THIS PAGE FIRST POSTED 1 FEBRUARY 2017

LAST MODIFIED Thursday 2 May 2019 8:58

Anne Remens Clarke

Dr GRAEME SKINNER (University of Sydney)


THIS PAGE IS ALWAYS UNDER CONSTRUCTION


To cite this:

Graeme Skinner (University of Sydney), "Anne Remens Clarke", Australharmony (an online resource toward the history of music and musicians in colonial and early Federation Australia): https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/clarke-anne.php; accessed 23 May 2019




CLARKE, Anne Theresa

(Miss REMENS; Miss REMANS; Miss REMMANS; RIMON; Ann Theresa REMAINS; Mrs. Michael CLARKE; Anne REMENS CLARKE)

Soprano vocalist, actor, dancer, theatre manager

Born ? England, c.1806
Arrived Hobart Town, VDL (TAS), 13 August 1834 (immigrant per Strathfieldsay)
Married Michael CLARKE, Trinity Church, Hobart Town, VDL (TAS), 25 October 1834
Active until 1847

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Anne+Remens+Clarke (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)


CLARKE, Michael

? Theatre musician, former military bandsman, vocalist, actor

Active 1830s-40s

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Michael+Clarke+c1834-47 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)


CLARKE, Anne Theresa (junior)

Theatrrical dancer, danceuse

Born Hobart Town, VDL (TAS), 22 September 1835
Active c.1845-47

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Anne+Theresa+Clarke+b1835 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)




Summary:

Of the various version of her ealiest stage name, "Miss Remens" appears most often in London playbills, and so that spelling has been preferred here for her indentifying tag, despite "Remans" being slightly more usual in Australian bills.

As the London Athenaeum noted early in 1835:

We observe by the Hobart Town Courier, that among the 286 Female Emigrants who went out in the Strathfieldsay were Miss Remans from the English Opera House, and Miss Rudelhoff from the Royalty; both were, it appears, instantly engaged by the manager of the Hobart Town Theatre.

Anne and her husband Michael Clarke returned to England in 1841 where they engaged a new company for the Hobart Theatre, including the Howson brothers, Emma Young, Theodosia Stirling, and Gerome Carandini.

Clarke retired at the end of the 1847 Melbourne season, gave her last farewell performance in Melbourne in December 1847, and

According to Gyger (Civilising the colonies, 40), Michael Clarke was a former military bandsman who had previously played in Sydney theatre; however, I have yet found no evidence supporting that claim.




Documentation

England (to 1834)
1833

The theatrical observer and daily bills of play (1 July to 31 December 1833), various, including:

8 July 1833

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183302lond#page/n39/mode/2up

9 July 1833

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183302lond#page/n43/mode/2up

12 July 1833

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183302lond#page/n69/mode/2up

13 July 1833

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183302lond#page/n71/mode/2up

16 July 1833

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183302lond#page/n79/mode/2up

21 August 1833

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183302lond#page/n203/mode/2up

22 August 1833

https://archive.org/stream/theatricalobserv183302lond#page/n207/mode/2up

1834
Van Diemen's Land (13 August 1834 to 25 August 1837)

Arrivals, female immigrants, Strathfieldsay, 13 August 1834; Tasmanian names index; NAME_INDEXES:402310; MB2/39/1/2 P109

Rimon, Ann T.


"TRADE AND SHIPPING", The Hobart Town Courier (15 August 1834), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4183645


"Domestic Intelligence", Colonial Times (19 August 1834), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8647758


[Advertisement], Colonial Times (19 August 1834), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8647767


[News], The Hobart Town Courier (22 August 1834), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4183612


"Domestic Intelligence", Colonial Times (26 August 1834), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8647779


[Advertisement], The Hobart Town Courier (10 October 1834), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4183042


Marriage register, Trinity Church, Hobart; Tasmanian names index; NAME_INDEXES:821067; RGD36/1/2 no 2523

https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD36-1-2p139j2k

Michael Clarke, Ann Theresa Remains, 25 October 1834


[Advertisement], Colonial Times (4 November 1834), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8647904

