned and gave one more tune to the satisfaction of all present.

The second part opened with The Overture to Der Frieschutz [sic], which on the whole was performed well. The Horn was rather too sharp. Under the Walnut Tree, by Mrs. Chester was well sung, and encored. We cannot say much for the Quartette. The Italian Duett - La ci darem la mano, by Mrs. Chester and an amateur, was excellent and was encored. The audience as well as the performers appeared in excellent spirits for they encored almost every piece. The Chorus Hail! all Hail! was also executed very well by the Bandsmen and Mrs. Chester. This also was encored. Miss and Master Deane sang the Duet, I know a Bank - very prettily, but the boy appeared to have a cold, and Miss Deane was rather timid; nevertheless, the song pleased so well as to be encored and they sang it the second time with more spirit. Rule Britannia! concluded the Evening's entertainments by a full body of Choristers, the Solos by Mrs. Chester. This Concert seemed more generally applauded than any heretofore.

"CONCERT", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (3 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2206396 

We are informed that Mrs. Chester's Concert was not well attended, notwithstanding which drawback the performance was generally worthy of a better house. Mr. Wallace, as usual, was the star of the evening, and his performance on the violin seem to have the powerful charm of never tiring. We regret we were not present to have given the particulars.

"MRS. CHESTER'S CONCERT", The Colonist (8 September 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31718472 

This rational and delightful entertainment, took place at the Royal Hotel, on Wednesday evening, 3rd instant. Mrs. C. was as usual unassuming in her deportment, and in excellent voice; her execution of the difficult flowing tones in the Soldier Tired, was admirable - every performer and vocalist appeared to exert themselves to the utmost, and with the happiest effect. Mrs. Chester may congratulate herself on having afforded to the public one of the most delightful musical entertainments that has yet been given to the Australian public.


"NEWS OF THE DAY", The Sydney Monitor (10 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32152168 

Mr. Wallace, we perceive, has announced another Concert to take place, under the patronage of the Governor. The improved weather will, we doubt not, facilitate the attendance. We hope more real music, both vocal and instrumental, and less mechanical display, will distinguish this Concert, than what we have hitherto witnessed. Nobody wishes to see mere exhibitions of fingering and bowing. We hope Mrs. Chester also will indulge in a little more animation, if she sing at this Concert. Out of the Theatre she is too grave.


[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (14 September 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32152195 

Under the distinguished Patronage of His Excellency the Governor, who has signified his intention of being present.
MR. W. WALLACE,
Leader of the Anacreontic Society and Professor of Composition, Royal Academy.
BEGS to announce that his Concert of Vocal and Instrumental Music will take place on
THIS EVENING, September 14, 1836, in the Saloon of the ROYAL HOTEL,
on which occasion he will be assisted by
Mrs. Chester, Miss Deane, Miss E. Wallace, Mr. Josephson, Mr. S. W. Wallace, Mr. Cavendish, and the Amateur who was received so favourably at Mrs. Chester's Concert.
Programme Concert.
PART I.
1. Overture
2. Glee, Vive le Roi - BALFE
3. Solo - Flute - NICHOLSON - MR S. WALLACE
4. Come Dolce - MISS WALLACE
5. French Song - BOILDEAU [sic] - AMATEUR
6. Fantasia, Piano Forte, with orchestral accompaniaments - KALKBRENNER - MR. W. WALLACE
7. Song-Soldier Tired - DR. ARNE - MRS. CHESTER
8. Paganini's Grand Solo (to be performed on one string), Violin - MR. W. WALLACE
PART II.
1. Overture
2. Trio and Chorus - Viva Enrico - PUCITTA - MRS. CHESTER, MISS WALLACE, AMATEUR and Chorus
3. Song - Rover's Bride - LEE - MRS. CHESTER
4. Duet. Pianoforte - HERTZ - MISS DEANE and MR. W. WALLACE
5. Song, Swiss Melody - MISS WALLACE
6, Duet - La ci darem la mano (by desire) - MOZART - MRS. CHESTER & AMATEUR
7. "Nel Cor pieu" [sic] Violin - by particular desire, MR. W. WALLACE
By the kind permission of Major England, Mr. Wallace will be allowed the assistance of the Band of the 4th, or the "King's Own," Regiment.
Single Tickets 7s 6d each; Family Tickets, to admit four £1 1s;
to be had of Mr. Ellard, Hunter-street; Mr. Chester, King-street, and Mr. Tyrer, George-street.
Concert to commence at 8 o'Clock.

"THE CONCERT", The Australian (16 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36858596 

. . . Mrs. Chester we never heard sing better; she executed the very difficult passages in The Soldier Tired with surprising facility, and we almost regretted that her powers should have been wasted upon such a hacknied song. The duet of La ci darem she sung with Mr. Rhodius very sweetly . . .

"Mr. Wallace's Concert", The Sydney Monitor (17 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32152219 

. . . With this general remark we have the pleasure to state, that the pieces and songs were executed with credit to the several performers. Mrs. Chester sang two songs, THE SOLDIER TIRED, and THE ROVER'S BRIDE. Miss E. Wallace sang COME DOLCE, and a SWISS MELODY. A Duett was sung by Mrs. Chester and an Amateur, and a Glee by Mrs. Chester, Miss Wallace, and the same Amateur. All these songs, &c went off with applause . . .

"MR. WALLACE'S CONCERT", The Sydney Herald (19 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12860477 

/. . . Mrs. Chester's ability as a vocalist is so well known to a Sydney audience, that it is now quite unnecessary to point it out. Yet, though she has great power of voice, we admired her song of the Rover's Bride, more than the Soldier Tired; and her performance in the trio and chorus, Viva Enrico, more than either. She also sang with great taste and judgment the duet, La ci darem la mano, from the Giovanni of Mozart, with an Amateur, who delighted the audience by the manner in which he had previously song a French air . . .


"Domestic Intelligence", The Sydney Times (17 September 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article252811764 

It is delightful to notice the progressive and rapid advancement of Australia, in the arts and sciences - in fact in civilization, as well as in pastoral and in commercial wealth. A twelvemonth ago, it would have been just as possible to walk from Sydney to old Drury, or to the English Opera House, as to get up such a Concert in Sydney, as that with which Mr. Wallace delighted the townsfolk on Wednesday evening last. Indeed Mr. W. Wallace, our fine violinist, and his charming nightingale sister - with Mrs. Chester, Mr. Dean and family, are a vast acquisition to the intellectual advancement of Sydney. So in the arts, it would have been next to an impossibility before the arrival of Mr. Fernyhough in the Colony a few months ago, to have obtained such excellent Lithograph and Zincographic prints, as may now be produced to embellish our Colonial Literature. We have been favored with a copy of a publication representing some well known aboriginal characters, which are entitled to praise, as being for the most part strking profile like nesses of our sable townsmen, and well executed. They will form a pretty present to friends in England; as characteristic of this country.

ASSOCIATIONS: William Fernyhough (printer, lithographer, engraver)


"DRAMA", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (17 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2206687 

Mr. Joseph Simmons late of the Sydney Theatre has we perceive returned from a successful trip to Van Diemen's Land, where he has boen giving a few of his celebrated "at homes." We hope Mr. Simmons may meet with an engagement at our Theatre as his talents can now not be very well done without: tho' in justice to Mr. Knowles we must say he surprises us by managing so well with so few materials. Mr. Simmons's loss is principally felt in musical pieces, for since the retirement of Mrs. Chester and Mrs. Taylor we cannot now name one vocalist among the whole corps dramatique.


[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (21 September 1836), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32152242 

MUSICAL FESTIVAL,
TO TAKE PLACE
This Evening, Sept. 21, 1836,
IN ST. MARY'S CHURCH, HYDE PARK.
Part First.
Selections from Handel's Sacred Oratorio,
THE MESSIAH.
-o-
INTRODUCTORY HYMN.
-o-
OVERTURE.
-o-
1. Comfort ye my People - MRS. RUST
2. He shall feed his Flock - AN AMATEUR
PASTORAL SYMPHONY.
3. Where is this Stupendous Stranger - MRS. CHESTER
4. He was despised - AN AMATEUR
5. I know that my Redeemer liveth - MISS WALLACE
6. Holy Lord - MRS. RUST
CHORUS HALLELUJAH.
-o-
Part Second. -
Selections from Hayden's Grand Oratorio,
THE CREATION.
-o-
"Ave Verum," Solo and Quartett, MRS. RUST AND AMATEURS.
-o-
OVERTURE.
-o-
1. In the beginning (Recit.) - Now Vanish (Air) - AN AMATEUR
2. Chorus, a New Created World
3. And God said (Recit.) - With Verdure clad (Air) - MRS. CHESTER
4. Of Stars the fairest pledge of day - AN AMATEUR
5. Sanctus - Trio - MRS. RUST and AMATEURS
6. Graceful Consort - MRS. CHESTER and AMATEUR
7. GRAND DOUBLE CHORUS - The praise of God - the Solos by MRS. CHESTER
-o-
Tickets and Books of the words, &c. to be had at
MR. TYRER's, 81, George-street; and at MR. ELLARD's, Hunter-street.
-o-
Single Admission Tickets - 0 10 6
Family ditto, to admit four 1 11 6
Single Tickets to admit two children.
Books of Words ........ 0 1 0
-o-
Leader of the Band, Mr. Wallace.
Principal Second Violin, Mr. Deane.
Assisted by the Gentlemen of the Philharmonic Society.
By the permission of Major England, the Band of the King's Own Regiment.
To commence at Seven o'Clock.

"THE ORATORIO", The Australian (23 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36854491 

. . . The Pastoral Symphony Where is this stupendous Stranger [sic], by Mrs. Chester was remarkably well sung by that lady. A little timidity prevented her from imparting to it all the impressiveness of which her fine voice is so susceptible; but she afterwards sang, with all her power, and with great sweetness, simplicity, and effect, With verdure clad the fields appear. Indeed we have not heard her to greater advantage, and one opinion appeared to pervade the whole audience as to the excellence with which she executed this air. Mrs. Chester's voice is one of great variety as well as compass - and she does herself injustice by the partiality she evinces for singing at the top of her voice. In the fine Hallelujah Chorus it was transcendant over every sound. She possesses very many of the attributes of a fine singer, the efficiency of which the cultivation of a subdued tone would greatly improve . . . He was despised and rejected of men was sung with great sweetness by Mr. Rhodius. His cadences were soft and sweet, and quite delightful. He possesses more power than he displayed: and were he to sing more boldly he would sing more successfully. In the duet of Graceful consort by thy side, with Mrs. Chester, he evinced the correctness of his taste and judgment . . .

"ORATORIO", Commercial Journal and Advertiser (24 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226458595 

. . . Mrs. Chester did not sing the Pastoral Symphony, as a contemporary has it - that piece was played by the Band - her "Where is this Stupendous Stranger," was sung most pleasingly, but with a diffidence that denied it much of that effect that she could have imparted to it - but her "With Verdure Clad" amply redeemed her, and replaced her high in the rank of Vocalists, for in this piece she gave scope to her rich and flexible voice . . .

"THE ORATORIO", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (24 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2206796 

Mrs. Chester was perhaps not quite so happy, in her first song, Where is this stupendous stranger? but she more than made up for the deficiency in her subsequent performances in the Hallelujah chorus, where the powers of her voice were finely developed. This lady appeared to much greater advantage than at Mr. Wallace's Concert. Her voice, indeed, is perhaps better adapted for the Theatre than a confined room . . .

"The Oratorio", The Sydney Monitor (24 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32152283 

. . . Mrs. Chester executed the many portions assigned her with great effect; and Miss Wallace sang far beyond her years that fine air - "I know that my Redeemer liveth" . . . Mrs. Chester exerted herself with fine effect in the chorusses. Her voice in the Hallelujah was heard above the whole Quire . . .

"THE ORATORIO", The Sydney Herald (26 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12864654 

. . . Mrs. Chester sung in her usual excellent manner, and appeared to more advantage in Haydn's very delightful song of "With Verdure Clad" than we ever had the pleasure of hearing her before. In the chorusses Mrs. Chester was invaluable. Mr. Rhodius stands pre-eminent amongst his brethren in the profession, and sung with much expression "He was despised," and also in a Duet with Mrs. Chester . . .

"Domestic Intelligence. THE ORATORIO", The Colonist (29 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31718544 

WE insert the following critique on the performances at the Oratorio in the Roman Catholic chapel, from the pen of a talented correspondent . . .

Mrs. M. You are very severe, Mr. T. Pray what think you of Mrs: Chester's abilities.

Mr. T. Mrs. Chester fortunately possesses a powerful and decidedly a very melodious voice, she shone conspicuous in every thing she attempted; when I say shone - you heard her voice above every other both in point of power and in alt. notis; yet there is a something wanting in this lady's style of singing; she astonishes the ear by her natural voice and the command she has acquired over it, never falsifying a note, or being out of tune; that is, she sings correctly, and that to a great nicety: but it is not solely the ear that a vocal performer should study to delight, the heart should be captivated and held during the whole performance; a powerful voice, be it ever so melodious, will not of itself do this, it must be done by an expression of feeling; the whole soul must be wrapt up in the character of the piece under representation, and reflect to an assembly the colouring and glow as well as the figure of the object or subject represented. If this lady would but convince herself of the necessity of reaching the hearts as well as the ears of her hearers, I am positive the benefit would soon become apparent to her.

Mrs. M. I must confess I agree with you on that point, and now you express it, I feel what it was I looked for in Mrs. Chester, and did not find it; at one time I was astonished by her execution and something beyond what I actually heard, and felt quite disappointed when she finished the air . . .


[News], The Colonist (29 September 1836), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31718563 

We are about to lose one of the best vocalists that has ever delighted the ears of a Sydney audience, who with her husband proceeds to India in a very short time. We allude to Mrs. Chester, whose deportment we are happy to say, during her stay in this colony, has been as correct as her singing has been pleasing.

"DOMESTIC", The Australian (30 September 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36853800 

We are about experiencing a serious loss to the musical profession, in the departure of Mrs. Chester for India.

Report says that Mrs. Taylor is to appear at our Theatre on Monday next, the truth of which we cannot vouch for.

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (1 October 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2206945 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester proceed to India shortly, the public will therefore lose a favourite actress and vocalist, and a lady whose deportment as such, has been highly creditable.


1 October 1836, Chester's special farewell appearance, Theatre Royal, Sydney

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (1 October 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32152320 

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (1 October 1836), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2206962 

Theatre Royal SYDNEY.
THE PUBLIC are most respectfully informed, that
MRS. CHESTER Will appear at the Sydney Theatre, for the last time previous to her departure for India, THIS EVENING, SATURDAY, OCT. 1, 1836, when will be performed the Comic Operatta, called
No Song No Supper.
Robin - Mr. Spencer.
Crop - Mr. Knowles.
William - Mr. Collins.
Frederick - Mr. Peat.
Endless (first time) - Mr. Simes.
Thomas - Mr. Lane.
Marguaretta - Mrs. Chester,
Being the last character in which she will appear during her short stay in Australia.
Dorothy - Mrs. Downes.
Nelly - Mrs. Jones.
In the course of the piece the following popular Songs by Mrs. Chester -
"Across the Downs this Morning."
"Should he Upbraid."
"With lowly suit and plaintive ditty."
"O say not woman's Heart is bought."
To conclude with the Splendid Romantic Spectacle of
BLUE BEARD: OR, Female Curiosity . . .
In the course of the piece the following songs and duets -
"Tink-a-Tink," Mrs. Jones & Mr. Buckingham.
"When pensive I thought on my Love," Miss Winstanley.
"Love is a Mischievous Boy", Mrs. Downes.
"A Fond Husband," Mr. Buckingham.
ALSO, In the course of the piece, a Turkish Dance,
By Mrs. Jones & Mr. Fitzgerald . . .
C. KNOWLES, Manager.

"THEATRE", The Sydney Monitor (3 October 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32152359 

The lively old Farce of "No Song No Supper" was performed on SaturSday, and Mrs. Chester appeared in the character of Margueretta. The three English ballads were pleasingly sung by that lady, but the first was best, because sung without ornament. English melodies will not admit of ornament. The acting of Knowles, Mrs. Downs, and Simes, was excellent . . .

"DRAMA", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 October 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2206991 

On Saturday evening the operatic farce of "No Song no Supper" was performed, in which Mrs. Chester took the part of Margueretta, being the last time of that lady's appearance previous to her departure for India. This piece has not been played before this season, owing to the absence of those performers who were necessary to sustain the characters. Mrs. Chester sung "Meet me by Moonlight," with great pathos and simplicity, and also "Should he upbraid," which is a song peculiarly adapted for her powerful and and melodious voice, combined with so much execution as Mrs. C. possesses. The other songs by this lady also gave universal approbation, and gained the applause they merited. Although Mrs. Chester does not possess any great degree of talent as an actress, still as a vocalist she was unrivalled on the Sydney stage, where, we think, she certainly excels, and it is much to be regretted the Proprietor of the Theatre could not come to terms with this lady, as her vocal abilities alone, considering the very great deficiency of this kind of talent among the present "corps," would have rendered her a useful ornament there . . . We must not omit stating that the orchestral accompaniments to Mrs. Chester, was execrable, and was quite sufficient to put the lady out of tune.


11 October 1836, the Chester's sailed from Sydney for Calcutta

"DEPARTURES", The Sydney Monitor (12 October 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32152462 

Yesterday, the bark Pegasus, Howlett, master, for Calcutta, with sundries Passengers - Judge Cracroft, Mr. and Mrs. Chester, Mrs. and Miss Howlett.


"DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE", The Sydney Herald (20 October 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12863852 

We understand that a musical gentleman of Sydney has written to Hobart Town for two celebrated violin-players, and the leading female vocalist of that place, the latter to fill up the vacancy occasioned by the departure of Mrs. Chester.



1837 (Scotland)

"MUSIC AT SYDNEY", Chambers Edinburgh Journal 275 (6 May 1837), 117

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=l2MiAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA117

A FILE of colonial newspapers is apt to be a source of considerable entertainment. It is particularly so if the colony be new and small, and things be only, as it were, in the bud. It is then most amusing to observe how minds, which, at home, would be making a stir about great matters, go to work when they have to agitate about things comparatively little, and how the terms and modes of speech customary here, look, when applied with the same seriousness to the miniature concerns of one of these infant states. The squabbles, too, and bickerings which are incessantly going on amongst colonial editors, are extremely amusing at this cool distance, where nothing is intelligible but that two or three honest gentlemen have been grievously offending each other's love of approbation.

Number three of "The Reformer," a fortnightly paper commenced in June 1836, at Sydney, contains an article under the title of "Music in Australia," in which the editor gives an account of certain concerts which had recently taken place in the Australian capital. Both for the information it conveys, and the designed or undesigned humour which lurks in the composition, this article is worthy of the notice of our readers. The writer commences by stating that, when he arrived in the colony four years ago, music was little in fashion, partly in consequence of the troubles at the end of Governor Darling's administration. For six months, sad to relate, there had not been a single concert in Sydney.

"It was the arrival of Mrs. Taylor, and then subsequently of Mrs. Chester, that roused, as it were, the musical lethargy of New South Wales; but it cannot be said that music was fairly established amongst us, until the tide of emigration brought to our shores Messrs. Wallace and Deane. When the first of the named gentlemen arrived in Sydney, there were persons who said, it was an act of folly that a man of his acquirements should have ventured to come to Botany Bay, and it was asserted, that he would have to expiate such a want of judgment as this. We were never of the same opinion; and we were not mistaken. The first and the second concerts, although succeeding each other rapidly, were crowded to excess; and as it is required to speak sometimes in figures, we believe that L.80 at least were cleared each time. But what must have been the astonishment of the idiots and circumscribed amongst us, when, about six months after the arrival of Mr. Wallace and his family, Mr. Deane also (member of the Philharmonic Society of London) removed him self and family from Van Diemen's Land to New South Wales. As we are never despairing, we did not despair either, in seeing such a vast accumulation of musical talent pour into our colony. We said to ourselves, there are capitalists and settlers of from fifty thousand to five and six thousand pounds of income a-year, there is a high-salaried governor, there are well-paid public officers amongst us. It is impossible that they should not imitate, I would not just say the king, but the respectability and wealth of Great Britain. * * * Several concerts were given both by Mr. Wallace and Mr. Deane; and it must be said, as being very creditable to our public, that every one of them (with the exception of one) was very well attended - and the indifferent attendance of that one was caused by excessive bad weather. We have heard, beginning with Beethoven and Paganini, almost every virtuoso in Europe; we have practised music ourselves in the happier days of our youth; we have therefore some right to review freely the prominent talents which the colony possesses at the present moment."

He then describes Mr. Wallace as one who would be considered "a good solo-player, even in one of the first-rate theatres at home." There are "tones of his" that the colony "does not yet thoroughly comprehend," but he believes it will "grow up to them." Mr. S. W. Wallace is "a very feeling, nay, original flute-player;" and Miss E. W. is "a juvenile performer," whose voice is "even now sweet and melodious," though she is as yet deficient in the pronunciation of Italian. Mr. Deane is "a very diligent and attentive leader, a good performer, and well versed in the theoretical part of music. How beautifully did he lead the quintette of Haydn; such a thorough-wrought piece of music must affect every mind. * * * * It creates a very homely feeling to see Mr. Deane busying himself about his numerous family, for the sake of procuring us recreation, elation, and refinement of mind. Miss Deane labours under the same advantageous predicament as Miss Wallace - she is also very young. It is very creditable to Mr. Deane, to have formed such a skilful pupil as his daughter is. Many hours and days must have passed by, to bring forth such precocious accomplishments. There is no hesitation, there is no mistake in Miss Deane's playing. Look at her Greek March! There she begins, and there it runs on clear and perfect to the very end. Some passages are even sublime, and who can say how far Miss Deane will improve, when she also will have become a big girl. Master E. Deane is rather a phenomenon, and we have never before seen a boy of his age managing the violoncello as he does."

Mrs. Chester, "although the last in our article, is not the least among our colonial performers. She has the strongest, most sonorous, and expressive voice, we have heard in the colony. Amongst other songs, her Auld Robin Gray is an admirable piece, which we would not be tired to hear day after day. But having spoken of Mrs. Chester and our other virtuosoes, we must now observe, that all and every one of them are labouring under a most perplexing disadvantage, and this is the want of a proper orchestra. Look how things are going on at home. There is a band of, say a hundred, or sixty, or forty musicians; the leader with the roll of paper in his hand gives the majestic sign; a whirlwind, a thunder of tones is coming forth; the minds of the audience, as well as that of the virtuoso, are wound up to a proportionate degree of elation; and lo! out of that chaos of tones emerges, like upon celestial wings, the glaring utterance of the virtuoso. He dwells some longer or shorter time in the regions of his fancy and imagination, and when he arrives at a certain stop, a mass of tones is echoing him, mingling, as it were, their joy with the applause and cheering of an electrified audience. How different to this are our present concerts! The tones of a Wallace, of a Chester, of a Miss Deane, are accompanied by the confounded scraping of some botching fiddler; and if there is not a superabundant stock of feeling in the minds of the principal performer, it is certainly not by this accompaniment that such can be ever elicited.

We want therefore a regular orchestra. We want a regular orchestra for the new theatre now erecting - we want one for each of our two cathedrals, &c. The colony is advanced enough, and the treasury is rich enough, that such and similar refinements might be now expected. It would be very expensive to have the performers written for from England, especially as fate, as it were, has cast on our shores a superabundance of musical talent. It was to such immigration of foreign talent, that in the middle ages the Italian states were indebted for that splendour in arts and sciences to which they finally arrived. It was not by sorcery and magic that they reached that splendour. It was because their Sir R. Bourke's, their H. McArthur's, their Sir J. Jamieson's, S. Terry's, &c. were men possessing national pride, and willing to give bread to such immigrants as well out of their own pocket as out of the public revenue. It is said, that the present governor is fond of music, and so it may be. But we beg leave to remind his excellency, that it is not by taking a few tickets that such national improvements as the above will ever be accomplished. If fate had cast during his reign painters on our shores - well, then it would have been in his power to give, in the first instance, this direction to the colony. As things stand now, it is in his hands to make it an eminently musical country."

The article ends with some specialties more for the consideration of the governor than of our readers.

ASSOCIATIONS: The anonymous author of the article, thus lambasted and quoted at length, was the editor of The reformer, John Lhotsky.




1837

To call up all the TROVE newspaper items tagged Marian Maria Chester for 1837:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Marian+Maria+Chester&q&l-decade=183&l-year=1837 

Calcutta, India (1837-41)

March 1837, Calcutta theatre

"SIGNORA SCHIERONI'S BENEFIT" and "THE GREEN-EYED MONSTER AND THE BRIGAND", Calcutta monthly journal and general register (May 1827), 183

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=yBUYAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA183 

Signora Schieroni's benefit at the Theatre on Monday night, went off with great eclat . . . [including] a piece by Poole called "Intrigue or the Bath road." We have little to say regarding this piece and perhaps the less said the better; for although it was performed cleverly enough, it has very little to recommend it. Even Sir Fretful himself would admit, that it "wants incident." It is, in short, what the Italians call a porcheria.

The only parts in it which afford the least scope to acting, are those which were performed by Mrs. Chester and count Almavivu, and their admirable acting and singing, gave full effect to the humour of the characters. The comic duet the dollery of which, we confess, is rather too much adapted to the taste of the galleries to please us, was encored. Mrs. Chester's "Should he upbraid," was very sweetly sung: it is a simple melody, and she had the good taste to avoid those fioriture by which such trifles are frequently married by English singers . . . Hurkaru, March 8.