"Mrs. Clark (Late Miss Remens)

1835

"Theatrical Emigrants", The Athenaeum 382 (21 February 1835), 156

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=qrhHAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA156

We observe by the Hobart Town Courier, that among the 286 Female Emigrants who went out in the Strathfieldsay were Miss Remans from the English Opera House, and Miss Rudelhoff from the Royalty; both were, it appears, instantly engaged by the manager of the Hobart Town Theatre, and made their first appearance in "The Lord of the Manor," the former as Annette, and the latter as Peggy, and, we are happy to add, were received with approbation. Theatricals, indeed, seem prospering in the colony. The Launceston Independant announces, among forthcoming novelties, an entire new drama to be called, "The Bandit of the Rhine," written by E. H. Thomas, Esq.


Baptism register, Trinity Church, Hobart; Tasmanian names index; NAME_INDEXES:1083880; RGD32/1/2/ no 6213

https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD32-1-2-p329j2k

Anne Theresa Clarke, daughter of Michael and Anne Theresa Clarke, baptised Trinity Church, Hobart, 11 October 1835, born 22 September 1835

1836

[Advertisement], The Tasmanian (26 February 1836), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232801331 

In the Matter of the Insolvency of Michael Clarke, of Hobart Town, Licensed Victualler . . .

1837

"Hobart Town Police Report. July 10, 1837)", Colonial Times (18 July 1837), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8650168 

Prisoner Constable William Morrow, complained in due form, under the provision of the Police Act, of Michael Clark for assaulting constable Chamberlain in the execution of his duty. It appeared that Mr. Clarke's female servant was found in a public house, in company, and drinking with a call boy of the Theatre, and as a matter of course taken in charge, when Mr. Clark interfered with the constables, and resisted one of them in the discharge of his duty. The defence set up was, the servant had gone to the public-house for some refreshment for her mistress who was at her duty at the Theatre. The person who was with her at the public-house was called on for the defence, and underwent a very severe cross-examination - he could not recollect particulars of what occurred, only that such might have been the case without his seeing that probably such might have happened. Mr. Clarke was fined £2 and costs.


"SHIP NEWS", Colonial Times (29 August 1837), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8650259 

AUGUST 25. - Sailed the Marian Watson, 144 tons; for Sydney, B. Shaw, Master, Cargo, sundries; Passengers - Mr. John Grisland, Mr. Baines, J. Clark, Mr. F. Shallis, Mrs. E. Shallis, Mr. W. Butler, Mr. M. Clarke, Mrs. Clarke, Mr. S. Cameron, Mrs. Cameron, Mrs. Ramus and servant Kemp, John Holder.

Sydney NSW (1 September 1837 - 25 November 1839)

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (2 September 1837), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2212760 

Mr. and Mrs. Cameron, accompanied by Mrs. Clarke of the Hobart Town Theatre, we understand, arrived by the Marian Watson, yesterday; their appearance will doubtless cause some stir in the theatrical world, and probably do something towards relieving the Theatre from its present unprofitable and "beggarly account of empty boxes."


13 September 1837, Anne Clarke, first appearance, Theatre Royal, Sydney

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (13 September 1837), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32157342 


"The Drama", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (17 October 1837), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2213487 

. . . During the course of the evening Mrs. Clarke, the Hobart Town vocalist, sang several pleasing little ballads. Mrs. Clarke's singing leaves a more pleasing impression on the mind of the auditory, than any other of the vocalists that ever appeared on the Sydney stage. We liked Mrs. Chester's ballad-singing very well; but her enunciation was much less distinct and her singing less natural and more laboured than that of Mrs. Clarke. Mrs. Taylor could once sing a pleasing song, but her voice and her modesty fled together. Mrs. Clarke as a vocalist (for her acting is very tame), and Miss Lazar as a dancer, are at present the principal attractions at the Theatre and we have little doubt will continue almost the only ones, while Simes continues to hold the office of manager and Mrs. Taylor rules the roast.