The Green Eyed Monster and the Brigand were performed before a very good house on Monday evening. Of the Green Eyed Monster we shall only say, that it brought out the Secretary in grand force; his Baron de Speyhenhausen, was a masterly performance. Mrs. Chester was a very sprightly and Espiègle Luise . . . The Brigand, which followed, was exceedingly well got up. We noticed all the French artistes on the stage. The music was very good - the composition of Mr. Hamerton; but, strange to say, notwithstanding all the talent put into requisition on the occasion, it was not so well executed by the Brigands as it might have been. The dresses were very pretty. Mrs. Chester was in admirable voice, and is rapidly winning the good feelings of the Calcutta audiences - she will be a great favorite in a short time. Not to make invidious comparisons, she is in her line, a better actress than any now in Calcutta, in addition to which, she has a superb voice, which has been well cultivated . . . Both the pieces went off with great success, and the plaudits were incessant. - Hurkaru, March 15.


April 1837, Calcutta theatre, &c.

"MR. HAMERTON'S NIGHT", "THE MACHINIST'S NIGHT", and "MRS. ATKINSON'S BENEFIT", Calcutta monthly journal and general register (April-May 1827), (261-), 262, 263, 264

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=yBUYAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA262 

[261] Mr. Hamerton had one of the best houses of the season . . . [262] . . . We never remember to have seen a play go off apparently more to the satisfaction of an audience, and the Wreck Ashore and the Irish Tutor, have positively elicited more applause, than all the other plays of the season hitherto put together. This we must take as a criterion of meri of some sort or other . . . Mrs. Chester acted and sang greatly to the taste of the andience, and was applauded till the Welkin roared again.

The Irish Tutor, is a Jewell of a farce . . . Mrs. Chester was encored in the beautiful Irish melody Sarourneen Deelish, which she sang with much taste and expression. It is quite clear that this lady's accomplishments are properly appreciated by the public, and the oftener she appears, the greater favourite will she become.

The music in the Wreck Ashore, was very prettv, it was, we learn, with the exception of a song by Mrs. Chester, and the glee in the second part, the composition of Mr. Hamerton - it does him great credit . . .

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=yBUYAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA263 

[263] . . . Mrs. Chester was in excellent voice, and both in singing and acting was warmly applauded, bearing us out in our opinion as to her becoming rapidly (and deservedly) a public favorite. - Englishman, April 14.

[264] . . . We have not leisure to say all that we could wish of the several clever personations of the characters in this drama of Guy Mannering - Mrs. Atkinson, Mrs. Chester, Gilbert Glossin, the Domine and Sebastian were apparently the cream of the entertainment . . . Mrs. Chester sang a song about Scotland, which was encored; the same honour was extended to the Chough and Crow; and in both these instances, the compliment to Mrs. Chester in the song, and to herself, Mrs. Atkinson, my Lord Lovel, and the chorus in the Chough, was the greater in as much the music of either piece had certainly not the merit of novelty to recommend it, an to so generally fastidious an audience, but for the fact of their having in this instance left fastidiousness at home, we suspect neither piece of music would, under ordinary circumstances, present much attraction . . . Hurkaru, April 19.

"UNION ASSEMBLY'S CONCERT" Calcutta monthly journal and general register (April-May 1827), 299

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=yBUYAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA299 

The Union Assembly's Concert at the Town Hall, on Wednesday evening, was well attended and "came off," as "our friend" would say, most brilliantly . . . Mrs. Chester's Hours of Rapture, an air in the bravura style, affording two very pleasing movements, was delightfully sung . . . Then followed Una voce poco fa in its English dress of Tyrant soon I'll burst thy chain, admirably sung by Mrs. Chester. The concluding piece was the splendid finale to the 1st Act of Don Giovanni, Venite pur avanti . . . Hurkaru, April 28.


21 November 1837, birth of Sydney Yates Chester, Madras, India

1838

To call up all the TROVE newspaper items tagged Marian Maria Chester for 1838:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Marian+Maria+Chester&q&l-decade=183&l-year=1838 


[News], The Sydney Herald (30 April 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12861466

Mrs. Chester, the vocalist, was still at Calcutta, at the end of January.


"MR. LINTON'S CONCERT", The Calcutta monthly journal; Asiatic news (May-June 1838), 225

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=MBYYAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA5-PA225 

We were in hopes, not only from Mr. Linton's choice programme, but the unusual coolness of the evening on Monday, that his concert would have been better attended. Malgrè the damper of such poor encouragement; he sang with great spirit throughout, and, with his invariable readiness, substituted a right jovial ballad for the promised "Calunnia" of "an amateur," who was non est inventus. The gems of the evening were, decidedly, the delightful performances of the Ryckmanns. Both the basso and the petit bassoon were exquisite, but the bijou of bijoux was the piano forte fantasia of the junior Ryckmann - the Thalberg of Ind. There was one pianissimo passage in it, which, what with the delicacy of his touch, the modulation of the pedal, and sundry other musical witcheries of which we confess our technical ignorance, he so thoroughly captivated the hearts of his auditors, that we heard around us, many an irrepressible ejaculation of delight and "special wonder."

Mrs. Chester was in excellent voice, but, we think, the songs assigned to her were not judiciously chosen, inasmuch as her forte lies in those that require more naiveté in the singing than so sombre a one, for instance, as "Gardez vous." Her "Dashing White Sergeant" and "Buy a Broom," afford ample corroboration of this assertion. Mesdames Ventura and Valadares acquitted themselves very creditably, and Delmar led admirably: in short, all went off to the entire satisfaction of the audience. - Englishman, May 2.


"MRS. CHESTER'S FAREWELL DRAMATIC CONCERT", The Calcutta monthly journal; Asiatic news (June-July 1838), 279-80

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=MBYYAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA5-PA279 

On Tuesday evening, we attended the above performance at the Town-hall, and considering the circumstances under which it had been got up, we were agreeably surprized to find it so well attended. There could not have been less than twelve hundred rupees in the room.

Mrs. Chester [was] welcomed with hearty congratulations, which, doubtless, stimulated her to do her utmost to please her audience; for she acquitted herslef much to their satisfaction.

Mrs. Valadares warbled through passages of considerable length, with great rapidity and delicacy of tone.

[280] O'Mauley was quite at home: his comic song of "St. Patrick was a gentleman," was very good, and more so his Duett with Mrs. Chester; "When a little farm we kept." He has good taste in his singing, as all the world knows from Dublin to Calcutta, and is an excellent comic actor.

Mr. Linton was in good voice: he sang, "Oh maiden fair," with Mrs. Chester in very beautiful style; but we think he was not quite so successful in "The Midnight review." We are aware that it is a very difficult piece, and we have seen Phillips fail in it.

Jem Crow and "The Lover's Mistake" certainly were mistakes, and we would recommend Colonel Freelove to save the prompter a great deal of trouble, and himself too, by learning his part better the next time he undertakes one.

Mr. Rykmann, senior, on the Basso Bassoon, was beautiful. His son, through indisposition was unable to attend. - Hurkaru, June 21.


[News], The Sydney Gazette (28 July 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2539296

Mrs. Chester intends returning again to Sydney from India. It also appears her change did not turn out so advantageous as she anticipated, theatricals being on the decline in India.


"CALCUTTA. MRS. CHESTER", Calcutta Monthly Journal and General Register (August 1838), 361

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=TxcYAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA361 

Mrs. Chester took her benefit on the 2d instant, from the city of palaces, in progress of Barrackpore, Kishnagur, Berhampore, Dinapore, Monghyr, Benares, and Allahabad; at each of which stations he fair vocalist will probably delight the residents with a soirée musicale. At Cawnpore Mrs. Chester purposes making some stay, after which she will proceed to Meerut, Agra, and probably to Delhi.

1839

To call up all the TROVE newspaper items tagged Marian Maria Chester for 1839:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Marian+Maria+Chester&q&l-decade=183&l-year=1839 


"Mr. and Mrs. Chester", The Australian (21 March 1839), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36863687 

We have been favoured with the perusal of a letter from Dinapore, dated the 16th instant, announcing the arrival of Mr. and Mrs. Chester, and the success of the latter, both vocally and histrionically. Notwithstanding the unusual inclemency of the weather, Mrs. C's soiree at Dinapore and a play attracted a large assembly of both civil and military - the former from Patna, affording their liberal patronage to the vocal voyageuse. Mrs. Chester we understand, played Dolly in "Fortune's Frolic" and Distaffina in "Bombastes Furioso" with the men of H. M. 31st, with great success, and quite bewitched the tympana Patna and Dinaporiles with her favorites "Buy a Broom" and "the Dashing White Serjeant." We heartily wish these thespic adventurers every success in the further prosecution of their travels. - Madras Paper.


"THE CHOWRINGHEE THEATRE", Calcutta Monthly Journal and General Register (May 1839), 179

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=xRcYAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA4-PA179 

The attendance at the theatre on Thursday Night, was again nearly as meagre as on the previous benefit night . . . On the drawing up of the curtain, Mrs. Tonson appeared, in THE YOUNG WIDOW, as Lucy . . . Mrs. Chester's appearance as Aurelia Fairlove, drew forth rounds of applause from the audience; her song of "Why are you Wandering?" was most beautifully sung, as was also that of "I'll be no submissive wife." "The dashing white Serjeant" was not introduced here, as mentioned, in the Programme. It is our opinion that the song "Why are you trandering?" ought not to have been introduced into the body of the play, it would have done much better to have had it between the acts, but as it was, there appeated no meaning for its introduction in the particular part of the play in which it was sung.

In EXCHANGE NO ROBERRY, or the Diamond Ring . . . Mrs. Chester had very little to do in the character of Lepelle, but that little was well done. In this comedy she introduced with effect and advantage, the amusing song of "The Dashing White Serjeant," the conclusion of which draw for the eneral applause and an encore was demanded, and the song was repeated and met with undiminished applause.

We are extremely sorry that Mrs. Chester has been so unfortunate in both her benefit nights - she is deserving of better treatment at the hands of the community of Calcutta, and, we trust, she will be more fortunate in future.- Hurk, April 6.


30/31 May 1839, destruction of the Chowringee Theatre, Calcutta, by fire

"DESTRUCTION OF THE CALCUTTA THEATRE BY FIRE", The Englishman [Calcutta] (1 June 1839); as reprinted in The globe and traveller [London] (4 November 1839), 3

We have seldom experienced more real pain in announcing a public calamity than we do in now putting on record what all our town readers are by this time aware of - the total destruction by fire of our long loved Indian Drury, the Chowringhee Theatre. After standing for some thirty years, a source of delight to thousands of visitors and of support to many deserving professional artistes; after sustaining numerous rude shocks from the vicissitudes of fashion and of taste, and from the operation of the commercial pressures which have at times affected; more or less the interests of all institutions supported by the public; after enduring unscathed the side-wind attacks of the righteous - over much, and the assaults of faction within, - our valued theatre, scene of a thousand delightful reminiscences and delicious associations, has shared the fate of all the mighty temples which devoting to Thespia had reared in our favoured land. We deeply regret the catastrophe, for we have reached a condition of society, a period of pecuniary pressure, and a state of reeling on the subject of theatricals, which, for the moment at least, forbids us to hope for an early resuscitation of histrionic amusements.

Various accounts of the origin of the fire have reached us, but the true version of the business we believe to be as follows: -

Some gentlemen in the marine service had been rehearsing the drama of The Pilot, preparatory to its performance on the 6th of May, and had duly retired to their homes about 11 o'clock. At about 12 o'clock, Mr. Chester, the Secretary to the theatre, being then in bed, was suddenly aroused the ayah with cries of "Fire, fire." He jumped up, looked out upon the stage, with which his room communicated, and immediatelv encountered volumes of smoke proceeding from the stage itself, the mimic sea with which the boards were covered being on fire, and the flames rapidly enveloping the wings or side scenes, and ascendiag to the roof. Mr. Chester saw there was not moment to be lost. He rushed out of the house with his wife and children, and had scarcely got into the street, when the whole became one vast flame. The roof, composed of the most combustible materials - straw, tarpaulin and wood - soon ignited, and in few minutes, we may say, everything was destroyed. The engines had arrived with extraordinary promptitude, and soon water could be obtained they were brought to bear upon the conflagration, under the direction of Captain F. Birch and Mr. Justice McMahon, who used the greatest exertions to give a proper direction to the labours of the firemen and to preserve order. All was in vain, however. The scenery, the splendid wardrobe and paraphernalia, the valuable dramatic library, the benches, trellis-work, frame-work, curtains, cushions, the whole property, in short (excepting a clock, and the plate of the Beef-steak Club), including all the chattels and wearing apparel of poor Mr. Chester and his family, fell a prey to the "devouring element," and by morning's dawn nothing was be seen but the bare masonry of the walls, and a heap of smoking embers. Mr. and Mrs. Chester were, with prompt humanity, immediately offered an asylum in the house of a neighbour, but we believe they have been rendered this calamity so utterly destitute that the smallest assistance that can be sent them by the generous and the charitable, will, we are sure, be very acceptable.

We regret to hear that the house was not insured; the loss to the proprietors will consequently not fall short of half lac of rupees, in addition to which there it debt of some 20,000 rupees, which they will now (the mortgaged property being gone) have to pay to the mortgagees.

"THE CHOWINGHEE THEATRE", Asiatic journal and monthly miscellany (June 1839), 177

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=nbtAAQAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA177

The Chowringhee theatre is no more, or exists but as a crumbling and ghastly skeleton of its former self. Between one and two o'clock in the morning of the 31st ult. [May], it was discovered to be on fire, and in about an hour was a blackened and empty shell . . . We are glad to see a spirit of kindness abroad, which leads us to hope that some provision will be made for the sufferers by the late conflagration of the Chowringhee theatre . . . we allude to Mrs. Francis, the oldest performer attached to the theatre, by which she was always scantily rewarded; to Mrs. Black, who is nearly of the same standing, and has lately been left a widow, in indigent circumstances; and more especially, to Mr. and Mrs. Chester (the secretary and his wife), who have not only, like Mrs. Francis and Mrs. Black, lost the employment upon which they depended for support, but have also been deprived, by the devouring element, of their little all of personal property; they have, we are assured on the best authority, scarcely a change of raiment, or a plate or spoon, or article of furniture of their own. We are delighted to see that their deplorable case has attracted the charitable consideration of the Lord Bishop, the Archdeacon, the managers of the late theatre, and a few others . . .

"BURNING OF THE CHOWRINGHEE THEATRE", Calcutta Monthly Journal and General Register (June 1839), 264

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=xRcYAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA4-PA264 

. . . Not an atom of the furniture and of other appurtenances of the Theatre, has, as far as can be learnt, been saved from destruction, and but a small part of the Secretary's furniture has been preserved. Mrs. Chester and her little boy escaped in safety, and we have not as yet heard of any accident affecting life or limb . . . No one seems to know how the fire originated. Mr. Chester's account is, that, shortly after he had retired to rest, and when he had just fallen asleep, he was aroused by one of his servants, and on going towards the door of communication betwixt his house and the stage, encountered a volume of dense and suffocating smoke.

[News], Hurkara [Calcutta] (1 June 1839); ed. in The Indian stage, 259-60

https://archive.org/stream/indianstage029370mbp#page/n285 

The Chowringee Theatre is no more or exists but as a crumbling and ghastly skeleton of its former self. Between one and two o'clock in the morning of the 31st ultimo it was discovered to be on fire and in about an hour it was blackened into an empty shell. All help was unavailing from the combustible nature of the various portions of the interior scenery, furnitures etc. The flames made such a rapid progress that although engines arrived in the shortest possible time, they could do nothing for the preservation of the house. The whole inside of the theatre boxes, pit and stage with all their decorations, appurtenances, in short, every thing that would burn had been burnt. The wooden dome made a most awful blaze which was seen from the most remote part of the town, until about half past two when it fell in with a tremendous crash. The only portions of the premises which have escaped are the portion on the West-ward, and a part of the house, to the south, occupied by the secretary. Not an atom of the furnitures and other appurtenances of the theatre has, as far as can be learnt, been saved from destruction. No one seems to know how the fire originated.

Mr. Chester's account is that after he has retired to [260] rest and when he had just fallen asleep he was going towards the door of communication between this house and the stage and encountered a volume of dense and suftocating smoke. There had been a rehearsal of the "Pilot" and "Sleeping Draught" which concluded at about half past twelve, shortly after which the party of the amateurs engaged in the representation broke up and retired from the theatre. On their departure, the lights were all carefully extinguished with the exception of one which was kept burning in the front of the stage every night.


[News], Hurkara [Calcutta] (12 June 1839); ed. in The Indian stage, 260-61

https://archive.org/stream/indianstage029370mbp#page/n287 

We are glad to see a spirit of kindliness abroad, which leads us to hope that some provision will be made for the sufferers by the late conflagration, of the Chowringhee Theatre.

We do not of course, include in this number, the proprietors of the theatre who were all (we believe) amateurs in good circumstances and will not be seriously injured by the loss. We allude to Mrs. Francis, the oldest performer attachad to the theatre by which she was always scantily rewarded, to Mrs. Black, who is nearly of the same standing and has lately been left a widow, in indigent circumstances and more specially to Mr. and Mrs. Chester (the secretary and his wife) who have not only like Mrs. Francis and Mrs. Black lost the employment upon which they depended for support, but have also been deprived by the devouring element of their little all of personal property; they have, we are assured on the best authority, scarcely a change of raiment or a plate or spoon, or article of furniture of their own. We are delighted to see that their deplorable case has attracted [261] consideration of the Lord Bishop, the Archdeacon, the Managers of the late Theatre and [a] few others.


"THEATRICALS", The Sydney Herald (25 October 1839), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12855825

Mr. and Mrs. Chester, formerly of this Colony, appear to have been unfortunate in the East Indies, for by the Calcutta paper of July, we perceive that a subscription had been entered into on their behalf, and that upwards of two thousand rupees (£200) had been subscribed. A performance of amateurs for their benefit was to have taken place at Allahabad, but a few hours before the performance was to have commenced, the roof of the Theatre fell in. The Chowingee Theatre, concerning which Mr and Mrs. Chester had entered into some speculations, was burnt down accidentally.

1840

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Hobart-Launceston-Carlton, VDL (TAS) (21 November 1841 to c.1845)
1841

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23 November 1841, the Chesters arrived Hobart Town

"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE", The Courier (26 November 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2955197

PORT OF HOBART TOWN. Arrivals . . . 23 - the bark Britith Sovereign, 491 tons, Cow, from Calcutta and Madras, with a general cargo-passengers, Dr. Ford, lady, and three servants, Mr. and Mrs. Chester and child . . .


"The Gazette", Colonial Times (11 October 1842), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8752972 

The Lieutenant-Governor has approved of Mr. William Chester being appointed to the situation of Postmaster at the Carlton.

"GAZETTE", The Courier (14 October 1842), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2953656 


16 March 1834, birth of Herman Chester

1843, births in the district of Hobart; Tasmanian Names Index; NAME_INDEXES:1067829; RGD33/1/1/ no 1373

https://stors.tas.gov.au/NI/1067829 

https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD33-1-1-p412j2k 


17 November 1834, death of Herman (Hermon Granado) Chester, 8 months, of hooping cough

1843, deaths in the district of Hobart; Tasmanian Names Index; NAME_INDEXES:1185766; RGD35/1/1 no 1924

https://stors.tas.gov.au/NI/1185766 

https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD35-1-1p209j2k 

1845

14 September 1844m birth of Ernest Stevens Chester

1844, births in the district of Hobart; Tasmanian Names Index; NAME_INDEXES:1068815; RGD33/1/2/ no 546

https://stors.tas.gov.au/NI/1068815 

https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD33-1-2-p517j2k 




Bothwell, VDL (TAS) (c.1845 to 19 September 1848)
1848

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"BOTHWELL", The Courier (8 April 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2969444

It is said that Mrs. Chester, our talented schoolmistress, intends to give a musical concert very shortly in Hobart Town. It may not be generally known to the musical world of Hobart Town, so well as to us of this district, the power and pathos of this lady's voice. She displays great taste and much science in the performance of all she sings; whether it be a ballad, or a higher order of musical composition. Until her arrival, it may be said that singing was almost a dead letter among us; she has, however, revived and established a taste for it, and many private parties have been got up for the purpose of hearing her sing. The church music may be mentioned also as a pleasing result of her exertions, which has lately undergone a complete change. The choir in the Presbyterian congregation was organised, taught, and still continues to be conducted by her. Mrs. Chester retired into private life about 6 years ago, on her return to this colony from a tour through India, but has been induced to come again before the public; when her friends (and she has many) will no doubt give her a hearty welcome. Communicated.

NOTE: See also Jones 2011, 210: "Mrs. Chester was granted leave of absence by the Board of Education for a week in May 1848 to visit Hobart to give a public concert. By that time it was noted the family had financial difficulties, described in the Board;s records as "harassed and humbled by pecuniary misfortunes" (Archives Office of Tasmania, CB3/2)


28 April 1848, Chester's first concert, Hobart

"MRS. CHESTER'S CONCERT", Colonial Times (25 April 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8762720

[Advertisement], Colonial Times (28 April 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8762754 

CONCERT OF VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC,
At the Hall of the Mechanics' Institute, THIS EVENING, 28th instant.
UNDER THE IMMEDIATE PATRONAGE OF LADY DENISON.
By permission, the Band of the 96th Regiment will attend.
Mrs. Chester will also be assisted by Mr. Imberg, Miss Duly, Mr. Curtis, and Amateur.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture - Military Band.
2. Song - "Bid me discourse" - Mrs. Chester - Bishop.
3. Instrumental.
4. Song - "The Reconciliation" - Miss Duly - Glover.
5. Solo - Pianoforte - Mr. Imberg - Herz.
6. Song - "Hearts and homes united" - Amateur - Blockley.
7. Air - "Di piaoer" - Mrs. Chester - Rossini.
PART II.
1. Military Band.
2. Song - "Gone is the calmness" - Miss Duly - Wallace.
3. Duet - Piano and Cornet-a-piston.
4. Glee - "See our oars" - Sir J. Stevenson.
5. Ballad - "Auld Robin Gray" - Mrs. Chester - Scotch air.
6. Military Band.
7. Song - "Do not mingle" - Mrs. Chester - Bellini.
To commence at 8 o'clock precisely.
Single tickets, 5s.; family ditto, to admit five persons, £1. To be had of Mr. Walch and Mr. Hawley, Stationers; Mr. Haynes, Confectioner; Mr. Holbird, Derwent House; and of Mrs. Chester, 47, Macqunrie-street.
A room will be provided for the accommodation of the ladies, with a female attendant, for bonnets, shawls, &c.
April 28, 1848.

"THE CONCERTS", Colonial Times (2 May 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8762761 

Mrs. Chester's concert on Friday evening, at the Mechanics' Institute, was very genteely, and indeed numerously attended, Lady Denison and a large party of the elite being present. Mrs. Chester in the selection of her songs evinced her admiration of the sweetest vocalist we ever heard - Miss Stephens; and in the first, "Bid me discourse," which, by the way is by no means easy of execution, displayed considerable vocal ability, which would have been more prominent had the cantatrice possessed more confidence. This, however, could scarcely have been expected, as a long time has elapsed since Mrs. Chester appeared before a public audience, and especially an audience so highly respectable as the present. But Mrs. Chester's forte is decidedly ballad singing, and in that most exquisite ballad "Auld Robin Gray," she most pathetically touched the feelings of the audience, and called forth an unanimous encore, which again produced long and enthusiastic applause. This beautiful ballad was the gem of the evening, and has stamped Mrs. Chester a vocalist of no mean order. The other singers exerted themselves well, Miss Duly particularly, who however wants more confidence. Her reception has always been favourable; and we must impress upon her the actual necessity of avoiding that nervousness which, while we cannot but in a measure admire, we feel is a drawback on the display of her talents. We need scarcely add that the concert went off With eclat; and we sincerely hope that we shall have a continuous repetition of such delightful entertainments.

Mr. Packer's concert, which was given last evening at the Music Hall, was not so well attended as we expected . . .

"Original Correspondence. To the Editor of the . . .", Colonial Times (2 May 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8762765 

SIR, - Having been present on Friday evening at the concert given by Mrs. Chester, in the Hall of the Mechanics' Institute, and also much pleased with the performances, I send you a few remarks upon the entertainment provided. I confine myself more particularly to Mrs. Chester's singing, as all the other persons who assisted are well known to the public, and acquitted themselves with much ability.

The opening piece was an Overture played by the excellent Band of the 96th Regiment. This was followed by Mrs. Chester, in Bishop's admirable song, "Bid me discourse," the words from the works of the immortal Shakspeare. This is one of the very best songs ever composed by Bishop: it abounds in passages of peculiar brilliancy and grace, and in a succession of rich and varied cadences. The singer was accompanied by the Military Band, which, though not well adapted for such a purpose, answered very well on this occasion. Mrs. Chester's voice possesses great compass and wonderful flexibility: her lower tones are characterized by fulness and clearness, and the upper by great sweetness and delicacy; the whole managed with so much ability that shows she must have studied under some able master. Indeed so great was the difference in her voice and style of singing from anything we have lately heard, that not a few began to consider whether they were not back again in dear old England. There is another feature - I would say beauty - in this lady's singing, and that is the admirable manner in which she terminates the several running passages by the introduction of the skake, which in Mrs. Chester's voice seems to be quite a gift of nature, for I think no shake so close and rapid as her's could have been acquired. I have heard the great Jenny Lind, and it is just in this way - thrilling, shaking, quivering passages, that makes her stand so immeasurably above any singer that has yet appeared in Europe.

Mrs. Chester's second song was the grand Cavatina "Di placer," from Rossini's Opera of La Gaza Ladra. There can be no question as to the excellence of Rossini's compositions, but I must confess that I like my own language so well, and not understanding Italian, that I should have preferred an English song. Mrs. Chester, however, sang it very beautifully, and received merited applause.

The gem of the evening was the old, but never tiring, ballad of "Auld Robin Gray." In this Mrs. Chester's voice was heard in its greatest perfection: the plaintive simplicity of the air - the sorrowful history of the artless country maid - her filial affection and all but broken heart - were tenderly pourtrayed throughout. Am I the only one who could not resist the tribute of nature as it rose to the eye, as a relief to the melancholy feelings which this song is calculated so powerfully to excite? Every word come home to the heart, and were spoken so distinctly that not even a syllable was lost. The audience testified their gratification by loudly calling for the song a second time.

"Do not mingle" was the closing song, and in this too Mrs. Chester was paid the compliment of an encore. It appeared that as she advanced towards the end of the programme the better her voice became: she lost the excitement on her first coming forward, and gained confidence and self-possession. It was remarked by one standing by, that Mrs. Chester ought to have begun the concert when she left off, for each song she sang was better than the one preceding.

A VISITOR.

"CONCERTS", The Courier (3 May 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2969228 

Mrs. Chester, after a lapse of twelve years, made her appearance once more before a Hobart Town assembly on the evening of Friday last, and attracted a numerous audience, desirous of hearing a singer of whom report spoke most favourably. Nor were they disappointed. Mrs. Chester possesses a naturally fine voice of great extent and power, united with skill and accomplishment in her art. In her first song, "Bid me discourse," she at once proved her science, although she filled in some of the passages from nervousness. The ice once broken, she gradually improved. "Di Pacer" was well sung, and reminded us of the days of "Auld Lang Syne," carrying our imaginations home to Old England. The beautiful ballad of "Auld Robin Gray," although well sung, wanted that depth of pathos with which this touching Scotch melody is capable of being endued. Its charm lies in its simplicity, and the notes should be given without turn or ornament. Mrs. Chester, however, secured an encore. Ballads invariably come home to the feelings of an English audience, and we cannot but wonder they are not oftener introduced at public concerts. Mrs. Chester's last effort was the song of "Do not mingle," which she gave in excellent style, and with such effect that she was rapturously encored. The military hand acquitted themselves in their usual creditable way. We were particularly pleased with the performer on the flute in the last overture. His notes were singularly rich and sweet, and his time admirable. The duet, piano Herr Imberg and cornet-a-piston by one of the band, was exceedingly well played. Miss Duly sings prettily, but wants power for a concert room. The glee, "See our Oars," wanted in precision, and consequently in effect. Altogether Mrs. Chester may congratulate herself at the result of her re-appearance; and we hope in a few weeks to have the pleasure of hearing her again.

On Monday evening Mr. Packer gave a concert at the Music Hall, in Collins-street . . .

"MRS. CHESTER'S CONCERT", The Britannia and Trades' Advocate (11 May 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226534499 


"CONCERT", The Courier (17 May 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2969074 

We learn that Mrs. Chester purposes giving a second concert on or about the 26th May, two days after the anniversary of the birth of Her Majesty Queen Victoria. The arrangements, which are not yet completed, are, we understand, on a scale which cannot fail to afford a rich musical treat.


26 May 1848, Chester's second Hobart concert

[Advertisement], The Britannia and Trades' Advocate (25 May 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226535299 

GRAND CONCERT.
MRS. CHESTER BEGS to acquaint the Ladies and Gentlemen of Hobart Town and vicinity; that (by request of her friends) she intends giving another
CONCERT, on Friday next, (To-morrow,) at the Hall of the Mechanics' institute, when she will be kindly assisted by Miss Duly, Herr Imberg, Mr. Young, Mr. H. Howson, and by several Amateurs.
Also, by the kind permission of Colonel Cumberland, Her Majesty's Band of the 96th Regiment will be in attendance.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Overture - Military Band.
2. Grand Air, "Joyous days of childhood," - Anna Bolena - Donizetti - Mrs. Chester.
3. Duet, Piano and Violin - H. Imberg and H. Howson.
4. Song - Miss Duly.
5. Military Band.
6. Song, "Wanted a Governess" - Mr. Young.
7. (By request) "Auld Robin Gray" - Mrs. Chester.
8. Grand Quintette by H. Bishop, "The fox jumped over the parson's gate," - by Mrs. Chester, Miss Duly, Mr. Young, and Amateurs.
PART II.
1. Overture - Military Band.
2. Song, "When the war steed is bounding," from Figlia di Regimento, (first time in the colony,) Donizetti - Mrs. Chester.
3. Duet, Flute and Piano.
4. Song - Miss Duly.
5. Military Band.
6. Song, "Savouneen Dheelish," Parry - Mrs Chester.
7. Duet, "When a little farm we keep," - Mrs. Chester and Mr. Young - Mazzinghi.
8. "Rule Britannia."
Tickets, 5s. each, to he had of Mr. Walch, and Mr. Hawley, stationers ; Mr. Holbird, Derwent House; Mr. Haynes, and Mr. Webb, confectioners; and at the Courier Office. To commence at 8 o'clock precisely.
May 25, 1848.

"CONCERT", The Courier (3 June 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2968951 

Mrs. Chester's concert on Friday week last did not pass off with such eclat as will be likely to induce the cantatrice soon again to leave the peaceful shades of her rural residence to waste her notes in the murky streets of Hobart Town. But, after all, where is the blame? One singer cannot make a concert, and if the materials are wanting, the public assuredly will be wanting also. Upon the present occasion, moreover, Mrs. Chester was not in such voice as on her previous performance. She was evidently oppressed with the attentions of Monsieur Influenza, which even the accompaniment of Herr Imberg failed to shake off. La voix could not bring out the upper G with clearness. The second part went off rather better than the first, and the duet of "When a little farm we keep" was repeated - truth obliges us to add - not on account of the composition as a piece of music, but from its enlivening qualities. The fact is, it is essentially it stage duet, and partakes of both acting and singing. This, of course, Mr. Young, who is otherwise out of his place in a concert-room, could hit off passablement bien. In his previous song of "Wanted a Governess," he gave the audience a specimen of French with a remarkable English pronunciation; but "ail's one to Dandie." The band of the 96th played their parts with their accustomed and well-trained ability. The effect of so many wind instruments is rather overpowering in a room like the Mechanics' Institute.


"Concert', The Cornwall Chronicle (23 August 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65979637 

We perceive by our advertising columns that the inhabitants of Launceston are to be favored with a visit from Mrs. Chester, the Vocalist, who has on several occasions attracted large audiences at the Hobart Town Concerts. The Hobart Town Journals have reported most favorably of this Lady's talents, and we are quite sure that the connossieurs of music on this side the island will be prepared to do justice to the exertions of Mrs. Chester on this her first visit. The Concert is filed to take place on Friday week at the Cornwall Assembly Rooms, and the usual kindness of Lieut. Col. Cumberland, has ensured the assistance of tbe excellent band of the 96th, on the occasion.


8 September 1848 (postponed from 1 September), Chester's Launceston concert

[Advertisement], The Cornwall Chronicle (30 August 1848), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65979951 

MRS. CHESTER
BEGS to acquaint the inhabitants of Launceeton, that she will have the honor to appear at an
EVENING CONCERT Of VOCAL & INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, to take place
IN THE CORNWALL ASSEMBLY ROOMS, ON FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1st, 1848.
On which occasion, by the kind permission of Colonel Cumberland, the BAND of Her Majesty's 96th Regiment will attend.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. OVERTURE - Military Band
2. BALLAD - "Rover's Bride" - A. Lee
3. INSTRUMENTAL.
4. GLEE - "Mynheer Van Dunk" - Cherubini
5. SONG - "Do not mingle" - Bellini
6. SOLO - Flute "Bel Regio" - Sola
7. BALLAD - "Auld Robin Gray"
PART II.
1. AMERICAN POLKA - Jullien
2. CAVATINA - "Come Dolce" - Rossini
3. INSTRUMENTAL.
4. GLEE - "Lightly Tread" - Calcott
5. SONG - "Joyous days Childhood" - Donizetti
6. GLEE
7. SONG - "Wild White Rose" - A. Lee
CONDUCTOR, MR. HOWSON, SENR.
Tickets 5s; children of schools and families, half price; - to be had of Mr. H. Dowling and Mr. Blake; and Mr. Whitehead at the Assembly Rooms.
TO COMMENCE AT 1/2 PAST 7 O'CLOCK.
August 26.

"LOCAL", The Cornwall Chronicle (2 September 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65981610 

Mrs. Chester's Concert was postponed from last evening to Friday next, owing to the unsettled state of the weather.

"Mrs. Chester's Concert", The Cornwall Chronicle (13 September 1848), 19

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65978982

On Friday evening, Mrs. Chester made her first appearance before a Launceston audience, as a Concert singer, and although the was evidently labouring under a severe cold, her debut was successful. On Mrs. Chester's advance to the platform, she was universally applauded, and after the performance of an Overture by the Band of H. M. 96th, she sang the famous ballad of "The Rover's Bride," by A. Lee, the Professor under whom we understand Mrs. Chester studied the art of singing for about two years. In this performance the daring of the bold outlaw, contrasted with the mild and plaintive accents of the confiding bride were well expressed, and the ballad was gone through with excellent effect. A couple or Scotch ballads - "Auld Robin Gray," and "John Anderson my Jo," were also tastefully given, and (the latter in particular), much applauded. "The joyous days of Childhood" was another sweet ballad, which, spite of the singer's harassing cough, was touchingly sung. The concluding song, "The Wild White Rose" was unavoidably interrupted by a violent cough, but upon the whole the taste displayed, in Mrs. Chester's selection, and performance was admirable. The Piano Forte used was not in first-rate tune, and the accompaniment was consequently somewhat deficient. A celebrated Sinfonia by Haydn was performed by a portion of the Band, assisted by Mr. Beckford, who lent the music for the occasion. Mr. Bishop the master of the Band, and Mr. Howson, Senr., displayed much ability in this portion of the entertainment. Several glees were sung by Amateurs during the evening, and gave general satisfaction, "Lightly tread" being the favorite. We hope Mrs. Chester's speedy restoration to health will give another opportunity to the inhabitants to witness her talented exertions.

ASSOCIATIONS: Francis Howson, senior (pianist, violinist); Mr. Bishop (master of the band of the 96th Regiment)


19 September 1848, the Chesters depart Launceston for Melbourne

"Shipping Intelligence. PORT OF LAUNCESTON", Colonial Times (22 September 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8763558 

September 19 - Sailed the brig Swan, Woods, master, for Melbourne. Passengers - Mr. Little, Mr. F. Midgley, Mr. and Mrs. Chester and two children, Mr. Seales, Mr. John Adams, Mr. Bonner, Mr. Farrant; 21 steerage.




Melbourne, Port Phillip district, NSW (VIC) (24 September 1848 to 19 May 1849)

24 September 1848, the Chesters arrive in Melbourne

"SHIPPING AND COMMERCIAL GAZETTE", Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal (25 September 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223152072 

ARRIVED. September 24. - Swan, brig, from Launceston. Passengers - . . . Mr. and Mrs. Chester and two children . . .

"MUSICAL", The Argus (3 October 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4768785 

We observe by our shipping report that Mrs. Chester, the celebrated vocalist, is among the recent arrivals from Van Diemen's Land. Mrs. C. was a prime favourite as a singer on the Sydney stage some ten or twelve years ago, and she has since added to her celebrity during her residence in Calcutta, where she was regarded as the prima donna.


10 October 1848, Chester's concert

"THE CONCERT", The Melbourne Daily News and Port Phillip Patriot (9 October 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225693084 

The abilities of the performer, the very moderate price of tickets, and the well known liberality (especially to strangers) of the Melbourne public, lead us to expect that Mrs. Chester's concert, for to morrow evening, will be gratifying to the public, and remunerative to the lady. The programme contains one gem of Bellini's, from Somnambula, which, if at all done justice to, is worth the price of the ticket.

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News and Port Phillip Patriot (9 October 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225693079 

Under the Immediate Patronage OF HIS HONOR THE SUPERINTENDENT, HIS HONOR THE RESIDENT JUDGE, AND HIS WORSHIP THE MAYOR.
MRS. CHESTER BEGS to acquaint the inhabitants of Melbourne, that she will have the honor to appear at an evening CONCERT, OF Vocal and Instrumental Music, to be held in the Hall of the Mechanics' Institute, To-Morrow, Oetober 10th, 1848. On which occasion she will be assisted by Mr. Megson, Mr. Anderson, and Amateurs.
PROGRAMME:
PART I.
Overture, "Semiramide" - Rossini.
Song - "Joyous Days of Childhood," (op. Anna Bolina) - Donizetti.
Solo - Violin - Megson.
Ballad - "Auld Robin Grey," Scotch Melody.
Solo - Pianoforte, Capriccio - W. H. Holmes.
Cavatina - "Di Piacer" (op. La Gazza Ladra) - Rossini.
Overture - "Men of Prometheus" - Beethoven.
PART II.
Overture - "Guy Mannering" - Bishop.
Song - "Rover's Bride" - A. Lee.
Solo - Flute
Ballad - "John Anderson My Jo" - Scotch Melody.
Quintette - Instrumental - Romberg.
Song - "Do not Mingle" (op. Somnambula) - Bellini.
Finale - "God Save the Queen."
Conductor and leader - Mr. Megson.
Tickets, 5s each, to be obtained of Messrs. Pullar, Cooper, and Clarke, stationers, Collins-street, and of Mrs. Chester, adjoining the "Duke of York Hotel," Eastern Hill.
Conceet to commence at eight o'clock, precisely.

"LOCAL INTELLIGENCE", The Melbourne Daily News and Port Phillip Patriot (12 October 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225693294 

MRS. CHESTER'S CONCERT came off at the Mechanics' Institution, on Tuesday evening, under the patronage of their Honors the Superintendent, the Judge, and his Worship the Mayor. The attendance was a very numerous one, and every seat was occupied. There was much in the programme that has not been recently performed at previous concerts. The instrumental part went off very fairly, notwithstanding one or two accidents in the shape of violin (primo) and violoncello strings breaking. [The overture to] "Guy Mannering" (in which Mr. Megson elicited deserved applause) gave great satisfaction. Mrs. Chester made her debût in "Joyous days of childhood" (Anna Bolina,) but from [? perceptible] nervousness sang a little sharp. In the cavatina Di piacer, her voice [? exerted] much power and execution. Mrs. Chester's concluding effort, "Do not mingle" from "Somnambula," was by far her best, and had it been sung in the same style in a theatre (where, by-the-bye, Mrs. Chester's abilities would have appeared to much greater advantage) would have [encountered] a warm "encore." The character, [? facility], tone, and power of his lady's voice, and the style of her performance, are infinitely better calculated for "the Boards" than for "the Concert room" - unless that "Concert room" be of much larger dimensions than any building this city affords. On the whole, we should say that Mrs. Chester has not yet done justice to her own abilities. We are satisfied that her powers are far beyond what we have yet heard. We have heard a more talented vocalist make a far interior first appearance to that of Mrs. Chester . . .

"CONCERT", The Argus (13 October 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4770917 

On Tuesday night, a concert was given by Mrs Chester, under the patronage of the Superintendent, notice of which had been given in some of the local journals. The attendance was good, but the performances did not elicit that degree of admiration which the previous celebrity of the fair vocalist would seem to warrant. Mr. Megson, as usual, received the approbation of the company for his splendid performance as a musician.

"MRS. CHESTER", The Melbourne Daily News and Port Phillip Patriot (14 October 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225693253 

On subsequent enquiry we have ascertained that our remarks upon Mrs. Chester abilities, were substantially correct. We said that the public had not yet heard her sing, and we learn from a most competent authority who was present at the rehearsal to the late concert, that she then sang beautifully.


25 and 27 October 1848, Chester's first appearances, Queen's Theatre

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News and Port Phillip Patriot (25 October 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225693381 

Queen's Theatre. CONTINUED NOVELTlES.
The Manager has much pleasure in informing the public that he has entered into an arrangement with
MRS. CHESTER, Who will appear . . . THIS EVENING, OCT. 25.
THE PERFORMANCES will commence with the laughable farce entitled
PERFECTION.
Kate, (with songs,) by Mrs. Chester.
To be followed by the entirely new Ballet entitled
DANCING MAD; OR, THE GHOST OF THE VILLAGE
After which the Petite Comedy entitled the
GREEN-EYED MONSTER.
Louise, (with the usual songs,) Mrs. Chester.
The Evening's Entertainments will conclude with the farce entitled
THE TWO GREGORIES . . .
J. T. SMITH, Proprietor.

ASSOCIATIONS: J. T. Smith (manager, proprietor)

"THE THEATRE", The Melbourne Daily News and Port Phillip Patriot (27 October 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225693226 

A great variety of entertaiments was exhibited at the Queen's Theatre on Wednesday evening. The most attractive was the first appearance of Mrs. Chester, who fully justified the judgment we formed, at the concert, of her ability. She is undeniably the best vocalist that has ever publicly appeared in this city - and despite the frightful accompaniment of a wretched orchestra, elicited founds of applause from the audience. The "Dashing White Sargeant" Mrs. Chester sang with spirit, brilliancy, and expression. Her extreme nervousness interfered with her voice at the commencement, but after the first verse she conquered this obstruction, and when concluding the song, received an unanimous encore. But again we would observe that no singer could exert themselves with confidence with such an execrable band to assist them. By-the-bye, these "incurables," while mangling the "Flaxen headed Cow Boy," produced such a discordant clamour, (as if the first violin and double bass were in hysterics, and the rest of the instruments enjoying the joke,) that the risibilities of the audience were pretty generally and loudly excited.


27 October 1848, Chester as Jenny Leatherlungs in Jenny Lind at last

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News and Port Phillip Patriot (27 October 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225693221 

. . . JENNY LIND having arrived by the last vessel from England, will make her first appearance . . . THIS EVENING, OCT. 27
THE PERFORMANCES Will commence with the Petite Comedy entitled the
GREEN-EYED MONSTER
Louise (with the usual songs,) Mrs. Chester
Dance - Master Chambers.
After which the Operatic Bagatelle, entitled
JENNY LIND AT LAST, OR, THE SWEDISH NIGHTINGALE.
Jenny Leatherlungs, (with songs.) by Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Mr. J. Chambers . . .

PIECE: Jenny Lind at last (Reach)


"QUEEN'S THEATRE", The Melbourne Daily News and Port Phillip Patriot (2 November 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225693286 

On Monday next, the proprietor intends producing a grand spectacle by Buckstone, entitled the Ice Witch, or the Frozen Hann; this spectacle we are assured will be the most pleasing production of the season, the scenery properties and dresses are entirely new, and some brilliant fires will be exhibited. Mrs. Chester's musical talents will enhance the interests of the piece, in which she made her appearance in London, as announced in the original cast of the Ice Witch.

NOTE: On Miss Crawford's appearance in the original production, see:

"DRURY LANE", The literary gazette (9 April 1831), 235

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=lDZDUdPLPWQC&pg=PA235 


[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News and Port Phillip Patriot (3 November 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225693512 

. . . THIS EVENING, NOV. 3 . . . the Scottish Tragedy, entitled DOUGLAS . . .
Song, "Here's a health bonnie Scotland to tree," Mrs. Chester.
conclude with for the last time the farce of the DAY AFTER THE WEDDING . . .

"THE THEATRE", The Melbourne Daily News and Port Phillip Patriot (15 November 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225693207 

"Clari, or the Maid of Milan," was produced at the Queen's Theatre on Monday night to a tolerably good house, and served to introduce the "first appearance of a lady," a pupil of Mr. Morton King's. We are sorry that we cannot congratulate the debutante upon her first appearance. Her representation was tame, and bare - her situations undramatic - her reading, ludicrously rapid - and her enunciation indistinct . . . The interlude, "Sylvester Daggerwood," (Morton King) was a decided hit . . . The concluding farce, "Wives by Advertisement," was well received, and is a very amusing "Olympic" burlesque. It was chiefly remarkable for the unanimous encore of the "Dashing White Sergeant" of Mrs. Chester, and the representation of the "Old Woman" character by Mrs. Avins, who dressed and played it with judgment and considerable talent. Again we must call the attention of the management to the tuneless and timeless awkward squad who occupy that portion of the theatre commonly called the Orchestre. Every member of the band seems bent upon playing an air of his own, of which the leader appears to be in the most blissful state of ignorance. How Mrs. Chester contrived to sing against the accompaniment is inexplicable.

ASSOCIATIONS: Morton King (actor, playwright, alias of Mark Last); Julia Avins (actor)


17 November 1848, Chester as Minna in The ice witch

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (17 November 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225706528 

. . . GRAND SPECTACLE. THIS EVENING, NOV. 17.
The performances will commence with Miss Mitford's Tragedy entitled
THE ICE WITCH, OR, THE FROZEN BAND, A TALE OF ENCHANTMENT.
Druda the Ice Witch, Mrs. Mereton.
Minna, with songs. Mrs. Chester . . .
MORTON KING, Manager.

ASSOCIATIONS: Mrs. Mereton (actor)


"MUSIC FOR THE MILLION. - MECHANICS' SCHOOL OF ARTS", The Melbourne Daily News (20 November 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225706808 

We see by our advertising columns that the music class purpose giving their first concert at the Mechanics' Institute, to-morrow evening. The members (amateurs) of this class are numerous, and we believe efficient performers. They are instructed by Mr. Megson (who will lead) and are wealthy enough to afford him a salary (for giving his attendance to the class once a week) of sixty pounds per annum. The programme is a very fair one saving the absence of violin solos and vocal performance - this deficiency could easily be remedied by securing the services of Mrs. Chester, without who no concert can be deemed well cast. We have beard of some private feuds aud bickerings in certain quarters, which is calculated to throw obstacles in the way of the "class" obtaining this lady's valuable assistance, but if we ascertain that for petty and professional jealousies the public are to be deprived of the available talent of performers like Mrs. Chester, we shall not hesitate to expose such illiberal conduct, and call down the censure of the public on the offender, ver. sap.

ASSOCIATIONS: Joseph Megson (violinist, leader)


11, 15, 18, and 20 December, Chester billed in songs

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (11 December 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225706854 

Queen's Theatre. THIS EVENING . . .
After which th« fifth Act of ROMEO AXD JULIET.
Song - Mrs. Chester . . .
After which the third Act of HAMLET.
Dance - Master Chambers.
Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (14 December 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225706949 

Queen's Theatre. FRIDAY EVENING, DEC. 15 . . . commence with the Musical Entertainment of
NO SONG NO SUPPER.
Dance - Master Chambers.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Mr. Chamber.
To be followed by the laughable interlude of SYLVESTER DAGGERWOOD . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (16 December 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225707033 

Queen's Theatre. MONDAY EVENING, DEC. 18 . . .
will commence with the Domestic Drama THE MAID AND THE MAGPIE
Song - Mrs. Chester . . .
The whole to conclude with the Ballet of
THE FAIR MAID OF PERTH.
Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (20 December 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225706707 

. . . THIS EVENING, DEC. 20 . . . commence with the Domestic Drama of
A TALE OF MYSTERY.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Master Chambers.
To be followed by the laughable farce of the
DAY AFTER THE WEDDING.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Mr. Chambers . . .


26 December 1848, Christmas pantomime

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (26 December 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225706917 

. . . THIS EVENING, the 26th December, 1848,
will be produced the grand fairy tale of enchantment entitled
ALADDIN; OR, THE WONDERFUL LAMP.
(With new scenery, dresses, choruses, &c.
Dance - Mr. Chambers.
Song - "Buy a Broom," (in character,) Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Master Chambers.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
The whole to conclude with the laughable Farce of
THE VILLAGE LAWYER.
MR. MORTON KING, Manager.


29 December 1848, selections from Shakspeare

"THE THEATRE", The Melbourne Daily News (29 December 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225707001 

Friday night is devoted to selections from Shakspere, and is designed principally for a box audience - the programme is injudicious so far as the performances are not relieved by any light interlude. Again, Mrs. Chester wastes her abilities upon songs of the old school - "Black eyed Susan" and "Cherry ripe" were all very well twenty years ago or when Miss Paton was "ow'r young to marry yet." With "Black eyed Susan" we will not quarrel as the ballad is a very superior one but "Cherry ripe" is at this time of day positively repulsive. We would as soon think of listening to "The merry Swiss boy," "Sally of our alley" or "The flaxen headed cow boy." - Modern writers afford plenty of material for such a voice as Mrs. Chester's and she is neither doing herself nor her audience justice in confining her abilities to such "stock" scores as she has hitherto indulged in.

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (29 December 1848), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225706999 

Queen's Theatre.
BY PARTICULAR DESIRE. THIS EVENING, DEC. 29.
THE PERFORMANCES will commence with the second Act of
RICHARD III.
Dance - Master Chambers.
After which the fifth Act of
ROMEO AND JULIET.
Song, "Black-eyed Susan," Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Mr. Chambers.
To be followed by the second Act of
MACBETH.
A new Pas De Deux, by Mr. Chambers.
Song, "Cherry Ripe," Mrs. Chester.
After which the third Act of
HAMLET.
Song, "Though I'm now a merry little Lad,"
Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Master Chambers.
The whole to conclude with the fourth Act of
THE MERCHANT OF VENICE.
The opera of "VAMPIRE" is in preparation and will shortly be produced.
MR. MORTON KING, Manager.

1849

To call up all the TROVE newspaper items tagged Marian Maria Chester for 1849:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Marian+Maria+Chester&q&l-decade=184&l-year=1849 


January 1849, Chester at Queen's Theatre

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (3 January 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473872 

Queen's Theatre . . . THIS EVENING . . . ALADDIN . . . An Overture by the Band. Song - Mrs. Chester . . . THE STRANGER . . . MR. MORTON KING, Manager.