[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (21 November 1837), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2214062 

Mrs. Clarke, the most talented, and decidedly the most pleasing vocalist that ever trod the Sydney stage, takes her benefit at the theatre on Thursday evening. The bill of fare Mrs. C. has provided promises a rich treat, as well to the connoiseur in music as to him who loves best the simple ballad. It is not often that the inhabitants of Sydney have it in their power to shew their r[e]spect to virtue by patronising the Sydney stage; Mrs. Clarke is a woman of irreproachable character, and we trust that the result of her benefit will shew that the inhabitants of Sydney respect and appreciate virtue wheresoever they meet with it.


23 November 1837, Anne Clarke (benefit)

{Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (23 November 1837), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2214113 

1838

"THE VICTORIA THEATRE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (6 September 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2550969

Mrs. Clarke's claims on the generosity of the Sydney public are based more upon her abilities as a songstress than as an actress. On the Sydney stage, in the former, she has no rival, nor, indeed, with the exception of Mrs. Chester, have we ever had an actress of equal musical abilities. Independent, altogether, of her claims as a musician and an actress, Mrs. Clarke has still higher claims on the consideration of her own sex; she is in public, and, we are informed, in private life a woman of the most irreproachable character, and purity of character on the stage, we are sorry to say, is so much of a rarity in these days, that we hold it to be the imperative duty of the virtuous portion of the community to encourage and reward it, whenever, as now, it is within the compass of their power.

1839


Melbourne, Port Phillip district (8 to ? 23 December 1839)

"SHIP NEWS", Port Phillip Patriot and Melbourne Advertiser (9 December 1839), 5 supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228129649 


[News], Port Phillip Patriot and Melbourne Advertiser (23 December 1839), 3 supplement

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228130027 

On Monday last Mrs. Clarke had a Concert at the British Hotel, the tickets were 10s. 6d. each. The pleasure that the public might have enjoyed at this soiree was completely spoiled by the noisy, drunken, blackguard language and outrageous conduct of a fellow professing to be a gentleman - report says it was the Editor of the Gazette. What were the constables about that they did not lodge him in the watch-house?


"Domestic Intelligence", Port Phillip Gazette (28 December 1839), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225005652 

Mrs. Clarke, in pursuance of her spirited design, delighted the fashionable world of Melbourne, on Monday evening last, with a brilliant Soiree, at the British Hotel. The songs chosen by her for the occasion required taste, feeling, and execution; every justice was rendered, and the audience were loud and continued in their applause. Mrs. Clarke's personation of the Old, Maid, attired in an antique dress of green silk, with spectacles of the same spinster-spirited hue, was admirable and elicited deserved commendation. The room itself was not well adapted to the purpose, being low and badly lighted; but, for the short notice which had been given, "mine host" of the British provided capital accommodation for the numerous and respectable audience which graced the arena of "music and of song." Mr. Jamieson accampanied Mrs. Clarke throughout the evening on a grand piano. It is to be regretted that this lady could not be induced to remain for a season in our little capital, as the support she experienced on even this first and hurried occasion, is a guarantee for a gratifying and remunerating patronage hereafter. Upon the close of the present Sydney Theatre, the inhabitants of Melbourne may expect a dramatic corps, (whose strength we have no doubt will be recruited by some talented amateurs) to assist them in dispelling the eternal monotony of the province, "happy" only in name.

1840

"PORT PHILLIP", Commercial Journal and Advertiser [Sydney, NSW] (8 January 1840), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226453389 

Mrs. Clarke, who is so well known as one of the lights of the Sydney stage, and whose private and public actions have gained for her an enviable estimation, is at present on a visit to our provincial capital. It is we believe, her intention to enliven Melbourne with the charms of a concert, to aid which purpose the services of several gentlemen have been gallantly offered and accepted.