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (12 January 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473054 

Queen's Theatre . . . THIS EVENING . . . the last act of BRUTUS . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . . the last act of A NEW WAY TO PAY OLD DEBTS . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . . for the time SYLVESTER DAGGERWOOD . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (15 January 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471668 

Queen's Theatre. THIS EVENING . . . THE LADY OF LYONS.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Master Chambers.
Dance - Mr. Chambers.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Master Chambers.
. . . to conclude with the laughable Farce of THE TWO GREENS . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (22 January 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473648 

. . . THIS EVENING, JAN. 22.
. . . will commence with Shakspeare's Tragedy of OTHELLO.
An Overture by the Band.
Dance - Master Chambers. Song - Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Mr. Chambers.
Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (31 January 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473724 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . Sheridan Knowles' . . . THE WIFE; OR, A TALE OF MANTUA. Song - Mrs. Chester . . .


February 1849, Chester at Queen's Theatre

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (5 February 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473116 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . BENEFIT OF MRS. MERETON . . . VALSHA, OR THE SLAVE QUEEN . . . To be followed by . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (7 February 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473570 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . BENEFIT OF MR. & MRS. DICHBURN . . . George Almar's . . . Pedlar's Acre; OR, THE WIFE OF SEVEN HUSBANDS. To be followed by . . . A new Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (9 February 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471760 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . HAMLET. Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (14 February 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471839 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . for the benefit of MR. BELFIELD . . . a domestic drama, written by Mr. Belfield, entitled RETRIBUTION; OR, THE DRUNKARD'S CURSE . . . Favourite Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Francis Belfield (actor, playwright)

PIECE: Retribution (Belfield; under later title The bottle)

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (16 February 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471965 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . Macbeth, for the FIRST AND ONLY TIME during this season.
Every care has been bestowed by strengthening the cast and introducing as much of the ORIGINAL MUSIC as the capability of the company will allow . . .
Macbeth - Mr. Morton King; Lady Macbeth - Mrs. Mereton; Hecate - Mrs. Chester.
. . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . .


21 February 1849, Chester's benefit

"MRS. CHESTER'S BENEFIT . . .", The Melbourne Daily News (21 February 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473298 

MRS. CHESTER'S BENEFIT for to-morrow evening is under the patronage of the Bar, and the performances selected are Mr. Belfield's new and successful drama "Retribution" with an interlude of singing and dancing, to conclude with the Brigand. Mrs. Chester has certainly not had a lengthened acquaintance with the public, but short as the intimacy has been, we think the satisfaction has been mutual. This lady is a clever "vaudeville" style of actress with a good voice which is generally thrown away upon music than has been hacked out and threadbare for the last half century. The Brigand we need scarcely say is a first-rate piece, if even tolerably performed.

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (21 February 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473294 

Queen's Theatre.
FOR THE BENEFIT OF MRS. CHESTER.
UNDER THE DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE OF THE MEMBERS OF THE BAR.
Mrs. Chester begs to inform her friends and the patrons of the Drama generally that her Benefit is fixed for Wednesday Evening, and she assures herself that the entertainments selected cannot fail to give satisfaction.
WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEB. 21.
THE PERFORMANCES will commence with (in consequence of the great success and many enquiries for) Mr. Belfield's New Drama, entitled
Retribution; OR, THE DRUNKARD'S CURSE.
Printed copies of the Drama will be for sale at the St. John's Tavern, at Mr. Cheetham's, and at the doors of the Theatre.
Dance - Master Chambers.
THE WITCHES' MUSIC from Macbeth, (by desire.)
The whole to conclude with the interesting Drama, entitled
THE BRIGAND.
Nights of Performanxe, MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, and FRIDAY.
MR. MORTON KING, Manager.


February and March 1849, Chester at Queen's Theatre

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (26 February 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226472830 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . MRS. AVINS . . . her BENEFIT . . . OBERON; OR, THE CHARMED HORN . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (28 February 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471626 

. . . FOR THE BENEFIT OF MR. MORTON KING . . . THIS EVENING . . . PIZARRO . . . ROLLO - MR. MORTON KING (his first apperanace in that character.) Elvira - Mrs. Mereton. Priestess - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (5 March 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473880 

. . . THIS EVENING. UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF THE LICENSED VICTUALLERS.
FOR THE BENEFIT OF MISS AND MASTER CHAMBERS . . .
THE DUMB MAN OF MANCHESTER.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
To be followed by the favorite Grand Ballet entitled THE MOUNTAIN SYLPH . . .
The whole to conclude with the Tragical Burlesque Opera of
BOMBASTES FURIOSO.
In the course of the Opera the following Songs, &c.
Song, "Ladies how do you do," - Master Chambers.
Song, "My Love is so Pretty," - Mr. Belfield.
Song, "Queen Dido," Mrs. Chester.
Trio, "O! Cruel Man," Mrs. Chester, Master Chambers and Mr. Belfield.
Song, "My Lodging is on the cold ground," Mr. Winter.
Duet, "I'll quickly run you through," Master Chambers and Mr. Winter.
Finale, by the characters . . .

"THE QUEEN'S THEATRE", Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal (7 March 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223157129 

On Friday evening Mr. Smith, the proprietor of this Theatre, will take his annual benefit, and as he has been a good caterer for the public, and been liberal with his Theatre in favor of charitable institutions, we wish him success. We have been requested to state that the performance will be "Arabin," a melodrama, founded upon the well-known work of Arabin, and dramatized by J. R. M., which was licensed by E. Deas Thomson, Esq., when in Melbourne and has been reserved for the visit of the Governor, who is expected to patronize the Theatre. Several songs have been contributed by the author of Arabin, and will be sung by Mrs. Chester and others.

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (9 March 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471422 

Queen's Theatre.
LAST NIGHT OF THE SEASON.
THE Proprietor has much pleasure in announcing the performance of an entirely COLONIAL PRODUCTION, and founded on colonial incidents, and to which every attention has been bestowed to give due effect to its representation. The piece has been dramatised by Mr. McLachlan from the work of "ARABIN, or the ADVENTURES OF A SETTLER," written by Thomas M'Combie, Esq.
The PROLOGUE will be spoken by the author.
THIS EVENING, MARCH 9, 1849, Will be produced for the first time, an entirely new Drama, in 3 acts, entitled
ARABIN; OR, THE ADVENTURES OF A SETTLER.
Dr. Arabin - Mr. Thompson.
Augustus Willis - Mr. Elrington.
Liddy, with songs - Mr. Belfield.
Mrs. Butler - Mrs. Mereton.
Marian, with songs - Mrs. Chester.
Closing Address, by the Manager.
Dance - Master Chambers.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
Solo, Violincello - Mr. THOMPSON, from ADELAIDE.
Dance - Mr. Chambers.
The whole to conclude with the Romantic Drama of OBERON.
Finale - God Save the Queen - by the Company . . .


21 March 1849, first night of new season

[Advertisement], Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal (21 March 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223155928 

QUEEN'S THEATRE ROYAL.
THE Manager begs to inform the public that this place of amusement will be opened on Wednesday Evening next, for the Season.
ON WEDSESDAY, 21st MARCH, 1849 . . an entirely new Play, in three acts, written by T. J. Serle, Esq., entitled THE GAMESTER OF MILAN.
Count Ardeschi - Mr. Thompson.
Frielsperg - Mr. Elrington.
Emma Frielsperg - Mrs. Mereton.
Annina (with songs) - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (23 March 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471032 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . .


26 March 1849, race week

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (26 March 1849), 1 supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226472503 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (27 March 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473821 

. . . THIS EVENING, MARCH 27,
WILL be performed the deeply interesting Drama, (in 3 acts), entitled
MICHAEL ERLE; OR, THE MANIAC LOVER.
Philip D'Arville - Mr. Elrington.
Michael Erle - Mr. Thompson.
Mary - Mrs. Mereton.
Miss Julia Spring - Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Mr. Chambers.
Dance - Master Chambers.
The whole to conclude with the Drama of
BLACK EY'D SUSAN.
William - Mr. Thompson.
Adlmiral - Mr. Elrington.
Susan - Mrs. Mereton.
Dolly (with the song of "Black Ey'd Susan,") - Mrs. Chester.
In the course of the piece, a Sailor's Hornpipe by Mr. Chambers . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (28 March 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473766 

. . . THIS EVENING, MARCH 28,
LADY OF LYONS.
Colonel Dumas - Mr. Elrington.
Claude Melnotte - Mr. Morton King.
Pauline - Mrs. Mereton.
Madame Deschappelles - Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Mr. Chambers.
Overture by the Band.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
Overture by the Band.
Dance - Master Chambers.
The whole to conclude with the laughable farce of THE RAILROAD STATION . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (29 March 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471287 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (30 March 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226474106 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . .
The whole to conclude with the laughable farce entitled
THE MORAL PHILOSOPHER.
Vieuxerand - Mr. Elrington.
Madame Dangerville - Mrs. Chester . . .


April 1849, Chester at Queen's Theatre

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (2 April 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226472536 

. . . First appearance of MR. BEAUFORT, From the London Theatres. THIS EVENING . . .
To be followed by the favorite Drama of
THE BRIGAND.
The Brigand - Mr. Thompson.
Prince - Mr. Elrington.
Ottavia - Mrs. Ditchburn.
Marie Grazie - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (4 April 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226472657 

. . . Only Night of Performance this Week.
THIS EVENING, APRIL 4th WILL be performed the Petite Comedy entitled
Cramond Brig.
JOCK HOWISON, by the BAILIE, and positively his last appearance in Melbourne.
King James - Morton King.
Marian, (with a song) - Mrs. Chester . . .


[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (7 April 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471148 

On EASTER MONDAY, APRIL 9th, 1849
WILL be performed an entirely new Drama, (in two acts) entitled
THE DELUSION; OR, IS SHE MAD.
Sir Bernhard Harleigh - Mr. Thompson.
Dasteton - Mr. Belfield.
Doctor Anodine - Mr. Elrington.
Ludy Emily Harleigh - Mrs. Chester . . .
THE whole to conclude with the laughable farce entitled the
ILLUSTRIOUS STRANGER.
Benjamin Bowbell - Mr. Morton King.
Aboulifar - Mr. Thompson.
Fatima, (with a song,) - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (11 April 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471828 

. . . THIS EVENING, APRIL 11th . . . THE DREAM AT SEA.
Overture by the Band.
Dance - Mr. Chambers.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Master Chambers . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (13 April 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473302 

. . THIS EVENING, APRIL 13th.
By particular desire of several parties
WILL be performed the Comedy entitled JOHN BULL.
Job Thornbury - Mr. Elrington.
Honble. Tom Shuflleton - Mr. Thompson.
Peregrine - Mr. Morton King.
Dennis Brulgruddery - Mr. Belfield.
Lady Caroline Braymore - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (16 April 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473836 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . WENLOCK OF WENLOCK.
Hubert Lyle - Mr. Montagu.
Osrick - Mr. Ditchburn.
Wolf - Mr. Elrington.
Wild Wenlock - Mr. Thompson.
Wittol Wattle - Mr. Capper.
Hugh - Mr. Winter.
Nicolas - Mr. Belfield.
Lady Rowena - Mrs. Chester.
Eva - Mrs. Ditchburn.
Rose - Mrs. Avins.
Overture by the Band.
Dance, by Mrs. Avins, and Mr. Chambers.
Dance Master Chambers.
Overture by the Band . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (18 April 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473501 

. . . THIS EVENING. APRIL 18 . . . HAMLET.
Laertes - Mr. Thompson.
Ghost - Mr. Elrington.
Hamlet - Mr. Morton King.
Ophelia - Mrs. Ditchburn.
Queen - Mrs. Chester.
Overture - by the Band.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
Overture by the Band.
The whole to conclude with the successful Ballet entitled DANCING MAD!

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (20 April 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471341 

. . . THIS EVENING, [FRIDAY] . . . JOHN BULL.
Job Thornbury - Mr. Elrington.
Honble. Tom Shuffleton - Mr. Thompson.
Peregrine - Mr. Morton King.
Dennis Brulgruddery - Mr. Belfield.
Lady Carolina Braymore - Mrs. Chester.
Overture by the Band.
Dance - Mr. Chambers.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
Dance - Master Chambers . . .

"THE APPLE OF DISCORD", The Melbourne Daily News (24 April 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226472065 

On Friday night last, the performances at the Queen's Theatre were interrupted by the ruffianly conduct of an individual in the pit, who threw an apple on the stage which nearly struck Mrs. Chester. Another thrown with greater force than the first immediately followed, and struck Mr. Thompson, one of the performers, but did not inflict any serious injury. The author of the mischief was immediately given into custody by the manager of the theatre, Mr. King, and after spending a night in the watchhouse, was on the following morning brought before the Mayor, when he expressed a desire to plend guilty to the charge, but no prosecutor being in attendance, the case wus dismissed . . .

"LATE OUTRAGE AT THE THEATRE", The Melbourne Daily News (28 April 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473188 


[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (23 April 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226472622 

QUEEN'S THEATRE. The Manager has much pleasure in announcing the engagement of MR. HYDES, from Sydney . . . who will have the honor of making his first appearance THIS EVENING . . . WHEN will be performed a new Petite Comedy entitled BUT HOWEVER . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: John Proctor Hydes (actor)

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (25 April 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473461 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . . NEGRO MELODY, "Ole Dan Tucker," with Congo Castinett Accompaniment, as sung by him with 2000 stick power of Approbation - MR. HYDES . . . NEGRO EXTRAVAGANZA, "Whare dy'e cum from," Congo Bone Castinett accommpaniment - Mr. HYDES . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (30 April 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226472390 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . the Petite Comedy of WHO'LL LEND ME A WIFE?
PHILANDERE ADDLEBRAIN - MR. HYDES . . .
Mrs. O'Screw - Mrs. Avins.
Mrs. Gumption - Mrs. Chester . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . . NEGRO EXTRAVAGANZA, "Melbourne Girls with pretty faces," - Congo Bone Castinett accompaniment by MR. HYDES . . .


May 1849, Chester at Queen's Theatre

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (2 May 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226472272 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . the Opera entitled THE VAMPIRE.
During the Opera the following songs will be sung: -
Opening Chorus by the Company.
Boat Song and Chorus by the Company.
Solo, Mrs. Chester.
"There's nae luck about the house," by the Company.
Duet, Though, you leave me now in sorrow," Mr. Montague and Mrs. Chester.
"Hurrah for the Bonnets so blue," Mrs. Chester.
"Faith I'll away to the wedding," Mr. Belfield.
Dance - Master Chambers.
Dance - Mr. Chambers.
Song - Mrs. Chester.
Overture by the Band . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (4 May 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226473409 

. . . FRIDAY EVENING. MAY 4th . . .
THE BRIGAND Interspersed with music incidental to the PIECE.
NEGRO MELODY, "Cynthia Sue," by MR. HYDES, with Congo Bone Castinett Accompaniment . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (7 May 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471719 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . Duet, "When a little farm we keep," MR. YOUNG and Mrs. Chester . . . Song - Mrs. Chester . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Charles Young (actor, vocalist)

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (9 May 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471189 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . Song - Mrs. CHESTER . . . NEGRO SERENADE, "Buffalo Gals," by MR. HYDES . . .

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (11 May 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471079 

. . . THIS EVENING . . . Song - Mrs. CHESTER . . .

[Advertisement], Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal (12 May 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223157521 

. . . POSITIVELY THE LAST NIGHT BUT TWO OF MR. HYDES and the CONGO MINSTREL, who proceeds to Sydney by the Shamrock. MONDAY EVENING, 14TH MAY . . . the Musical Interlude of THE SENTINEL.
Frederick - Mr. Thompson.
Sloppsen - Mr. Young.
Linda - Mrs. Chester . . .


19/20 May 1849, Chester clears out (19), departs (20) for Sydney

"CLEARED OUT", The Melbourne Daily News (21 May 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226471860 

May 19. - Shamrock, steamer, 200 tons, G. Gilmore, commander, for Sydney. Passengers (cabin) - . . . Mr. and Mrs. Chester . . .




Sydney, NSW (24 May to ? July 1849)

24 May 1849, Chester arrives Sydney

"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. ARRIVALS", The Sydney Morning Herald (24 May 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12911304 

May 24. - Shamrock, steamer, 200 tons, Captain Gilmore, from Launceston the 16th, Melbourne the 20th, and Twofold Bay the 22nd instant. Passengers . . . Mrs. Chester . . .


"SYDNEY", The Courier (30 June 1849), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2965600 

A ci-devant London actress, Mrs. Chester, made her first appearance last Saturday as Madame Galochard, in the King's Gardener: her acting is naive and piquant, and malgre the severe cold under which she evidently laboured, her ballad singing was pleasing, although of a school rather passee. Her speaking voice is remarkably melodious and euphonie, and as for as we can judge from so early an acquaintance with her qualifications for the stage, we consider her an acquisition. - Sydney Atlas, June 9.




Maitland, NSW (August 1849 to December 1850)

16, 18 and 20 August 1849, Chester with Hambleton's company

"THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (15 August 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article701045 

Any of our readers who are lovers of the drama will see with pleasure by an advertisement in another column that Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton, Mrs. Chester, Mr. Willis, and the American Serenader, have paid a visit to Maitland, and purpose re-opening the Amateur Theatre on Thursday (to-morrow) evening.

"THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (18 August 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article700999 

On Thursday evening Mr. Hambleton and his company, assisted by two of the amateurs, re-opened the Maitland Theatre, the performances being the third act of "Othello," the farce of "The Intrigue," and the farce of "The Widow's "Victim," all of which were performed with considerable spirit. Mr. Willis was highly applauded in his personification of "Varnish" and in "The Widow's Victim." Mrs. Chester makes a fair actress, and is a very good singer, her song of "The Dashing White Sergeant," being deservedly encored. The American Serenader (whose name is not given) makes a capital nigger, giving the grotesque melodies, and playing tunes on his bones castanets, with the usual popular enthusiasm, ensuring continual encores. Mr. and Mrs. Hambleton are already so well known in Maitland that we need scarcely say both played with their usual spirit and effect. The amateurs who took part also performed well. The house was a very thin one, probably in consequence of the short notice which had been given, but the performances were received with continued applause. The pieces announced for Saturday (this) evening are "The Intrigue," "The Dead Shot," and "The Irish Tutor," varied by a good selection of nigger and other singing.

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (18 August 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article700984 

MAITLAND THEATRE. Saturday Evening, August 18, 1849.
The Evening's Entertainments will commence with THE INTRIGUE; OR, THE BATH ROAD.
After which, Nigger Song - "'OLE DAN TUCKER" (with bone accompaniment), by the Serenader.
Song - "THE DASHING WHITE SERGEANT," by Mrs. Chester.
To be followed by THE DEAD SHOT.
Irish Comic Song-" THE GOLDEN KALIFORNY," Mr. Hambleton.
Nigger Song - "KNOCK A NIGGER DOWN," by the Serenader.
To conclude with the favorite Farce of THE IRISH TUTOR.
For characters and particulars see bills.
ADMISSION - Front Seats, 2s. 6d. Back seats, 1s. 6d.
Doors open at seven o'clock; performances commence at half-past.
N.B. - No Smoking allowed in the Theatre.

"THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (22 August 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article700850 

On Saturday evening last Mr. Hambleton's company performed "The Intrigue," "The Dead Shot," and "The Irish Tutor," with applause, although the house was a very poor one; the singing of Mrs. Chester and the American Serenader was much applauded. On Monday evening the house was better filled; the performances were "A Day in Paris," and "The Widow's Victim," varied by a musical interlude between the pieces; the music and singing in this was remarkably good, and the second part, consisting of Ethiopian Serenades, was received with great applause and repeated encores.


3, 6, 8, 10 and 13 September 1850, Chester with Hableton's company and amateurs

THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (5 September 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article700586 

Mr. Willis took his benefit at the theatre Monday evening, and was welcomed by a pretty good house. The first piece was the drama of "The Inchcape Bell," which was performed very well, nearly the whole of the amateurs assisting. After several songs by the American Serenader and Mrs. Chester the performances closed with the farce of "The Happy Man," Mr. Hambleton taking the principal part in his usual effective style. On Thursday (to-morrow) evening the performances will be for the benefit of the Maitland Hospital, and the pieces announced are the drama of "The Rover's Bride," aud the farce of "The Valet de Sham," with a variety of comic and sentimental singing.

"THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (12 September 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article700360 

On Saturday evening Mr. Coleman, "The Serenader," took his benefit, and had a good house. The pieces selected were "The Inchcape Bell," and "The Two Gregories," with a variety of Nigger Melodies, and a scene from "Life in New York," between. The whole of the performances went off well. On Monday evening Mrs. Hambleton took her benefit, and had an overflowing house. The melo-drama of "Infanticide; or the Bohemian Mother," was the first piece, and was got through passably. This was followed by a variety of singing and dancing, in the course of which Mr. Hambleton made his debut as a Nigger, and certainly succeeded admirably for a first attempt. The duet of "All's Well" was sung in a very good style by Mr. H. and an amateur. An amateur also went through a variety of tumbling feats, in which he displayed a great deal of strength and suppleness. The performances conoluded with the farce of "The Married Rake." In this the performers were quite at home, and acted with their customary spirit and humour in lighter pieces; Mr. Hambleton's Darby Twist was excellent. Tonight a Musical Soiree is to be given, in the long room of the Fitz Boy Hotel, for the benefit of Mrs. Chester, when a variety of popular pieces and songs will be given. Mrs. Chester has secured the assistance of Mr. Turner, and several amateurs; and we doubt not that her endeavours to please will meet with due appreciation. Tomorrow night Mr. Hambleton will take his benefit at the Theatre, being the last appearance of the company in Maitland. Mr. H. is so popular here - and deservedly so, for his acting in most of his characters is really excellent - that he is almost sure to obtain a crowded house for his benefit.

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (12 September 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article700352 

MUSICAL SOIREE. For the Benefit of Mrs. Chester,
WHO begs to announce to her friends and the public generally of Maitland that This Evening (Wednesday), Sept. 12th, she will have the honor to appear at a MUSICAL SOIREE, in Mr. Reeves's Long Room, assisted by Mr. Turner and Amateurs, when she solicits a share of their kind patronage.
Amongst other popular pieces will be sung, "The Four Leaf Shamrock." "Pestal." "Woodman, Spare that Tree." "Queen of my Soul." "All's Well." "Do not Mingle." "The Flying Dutchman." "Rover's Bride." "Viva Enrico." Duett, "Dearest Norma." And many other Fashionable Songs, Comic Duetts, Glees, &c.
In the course of the Evening: will also be sung, the whole of the WITCHES' MUSIC from Shakspeare's tragedy of "Macbeth," the principal Solos by Mr. Hambleton and Mrs. Chester.
The whole to conclude with the much admired ETHIOPIAN MELODIES.
To commence at half-past seven o'clock precisely.
Tickets of admission, 2s. each, to be had of Mrs. Chester, at the "Fitz Roy Hotel," West Maitland.

"THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (15 September 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article700259 

The concert announced by Mrs. Chester for Wednesday evening at the Fitz Roy Hotel did not come off. On Thursday evening Mr. Hambleton took his benefit at the theatre; the house was a moderate one, and the performances went off well, Mr. Hambleton announcing at the close that it was his last appearance here.


"CONCERT", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (3 November 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article698866 

We observe by an advertisement in another column that Mr. Turner will give a vocal concert on Tuesday evening next, at the Northumberland Hotel, and will be assisted by Mrs. Chester and several amateurs. The profranime announces a good selection of songs, duets, &c.

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (3 November 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article698825 


15 November 1849 (postponed from 12 November), Chester opens the theatre

"THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (10 November 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article698615 

Mrs. Chester has announced that she will re-open the Maitland Theatre on Monday evening next, with the assistance of the amateurs. The pieces announced are the musical burletta of "The Sentinel," the petite comedy of "The day after the Wedding," and the farce of "The Village Lawyer."

"THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (14 November 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article698567 

On Thursday evening the Amateur Theatre was re-opened by Mrs. Chester and a body of the amateurs. The performances were the musical burletta of "The Sentinel," the comedy of "The day after the Wedding," and the farce of "The Village Lawyer." Mrs. Chester proved a good actress and a spirited singer, and the amateurs played remarkably well; the whole of the pieces went off capitally.


10 December 1849, Chester at John Turner's concert

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (1 December 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article698137 

VOCAL CONCERT! Under the Patronage of Major Crummer, P.M.
MR. TURNER begs respectfully to announce that, having obtained the Colonial Secretary's License, his CONCERT of VOCAL MUSIC will take place at the "Northumberland Hotel," on THURSDAY Evening, December 6th, 1849, under the above distinguished patronage; on which occasion he will be assisted by Mrs. Chester and several Gentlemen Amateurs.
PROGRAMME.
PART I.
1. Duet - "Tell me where is Faney bred" Stevenson - Mrs. Chester and Mr Turner.
2. Song - "The Oak and the Ivy" - Ransford - Mr. Turner.
3. Song - "Pestal" - Horn - Mrs Chester.
4. Song - "Will you Love me then as now" - Amateur.
5. Song - "When Time bath bereft thee" - Amateur.
6. Duet - "Dearest Norma" - Bellini - Mrs. Chester and Mr Turner.
PART II.
1. Song - "Smuggler King" - Glover - Mr. Turner.
2. Song - "Do not mingle" - Bellini - Mrs. Chester.
3. Song - "Some Love to Roam" - Russell - Amateur.
4. Duet - "Minute Gun at Sea" - King - Mrs. Chester and Amateur.
5. Comic Song - "When a man Weds" - Horn - Mr. Turner.
6. Song - "Woodman Spare that Tree" Russell - Mrs Chester.
PART III.
1. Comic Song - "City of Sligo" - Irish - Amateur.
2. Song - "Old House at Home" - Loder - Mr. Turner.
3. Song - "Kathleen Mavourneen" - Crouch - Mrs. Chester.
4. Song - "Love Not" - Blockley - Amateur.
5. Song - "Molly Bawn" - Lover - Mr. Turner.
6. Song - "Queen of my Soul" - Wollaston - Mrs. Chester.
Finale - "Long may England flourish" - Weston - Omnes.
Tickets - Front Seats, 3s.; Back Seats, 2s. To be had at Mr. Turner's residence; Mr. Yeomans's, "Northumberland Hotel;" Mr. Rosseter's, "MaitlandHotel;" Mr. Reeves's, "Fitz Roy Hotel ;" and Mr. Griffin's, "Globe Inn," Morpeth.
Doors to open at Half-past Seven o'clock, and to commence nt Eight o'clock precisely.
***Mr. Brown's Omnibus will be in attendance. Tickets that were issued for a previous occasion will answer for this.

"CONCERT", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (5 December 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article698092 

Mr. Turner announces his concert for to-morrow evening at the Northumberland. The concert would have come off on the 6th ult., but from a delay in the arrival of the necessary license from the Colonial Secretary it could not then take place; the license has now been obtained. Mr. Turner will be assisted by Mrs. Chester and several amateurs. The programme includes an excellent selection of songs, ballads, and duets, and from the well known talent of the artists, no doubt a full house will welcome them.

"MR. TURNER'S CONCERT", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (8 December 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article698067 

This concert was to have come off on Thursday evening, but the afternoon and evening being very wet and stormy, it was again obliged to be postponed. We are sorry that the unfavorable weather should have prevented the concert a second time from taking place, as it must necessarily put Mr. Turner to further cost and trouble, besides the disappointment to the numerous persons who had bought tickets . . .

"MR. TURNER'S CONCERT", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (12 December 1849), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article697929 

On Monday evening Mr. Turner's concert was given at the Northumberland Hotel, to a vert full audience. Mr. Turner and Mrs. Chester alternately presided at the pianoforte, and they were assisted in the songs by three amateurs. The singing was altogether very good, and was met with much applause, several encores being demanded. Among the songs those which pleased us best were "Will you love me then as now," sung by an amateur; "Smuggler King," capitally given by Mr. Turner; "Molly Carew," admirably and humorously sung by an amateur, and encored; "When a man Weds," given with great humour by Mr. Turner, and encored; "Woodman spare that Tree," tastefully sung by Mrs. Chester; "City of Sligo," humorously sung by an amateur, and encored; "Old House at Home," one of the best songs of the evening, sung by Mr. Turner with excellent effect, and deservedly encored; "Kathleen Mavourneen," very well sung by Mrs. Chester; and "Molly Branagan," given with capital comic effect by an amateur, and encored. The concert went off very well, the whole of the numerous audience appearing well satisfied.

1850

26 June 1850 (postponed from 27 May), Chester and John Turner's concert

"CONCERT", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (22 May 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article693842 

It is now a considerable time since the inhabitants of Maitland and the neighbourhood have been gratified by an opportunity of attending a concert. Their old favorites, Mrs. Chester and Mr. Turner, haye announced a vocal concert for Monday evening next, at the Northumberland Hotel, which will no doubt be extensively patronised. The programme gives promise of a rich evening's pleasure and amusement, the vocalists being Mrs. Chester, Mr. Turner, and several amateurs.

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (29 May 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article693677 

MRS. CHESTER AND MR. TURNER beg to inform their friends that in consequence of Mrs. Chester's sudden and severe attack of illness, they have been compelled to POSTPONE the CONCERT announced for this Evening, but trust that in a short time she will be able to appear before them. Monday, May 27, 1850.

"THE CONCERT", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (29 May 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article693695 

A concert had been announced for Monday evening, at the Northumberland, by Mrs. Chester and Mr. Turner; but we regret that Mrs. Chester was seized with sudden and severe illness before that evening, and the concert has consequently been necessarily postponed for the present.

"VOCAL CONCERT", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (22 June 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article692570 

On Wednesday evening next Mrs, Chester announces that she will give a vocal concert at Mr. Bailey's Hotel, the Cottage of Content, East Maitland, when she will be assisted by Mr. Turner and several amateurs. The programme is very inviting, including several favorite songs, glees, &c. Mrs. Chester's and Mr. Turner's well known musical talent will no doubt secure them a full house.

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (26 June 1850), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article692513 

Vocal Concert, East Maitland. MRS. CHESTER, having recovered from her late indisposition, begs to inform her friends of East Maitland, Morpeth, and the public generally, that she will give a CONCERT of VOCAL MUSIC, at Mr. Bailey's Hotel, the "Cottage of Content," East Maitland, on WEDNESDAY NEXT, June 26, 1850, on which occasion she will be assisted by Mr. TURNER and several Amateurs; and for which she solicits a share of that patronage so liberally bestowed by the lovers of music upon late Concerts.

"MRS. CHESTER'S CONCERT", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (29 June 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article692361 

On Wednesday evening Mrs. Chester, assisted by Mr. Turner and two amateurs, gave a concert, at the Cottage of Content, East Maitland. The attendance was very thin. The concert passed off very well, Mr. Turner's singing of the "Old House at Home," and "The Smuggler King," being particularly good. Mrs. Chester was also in good voice, and sang with great effect, particularly in the duet and glees. Both amateurs were greatly applauded, and the Irish comic song was given with excellent humorous effect.


[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (14 September 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article690064 

Dancing. MRS. CHESTER begs leave to inform the inhabitants of Maitland that she has opened a DANCING ACADEMY for YOUNG LADIES and GENTLEMEN, for which she solicits their patronage. The Class meets twice a week, at her Residence, next door to the late residence of Mr. C. M. Clark, West Maitland. Every attention will be 'paid to the manners and deportment of all Pupils entrusted to her care. Terms on application.


14 October 1850, opening night of the new amateur theatre

"NEW AMATEUR THEATRE - THE VICTORIA" The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (12 October 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article689238

Our readers will see in another column an advertisement of performances on Monday evening, by a company of amateurs, assisted by Mrs. Chester, Mrs. Williams, and Mr. Raymond, at a new theatre recently fitted up in the concert room of the Rose Inn, West Maitland. The new theatre will be, we think, the most popular yet opened in Maitland as regards its comfort and convenience; the stage has been so constructed as to occupy as little of the space in the room as possible, so that a large space is left for the audience, who will enjoy the pleasure of witnessing theatrical performances in a comfortable room. The stage and fittings are neat and appropriate, advantage being skillfully taken of the limited space occupied by them. The pieces chosen for the first evening ire the comedy of "The Day After the Wedding," the farce of "State Secrets," and the farce of "The Spectre Bridegroom." A nigger melody is also announced by Master Sydney Chester, and a song by Mrs. Chester.

ASSOCIATIONS: Victoria Amateur Theatre Maitland 1850

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (12 October 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article689235 

VICTORIA AMATEUR THEATRE, "Rose Inn," West Maitland.
Under the Patronage of Major Crummer, P.M. THE public of Maitland are respectfully informed that the above Theatre will be OPENED on Monday Evening, October 14th, 1850, under the Management of several Gentlemen Amateurs (assisted by Mrs. Chester, Mrs. Williams, and Mr. Raymond), on which occasion they solicit the public patronage and support.
Neither pains nor expense have been spared to render the Theatre as neat and effective as possible, and with a due regard to the public convenience. The whole of the Scenery has been painted by Mr. Sheppard with considerable care; and it is hoped that the arrangements which have been made will not fail to give entire satisfaction.
The Evening's Entertainments will commence with a Petit Comedy, in one Act, entitled THE DAY AFTER THE WEDDING.
After which, Master Sydney Chester will make his first appearance in a Nigger Melody, accompanying himself on the bones.
Song - "The Man that could never get warm." - Amateur.
To be succeeded by the very laughable Farce, entitled STATE SECRETS.
A Song, by Mrs. Chester.
The whole to conclude with the laughable Farce, entitled THE SPECTRE BRIDEGROOM; Or, a Ghost in Spite of Himself.
Doors open at Seven o'clock, performance to commence at Half-past Seven precisely.
Front Seats, 2s. 6d.; Half-price, 1s 6d. Back Seats, 1s. 6d; Half-price, 1s. - Children at half-price. - Half-price at Nine o'clock. Vivat Regina.

"AMATEUR THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (16 October 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article689177 

On Monday evening the the new theatre, "The Victoria," recently fitted up in the Rose Inn, West Maitland, was opened by a very good company, comprising several amateurs, Mrs. Chester, Mrs. Williams, and Mr. Raymond. The performances for the evening were "The Day after the Wedding," "State Secrets," and "The Spectre Bridegroom." Of these the last piece was performed with the best effect, and was really a good performance, Mr. Raymond making a capital Squire Aldwinkle, Mrs. Williams a good Georgiana Aldwinkle, and Mrs. Chester Lavinia; the amateurs played also in this piece with remarkable spirit, two or three of the characters being particularly well sustained. The other two pieces were well played, the second perhaps better than the first, the performances improving as they proceeded. Among the songs sung Master Sydney Chester obtained great applause and an encore in his nigger melody, with bone accompaniment; and an amateur was encored in "The man that could never get warm." The stage fittings were good and complete, working very well; the scenery, which has been painted for the theatre by Mr. Sheppard, was much admired, being very effective. The theatre was somewhat warm, but was very generally commended, and the audience, were treated by the performers to "God save the Queen" as a finale, left well satisfied. The attendance was pretty good, a thunderstorm in the afternoon probably lessening the numbers. On the same evening Mr. Bell and his company of amateurs gave a performance in the theatre at the rear of the old Albion Inn.


24 and 30 October 1850, second and third nights of the amateur theatre

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (23 October 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article688958 

VICTORIA AMATEUR THEATRE, "Rose Inn," West Maitland.
First Night of the "Yeoman's Daughter."
THE GENTLEMEN AMATEURS in connection with the above Theatre have much pleasure in announcing that their next Performance will take place on Thursday Evening, October 24, 1850, when will be introduced, for the first time here, an interesting Drama, in two Acts, entitled THE YEOMAN'S DAUGHTER.
A Nigger Melody, by Master S. Chester, accompanying himself on the bones.
Matrimonial Duet, Mrs. Chester and Amateur.
A favorite Comic Song, Amateur.
To conclude with (by particular desire) the very laughable Farce, in two Acts, entitled THE SPECTRE BRIDEGROOM; Or, a Ghost in Spite of Himself.
Leader of the Orchestra. Mr. E. Fanning . . .

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (30 October 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article688841 

VICTORIA AMATEUR THEATRE, "Rose Inn," West Maitland . . . on Thursday Evening, October 31, 1850, when will be introduced, for a the second time, a Drama (which was received on its first representation with so much approbation) entitled THE YEOMAN'S DAUGHTER.
A Favorite Song, Amateur.
Matrimonial Duet, Mrs. Chester and Amateur.
Comic Medley, Amateur.
The whole to conclude with, for the first time here, a laughable Farce, in one Act, entitled THE VALET DE SHAM.
Leader of the Orchestra, Mr. E. Fanning . . .

"THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (2 November 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article688767 

On Thursday evening the "Victoria" company of amateurs gave their third performance at the Victoria Theatre, Rose Inn. The first piece, "The Yeoman's Daughter," was better performed than even on its first representation, and gave great satisfaction. The second piece announced was the farce of "The Valet de Sham," but one of the amateurs, who had taken a principal part, being unable to attend, the "Tailor of Tamworth" was substituted; it went off tolerably well, but of course the performers were not so perfect as if they had had time to prepare. Among the songs, "The Matrimonial Duet," by Mrs. Chester and an amateur, was encored, as was also a Comic Medley by an amateur. The attendance was pretty good, considering the hot and stormy-looking evening.


6 and 9 November 1850, amateur performances

"THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (9 November 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article688461 

On Wednesday evening the "Victoria" company of amateurs gave a performance at the Victoria Theatre, Rose Inn, West Maitland. The pieces were the comedy of "The Day after the Wedding," and the farce of "The Valet de Sham ;" the first was as well performed as previously; the second was one of the most successful pieces performed by the company, Mr. Fanning making, a capital Wigler, and Mr. Raymond an equally good Mr. Tweezer, while Mrs. Williams as Miss Marchmont, and Mrs. Chester as Clipper, performed with remarkable spirit; the piece was highly relished by the audience throughout. Among the songs, "Where is the Rover," by Mrs. Chester, was encored, as was also a comic song, by an amateur. The attendance was pretty good . . .

"THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (13 November 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article688348 

On Saturday evening the "Victoria" company of amateurs gave another performance at the Victoria Theatre, Rose Inn, West Maitland. The pieces were the drama of "Self Accusation," and the farce of "The Valet de Sham." Although the first piece was slightly marred by the fact that one or two of the amateurs who had taken parts failed to attend, and their parts were consequently simply read, it nevertheless went off well, Mr. Raymond sustaining the part of Stephen Darvell with excellent effect, and Mr. Fanning playing Joe Raby well, while Mrs. Williams as Patty, and Mrs. Chester as Mary Brandon, acquitted themselves with equal effect; the amateurs also played well. The "Valet de Sham" was again remarkably well performed. A comic song "Kind Relations," by an amateur, was encored, as was a nigger melody, by Master Chester. The house was very well filled, fuller perhaps than on any previous evening.


7 and 28 December, including Edward Faning and Chester's benefits

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (7 December 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article687649 

VICTORIA AMATEUR THEATRE. MR. Faning's Benefit.
MR. FANING has much pleasure in announcing . . . that his BENEFIT will take place THIS EVENING (SATURDAY), December 7th, 1850 . . . The Evening's entertainments will commence with a domestic Melo-drama, in two acts, entitled, LUKE THE LABORER; OR, THE LOST SON.
After which - COMIC SONG - Mr. Faning.
Recitation - THE BATTLE OF MINDEN - Amateur.
Solo (Violin) - Mr. Faning.
SONG - "THE SMUGGLER KING" - AMATEUR.
Trio-Cornopean and two Trombones.
SONG - "Will you love me then as now." MRS. CHESTER.
The whole to conclude with the very laughable Farce of THE IRISH TUTOR.
For particulars see small bills.

"THEATRICALS", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (11 December 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article687601 

On Tuesday evening, the 3rd, Mr. Bell took his benefit, assisted by the Tradesmen Amateurs, at the Royal Amateur Theatre, old Albion, the pieces being the melodrama of "The Innkeeper of Abbeville," and the farce of "Terry Roe;" the house was very well filled. On Saturday evening last Mr. Faning took his benefit, at the Victoria Amateur Theatre, Rose Inn. The pieces selected were the melodrama of "Luke, the Labourer," and the farce of "The Irish Tutor;" the first was well performed, Mr. Faning making a good Philip, and the other performers and amateurs sustaining their parts well; in the second Mr. Faning made a capital Terry O'Rourke, while Mr. Raymond as Tilwell, Mrs. Williams as Rosa, and Mrs. Chester as Mary, played with great spirit. The house was quite crowded.

"THEATRICALS" The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (28 December 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article687157 

The Victoria Company of Amateurs performed on Saturday evening last, and again on Tuesday, Thursday, and last evenings, the attendance each evening being very small. This evening (Saturday) Mrs. Chester takes her benefit, and has announced for performance the drama of "The Brigand's Oath," and the ballad opera of "The Waterman." Mrs. Chester's established popularity will doubtless secure her a good house.

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (28 December 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article687106 

VICTORIA AMATEUR THEATRE, "ROSE INN," WEST MAITLAND.
This Evening, (Saturday), December 28th, 1850.
MRS. CHESTER has the honor to announce to her friends and the public that her BENEFIT takes place This Evening, when she hopes for a share of their patronage and support.
The pieces selected for the occasion are the Drama of
"THE BRIGAND'S OATH," and the Ballad Opera of "THE WATERMAN,"
with a variety of SINGING AND DANCING, and a Nigger Song by Master Chester (positively his last appearance).
N.B.-The performances will on this occasion commence at Half-post Seven precisely, and terminate bv Eleven.




Newcastle, NSW (c. 1851-53)
1853

? January or February 1853, concert, Court House, Newcastle

John Askew, A voyage to Australia and New Zealand, including a visit to Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, Hunter's River, Newcastle, Maitland, and Auckland (London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co., 1857), 290

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=dcUNAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA290

. . . Mr. Spragg's next appearance before the public was in the character of a comic singer at a public concert given in the court-house by Mr. Chester. Mrs. Chester was the principal and only female singer. She had been a professional both in London and Sydney. Mr. Chester was a clerk at a store, and had only been a short time in the city. Concerts were rare things in Newcastle; and when the night came, the house was crowded with all the fashion and beauty of the city and neighbourhood. Mr. Spragg, in order to be in full trim for the occasion, had two nights of rehearsal in his own drawing-room. A short time before the concert hour, the kitchen was turned into a green-room. I lent him a long pair of ridge-and-furrow Scotch stockings, which he drew on over white trousers and fastened at the knees with pieces of red ribbon. A loose shooting-jacket was thrown across his shoulders, and a rustic hat well floured, crowned the whole man. As a finishing-stroke, his face was coloured with rouge, and his hair was dusted with whiting. He spent an hour at this evening's toilet. His duty was to shine in the character of a country clown; and before a large glass on the chimney-piece he studied his part so well, that he was "perfect" by the time he was called upon. Mrs. Chester sung several popular songs, accompanied by the piano; Master Sydney Chester, a boy of 14 years, sung several nigger melodies; Mr. James Hannel sung an Irish song; and then came Mr. Spragg, who sung the "Country Fair." This song elicited a hurricane of applause, which died away in the gruff sounds made by some clever imitator of a braying donkey. The whole of the proceedings passed off so well, that there was another concert on the following week, at which Mr. Spragg appeared in the same character, and Mr. Rogers, grotesquely attired, sung his usual ditty.

ASSOCIATIONS: John Askew (traveller, author, self-identified as "a steerage passenger"); Joseph Spragg (comic vocalist)

NOTE: Askew noted that he had arrived in Newcastle on the last day of 1852 (286), and found accommodation with the storekeeper, and former convict, Spragg, until leaving the town on 23 February 1853.

1854
Sydney, NSW (by August 1854 to May 1855)

28 August 1854, Royal Victoria Theatre, opening night of the season

"ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE", Empire (28 August 1854), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60197347 

FIRST NIGHT of the Season . . . First Appearance of MISS JULIA MATTHEWS [sic], the celebrated Infant Prodigy . . . ON MONDAY EVENING, August 28, 1854 . . . will commence with GOD SAVE THE QUEEN, sung by the combined strength of the Company, newly arranged by Mr. Lavenu - After which . . . THE SPOILED CHILD. Little Pickle, the Spoiled Child, Miss J. Mathews . . . Miss Pickle, Mrs. Chester . . . The whole to conclude with the laughable farce of BOX AND COX . . . Mrs. Bouncer, Mrs. Chester . . .


14 October 1854, Chester as the marchesa in Daughter of the regiment

[Advertisement], Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (14 October 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59759251 

. . . THIS EVENING, October 14, PART I. By particular desire,
selections from Donizetti's Favourite Opera of LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO
MARIE - Miss CATHERINE HAYES
Marchesa - Mrs Chester.
SULPIZIO - MONS. EMILE COULON . . .

"MISS CATHERINE HAYES' FAREWELL CONCERT . . .", The Sydney Morning Herald (16 October 1854), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12956628 

. . . went off with the eclat which we had predicted. Never has the Victoria Theatre presented such a phalanx of rank, beauty, and fashion, as on this occasion. We observed among the audience the Governor-General and suite, the Chief Justice and Lady Stephen, the Attorney-General and Mrs. Plunkett, Mr. Justice Therry and family, the Colonial Treasurer and Mrs. Merewether, the Solicitor-General and Mrs. Manning, the Principal of the University and Mrs. Woolley, and many of the leading families of this city and its neighbourhood. The programme consisted of selections from the Figlia del Reggimento, and the Don Posquale, in both of which Miss Hayes was received with the most rapturous applause . . . Mrs. Chester, as the Marchesa, in the Figlia, was as effective as on the previous occasion, and was received with much favour by the audience . . .


21 October 1854, Chester as Meg Merrilies in Guy Mannering

[Advertisement], The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator (21 October 1854), 14

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article251543568 

ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE. FIFTH APPEARANCE OF MRS. H. T. CRAVEN, late Miss Eliza Nelson, the celebrated Ballad Vocalist, from Drury Lane and the Olympic Theatres. On Saturday, October 21st, 1854, THE Evenings Entertainments will commence with the Operatic Drama, entitled GUY MANNERING, OR, THE GIPSY PROPHECY, as adapted for stage representation, in Two Acts . . . Colonel Mannering, Mr. Holloway; Henry Bertram, Mr. J. Howson; Dirk Hatteraick, Mr. Byers; Gabriel, Mr. F. Howson; Franco, a Gipsy boy, Miss Hart; Julia Mannering, Madame Sara Flower; Lucy Bertram, Mrs. Guerin; Meg Merrilies, Mrs. Chester . . .


16 October 1854, Chester in Our Nelly

"THE VICTORIA", Empire (23 October 1854), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60199103 

Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Craven made their first appearance at the Victoria Theatre on Monday evening last. The musical drama of Our Nelly, and the bagatelle of The Doloureux (both from the pen of Mr. Craven) were selected for the occasion. Nelly was personated by Mrs. Craven, who sang several songs with much effect, although her voice seemed rather weak, probably from the nervousness naturally attendant upon a first appearance. Mr. Craven, as Tom College, the medical student, was gentlemanly comical, and hit off the characteristics of those sons of Esculaplus very effectively. Mr. Frank Howson and Mr. Howard sustained their respective parts very well, and came in for a fair share of the applause which the piece received from a crowded house. We must not omit to notice the creditable acting of Madame Sara Flower, of Mrs. Chester as the doting mother, nor of Mrs. Branscombe as the housemaid . . .


26 October 1854, Chester as Widow Melnotte in The lady of Lyons

"ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE", The Sydney Morning Herald (26 October 1854), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12953139 

THIS EVENING, Thursday, October 26, The performance will commence with THE LADY OF LYONS: Glavis, Mr. F. Howson ; Claude Melnotte, Mr. Edwin Booth; Colonel Dumas, Mr. D. C. Anderson; Pauline, Miss Laura Keene; Widow Melnotte, Mrs. Chester; Madame Deschappelles, Madame Sara Flower . . .


9 November 1854, Chesters as Meg Merrilies in Guy Mannering

"VICTORIA THEATRE", The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator (11 November 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article251542595 

. . . On Thursday evening was produced the musical drama GUY MANNERING, in which we again had the pleasure of hearing the "sweet voices" of Madame Sara Flower, Mrs. Guerin, and the Messrs Frank aad John Howson. All the songs were well received - the duet "I know a Bank," between Madame Sara Flower and Mrs. Guerin was sung with good taste, and received great and well merited applause. As did also the song - "Safely follow Him," by Mr. F. Howson. The final chorus - "There is nae luck about the house," received the compliment of au encore; nor was the acting of the various characters un worthy of commendation. Dominie Sampson of Mr. Howard was pro-di-giously - successful, and Dandie Dinmont the rough and honest hearted borderer, was sustained by Mr. R. McGowan, in a manner which promises well for this young comedian's future success. The Meg Merrilies of Mrs. Chester was also very creditable . . .


30 December 1854, Chester as Mabel in The old house at home

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (30 December 1854), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28640758 

THIS EVENING, December 30th, 1854 . . . Christmas Pantomime, entitled HARLEQUIN KING BLEAR AND HIS THREE DAUGHTERS . . . To be followed by OUR OLD HOUSE AT HOME. Vincent Middleton, Mr. Holloway; Farmer Greenland, Mr. Byers; Michael Wright, Mr. Howard; Mat Maybush, Mr. F. Howson; Fanny Greenland, Mrs. Guerin; Sophia Greenland, Mrs. Branscombe; Becky Wiggles, Miss Sinclair; Mabel, Mrs. Chester . . .

1855

9 May 1855, Chester in Midas

"ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE", Empire (9 May 1855), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60176202 

. . . The evening's performance concluded with the musical burlesque of "Midas." Messrs. Lambert and Stephens, and Mrs. Craven and Mrs. Chester give a certain attraction to this piece, which, however, does not, as a selection, do much credit to the taste of the management. The orchestra, under the able guidance of Mr. Winterbottom, has become one of the greatest attractions in the Theatre to lovers of music, and it is no small pleasure to have selections from the best operas of Verdi and Donizetti so well performed, as is now the case every evening. . .


19 May 1855, Chester as Aurelia Durable in Raising the wind

"ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE", The Sydney Morning Herald (19 May 1855), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12969452 

THIS EVENING . . . To condude with the farce called RAISING THE WIND . . . Fainway, Mr. C. King; Jeremy Diddler, Mr. H. T. Craven; Fainwould, Mr. Ryan; Sam, W. H. Stephens; Richard, Mr. Cordner; Miss Aurelia Durable, Mrs. Chester; Peggy, Mrs. H. T. Craven.


24 May 1855, Chester in The lady of Lyons

[Advertisement], Empire (24 May 1855), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60179643 

THIS EVENING . . . will commence with Bulwer's Play of The LADY OF LYONS. Characters by G. V. Brooke, R. Younge, Lambert, H. T. Craven, C. Evans, Ryan, C. King, Maynard, Cordner, Turner; Miss Fanny Cathcart, Mrs. Chester, and Mrs. Lambert . . .

Melbourne, VIC (June 1855 to January 1856)

28 May 1855, openins of the Wallers's season, at the Queen's Theatre

[Advertisement], The Age (25 May 1855), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154890934 

QUEEN'S THEATRE. D. W. Waller, Sole Lessee . . . will open for the season on MONDAY, MAY 28, 1855 . . . The Company will consiste of the following ladies and gentlemen: -
Mrs. A. Moore, from Theatres Adelaide and Geelong.
Mrs. Thom, an old and valued favorite.
Mrs. Chester, from, Victoria Theatre, Sydney . . .
A full and efficient Orchestra, under the well-known and universally appreciated leadership of Mr. THOM.
First appearance of those celebrated Artistes
MR. AND MRS. WALLER . . .