"ADELAIDE CONCERT", The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (17 January 1840), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32166921 

Mrs. Clarke, in pursuance of her spirited design, delighted the fashionable world of Melbourne, on Monday evening last, with a brilliant Soirée, at the British Hotel. The songs chosen by her for the occasion required taste, feeling, and execution; every justice was rendered, and the audience were loud and continued in their applause. Mrs. Clarke's personation of the Old Maid, attired in an antique dress of green silk, with spectacles of the same spinster-spirited hue, was admirable, and elicited deserved commendation. The room itself was not well adapted to the purpose, being low and badly lighted; but for the short notice which had been given, "mine host" of the British provided capital accommodation for the numerous and respectable audience which graced "the arena of music and of song." Mr. Jamieson accompanied Mrs. Clarke throughout the evening on a grand piano. It is to be regretted that this lady cannot be induced to remain for a season in our little capital, as the support she experienced even on this first and hurried occasion, is a guarantee for a gratifying and remunerating patronage hereafter. Upon the close of the present season of the Sydney Theatre, the inhabitants of Melbourne may expect a dramatic corps, (whose strength we have no doubt will be recruited by some talented amateurs) to assist them in dispelling the eternal monotony of the province, "happy" only in name.

Hobart Town , VDL (TAS) (by March 1840 to . . .)

"THEATRE, CAMPBELL-STREET", The True Colonist Van Diemen's Land Political Despatch . . . (13 March 1840), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202419670 

We understand that Mr. Capper and Mrs. Clarke have taken the Theatre from Mr. De Graves for the race week; and that Mrs. Clarke is to have it for three months after that. Mrs. Clarke has always been a very great and deserved favourite with the Hobart Town people, and we hope she may succeed.

[Advertisement], The Hobart Town Courier and Van Diemen's Land Gazette (13 March 1840), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8747460 

"AMUSEMENTS OF THE WEEK", Colonial Times (17 March 1840), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8750588 

Mr. Capper opened the Victoria Theatre last night, to a pretty fair audience. He has taken the house for the Race Week, and has engaged a numerous company, being determined to entertain the public, as much as he can. The house has been very neatly decorated, and, we understand, that the new Manager intends to confine the performances chiefly to Melo-dramas and Farces, - a very judicious course, in our opinion. Our old favourite, Mrs. Clarke, has returned, after an absence of nearly three years, and made her appearance, last night, in her favourite character of Lady Margaret, in the Vampire. After this week, she will join Mr. Capper, in partnership, for a limited period; and, as every pains have been taken, and no expense spared, both as to performers, and an efficient orchestra, we sincerely hope, that they will meet with the success, which they deserve. We must not forget our old Fantoccinist, Mr. Masters, who also intends to exhibit his Hoblum Goblums nightly, during the week: we perceive, he has added a Panorama to the exhibition, and we assure our country friends, they will derive considerable amusement from a visit to Mr. Masters' Fantoccini.

1841

"CONCERT", The Courier (29 January 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2957172 

We perceive by announcement that Mrs. Clarke, previous to her departure for England, is making one more effort to gratify and amuse her numerous friends, by giving a farewell concert, which will take place at the Theatre, in Campbell-street, on Monday next. In addition to the auxiliary services of the fine band of the 51st regiment, which has been placed at Mrs. Clarke's disposal by the permission of Colonel Elliott, we are happy to observe in the bill of particulars a considerable amount of private professional talent, likewise rallying round our indefatigable managress, to second her efforts on the present occasion. We heartily wish Mrs. Clarke the success to which her industry and exertions entitle her.

1842

"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE", The Courier (28 January 1842), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2954943

1843

[Advertisement: Letter from Michael Clarke], The Courier (13 January 1843), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2953298


1844

[Advertisement], The Courier (21 September 1844), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2950534 

Under Distraint for Rent.
Peter Degraves against Michael Clarke.
UPON MONDAY next, the 23rd instant, at 12 o'clock, there will be SOLD by AUCTION, at the Victoria Theatre, situate in Campbell street, in the occupation of the above Michael Clarke - House-hold furniture, including a grand horizontal pianoforte, stage furniture, theatrical scenery, lamps, &c., with other usual apparatus for a theatre. Terms-cash.
ROBERT MANN, Auctioneer.