11 June 1855, Chester as Mysis in Midas

"QUEEN'S THEATRE", The Age (13 June 1855), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154897260 

. . . The great affair of the evening, however, was the burlesque of Midas, the completeness of the getting up of which deserves high commendation . . . The reception with which it met augmented the regret that its earlier production had not been accomplished, as there is much reason to believe that this circumstance would have averted the consummation of what would appear to be an inevitable necessity. Be praise, however, where praise is merited, and hence we say that the Apollo of Mrs. Waller was a morceau of the humorous, the poetic, and the melodious, and confirmed the claims she has upon the conviction that her versatility is unsurpassed on the Victorian stage. Her voice is one of the most flexible we have ever heard, and the sweetness of her intonation is more than excellent. She gave the old favorite, of "Believe me if all those Endearing Young Charms" with melting sweetness, and the other incidental songs were each and all of them uttered with a like grace, as the audience vehemently asserted. Mrs. Chester's Mysis was given with such evidences, of natural capability, and with genuine raciness as made us regret exceedingly that she appeared for the first and last time, and we cannot refrain from hoping that some arrangement may result in keeping open the theatre so as to give us further opportunity of seeing this lady in her old woman's parts, which we have satisfactory assurance she plays so admirably . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Emma Waller (actor, vocalist)


"VICTORIA. THEATRE ROYAL [Melbourne]", South Australian Register (25 June 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49309480 

An immense advance has been made since last week in the progress of the works at the new theatre . . . The theatre is to open on the 2nd of July, and the intention of the proprietor is to popularize his establishment by making the prices of admission suited to the altered state of the times. Amongst the engagements already effected are those of Mr. and Mrs. C. Poole, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Phillips, Mr. Thom, Mrs. Gowan, and Mrs. Chester, Miss Anna Maria Quinn (whose juvenile performances are said to be surprising), Mr. Rayner, Mr. Burford, and Mr. Stephens. Madame Strebinger and an efficient corps de ballet have also been engaged, and negotiations are being entered into with the principal theatrical celebrities in the colonies. The orchestra will consist of between twenty and thirty performers, including some of the best musicians in this part of the world, and led by Mr. B. Thom . . .


3 July 1855, garrison theatricals, Patriotic Fund, Chester as Lady Clutterbuck in Used up

[Advertisement], The Argus (26 June 1855), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4809889 

"AMATEUR THEATRICALS", The Argus (3 July 1855), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4810955 

The Queen's Theatre will be reopened this night by a company of amateur actors, principally military officers at present stationed in Melbourne whose exertions will on this occasion be devoted to the augmentation of the Melbourne contribution to tho Patriotic Fund. Mr. R. H. Horne, the neglected author of the finely-conceived poem "Orion," who was one of the celebrated amateur theatrical corps which included amongst its members the names of Forster, Dickens, Costello, Leman, &c, will assume one of the characters in "Used Up," the drama selected for the first piece. The attempt, in the present dearth of theatrical amusements, will, no doubt, be fully successful, at any rate, the occasion, we feel certain, will command a crowded house. Mrs. Thom, whose qualities as an actress have never been sufficiently appreciated here simply because they have had no opportunity of being exhibited, and Mrs. Chester, an old colonial favorite, will also appear.

"QUEEN'S THEATRE. GARRISON THEATRICALS", The Argus (4 July 1855), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4811141 

A brilliant audience assembled last evening in the Queen's Theatre, to do honor to the amateur theatrical performance in aid of the Patriotic Fund. Every part of the house was well filled . . . Miss Catherine Hayes and Mrs. Hayes were also present throughout the performances which the fair prima donna appears to enjoy to the full in as high a degree as the less initiated in the mysteries of the stage . . . After a short interval, occupied to advantage by the orchestra, the performance of the first piece, Bourcicault's well-known comic drama, "Used Up", commenced . . . Mrs. Thom made a very pretty and vivacious Mary; and Mrs. Chester, who is evidently an actress of considerable attainments, performed the rôle of Lady Clutterbuck most amusingly . . .


16 July 1855, opening night of the Theatre Royal, Melbourne, Chester as Mrs. Candour in The school for scandal

[Advertisement], The Argus (12 July 1855), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4811777 

THEATRE ROYAL, Melbourne.
Grand Opening and Inauguration of THE THEATRE ROYAL, Bourke-street, On MONDAY NEXT, 16th JULY, Under the Sole Management of Mr. JOHN BLACK . . .
. Will be produced Richard Brinsley Sheridan's Fashionable Comedy, in five acts, of the SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL.
Sir Peter Teazle - Mr. G. H. Rogers . . .
Lady Teazle - Mrs. Charles Poole.
Mrs. Candour - Chester.
Lady Sneerwell - Mrs. Moore.
Maria - Mrs. Thom . . .


19 July 1855, Chester in Little Pickle

"THEATRE ROYAL", The Argus (21 July 1855), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4812773 

The "Stranger" was produced at this elegant Theatre on Thursday evening, with complete success . . . Miss Anna Maria Quinn created a perfect furore, as Little Pickle in the capital old farce of the "Spoiled Child" . . . Mr. Vinson, who is the tutor of this wonderful instance of Infant genius, deserves immense credit for the accomplishments which his pupil displays. He is a capital actor hismelf, and with Mrs. Chester, who was admitably made up for the occasion, contributed to the great success which was awarded to the performance of the farce . . .


3 and 5 September 1855, Chester as the marchioness in The daughter of the regiment (Donizetti)

[Advertisement], The Argus (3 September 1855), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4817073 

"THEATRE ROYAL", The Argus (7 September 1855), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4817462 

On Wednesday evening another crowded house at this establishment witnessed the repetition of "The Daughter of the Regiment." Since Monday evening a number of crudities, which were then noticeable, had been corrected, and on this occasion the opera was performed in such a manner as left little to be desired . . . Mrs. Chester did the little she was called upon to do as the Marchioness in a very satisfactory manner . . .


5 October 1855, opening night of Akhurst's Mirror of beauty, Chester as Queen Grammar (with songs)

[Advertisement], The Argus (5 October 1855), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4820091 

"THEATRE ROYAL", The Argus (6 October 1855), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4820146 

Yesterday evening a new burlesque extravaganza entitled the "Mirror of Beauty; or, Little Snow-White and the Seven Dwarfs," was performed at this theatre to a very crowded audience . . . The extravaganza is from the pen of Mr. W. M. Akhurst, a gentleman already well known as a dramatic writer of considerable merit . . . Mrs. Chester would have been an excellent Queen Grammar had she studied her part as well as she had conned the songs it contained . . . The different parts contain some excellent parodies on popular songs, and the effect which was given to them by the judicious aid of the orchestra is not unworthy of remembrance.

"THEATRE ROYAL - HYDES'S BENEFIT AND THE NEW BURLESQUE", The Argus (9 October 1855), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4820339 

The performances on Saturday evening were for the benefit of Mr. J. P. Hydes, the popular actor and well-known late lessee of the Queen's Theatre . . . Among other things, Mrs. Chester, who plays the leading character of Queen Grammar, had become better acquainted with her part, and her performance was deservedly successful . . .


16 October 1855), Chester as Mrs. Hunter in "A.S.S."

[Advertisement], The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), 16 October, p. 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154895198 

. . . THIS EVENING, Tuesday, October 16, The performances will commence with Shakspere's Sublime Tragedy, in Five Acts, of HAMLET . . .
To conclude with the Laughable Farce, entitled "A. S. S."
Mr. Diogenes Hunter - Mr. G. H. Rogers.
Anthony Sniggles - Mr. A. Philips.
Adolphus - Mr. Richardson.
Mrs. Hunter - Mrs. Chester.
Sophia - Mrs Thom . . .


30 November 1855, amatuer performance, charity benefit, Chester as Mrs. Wheezy in Cut for partners

[Advertisement], The Argus (30 November 1855), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4824617 

THEATRE ROYAL . . . AMATEUR PERFORMANCE, In Aid of the Funds of THE MELBOURNE HOSPITAL . . .

THE THEATRES. PERFORMANCE FOR THE HOSPITAL", The Age (1 December 1855), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154868049 

Thr Garrick Club may plume itself upon the achievement of a great and legitimate triumph. To have attracted so large an audience as assembled within the walls of the Theatre Royal, last night . . . The performances were brought to a close by Bruton's laughable farce of Cut for Partners, in which the Fipkins of Mr. Bagster, and the Snobbins of Mr. Durrand kept the audience in a roar of laughter. Mrs. Chester was as susceptible and superstitous as Mrs. Wheezy ought to be; and Mr W. J. Henningham. as Frederick Altamont, Mr. R. Henningham as Frank Lovell, and Mr. Harrison as Wheezy, ably seconded the efforts of their colleagues . . .


8 December 1855, Chester as Mrs. Bundle in The waterman

[Advertisement], The Argus (8 December 1855), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4825246 

THEATRE ROYAL . . . THE SLEDGE DRIVER . . THE LOAN OF A LOVER . . .
To conclude with the musical burletta of THE WATERMAN.
Robin (with the song of "Cherries and Plums ) - Mr. S. Howard.
Tom Tug (with the songs of "Did you ne'er hear of a Jolly Young Waterman," "Farewell my trim-built wherry," "Bay of Biscay," &c. - Mad. Sara Flower.
Mrs. Bundle - Mrs. Chester . . .


12 December 1855, Chester in Toddlekins

"THEATRE ROYAL", The Argus (13 December 1855), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4825630 

The "Stranger" was performed last evening with considerable success. Miss Poole, Mr. Rogers and Mr. Burford filled their respective parts to the obvious satisfaction of the audience . . . The farce of "Toddlekins" followed, in which Mrs. Chester and Mr. Rogers were thoroughly effective. Mr. Rogcrs makes a most amusing hypochondriac. The opera, of "Lucrezia Borgia" is to be repeated this evening, probably for the last time in Melbourne with Miss Hayes as the principal character . . .


17 December 1855, Maria Carandini's benefit, Chester as Mrs. MacCandlish in Guy Mannering

"THEATRE ROYAL", The Age (18 December 1855), 4-5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154859678 

The aspect of tho house last night was such as to constitute a very gratifying compliment to Madame Carandini, for whose benefit the performances were given . . . The performances commenced with the first act of Norma, in which both Miss Hayes and Madame Carandini appeared to excel their previous efforts . . . A pas de deux by Madame Strebinger and Signor Carandini, was vehemently redemanded ; and after this little interlude came the operatic drama of Guy Mannering. Every one knows the plot of this favorite piece, and the charming melodies with which it is studded are most of them, as familiar as household words . . . Mr. Welsh played Bailie Mucklethrift . . . and Mrs. Chester, as the relict of two husbands, and the wife of a third, made a capital helpmate to the Bailie . . .


26 December 1855, first night of the Christmas pantomime

"THE THEATRES", The Age (27 December 1855), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154863120 

. . . The pantomime at the Royal last night . . . it is confessedly a rechauffe of a burlesque played in London, and the local allusions are perhaps as felicitous as most things of the kind are in an adaptation. It is entitled "The Magician's Daughter; or, Harlequin, King of the Golden Island and the Fairy Rifle Corps" . . . King Orfwithishead (Mr. G. H. Rogers) . . . Signor Jacobs and Potyanthraesar (Mr. McGowan and Mrs. Chester) . . .

1856

5 January (postponed from 4 January) 1856, Melbourne, Chester's benefit, Theatre Royal

"MRS. CHESTER", The Age (2 January 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154866134 

This lady takes her benefit at the Theatre Royal on Friday next, on which occasion Madame Carandini, M. Coulon, M. Barre, and the beneficiare herself will appear in some selections from the Daughter of the Regiment, to be followed by the capital farce of the Lilywhites, in which Mrs. Chester and Mr. Rogers will sustain the characters of Mr. and Mrs. Lilywhite. We hope, for the sake of a very deserving actress, who is always at her post, and who is equally esteemed for her ability and her cheerfulness, that Mrs Chester's benefit on Friday night will prove to be a bumper.

"THEATRE ROYAL", The Age (3 January 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154860059 

In consequence of the funeral of the late Governor being appointed to lake place on Friday next, Mrs. Chester's benefit is necessarily postponed until the following evening (Saturday).

"THEATRE ROYAL", The Age (5 January 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154866517 

Mrs. Chester takes her benefit this evening, and puts forth a bill or fare so varied in its character, as to contain the promise of gratification to all tastes. The entertainments will include operatic selections, dancing, the sprightly farce or the Lilywhites, and the lively little comedietta of the Married Rake, in which Mrs. Deacle and Mr. Benson, - an actress and actor of considerable repute in the Indian Presidencies - will make their first appearance before the colonial public. With so much to attract and please, Mrs. Chester may fairly anticipate a full house.

[Advertisement], The Argus (5 January 1856), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4827487 

THEATRE ROYAL. For the BENEFIT OF MRS. CHESTER On Saturday, January 5th, will be performed . . .

"THE THEATRES", The Age (7 January 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154866066 

Mrs, Chester took her benefit on Saturday evening. The house was somewhat thinly attended at first, but gradually filled up during the progress of the first piece.

A selection from the Daughter of the Regiment (polyglot edition) commenced the performances, the part of Marie being sustained with her usual spirit and ability by Madame Carandini; that of the Countess by Mrs. Chester, who led the opening preghiera in a very effective style. M. Barre sang much better than we have heard him on previous occasions, and M. Coulon would make an excellent Sulpizio; if he would only make himself master of the music, or, having perfectly learned it, would only carefully remember it.

M. Carandini and Madamo Strebinger executed a graceful pas de deux after the Opera, and were warmly encored; and a small creature, whose petite person appeared still more diminutive upon that huge stage, delighted everybody by her sailor's hornpipe, which was unanimously redemanded, and repeated con amore.

The farce of the Lilywhites, with Mr. Rogers and Mrs. Chester as the pair of turtle-doves, kept the house in a roar of laughter, and the virtuous indignation of the lady, and the conscience-stricken humiliation of her jealous husband were capitally depicted.

The afterpiece of the Married Rake served to introduce Mrs. Deacle and Mr. Benson to the Melbourne public. The former is an arch and sprightly actress, but is too apt to mistake boisterousncss for vivacity, and to lose sight of that refinement both of tone and manner which befits the lady. Mr. Benson is one of the best light comedy actors we have seen upon the colonial stage, and with a little more attention to his coiffure, and a less free indulgence in a certain expletive, will become a great favorite.

Bendigo and Castlemaine, VIC (February 1856 to January 1857)

Mrs. Chester was cast and billed mainly in speaking parts in Henry Coleman's company for Bendigo and Castlemaine; press notices and advertisments some of the major parts listed below; her husband, William, was treasurer and box-keeper of the Coleman company


"COMPLIMENTARY BENEFIT TO MR. COLEMAN", Bendigo Advertiser (16 February 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88048872 

. . . all tickets be signed by the secretary, and handed to the treasurer, Mr. Chester . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Henry Coleman (actor, theatrical manager, active VIC, 1855-57; SA, 1857)


26 February 1856, Bendigo, opening night of the Coleman company's season

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (19 February 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88048887 

COLEMAN'S CRITERION THEATRE, MUNDY-STREET.
Manager and Sole Proprietor, - MR. HENRY COLEMAN.
GRAND OPENING NIGHT! Of the Season! On Tuesday, February 26th, 1856 . . .
The following Company has been engaged for the season, viz,
MADAME SARA FLOWER, Pupil of the Royal Academy, London, of the La Scala, Milan, and Prima Donna of the principal colonial Theatres;
MRS. CHESTER, The popular delineator of old women characters, formerly of the Theatres Royal, Drury Lane, Covent Garden, and Dublin;
and late of the Theatre Royal, Melbourne;
MRS. R. McGOWAN, Principal Danseuse of the Theatre Royal, Sydney, and Coppin's Olympic;
MISS HUDSON, A Colonial Favorite;
MRS. GILL, Favorite Actress and Pianist;
MRS. RICARDS, From the Habart Town and Melbourne Theatres;
MR. J. L. BYERS, Leading Tragedian from the principal Californian and Colonial Theatres;
MR. SAM. HOWARD, the well-known Comedian, from the Theatres Royal, Hobart Town, Sydney, Melbourne and Geelong;
MR. FAWCETT, A well-known favorite on Bendigo;
MR. R. McGOWAN, From the principal Theatres in the Colonies;
MR. B. I. COLEMAN, An established favorite;
MR. J. J. WELSH, Prom the Theatres Royal, Sydney and Melbourne;
MR. RICHARDSON, From the Theatre Royal, Melbourne;
MR. RYAN, From Coppin's Olympic;
MR. RICARDS, From Hobart Town and Melbourne;
MR. STYLES, From the Sydney Theatre; and
MASTER ERNEST CHESTER.
An Efficient Orchestra has been engaged, under the leadership of Mr. Tucker, late of Jullien's and Winterbottom's Concerts . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Sara Flower (vocalist, actor) and her husband Sam Howard (actor); Edward Tucker (leader of the orchestra, violinist)


1 March 1856, Bendigo, Chester as Madame Deschapples in The lady of Lyons

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (1 March 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88049016 

THIS EVENING, SATURDAY, 1st March, 1856.
The Performances will commence with Bulwer's Elegant Play, in five acts, of THE LADY OF LYONS, OR LOVE AND PRIDE.
Beauseant - Mr. Fawcett.
Damas - Mr. S. Howard.
Claude Melnotte - Mr. J. L. Byers.
Pauline - Mrs. BROUGHAM.
Madame Deschapples - Mrs. Chester . . .

"COLEMAN'S CRITERION THEATRE", Bendigo Advertiser (4 March 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88049032 

. . . The piece was well put upon the stage, and the performance highly creditable. The character of "Pauline" is not one in which the peculiar qualities of Mrs. Brougham's acting are displayed. Mrs. Chester went through the part of "Madame Deschapples" with spirit, and gave a very appropriate impersonation of the character . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Emma Brougham (actor); James Lucas Byers (actor)


4 and 6 March 1856, Bendigo, Chester sings Savourneen Deelish, and as Lady Sowerby Crawley in Serious family

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (4 March 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88049049 

. . . TUESDAY EVENING, 4th March, 1856. The performances will commmence with the Comic Drama in one act, entitled, COUSIN CHERRY, OR, The Widow of the Mill.
Cousin Cherry - Mrs. BROUGHAM . . .
Ballad - "Savourneen Deelish" - Mrs. Chester . . .

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (6 March 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88049070 

. . . THURSDAY EVENING, 6TH MARCH, 1856 . . . the favorite Comedy in three acts SERIOUS FAMILY . . . Lady Sowerby Crawley - Mrs. Chester . . .


8 March 1856, Bendigo, Chester, as one of the witches, in "Locke's music in Macbeth", and as Mrs. Crinum in The wandering minstrel

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (8 March 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88049085 

COLEMAN'S CRITERION THEATRE, MUNDY-STREET . . .
First Time, the Tragedy of MACBETH,
The most powerfully-cast piece yet produced on Bendigo.
Mr. J. L. Byers, as - Macbeth.
Madame Sara Flower, as - Hecate.
Mrs. BROUGHAM, as LADY MACBETH!
The whole of Locke's Original Music;
Principal Singing Witches - Mrs. Chester, Mrs. Macgowan, Mrs. Gill, Miss Hudson and Mrs. B. Richards.
THIS EVENING, SATURDAY, March 8, 1856, will be presented . . . MACBETH . . .
To conclude with the laughable Farce of THE WANDERING MINSTREL.
Mrs. Crincum - Mrs. Chester.
Jem Bags - Mr. S. Howard.
Herbert Carol (with Songs) - Mme. Sara Flower . . .

MUSIC: Locke's music in Macbeth (probably, correctly, by Richard Leveridge)


13 and 15 March 1856, Bendigo, Bellini's Norma, Chester as Clotilda

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (13 March 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88049137 

"COLEMAN'S CRITERION THEATRE", Bendigo Advertiser (18 March 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88049166 

On Saturday evening last Bellini's opera of "Norma" was produced, for the second time at this theatre, there was no alteration in the cast except that the part of "Oroveso" was sustained by Mr. Hancock in consequence of the indisposition of M. Coulon . . . "Pollio" (M. Barre) a Roman officer falls in love with Norma" (Madame Cailly) the daughter of "Oroveso" (Mons. Coulon) the high priest of the Druids . . . Norma contrives to keep her amour with Pollio an impenetrable secret to all but "Clotilda" (Mrs. Chester) her confidante. In this state of things Pollio sees "Adalgisa (Madame Sara Flower) another priestess, and with the inconsistency of any modern Lothario, is smitten at first sight . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Clarisse Cailly (vocalist); Edward Hancock (vocalist); Emile Coulon (Vocalist); Mons. Barre (vocalist)


[Advertisement], The Argus (19 March 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4833461 

MONDAY, 24th MARCH. Unreserved Sale of Unredeemed Pledges. J LYONS and CO. Will sell by auction, at the New Commercial Sales Room, Bourke-street, on Monday, 2dth inst., at eleven o'clock, The following pledges from Messrs. Cohen and Marks, 128 Russell-street, Melbourne . . . the likeness of Mrs. Chester as Lady Teazle, in oil painting . . .


5 April 1856, Bendigo, Chester as Madame Deschapelles, in The lady of Lyons, with Lola Montez as Pauline

"COLEMAN'S CRITERION THEATRE", Bendigo Advertiser (7 April 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88049358 

On Saturday the house was crowded to see Madame Lola Montes, for the first time, in the "Lady of Lyons," as Pauline . . . on the whole it was a very creditable performance. Howard's Dumas, and Mrs. Chester's Madame Deschapelles were truly admirable . . .


10 April 1856, Bendigo, Chester as Emilia, in Othello

"COLEMAN'S CRITERION THEATRE", Bendigo Advertiser (11 April 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88049453 

Miss Wernham made her debut at this theatre last evening in the character of Desdemona in "Othello" . . . Mr. Byers, who personated the Moor, somewhat overwrought the character, but his conception was good. Mr. Fawcett's Iago was very fair. Mrs. Chester, as Emilia, went through her part with considerable merit . . .


22 April 1856, Bendigo, Chester as Mrs. Candour, in The school for scandal

"COLEMAN'S CRITERION THEATRE", Bendigo Advertiser (23 April 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88049666 

Last evening Sheridan's excellent comedy of "The School for Scandal" was produced at this theatre. The performance went off very well, and the attendance was tolerably good. Madame Lola Montez as Lady Teazle, and Mr. Folland as Charles Surface were undoubtedly the best acquainted with the characters they assumed. Mr. Byers' Joseph Surface we have spoken of on a former occasion, and his last evening's performance deserves equal credit. Mrs. Chester as Mrs. Candor was an excellent cast, and performed with her usual good style.

ASSOCIATIONS: Lola Montez (actor, dancer); Noel Folland (actor, manager)


26 and 27 May 1856, Castlemaine, Coleman's company, Chester as Madame Deschappelles, in The lady of Lyons with Gustavus Vaughan Brooke as Melnotte

[Advertisement], Mount Alexander Mail (23 May 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202634081 

"COLEMAN'S CASTLEMAINE THEATRE", Mount Alexander Mail (30 May 1856), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202633221 

. . . That the public of Castlemaine are not insensible to the charms of real dramatic talent, has been pretty well evidenced this week by the reception given to Mr. G. V. Brooke, Mr. and Mrs. Heir, Miss Wernham, Mrs. Chester, Mr. Howard, and Mr. Fawcett, who were detached from the Bendigo company for the purpose of assisting the great tragedian in his performances here, the first of which took place on Monday evening, when he played Othello . . . On referring to the advertisement elsewhere, our readers will perceive that the Theatre will be reopened on Saturday night for another short series of performances, in which will appear Mrs. Chester, Miss Wernham, and Mrs. Gill . . . Messrs. Howard, Fawcett, Walsh, Ryan, &c., &c.

"MINING INTELLIGENCE. CASTLEMAINE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. May 29. THEATRICALS", The Age (4 June 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154866769 

Mr. G. Brooke has been performing this week to crowded houses, who have received him with the greatest enthusiasm. He was assisted by Mr. and Mrs. Heir, Miss Wernham, Mrs. Chester, Mr. Howard, aud Mr. Fawcett, and other members of Mr. Coleman's Bendigo company . . . The subject of the first performance was Othello, of the second, the Lady of Lyons, and of the third, Delicate Ground, and O'Callaghan in "His last legs." The last performance excited quite a furore, and Mr. Brooke and Mr. Coleman, as well as the subordinate performers were received in a manner that must have almost turned their heads. The prices of admission to the reserved seats was ten shillings, and backseats seven-and-sixpence. Five hundred persons on each occasion paying these sums would realize a smart amount to the manager. After such a drainage of the public exchequer, it would be very bad policy to canvass for such tame things as churches and Mechanics' Institutions.

ASSOCIATIONS: Gustavus Vaughan Brooke (actor); Robert Heir and Fanny Cathcart (Mrs. Heir) (actors)


31 May 1856, Castlemaine, Chester in The Queensberry fete and The wandering minstrel

[Advertisement], Mount Alexander Mail (30 May 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202633225 

COLEMAN'S CASTLEMAINE THEATRE . . . THREE MORE NIGHTS HERE Commencing ON SATURDAY NEXT, MAY 31 . . . will commence with the celebrated Drama of THE QUEENSBERRY FETE, In which MR. HOWARD, MR. RYAN, MR. WELSH, MISS WERNHAM, MRS. CHESTER, AND MRS. GILL Will Appear . . . To conclude with THE WANDERING MINSTREL . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Fanny Wernham (actor, died San Francisco, by 1878)


5 June 1856, Castlemaine, Chester as Lady Scraggs in Stage-struck

"THE CASTLEMAINE THEATRE", Mount Alexander Mail (6 June 1856), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202632226 

Last evening, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Holt appsared as Don Caesar de Bazan and Maritana . . . The afterpiece was the farce entitled "Stage-struck," in which Mrs. Holt appeared as Sally Scraggs, with Mr. Howard as Tom Tape, and Mr. Fawcett as Count Glorieux; "formidable" Lady Scraggs being taken by Mrs. Chester . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Clarence Holt (actor, d. 1903)


16 June 1856, Bendigo, Chester as Mrs. Biffen in Popping the question

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (16 June 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88050701 

COLEMAN'S CRITERION THEATRE.
First Night of the New Comic Drama of GIRALDA, OR WHICH IS MY HUSBAND.
MONDAY EVENING, June 16th, 1856, will be performed the new drama in three acts, of GIRALDA.
Perez - Mr. S. Howard.
Giralda - Miss F. Wernham.
Pas de Deux, Mrs. R. MacGowan and Signor Bellati.
POPPING THE QUESTION.
Mr. Primrose - Mr. J. J. Welsh.
Miss Biffin - Mrs. Chester.
To conclude with the laughable Farce of the VALET DE SHAM.
Dress Circle and Stalls, 6s. Pit, 4s.
W. Chester, Treasurer.
S. T. Howard, Stage Manager.


28 June 1856, Bendigo, Chester's benefit

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (27 June 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88050957 

COLEMAN'S CRITERION THEATRE.
Proprietor and Manager, Mr. H. Coleman.
For the Benefit, of MRS. CHESTER.
On SATURDAY EVENING, June 28th, 1858.
MRS. CHESTER in announcing to her friends and the public of Bendigo, that her benefit will take place on the above evening, begs to intimate that she has selected a Drama from the pen of J. B. Buckstone, Esq., of intense interest, which was played with immense success at the Adelphi Theatre, London, and which she believes has never been produced on these gold-fields, entitled
VICTORINE; Or, I'll Sleep on it.
The subject of this favorite Drama is that of Victorine, a young and lovely embroideress, having received an offer of marriage from two persons; one a rich roue, the other a poor mechanic, determines, before she makes her election, to well consider and reflect upon the choice she ought to make. She bids her companions good night, retires to bed to meditate on the course she should adopt, resolves - I'll sleep on it. The first act terminates with Victorine retiring into bed; when the dream of her future life, supposing her to have chosen her wealthy lover, is enacted through the last two acts of the Drama.
The denoument showing that virtue, not wealth, is the path that leads to true happiness.
Characters in Act I.
Introduces the argument of love and marriage; the struggle how to choose; the resolve - I'll sleep on it.
Alexandre, a Roue, Mr. J. L. Byers.
Michael, an Upholsterer, Mr. Richardson.
Victorine, an Embroideress, Miss Wernham.
Elise, a Sempstress, Mrs. CHESTER.
A lapse of five years is supposed between the 1st and 2nd acts.
Characters in Act II.
The commencement of the Dream.
Monsieur de St. Alexandre, a Horse-dealer, Mr. J. L. Byers.
MiehaelJForeman to an Upholsterer, Mr. Richardson.
Mr. Bonassua, a Jeweller, Mr. S. Howard.
Blaize, his Servant, Mr. B. J. Coleman.
Macare, Mr. B. Ricards.
Bijon, a Groom, Mr. Styles.
Madame St. Victor, Miss Wernham.
Madame La Baronne Elise, Mrs. CHESTER.
Mrs. Bonassus, Mrs. Gill.
Justin, Miss Lewis.
Characters in Act III.
A supposed lapse of twenty years has occurred since the last act.
Alexandre, an Escapsd Convict, Mr. J, L. Byers.
Michael, a Captain of the National Guard, Mr. Richardson.
Mr. Bonassus, a Widower, Mr. S. Howard.
Blaize, his Man, Mr. B. J, Coleman.
Cjesnr Chnnteloupe, a Soldier, Mr. J. J. Welsh.
Victorine, Keeper of a Lodging-house, Miss Wernham.
Elise, her Housekeeper, Mrs. CHESTER.
Sophie, Mrs. B. Ricards.
In the last scene the characters are dressed precisely as in the first act.
Victorine's address.
To the Gentlemen, - If you are in perplexity, be not too hasty in your decisions, but think first of the cause, and sleep on it.
To the Ladies, - If you are in love, be not too eager to hope, nor to ready to fear, but sleep on it.
The gentle public, - The Beneficiaire invites all to respond to this appeal for their support - that she may have the satisfaction of a bumper house - that such a pleasing remembrance of their patronage may enable her, after the fatigue of the evening, to retire and sleep on it - with gratitude.
After which,
Miss Berg, of the Theatre Royal, Melbourne, has kindly volunteered her services to appear in a Double Irish Jig with Mrs. R. Macgowan.
The Cracovienne, Miss Berg.
Pas de Deux, Mrs. R. Macgowan and Signor Bellati.
To conclude with the laughable farce of the
RENDEZVOUS,
Quake, Mr. J J. Welsh.
Simon, Mr. S. Howard.
Captain Boulding, Mr. Chester, (his first and only appearance).
Charles, Mr. Richardson.
Smart, Mr. B. J. Coleman.
Lucretias, Mrs. Gill.
Sophia, Miss Wernham.
Rose, Mrs. CHESTER.
Tickets to be had of Boyd and Harris, View Point; Victoria Hotel, Pall Mall; and Mrs. Chestor, Criterion Hotel.


5 July 1856, Sam Howard's benefit

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (5 July 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88051223 

. . "Just Drop In" on SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 5th, TO SAM HOWARD'S BENEFIT. THE Entertainments will commence with . . . PAUL PRY . . . Mrs. Subtle, Mrs. Chester . . . To conclude with the side-splitting burletical farce of JEM BAGGS, Or, The Wandering Minstrel . . . Mrs. Crincum, Mrs. Chester . . .


12 July 1856, Miss Wernham's benefit

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (12 July 1856), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88051352 

. . . For the BENEFIT of MISS F. WERNHAM . . . SATURDAY EVENING, July 12, 1856 . . . To conclude with the admired comedy of NAvAL ENGAGEMENTS . . . Mrs. Pontifex, Mrs. Chester; Miss Mortimer, Miss F. Wemham . . .


"MORGAN AND FILL'S DAGUERREAN GALLERY", Bendigo Advertiser (18 July 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88051490 

We yesterday paid a visit to the Daguerrean Gallery of Messrs, Morgan and Fill, in Bull-street, Sandhurst . . . As far as our limited observation extends, the specimens of art which are to be seen . . . are superior to any that have been accomplished either here or in England, and can only have been attained by the most intense study and observation, as well as by extensive practice. On the one side of the case the observer will recognise Mr. Chester, the well-known boxkeeper of Coleman's Criterion Theatre . . .


29 July 1856, Castlemaine, amateurs

[Advertisement], Mount Alexander Mail (25 July 1856), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202630569 

THEATRE ROYAL CASTLEMAINE. CASTLEMAINE AMATEUR DRAMATIC SOCIETY have the honor to announce that they will give a Dramatio Entertainment on TUESDAY EVENING, JULY 29th, in aid of the Funds of THE CASTLEMAINE HOSPITAL, On which occasion the performance will commence with Sheridan's Comedy of THE RIVALS! . . . Mrs. Malaprop - Mrs. Chester . . . To conclude with BOMBASTES FURIOSO . . . Artexominous - Mr. Kentish . . . Distafinna - Mrs. Chester . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Henry Nathaniel Lipscombe Kentish (1835-1909, clerk of the court, amateur actor), son of Nathaniel Lipscombe Kentish


31 July 1856, Bendigo, Sandhurst amateurs

"COLEMANS CRITERION THEATRE", Bendigo Advertiser (1 August 1856), 2-3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88051805 

Last evening the Sandhurst Amateur Dramatic Club gave a performance for the benefit of the Bendigo New Hospital . . . The performances commenced with the five-act comedy of the "Poor Gentleman," which the Club, ably assisted by Miss Wernham and Mesdames Chester, Gill, and Ricards, produced in a very effective style . . . [3] . . . in the after-picce of the "Irish Lion" Mr. Casey's Tom Moore was a most succcssful impersonation . . . The amateurs are under great obligations to the ladies who so kindly gave their services on the occasion. We hope the other ladies will not be aggrieved at our especially singling out Miss Wernliam, who was really the life and soul of the pieces. Mrs. Chester, too, played with her usual gusto . . .


12 August 1856, Bendigo, amateur performance by Castlemaine amateurs

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (12 August 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88052030 

CASTLEMAINE AMATEUR DRAMATIC SOCIETY Will perform at COLEMAN'S CRITERION THEATRE, OM TUESDAY, the 12th AUGUST . . .

"COLEMAN'S CRITERION THEATRE", Bendigo Advertiser (13 August 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88052071 

Last night the Castlemaine Dramatic Society gave a performance at this theatre for the benefit of the Bendigo New Hospital . . . Mrs. Chester, as Mrs. Malaprop, was quite at home, and fairly surpassed, herself, eliciting continued applause . . .

"THE CASTLEMAINE DRAMATIC SOCIETY", Mount Alexander Mail (15 August 1856), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202634463 

The above society gave a return performance on Tuesday night at Coleman's Criterion Theatre, for the benefit of the Bendigo New Hospital . . . the manner in which the gentlemen of Castlemaine enacted Sheridan's Comedy of The Rivals proved that they are no longer entitled to the critic's indulgence, for they performed as creditably as any regular professional corps dramatique . . . and we should be guilty of injustice if we did not accord our meed of praise to the "Mrs. Malaprop" of Mrs. Chester, the "Julia" of Mrs. Gill, the "Lydia Languish" of Mrs. McGowan. All the ladies did their best, and their exertions were properly appreciated. However, to use the words of Mrs. Malaprop, we will make no more "delusions," save and except to mention that in the burlesque of Bombastes Furioso, the "Distaffina" of Mrs. Chester was inimitable . . .


8 October 1856, Castlemaine, amateur performance

"THE CASTLEMAINE AMATEUR DRAMATIC SOCIETY", Mount Alexander Mail (10 October 1856), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202634251 

The members of this Society essayed a third performance at the Theatre on Wednesday evening, the pieces selected being Coleman's comedy of The Heir at Law, and the farce of The Weathercock. The performance was in aid of the Mechanics' Institute, and a well filled house exhibited at once the favor with which the public regard the efforts of the Society, and the general desire to support their laudable endeavors. Both pieces were well rendered . . . In "The Weathercock," . . . [the] female characters were sustained by Mrs. Chester (Lady Duberly), Miss Montrose (Caroline Dormer), and Mrs. Richardson (Cicely Homespun) . . .


13 or 20 October 1856, Castlemaine, Chester's benefit advertised

[Advertisement], Mount Alexander Mail (13 October 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202634997 

THEATRE ROYAL.
CASTLEMAINE AMATEUR DRAMATIC SOCIETY.
MRS. CHESTER'S BENEFIT;
THE Members of the Castlemaine Amateur Dramatic Society announce that on Monday next they Intend giving a Benefit to Mrs. Chester, in acknowledgment of the services rendered by that lady to the Society in their recent performances, and respectfully appeal to the public to assist them in paying an adequate compliment to the beneficiare's histrionic abilities, and her professional [. . . ? assistance to . . .] the society.
The pieces selected for this occasion are SIMON AND CO, THE HAUNTED INN, AND THE RENDEZVOUS.
The characters in which will be sustained by members of the Society, assisted by Miss Montrose, Mrs. Richardson, add Mrs. Chester.
Full particulars will be published in future advertisements.


30 October 1856, Bendigo, Tom Besnard's benefit

"CRITERION THEATRE", Bendigo Advertiser (31 October 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87995228 

Last night the performances at this theatre were for the benefit of Mr. Besnard, and we were glad to see that the attendance was good. Mr. Besnard as O'Callaghan and Morgan Rattler was ably supported by Mrs. Chester and Miss Hudson, and the pieces went off in good style. A short time previous to the second piece, a cry of fire was raised and at first assumed rather a serious aspect, as a dead rush was made to the doors, the effect of which was effectual in barring all egress for a few seconds. It appenred the accident was occasioned by one of the occupants of a private box while smoking a cigar carelessly setting fire to the white muslin curtains, which speedily blazed up, and frightened a large number out of their presence of mind. It was speedily put out and order restored.

ASSOCIATIONS: Tom Besnard (vocalist)

1857

January 1857, Castlemaine, the Chesters with McGowan's company

"Theatre Royal", Mount Alexander Mail (19 January 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202631235 

We understand that the theatre has been enaged for a period of six months by Mr. McGowan, and from Thursday next, a series of theatrical entertainments will be commenced by a company, among whom are Mr. and Mrs. Chester, Mr. Walsh, and several others whose names are familiar to the public of Castlemaine.

ASSOCIATIONS: Robert McGowan (comedian, manager, died Sydney, 24 August 1864, aged 33); his wife, Mrs. R. McGowan = Fanny Griffiths (dancer)

Melbourne, VIC (by August 1857)

7 August 1857, Melbourne, VIC, Chester in Time works wonders, Garrick Club, Princess Theatre

[Advertisement], The Age (5 August 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154834394 

PRINCESS'S THEATRE.
Spring-street, opposite the Houses of Parliament.
AMATEUR PERFORMANCE by the MELBOURNE GARRICK CLUB,
On FRIDAY, 7th AUGUST, 1857.
The MISSES GOUGENHEIM have kindly volunteered their assistance . . .
on which occassion the performances will commence with, for the first time in these colonies, Douglas Jerrold's Comedy, In five acts, entitled,
TIME WORKS WONDERS . . .
Florentino - Miss Adelaide Gougenheim.
Bessy Tulip - Miss Joey Gougenheim.
Miss Tucker - Miss Emily Glyndon.
Mrs. Goldthumb - Mrs. Chester.
Chicken - Miss Marie Nelson . . .

ASSOCIATIONS: Adelaide and Joey Gougenheim (actors, vocalists); Marie Nelson (actor, vocalist)

1858
Newcastle and Sydney, NSW (c. 1858 to 20 December 1859)

"NEWCASTLE. PUBLICANS' LICENSES", Northern Times (24 April 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128761414 

William Chester, Metropolitan, Watt street, Newcastle, the house lately occupied by Captain Bingle, nearly opposite the Bank of New South Wales.


4 and 11 May 1858, Newcastle, NSW, Chester as Mrs. Malaprop in The rivals and in All that glitters is not gold

"NEWCASTLE THEATRE", Northern Times (8 May 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128760737 

A theatrical entertainment was given on Tuesday evening last in favour of the Indian Mutiny Relief Fund, and the house was visited by a fashionable and crowded audience. R. B. Sheridan's comedy of the Rivals was the opening piece, and, through the exertions of a few of the amateurs and Mr. Byers's company, passed off admirably. We have not space to speak individually of the performers, but we cannot overlook the "Captain Absolute" of Mr. C. Hannell, and the exquisite richness of Mrs. Chester, in the character of Mrs. Malaprop. The Philharmonic band sweetly blended its harmonious strains throughout the evening. We believe the proceeds, clear of all expenses, will amount to about £20. In return for the ready and willing co-operation of Mr. J. L. Byers, on this occasion, the sub-committee have announced a complimentary benefit to that gentleman on Tuesday evening next, when the play of "Damon and Pythias" will be performed, with the assistance of amateurs. The band of the Philharmonic Society will be in attendance. Mrs. Chester will also appear, in the afterpiece of "All that Glitters is not Gold." Mr. Byers in consequence of the sympathy attending the Indian Mutiny Relief Fund, suffered considerably from the paucity of support given on the Monday evening previous, and we sincerely trust he will be amply recompensed by a deserved "bumper house" on Tuesday night.

ASSOCIATIONS: James Lucas Byers (actor, manager)


21 June 1858, Newcastle, Chester's theatrical benefit

"THEATRICAL", Northern Times (12 June 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128760219 

We have much pleasure in announcing that the amateurs of Newcastle are about to give a performance for the benefit of Mrs. Chester on her retirement from the stage. Shakespeare's tragedy of Romeo and Juliet had been selected, in which that lady will sustain the character of the Nurse; and our favorite amateur, Capt. Absolute, will appear as Romeo. Mr. Byers and company will also kindly assist. We understand that Mrs. Chester was the first professional lady who visited the colony, and before that time was a singer and actress of some celebrity at "Old Drury." Her first appearance in Sydney was in 1836, at the old Theatre Royal, in George-street, in the musical drama of "Clari." She afterwards played there for several months until her departure for Calcutta. She has subsequently appeared in conjunction with some of the brightest stars who have graced our histrionic hemisphere and gladdened many a dull scene, and caused many a hearty laugh, as several of us can testify. Fickle fortune has, however, tossed her about, sometimes high and sometimes low, through various shades from grave to gay - and now on her exit from professional life, commences a new drama entitled "Mine Hostess," and bids farewell to all pomp and circumstance of "gaudy show." For although Mrs. Chester retires from the stage, she will continue before the public, and on the 1st of July, at the Metropolitan, the curtain will rise to an entire change of performance, where she purposes to give daily such an entertainment as shall please the most delicate or fastidious tastes. We trust that the contemplated tribute to her talent and standing among us will be such that she can look back to the "fall of the curtain" on her professional career with pleasure and satisfaction.

"NEWCASTLE . . . THEATRE", Northern Times (19 June 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128762044 

We perceive that Mrs. Chester's farewell performance is announced for Monday evening next, under the distinguished patronage of the Warden, Police Magistrate, and Magistrates of Newcastle. This is a compliment that must be very gratifying to that lady, and it also evinces their appreciation of the production of one of Shakespeare's plays, which can seldom be witnessed here, arising from many causes, such as the want of numbers to sustain the characters, or the absence of some particular party necessary to the completeness of tho whole. In this instance, how ever, Mrs. Chester will be aided in the cast of characters by Mr. Byers and his talented company, as well as by the gentleman amateurs, and we have no doubt that a large attendance will he present on the occasion. The pieces announced for the evening are "Romeo and Juliet," and "All that glitters, is not gold."

"NEWCASTLE", Northern Times (23 June 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128761496 

During the past two or three evenings our city has been enlivened by some admirable performances in the dramatic sphere. The company, under the able direction of Mr. J. L. Byers, have performed two dramas and the tragedy of "Richard III," in a highly creditable manner, to respectable audiences. Mr. Byers is entitled to great praise for bis masterly impersonation of "the crook-backed tyrant," and for the efficient way in which the tragedy was placed upon our limited boards. On Monday evening the Theatre was opened under distinguished patronage, for the benefit of Mrs. Chester on her retirement from public life, and the house was consequently filled to excess with a considerable sprinkling of the elite of Newcastle. The tragedy of "Romeo and Juliet" was produced on the occasion. Mr. Byers's company were engaged, and the whole affair passed off admirably.


27 July 1858, Newcastle, Chester receives the governor at the Metropolitan Hotel

"THE LATE RAILWAY DEMONSTRATION", Northern Times (31 July 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128759781 

In our report, in Wednesday's paper, of the grand demonstration at West Maitland, on Tuesday, in honour of the Extension of the Railway, there were several omissions which we now beg to supply . . .

WITH reference to his Excellency's movements . . . His Excelleney honoured Mrs Chester, of the Metropolitan Hotel, Newcastle, with his presence; and was pleased to express to the worthy hostess his gratification at the completeness of the preparation she had made for his reception . . .

1859

15 June 1859, Newcastle, death of William Chester

"DEATHS", The Sydney Morning Herald (23 June 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13026684 

On the 15th instant, at his late residence, Bolton-street, Newcastle, Mr. William Chester, after a long and painful illness, in his 49th year, son of the late Edward Yates Chester, Esq., of Holyport, Berkshire, England, and brother of Granado Chester, Esq., late surgeon of the 5th Madras Light Cavalry. He was much respected and deeply regretted by all who knew him. English papers please copy.

ASSOCIATIONS: Edward Yates Chester (c.1776-1851)


"ECCLESIASTICAL JURISDICTION", New South Wales Government Gazette (24 June 1859), 1417

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228718135 

In the Supreme Court of New South Wales. ECCLESIASTICAL JURISDICTION. In the Goods, Chattels, and Credits of William Chester, late of the City of Newcastle, in the Colony of New South Wales, publican, deceased. NOTICE is hereby given, that fourteen days after this notice, Marian Maria Chester, widow and relict of the above-named William Chester, deceased, will apply to this Honorable Court, that Letters of Administration of the goods, chattels, and credits of her late deceased husband, may be granted to her. - Dated this twenty-first day of June, A.D, 1859. HENRY BAKER Proctor for the said Marian Maria Chester. By Iceton and Pownall, his Agents. 1630 4s. 6d.


22 November (postponed from 15 November) 1859, Sydney, Chester's benefit concert

[News], Empire (10 November 1859), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64092699

One of the oldest professionals of Sydney claims the sympathies of the public. Mrs. Chester, formerly one of our best vocalists, being afflicted with paralysis, and desirous of returning to England, is about to give a concert, in the Exchange, under the patronage of his Excellency the Governor-General and Lady Denison. Madame Jaffa, Miss Brady, Madame Flora Harris, Messrs. Charles Packer, J. and E. Deane, Kohler, Frank Howson, and others, give their services to this charitable cause; and the concert will undoubtedly receive the warmest support from the musical world and general public of Sydney.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (15 November 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13033245 

POSTPONEMENT of Mr. [sic] CHESTER'S CONCERT In consequence of there being a supplementary mail on Wednesday, Mrs. CHESTER respectlully informs her patrons and the public generally that her Concert, at the Exchange, is postponed to TUESDAY, 22nd instant.

[News], Empire (21 November 1859), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64093318

It is now about twenty-three years, since the arrival of Mrs. Chester threw the musical world of Sydney into considerable excitement. That lady was the first veritable "star" that had deigned to visit the colony. Fame spoke favourably of her vocal powers, and many who bad witnessed the beautiful performance of the celebrated Miss Chester (now Duchess of Buckingham) wondered who Mrs. Chester could be, until the manager of the Sydney theatre announced her as Mrs. Chester late Miss Crawford, of the London theatres. She was accompanied by her husband, brother of the Miss Chester above alluded to, a gentleman of whom those who had the pleasure of his acquaintance spoke in the highest terms; he brought letters of introduction to the chief officers of the Government, and up to the period of his death (now about five months since) held a responsible situation at Newcastle. Mrs. Chester made her first appearance before the Sydney public in the character of "Clari, or the Maid of Milan," and her beautiful singing of "Home, sweet home," and "Tyrant, soon I'll burst thy chains" at once proved her to be a vocalist of much ability. Mrs. Chester was engaged to sing three nights in each week, at a salary of ten pounds per night, and the management, at that time reaped a golden harvest from her labours. A reference to Doctor Loetzby's [Lhotsky's] Review on music in New South Wales, published in 1837 will shew the estimation in which Mrs. Chester was then held by a delighted public. About two years afterwards she was induced by promises of great patronage to visit India, and shortly after departed with her husband for Calcutta, where for a time her professional efforts were crowned with complete success, she was honoured with the friendship and patronage of the highest families and personages in the "City of Palaces," and was on the high road to independence, when misfortune in a fearful form overtook her, and at once blighted her prospects and her hope, by a terrible catastrophe. She was awoke in the middle of the night by the cry of "Fire!" and had scarcely time to envelop herself in a blanket, with the assistance of her husband, and leap from the window of the hotel, when the fearful thought that her infant son, whom she had entrusted to a servant, was still in the burning house, took possession of her mind. No assurance on the part of her husband could, in her state of excitement, convince her of the contrary, and in the midst of her screams for her child, the building fell in with a fearful crash; from that moment her mind was in blank, reason had forsaken her, and even the sight of her infant (which had been saved long before the mother) failed to repair the awful shook. For many months Mrs. Chester remained in this state, even the sight of a lighted candle would bring on a fearful paroxysm, and fears were for a time entertained that she would never regain her reason. Mrs. Chester left India, and resided for a long time in Hobart Town, where she slowly recovered her faculties, and in her strictly retired position, and private life, endeared herself to all within the circle of her acquaintance. Mrs. Chester afterwards returned to New South Wales and introduced here from Van Diemen's Land the talented family of the Deanes, and afterwards resided with her husband at Newcastle, but an attack of paralysis has now entirely incapacitated her from further professional exertion. Destitute, and a widow, Mrs. Chester now appeals to the sympathies of the musical public, and we heartily trust that her appeal will not be made in vain. Mrs. Chester is now desirous of returning to her friends in England; we hope that her benefit at the Exchange Rooms, tomorrow evening, will furnish her with the means of doing so. We have only to add that the programme is one most attractive, and will be patronised by his Excellency the Governor-General, Sir George F. Bowen, Governor of Queensland, and the Masonic body of Sydney.

Also reprinted in Maitland in "SYDNEY NEWS . . . A MELANCHOLY HISTORY", The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (24 November 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18656425 

[News], Empire (22 November 1859), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64093333 

The concert for the benefit of Mrs. Chester, that was postponed last week on account of the arrival of the mail, will take place at the Exchange Hall this evening. The cause for which the concert is given - that of rendering assistance to me of the oldest members of the musical profession - is alone sufficient to attract a crowded auditory; but the entertainment, which is under the patronage of his Excellency the Governor-General and Lady Denison, the Governor of Queensland and Lady Bowen, and of the Masonic body of Sydney, is likewise deserving of support, the programme presenting an excellent selection of music. Amongst the gems to be performed are - the Rondo from Beethoven's Concerto in E flat, by the admirible executante of classical music, Madame Jaffa; a quartett for stringed instruments, by the Messrs. Deane; a pianoforte duet for Messrs. C. S. Packer and F. Ellard, and numerous other popular pieces, both vocal and instrumental.