"Domestic Intelligence", The Melbourne Weekly Courier (30 November 1844), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228063459 

We observe in the Van Diemen's Land newspapers, a report of an examination in the insolvency of Michael Clarke, the lessee of the Theatre Royal at Hobart Town and Launceston, in which there is about as clean a sweep as we have yet seen. The debts as set forth in the schedule, were £284 7s. 7d., the assets - real estate, none; personal estate, none; debts due to the insolvent, none!!!

1845

"THEATRICALS", Colonial Times (15 August 1845), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8757044 

Mrs. Clarke and Mrs. Thomson have their joint benefit on Monday night. These Ladies are especially deserving the support of the public, and we rejoice to find their benefit is under the patronage of "the Ladies of Hobart Town" - the elite of whom will honor it with their protection. Mrs. Clarke is so well known here - her conduct in private life has been so correct and free from even the breath of calumny, that it is unnecessary to say more. Mrs. Thomson possesses an equally high reputation in private life. She is a near relative of that celebrated author and performer, Mr. Leman Reid, and possessing first-rate professional talents, the performances of Monday evening will afford a high theatrical treat, as the programme shows. We believe both these deserving ladies proceed forthwith to Port Phillip, where they will no doubt receive that public and private support, to which their correct deportment so fully entitles them.


"Shipping Intelligence . . . DEPARTURES", Launceston Examiner (10 September 1845), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36241326 

September 8. - Brig Swan, 140 tons, Bell, master, for Port Phillip ; James Raven, agent. Cabin passengers - Mr. H. Lynes, Mr. J. Austin, Mrs. Clarke and daughter, Mrs. Thompson and daughter . . .

Melbourne and Geelong (12 September to 11 October 1845)

"Shipping Intelligence", The Melbourne Courier (15 September 1845), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226363895 

. . . September 12. - Swan, from Launceston . . . Passengers per Swan . . . Mrs. Thomson and daughter, Mrs. Clark and daughter . . .


"THEATRICALS", Port Phillip Patriot and Melbourne Advertiser (16 September 1845), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226347353 

We are informed that it is the intention of Mrs. Clarke, who arrived per Swan, to commence her first theatrical campaign in the province, at Geelong . . .


"MRS. CLARKE", The Port Phillip Patriot and Morning Advertiser (10 October 1845), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226315115 

This lady, who has been so long at the head of the corps dramatique on the southern side of the neighbouring island of Van Diemen's Land, having lately visited Melbourne for the purpose it was affirmed of establishing a second company of comedians, takes her departure for Launceston on the Shamrock, to-morrow, not having succeeded it is said in carrying her purpose into effect.


"THINGS THEATRICAL", Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal (25 October 1845), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225063688 

The Colonial Secretary has forwarded to Melbourne, a license for the old Theatre, Bourke-street, on the application of Mrs. Clarke, who dispensed with the custom of applying through the Melbourne bench. We believe the license has been sent - subject to the approval of His Honor the Superintendent.

Hobart and Launceston (13 October 1845 to . . .)

"Shipping Intelligence. LAUNCESTON. ARRIVALS", Launceston Examiner (15 October 1845), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36241920 

October 13. - Steam ship Shamrock, 200 tons, Gilmore, master, from Sydney and Port Phillip . . . Passengers for Launceston - . . . Mrs. and Miss Clarke . . . Mr. and Mrs. Young, Mr. Cameron . . .

1846

1847

Launceston (August - 20 August 1847)

1847 'Advertising', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 4 August, p. 3. , viewed 29 Apr 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65943294

"LOCAL . . . THE THEATRE", The Cornwall Chronicle (7 August 1847), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65981909 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarke having relinquished the lesseeship of the Hobart Town Theatre are now in Launceston on their way to Port Phillip. On Monday evening they ask the patrons of the Drama for a Benefit, on which occasion the entertainments will consist of the comedy of "the Loan of a Lover," an interlude called "the Intrigue," and the Ballet of the "Royal Standard," together with a variety of singing and dancing as announced in the bills for tbe night.

1847 'Advertising', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 7 August, p. 1. , viewed 29 Apr 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65981902

1847 'Advertising', The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), 14 August, p. 1. , viewed 29 Apr 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65981453


"Shipping Intelligence . . . PORT OF LAUNCESTON", Colonial Times (24 August 1847), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8761188 

August 20 - Sailed the brig Raven, Bell, master, for Melbourne. Passengers . . . Mr. Mrs. and Miss Clarke . . .


Melbourne (28 August 1847 - end of 1847)

"SHIPPING COMMERCIAL GAZETTE . . . ARRIVED", Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal (30 August 1847), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223152981 

August 28, - Raven, brig, 170 tons, Ball, master, from Launceston. Passengers . . . Mr. and Mrs. Clarke . . .


"THE DRAMA", Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal (28 August 1847), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223153432 

Some important additions to the strength of the corps dramatique of the Queen Theatre, are daily expected from Hobart Town, the proprietor having concluded engagements with some well-known to histrionic fame. Among others we are given to understand that he has secured the services of Mrs. and Miss Clarke. Mr. Duke, a very superior scene painter, has also been engaged. Other old favourites will shortly follow, and in a very little space of time, the "Queen's" will yield to no theatre in the colonies, with the exception of Sydney, of which it will be a worthy rival. Mrs. Clarke is well known and much esteemed for her dramatic talent in the neighbouring colony of Van Deimen's Land. Her daughter - Miss Clarke - is highly appreciated as a danseuse, and we nave no doubt but the two - mother and daughter - will quickly establish themselves as decided favourites. The Hobart Town press mentions them very favourably.


"QUEEN'S THEATRE", Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal (Vic. : 1845 - 1850), 4 September, p. 2. , viewed 29 Apr 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223149790

"QUEEN'S THEATRE", Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal (Vic. : 1845 - 1850), 11 September, p. 2. , viewed 29 Apr 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223149358

"QUEEN'S THEATRE", Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal (Vic. : 1845 - 1850), 15 September, p. 2. , viewed 29 Apr 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223150052


"PORT PHILLIP. MRS. CLARKE'S BENEFIT", Colonial Times (5 November 1847), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8761656

As this will be probably the last time Mrs. Clarke will appear before a Melbourne audience, we trust the public will not lose the opportunity of hearing a really good song.


30 December 1847, last night of the season, Queen's Theatre, Melbourne

1847 'Advertising', The Port Phillip Patriot and Morning Advertiser (Vic. : 1845 - 1848), 30 December, p. 3. , viewed 29 Apr 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226514756

1848

"DOMESTIC GAZETTE", Port Phillip Gazette and Settler's Journal (15 January 1848), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223151890 

Mrs. Clarke from Hobart Town, has retired from the Theatre.




Bibliography and resources

"THE MELBOURNE STAGE IN THE FORTIES. By J. S. No. IV.", The Argus (7 June 1890), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8610398

On the 1st September [1847], a Mr. and Mrs. Clarke arrived from Tasmania. Both of them were vocalists, and the lady added dancing to her other accomplishments. There was a succession of musical pieces, and "Kate Kearney", "Giovanni in London", "Love in a Village", and "The Waterman" figured on the bills. But the influenza must have seriously interfered with the theatre, disabling the company and diminishing the audiences . . . The Clarkes made their last appearance and took a benefit in "Guy Mannering" and "No Song No Supper" on the 18th of October . . .


Brewer 1892


Elizabeth Webby, "Anne Clarke", in Philip Parsons (ed.), Companion to theatre in Australia (Sydney, 1995)


Gyger 1999


Alison Alexander, "Anne Clarke"

http://www.utas.edu.au/library/companion_to_tasmanian_history/C/Anne%20Clarke.htm


Anae 2005


"Anne Clarke (theatre manager)", Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Clarke_(theatre_manager)







© Graeme Skinner 2014 - 2019