"MRS. CHESTER'S CONCERT", The Sydney Morning Herald (22 November 1859), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13033594 

We have much pleasure in calling the attention of the lovers of music to the concert which is to be given this evening at the Exchange, for the benefit of Mrs. Chester, who having been for very many years an artiste of considerable ability, and well known both to the Colonial public and the musical circles at home - but now disabled, and reduced in circumstances through sickness - has appealed to a generous public for their sympathy and patronage in the present instance, that she may be enabled to return to her native land to place herself under the care and protection of her friends. The programme is a highly attractive one, and the concert being under the patronage of His Excellency the Governor-General and Lady Denison, Sir George Bowen (the Governor of Queensland), and the Masonic Body in Sydney, promises to be interesting and well worth hearing. We understand that the ladies and gentlemen assisting at this concert have generously volunteered their gratuitous services.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (22 November 1849), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13033565 

EXCHANGE CONCERT ROOM. Mrs. CHESTER has the honour to announce to her friends and the musical public in general, that the CONCERT, under the immediate patronage of his Excellency the Governor General and Lady Denison, Sir George Bowen (Governor of Queensland), and Lady Bowen, also of the Masonic Body in Sydney, to raise funds to enable her to return to her friend in England, a step rendered necessary by the severe attack of PARALYSIS, under which she has been recently suffering, and at which the following talented artistes -
Madame FLORA HARRIS.
Miss NINA SPAGNOLETTI.
Madame JAFFA.
By the kind permission of Charles Poole, Esq.,
Mr. F. HOWSON, and Mr. R. KOHLER.
Mr. F. ELLARD.
Messrs. J. and E. DEANE.
Mr. E. H. COBLEY.
Several Amateurs,
And the Members of the People's Vocal Association, have generously proffered their gratuitous assistance.
THIS EVENING, November 22nd.
PROGRAMME.
PART 1.
Glee - "Awake, Eolian Lyre"- (Members of the People's Vocal Association) - Danby.
Solo, Pianoforte - "Rondo from Concerto in B flat" (Madame Jaffa) - Beethoven.
Song - "Truth in absence" (Madame Flora Harris) - Harpur.
German Ballad - "When the quiet Moon" - (Mr. F. Howson) - Schondorff.
Solo - Harp (Mr. E. H. Cooley) - Bochsa.
Scena - "Robert toi que j'aime" (Miss Nina Spagnoletti) - Meyerbeer.
Duet - "Sainted Mother," from the Opera of Maritana - Lady Amateurs - Wallace.
Song - "The Bells" - (Mr. F. Ellard) - Balfe.
Hunting Song - "The stars are still" (Members of the People's Vocal Association) - C. S. Packer.
PART II.
Grand Duo Concertante for two Pianofortes (Mr. Charles S. Packer and Mr. F. Ellard) - Osborne.
Song - Madame Flora Harris.
Part Song - "Oh hills! Oh vales" (Members of the People's Vocal Association) - Mendelssohn.
Buffo Song - "Ye Tormentors"- (Cenerentola) - (Mr. F. Howson) - Rossini.
Solo - Concertina - Mr. R. Kohler.
Ballad - "Violet" (Miss Nina Spagnoletti) - Baker.
Australian National Anthem - "Australia hail" (Members of the People's Vocal Association) - Packer.
Conductor. Mr. CHARLES S. PACKER.
Single tickets. 4s ; double tickets, 7s.; family tickets, to admit four, 12s. each.
May be had of Messrs. Johnson and Co . Pitt-street; Messrs. Clarke, Martin, Buist, and Aldis, George-street; Mr. Moss, Hunter-street ; Mr. Hurford, 76, Castlereagh-street; and of Mrs. Chester, 277, Castlereagh-street.

MRS. CHESTER'S CONCERT, THIS EVENING.
Tickets, 3s. 6d , 6s, and 10s 6d, at HURFORD'S Pianoforte Warehouse, Castlereagh-street.

[News], Empire (24 November 1859), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64093443

As a musical entertainment, the Concert of Mrs. Chester, at the Exchange, on Tuesday evening, was undoubtedly one of the best of the season; and this, as well as the peculiar cause for which it was given - aid to so deserving and unfortunate a member of the musical profession - makes us regret that it was not more successful in a pecuniary point of view. That a concert of this description should not have been better supported, does not say much for the musical taste of Sydney, now endeavouring to take its place in the musical world by means of a number of musical societies. One thing is also apparent from the limited attendance, that the system of patronage no longer succeeds in materially contributing to the success of an entertainment; many seemed disappointed at the non-appearance of the two Excellencies. Nearly the whole of the programme of Tuesday evening was artistically and spiritedly executed, and though totally opposed to the practice of compelling artists to do double duty, and of unnecessarily lengthening an already long programme by repeated encores, yet we must acknowledge that on this occasion they were richly merited. Every musical connoisseur will readily concede the palm of excellence to Osborne's duo concertante for the pianofortes (part II., No. 1), executed by Messrs. Charles S. Packer and F. Ellard. It excited a burst of enthusiastic applause, but owing to the length of the piece, the encore was judiciously declined. The piece is not threadbare, but comparatively new to the Sydney Concert Room, and will prove a favourite. One could not help admiring the easy and elegant style and slightness of touch displayed by Mr. Packer - there is no mistaking in him the genial artist, thoroughly imbued with the spirit of music. The part-song "Oh hills, Oh vales," (Mendelssohn), admirably sung by the members of the People's Vocal Association, though not encored, deserves next in order to be warmly mentioned. The light and shade in the execution was beautifully kept up. The duett, "Sainted Mother," from Wallace's opera of "Maritana," was exceedingly well sung by Miss Brady and Mrs. Cordner; it was encored, but the piece substituted was less effective. Frank Howson sung a German ballad by Schondar, "When the quiet Moon," with great taste; he was encored in this, as also in the famous buffo song from Rossini's Cenerentola, "My Tormentors," proving Mr. Howson still to be one of our most favourite concert vocalists. The other encores were Madame Flora Harris in Mrs. Nortons "Juanita," a song which, by her beautiful rendering, she has made quite her own. Miss Nina Spagnoletti in Linley's ballad of "Ever of Thee," charmingly executed, and wisely substituted for the hacknied scena from "Robert le Diable," the vocalist giving for the encore Wrighton's "Sweet Home," equally well sung; and Mr. R. Kohler's concertina solo, which was rapturously received. Mr. Packer's "Hunting Song" was also very artistically given by the chorus. Mr. F. Ellard sang Balfe's ballad "The Bells," with excellent voice, but provoked the risibility of the audience by the display of some of his peculiar eccentricities, real or affected. In consequence of indisposition, Madame Jaffa was compelled to conclude her pianoforte solo (the Rondo from Beethoven's Concerto in E flat) very suddenly. This was much to be regretted, as, from the talents of this lady, in this particular style of music, it would otherwise have undoubtedly proved one of the gems of the evening.

"SYDNEY", The Goulburn Herald and County of Argyle Advertiser (26 November 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article118247278 

A concert, for the benefit of Mrs. Chester, was given in the hall of the exchange, yesterday evening. Itwas not quite so fully attended as it ought to have been, but the audience was of first-class quality, including Sir William and Lady Denison, Sir George and Lady Bowen, &c.

"SYDNEY INTELLIGENCE", Northern Times (30 November 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128758993 

A voluntary concert for the benefit of Mrs. Chester, an old and deserving actress, took place Tuesday evening, the 22nd inst. The concert was successful, notwithstanding the ahsence of distinguished persons, whose patronage and attendance were anticipated.

"MUSIC AND DRAMA", The Sydney Morning Herald (13 December 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13034375 

. . . Another concert, calling for some immediate notice, took place at the Exchange Hall on the 22nd, given for the benefit of Mrs. Chester, a musical artiste of considerable ability, but now, through ill health, compelled to retire from her profession and to return to her friends in England. The programme on the occasion was judiciously varied, and the attendance both numerous and select.

"AMUSEMENTS", Empire (13 December 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64094323

. . . In other amusements we have had the concerts above-mentioned, with poor vocal, but very good instrumental music, the result of the union of two orchestras. The oratorio of Judas Maccabeus, very well given by the Sydney Vocal Harmonic Society; an extremely successful complimentary benefit to Mr. J. H. Black; and a concert on behalf of Mrs. Chester, one of our oldest vocalists, formerly Miss Crawford, of London, and wife of the Duchess of Buckingham's brother; who has been suffering severely from paralysis, and is about returning to England.


20 December 1859, Sydney, Chester sails for England

"CLEARANCES. DECEMBER 16", The Sydney Morning Herald (17 December 1859), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13034600 

Blackwall, ship, 838 tons, Captain Stewart, for London. Passengers . . . Mrs. Chester . . .

"DEPARTURES FOR ENGLAND", The Sydney Morning Herald (13 January 1860), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28629260

December 20. - Blackwall, ship, 831 tons, Captain Stewart, for London. Passengers - Colonel and Mrs. Percival, 2 children and servant, Miss Hodson, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Master Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs. Rossiter, 3 children and servant, Mrs. Clarke and 2 children, Mrs. Farras and 6 children, Mr. Wainwright, Mr. and Mrs. Barnett, Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins, Mr. and Mrs. King, Master Pratt, Mr. and Mrs. Travers, Mrs. Chester, Mr. and Mrs. Davis, Messrs. Wright, Brown, Blackwell, Williams, and 20 in the steerage . . .

1860
? London, England (c. 1860-61)

"DRAMA IN AUSTRALIA", The Era (19 February 1860), 10

[From the Sydney Empire, as above] . . . and a concert on behalf of Mrs. Chester, one of our oldest vocalists, formerly Miss Crawford, of London, and wife of the Duchess of Buckingham's brother; she has been suffering severely from paralysis, and is about returning to England,


"THE LATE MR. JOSEPH WYATT. TO THE EDITOR OF THE . . .", Empire (25 July 1860), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60413840 

. . . The late Mr. Wyatt may well have been considered the originator of the legitimate drama in these colonies. After having leased during the years 1837, 1838, and 1839, the old Theatre in George-street, where the Royal Hotel now stands, in the subsequent year he built the Royal Viotoria Theatre, and in thus providing a suitable home for the expositor of Shakspere, he, in my opinion deserved the fullest thanks of our Sydney public. The company with which he opened this establishment embraced several names which will long be remembered by our play-going community. Who that has ever seen can ever forget Simmons, true to nature in every character he assumed every inch an actor; Meredith, who had Shakspere at his fingers ends, and Knowles who was both a scholar, and a gentleman? Added to these were Cameron, Mackay, Lazar, Simes, Fenton, Grove, Falchon, the charming Mrs. Taylor, Mrs. Bushell, the sweetest of soprano singers; Mr. Bushell, the celebrated buffo; Mrs. Chester, Mrs. O'Flaherty, Mrs. Thomson and her daughter, now Mrs. Young (at present performing with great success in London), and Mrs. Ximenes; the talented Wallace being the leader of the orchestra . . .

NOTE: Chester was not, in fact, in Wyatt's company at the opening of the Victoria, but in India



Melbourne, VIC (1861)
1861

5 August 1861, Melbourne, Chester's benefit and final performance, Theatre Royal

"THE WEEK", The Melbourne Leader (3 August 1861), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197522091 

"THE NEWS OF THE DAY", The Age (3 August 1861), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154902571 

The performance by the Garrick Club on Monday evening is for the benefit of Mrs. Chester, a lady whose connection with the colonial stage dates from a very early period in our history. Some twenty-six years have elapsed since she made her ddbut in Sydney, after having been a considerable favorite on the London boards. She subsequently went to India, but returned to these colonies where she has been long and favorably known. Within the last two years, however, she has been incapacitated by paralysis from pursuing her avocation; see has also become a widow, and has been for some time subsisting upon the aids received from casual benevolence. The use of the theatre has been kindly granted by Mr. Kyte, the Garrick Club has liberally proffered its aid on the occasion, and the Freemasons, of whom the late Mr. Chester was one, have given their patronage.

"THE NEWS OF THE DAY", The Age (5 August 1861), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154902924 

. . . The Theatre Royal was wretchedly attended on Saturday night . . . To-night, a complimentary benefit is announced on behalf of Mrs. Chester, a very old member of the theatrical profession . . .

"TOWN TALK", The Herald (5 August 1861), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article244247887 

The performance at the Theatre Royal on Saturday night, in aid of the funds of the Benevolent Asylum, was very meagrely patronised. The pieces were "Love's Sacrifice" and the "Double-bedded Room," represented by members of the Garrick Club, assisted by Miss Rosa Dunn, Miss Mortimer, Mrs. A. Phillips, and some other professional ladies. The band of the Collingwood Volunteers played several pieces of dance music at intervals during the performance. Mrs. Chester, who formed one of the company engaged at this theatre when it was opened under tho management of Mr. Black, takes a benefit here to-night. This lady, who is unfortunately suffering from ill health, and has fallen into indigent circumstances, was formerly well known on the London stage.

[Advertisement], The Argus (3 August 1861), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5702677

COMPLIMENTARY BENEFIT And LAST APPEARANCE On the Stage of Mrs. CHESTER, For many years a member of the Theatres Royal, Drury Lane, Covent Garden, Dublin, &c.; also, of the Royal Victoria Theatre, Sydney; and the Theatre Royal, Melbourne.

In consequence of the prolonged Indisposition of the above lady, so well known for many years on the Victorian stage, several gentlemen belonging to the profession, as well as amateurs of the Garrick and Histrionic Clubs, have offered their services gratuitously on her behalf, at the Theatre Royal,

On MONDAY evening next, the 5th inst.; the use of the theatre having also been most kindly and gratuitously conceded by Mr. Kyte, and it now only remains for the admirers and supporters of the drama in this city, by their patronage on this occasion, to render the event substantially beneficial to an actress who in at present, through bad health and other suffering, in the most pressing need of assistance.

The Performances will commence with Bulwer Lytton's play of THE LADY OF LYONS.
Claude Melnotte . . . Mr. Hayward.
Colonel Damas . . . Mr. Harwood.
Beauseant . . . Mr. Buckingham.
Glavis . . . Mr. J. W. Manvers.
Gaspar . . . Mr. Donald.
Deschappelles . . . Mr. Weedow.
Landlord . . . Mr. Nealor.
Pauline . . . Miss Emma St. Clair.
Madame Deschappelles . . . Mrs. Phillips.
Widow Melnotte . . . Mrs. Chester.
Jeanette . . . Miss Jones.

Dance . . . Miss Amy Chambers.

To be followed by A PETITE CONCERT, In which Miss OCTAVIA HAMILTON and Mrs. FREDERICK YOUNGE, who have with, great kindness given their valuable aid, will appear.
Duet (From "The Rose of Castile") Mrs. Frederick Young and Miss Octavia Hamilton.
Spanish Song, "Sweet Love Arise," Mrs. Frederick Younge.
Favorite Ballad, Miss Octavia Hamilton.

To conclude with TEDDY THE TILER.
Lord Dunderford . . . Mr. J. Manly.
Teddy the Tiler (on this occasion) Mr. J. Simmons.
Henry . . . Mr. R. Campbell.
Frederick . . . Mr. Collingwood.
Notary . . . Mr. Wilmot.
Richard . . . Mr. Smith.
Tim . . . Mr. R. A'Beckett Evans.
Lady Dunderford . . . Mrs. Chester.
Oriel . . . Miss Bush.
Julia . . . Miss R. A'Beckett Evans.
Flora . . . Miss St. Clair.

"TOWN TALK", The Herald (6 August 1861), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article244246054 

Mrs. Chester's benefit performance at the Theatre Royal last night was very scantily attended. The "Lady of Lyons," in which the leading members of the Garrick Club appeared rather proved the ambition of the amateurs than their ability to maintain so high a flight. Sooth to say the acting was not above mediocrity, but the cause in which the performers were engaged was more than justificatory of their presence on this occasion. A petite concert, in which Miss Octavia Hamilton, and Mrs. F. Younge acquitted themselves with credit, followed the play, and the entertainment closed with a farce.

ASSOCIATIONS: Emma Jane Younge (actor, vocalist)


1861, VIC, marriage of Marian Maria Chester and Robert Rolland

Marriage of Robert Rolland and Marian Maria Chester, VICTORIA BDM - 1861/3140

https://online.justice.vic.gov.au/bdm/indexsearch.doj


26 October 1861, Sydney, NSW, death of Sydney Yates Chester (1837-1861)

"DEATHS", The Sydney Morning Herald (21 November 1861), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13057298 

CHESTER - October 26th, Sydney Yates, eldest son of the late Mr. William Chester, of Newcastle, New South Wales, aged 24 years.

"FUNERAL OF MR. CHESTER, LATE OF NO. 2 VOLUNTEER ARTILLERY", The Sydney Morning Herald (28 October 1861), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13058575 

The funeral of the above gentleman, who was lately a member of No. 2 Battery of Volunteer Artillery, took place yesterday afternoon. Shortly before three o'clock, several members of the two batteries of artillery, and about 300 of the rifles assembled at the corner of Hunter and Castlereagh streets, opposite the late residence of the deceased, when the procession was formed in the following order: - A firing party (from the company to which Mr. Chester lately belonged, under the superintendence of sergeant McKean, R.A.), the artillery band, the rifle band, the body (on a gun carriage, drawn by two horses, the mourning coach containing the chief mourners, members of the second Battery of Artillery, members of the first Battery, followed by the non-commissioned officers and officers; the Volunteer Rifles, followed by their non-commissioned and commissioned officers, and lastly the personal friends of the deceased. In this order the funeral cortege proceeded down Hunter-street, the bands playing the "Dead March in Saul," and along George-street to the Camperdown Cemetery, accompanied by a large concourse of people. Arrived at the Cemetery, the body was removed from the gun-carriage and borne to the grave by members of No. 2 Battery, and on the termination of the funeral service three volleys were fired over the grave. The Volunteers then left the ground and formed in the Newtown Road, and returned to the Brigade office, where they were dismissed. There must have been some thousands of persons in the Cemetery, who, with the members of the Volunteer companies, appeared to take a deep interest in the mournful proceedings.




Newcastle, NSW (? to 18 August 1867)
1867

18 August 1867, Newcastle, NSW, death of Marian Maria Rolland

"DEATHS", Empire (26 August 1867), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60844084 

ROLLAND - On the 18th instant, at her son's residence, Wolfe-street, Newcastle, of Asthma, Mrs. M. M. Rolland, aged fifty-one years, mother of Mr. E. S. Chester, of that city.




Posthumous (19th-century)
1872

"RECOLLECTIONS OF THE THEATRE ROYAL", The Argus (21 March 1872), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5860845 

Mrs. Chester, an excellent actress of old women, who played Mrs. Candour, is, we believe, dead.

1897

? "Literary Notes, Etc.", The Maitland Weekly Mercury (16 January 1897), 13

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126324112 

The authorship of the famous song "Kathleen Mavourneen' having often been questioned, Mr. Stephen Massett, in 1893, obtained from Professor Crouch this statement: -

"The music of the song "Kathleen Mavourneen" was composed by me in Plymouth, England in 1839. The words by their exquisite beauty attracted my attention in the Metropolitan Magatine, published in London, and written by Mrs. Marian Crawford, wife of an English barrister. I immediately called upon the lady and said, 'I want the words of this Song of yours as my property. In this envelope are Bank of England notes for £30.' The lady gave me a receipt for the amount, and the song was mine. It was then published by D'Almaine and Co., 20 Soho-square, London, and was first sung by me at a concert given at Plymouth, England, by Mr. E. P. Roe, the publisher of music in the town and subsequently presented out and out by me to his wife, Mrs E. P. Roe. Since that time, over fifty-four years ago I have not received ten cents' profit from the song, though it has been issued by thirty different publishers in America and England, and made many in dependently rich."

When he signed the foregoing statement Professor Crouch was in his eighty-fifth year. He afterwards died at Portland, Me.




Bibliography and resources


Brewer 1892

Francis Campbell Brewer, The drama and music in New South Wales (Sydney: Charles Potter, govt. printer, 1892), 9

https://archive.org/details/dramamusicinnews00brew/page/9 (DIGITISED)

[9] . . . No little stir was created by the announcement that "Mrs. Chester, from the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London," would make her first appearance on October 1, 1836 [recte 1835]. The very fact of seeing either an actor or actress who had trodden the stage of that historic theatre was sufficient to attract a large audience. "From the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane! "There was magic in those six words ; and on the night of Mrs. Chester's début in Sydney expectancy had reached its highest point. The audience was not disappointed, but at the same time did not evince any great enthusiasm over the new artiste, who pleased them more as a singer than as an actress. The piece selected for Mrs. Chester's appearance was "The Maid of Milan," into which six or seven ballads were interpolated especially for the débutante. Mrs. Chester, however, was a decided acquisition.


McGuanne 1901

John Percy McGuanne, "The humours and pastimes of early Sydney", The Australian Historical Society Journal and Proceedings 1 (1901), (34-42), 41

https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/16854903 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-78594394/view?partId=nla.obj-78597224#page/n21/mode/1up (DIGITISED)

. . . While we have music and singing by the ear, one or two important items deserve noting. Sydney's earliest singers were Mrs. Rust, Mrs. Bird, Mrs. Lancaster of St. James' Choir, Misses Eliza and Sarah Wallace, Miss Douglas, Miss Winstanley, Mrs. Taylor and Mrs. Chester, both the latter from Drury Lane, all of whom were most estimable persons except, perhaps [Maria Taylor] . . . The male singers were Gordonvitch, a Polish refugee, Rhodius, the artist, Simmons, comic singer. Father Spencer was a musician and choirmaster . . .


Annals 1904

"ANNALS OF THE TURF AND OTHER PASTIMES IN NEW SOUTH WALES AND ELSEWHERE. No. LVI", Sydney Sportsman (8 June 1904), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article167249458 

. . . In September [1835], Simmons took a benefit, the advertisement for which occupied two columns of the "Gazette." About this time there arrived from Drury Lane Mrs. Chester, who made her first appearanca in October, 1835, as Clari in "The Maid of Milan." I have before me a playbill of the farewell benefit and last appearance on the stage of this lady. It was at the Theatre Royal, Melbourne, in 1862. The initial piece was "The Lady of Lyons," the Claude Melnotte being Mr. John Hayward, an old actor who had retired from the stage and taken to civic life. He, in time, returned to the stage as Mr. Deorwyn, and brought with him his two daughters, now Mrs. Richard Stewart, jun., and Mrs. Charles Holloway. The Colonel Dumas was Mr. H. R. Harwood, and Samuel Hawker Banks was the Caspar. Mrs.Chester was the Widow Melnotte, Mrs. Alfred Phillips (an actress and an authoress of no mean repute) being Madame Deschapelles. A petite concert followed, in which Octavia Hamilton (Mrs. Moon) and Mrs. Frederick Younge (a daughter of Haydyn Corri) appeared. The farce was "Teddy the Tiler," Mrs. Chester playing Lady Dunderford, and Mr. J. Simmons Teddy the Tiler. Thus, after a lapse of nearly 30 years, these two ancient players came together again . . .


Osric 1911 (ed. 1996)

The romance of the Sydney stage, by Alfred J. Crips and Humphrey Hall, MS, National Library of Australia

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/25748757 

Published as: The romance of the Sydney stage by "Osric" (Sydney: Currency Press, 1996), 37, 38, 39, 133, 154, 155, 160, 171, 271

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/44791594 

As reported in the 1996 edition, page xi, extant letters dated November 1911 (to Cripps from Harold Wright, Mitchell Librarian) and November 1913 refer to the manuscript


Gupta 1934

Hemendra Nath Das Gupta, The Indian stage (Calcutta: Metropolitan Printing & Publishing House, 1934), 252, 258, 259, 260

https://archive.org/stream/indianstage029370mbp#page/n287 


Hall 1951 (also reprinted as Hall 1991)

James Lincoln Hall, "A history of music in Australia - 9: Early period - New South Wales, 1835: Mrs. Chester from Drury Lane", The canon 5/2 (September 1951), 52-58

James Lincoln Hall, "A history of music in Australia: Mrs. Chester from Drury Lane 1835 . . .", Australiana 13/3 (August 1991), 80-82

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/51919662 


STR 1966

"Notes and queries: Mrs. Chester, Sydney Theatre 1835, but formerly of Covent Garden and Drury Lane", STR theatre notebook 20/2 (Winter 1965/66)

https://www.str.org.uk/publications/back-issues 


Beedell 1992

Ann V. Beedell, The decline of the English musician (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992), 257, 262, 263, 276


Gyger 1999

Alison Gyger, Civilising the colonies (Sydney: Pellinor, 1999), 21, 22-26, 28, 32

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/46446060 


Fotheringham 2006

Richard Fotheringham, Australian plays for the colonial stage: 1834-1899 (St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 2006), 109

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=2mIYkb8NaXYC&pg=PA109 (PREVIEW)

. . . Mrs. Chester played the leading role of Marian Waller and also sang several solo songs after the play concluded. It was claimed that she was a major English opera singer when she arrived in Sydney in 1835 where she was not liked; however, she persevered and became a stock colonial actor for the next twenty-five years . . .


Dutt and Munsi 2010

Bishnupriya Dutt and Urmimala Sarkar Munsi, Engendering performance: Indian women performers in search of an identity (New Delhi: SAGE, 2010), 28-33

https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/37449477

Chapter 1: Actresses of the colonial space; English actresses in India (1789-1842), 3-46


Greene 2011

John C. Greene, Theatre in Dublin, 1745-1820: a calendar of performances, volume 6 (Bethlehem: Lehigh University Press, 2011), 4403, 4404, 4382, 4394, 4430, 4433, 4439

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=boLmd-KxZ9oC&pg=PA4403 (PREVIEW)


Jones 2011

Betty Jones, "A modest but steady income", Tasmanian ancestry (March 2011), 209-212

http://www.tasfhs.org/Volume%2031.pdf (DIGITISED)

Marian Maria Chester, 209-10; and Julius Samuel Imberg, 210-12


Skinner 2011

Skinner 2011, First national music, 125, 129 130

http://hdl.handle.net/2123/7264 (DIGITISED)






© Graeme Skinner 2014 - 2019